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Encyclopedia > Mass (liturgy)
A Medieval Low Mass by a bishop.
A Medieval Low Mass by a bishop.

The Mass is the name given to the Eucharistic celebration in the Latin liturgical rites of the Roman Catholic Church, in Old Catholic Churches, in the Anglo-Catholic tradition of Anglicanism, and in some largely High Church Lutheran regions, including the Scandinavian and Baltic countries. Look up mass in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Pontifical_Mass_-_15th_Century_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_16531. ... Image File history File links Pontifical_Mass_-_15th_Century_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_16531. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Latin liturgical rites used within that area of the Roman Catholic Church where the Latin language once dominated (the Latin Rite or Western Catholic Church) were for many centuries no less numerous than the liturgical rites of the Eastern autonomous particular Churches. ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... The Old Catholic Church is a community of Christian churches. ... ... Anglicanism commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, the churches that are in full communion with the see of Canterbury. ... Within Lutheranism, the term high church is sometimes used to describe those traditions and congregations that distinguish more strongly between formal religious phenomena — holy or sacred roles, facilities, ideas, institutions and accoutrements — and their everyday counterparts. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. ...


The term is derived from the late-Latin word missa (dismissal), a word used in the concluding formula of Mass in Latin: "Ite, missa est" ("Go; it is the dismissal").[1] Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The Ite missa est is the concluding salutation of the Mass (liturgy) of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


For the celebration of the Eucharist in Eastern Churches, including those in full communion with the Holy See of Rome, other terms, such as the Divine Liturgy, the Holy Qurbana, and the Badarak, are normally used. Western denominations not in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church, such as Calvinist Christianity, also usually prefer terms other than Mass. For information on the theology of the Eucharist and on the Eucharistic liturgy of other Christian denominations, see "Eucharist" and "Eucharistic theology". Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, Armenia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope in Rome. ... Full communion is completeness of that relationship between Christian individuals and groups which is known as communion. ... The term Communion is derived from Latin communio (sharing in common). ... While all episcopal sees can be referred to as holy sees, the term Holy See is normally used in international relations (as well as in the canon law of the Catholic Church) to refer to the central government of the Catholic Church, headed by the Bishop of Rome, commonly called... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Holy Qurbana or Qurbana Qadisha (ܩܘܪܒܢܐ ܩܕܝܫܐ qûrbānâ qadîšâ, pronounced qurbono qadisho in West Syriac), the Holy Offering, refers to the Divine Liturgy as celebrated according to the Chaldean and Syriac Christian Rites, the former by the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church and the Assyrian Church of the East, and the... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Calvinism is a theological... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Eucharistic theology treats doctrines of the Holy Eucharist. ...

Contents

The Mass in the Catholic Church

Main article:Eucharist (Catholic Church)

The Council of Trent reaffirmed traditional Christian teaching that the Mass is the same Sacrifice of Calvary offered in an unbloody manner: "The victim is one and the same: the same now offers through the ministry of priests, who then offered himself on the cross; only the manner of offering is different. And since in this divine sacrifice which is celebrated in the Mass, the same Christ who offered himself once in a bloody manner on the altar of the cross is contained and offered in an unbloody manner... this sacrifice is truly propitiatory" (Doctrina de ss. Missae sacrificio, c. 2, quoted in Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1367). The Council declared that Jesus instituted the Mass at his Last Supper: "He offered up to God the Father His own body and blood under the species of bread and wine; and, under the symbols of those same things, He delivered (His own body and blood) to be received by His apostles, whom He then constituted priests of the New Testament; and by those words, Do this in commemoration of me, He commanded them and their successors in the priesthood, to offer (them); even as the Catholic Church has always understood and taught."[2] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Last Supper in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci. ...


The Roman Catholic Church sees the Mass as the most perfect way it has to offer latria (adoration) to God. It is also Catholic belief that in objective reality, not merely symbolically, the wheaten bread and grape wine are converted into Christ's body and blood, a conversion referred to as transubstantiation, so that the whole Christ, body and blood, soul and divinity, is truly, really, and substantially contained in the sacrament of the Eucharist.[3] Latria is a Greek term used in Catholic theology to mean adoration, which is the highest form of worship or reverence and is directed only to God. ... Main article: Eucharist (Catholic Church) Transubstantiation (in Latin, transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ occurring in the Eucharist according to the teaching of some Christian Churches, including the Roman Catholic Church. ...

Latest edition (2002) of the Missale Romanum

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2053x1421, 404 KB)[edit] Summary photograph taken by me. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2053x1421, 404 KB)[edit] Summary photograph taken by me. ...

Texts used in the Roman Rite of Mass

The Roman Missal contains the prayers and rubrics of the Mass. The ordinary expression of the edition promulgated by Pope Paul VI. The edition promulgated by Pope John XXIII in 1962 is an extraordinary expression of the same liturgical rite.[4] The 1962 Missal contains not only the prayers of the Mass itself, with the prayers for each day of the calendar, but also the scriptural readings for each day. The Roman Missal (Missale Romanum) is the liturgical book that contains the texts and rubrics for the celebration of the Latin rite of Mass. ... The Mass of Pope Paul VI is the liturgy of the Catholic Mass of the Roman Rite as revised after the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965). ... The Tridentine Mass (Pontifical High Mass) being celebrated at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Wyandotte, Michigan - 1949. ...


In the United States and Canada, the English translation of the Roman Missal is at present called the Sacramentary. Sacramentary was a musical service book, containing the prayers that were recited by the celebrant during the mass. ...


The Lectionary presents passages from the Bible arranged in the order for reading at each day's Mass. Compared with the scripture readings in the pre-1970 Missal, the modern Lectionary contains a much wider variety of passages. A Lectionary is a book or listing that contains a collection of scripture readings for Christian worship. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...


A Book of the Gospels called the Evangelary is recommended for the reading from the Gospels, but the Lectionary may be used in its place. A Gospel Book is a codex or bound volume, containing one or more of the four Gospels of the Christian New Testament. ... The Gospel in Christian liturgy refers to a reading from the Gospels used during various religious services and mass. ...


Structure of the Roman Rite of Mass

(For earlier forms, see Pre-Tridentine Mass and Tridentine Mass.) By Pre-Tridentine Mass is meant the successive forms of the liturgy of the Mass of the Roman Rite up to 1570, when Pope Pius V, to whom the task was entrusted by the 1545-1563 Council of Trent, ordered the general adoption, within the Latin-Rite or Western Church... The Tridentine Mass (Pontifical High Mass) being celebrated at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Wyandotte, Michigan - 1949. ...


Within the fixed structure outlined below, the Scripture readings, the antiphons sung or recited during the entrance procession or communion, and the texts of the three prayers known as the collect, the prayer over the gifts, and the postcommunion prayer vary each day according to the liturgical season, the feast days of titles or events in the life of Christ, the feast days and commemorations of the saints, or for Masses for particular circumstances (e.g., funeral Masses, Masses for the celebration of Confirmation, Masses for peace, to begin the academic year, etc.).


Pre-Mass procedures

A bowl of holy water is kept near each entrance to the church. As parishioners enter, they dip their fingers into the water and then make a sign of the cross. This action reminds participants of their baptismal promises [that through baptism they have been clensed of their sins]. Following this, it is customary to genuflect by the side of a pew in the direction of the tabernacle holding the Blessed Sacrament (consecrated Eucharist) before sitting or kneeling, and taking time to recollect thoughts before entering into the sacred action of the Mass. If the Blessed Sacrament is not present in the sanctuary, it is not necessary or customary to genuflect, although many people still do this out of habit. St. ... For other uses, see Sign of the cross (disambiguation). ... Genuflection is an act of reverence consisting of falling onto (usually) one knee. ... Pews in rows in a church. ... The Blessed Sacrament is displayed in a procession at the 2005 Southeastern Eucharistic Congress. ...


Introductory rites

After an entrance hymn or the recitation of an antiphon, Mass begins with all making the large Sign of the Cross (the fingertips of the right hand touch in sequence the forehead, breast, left shoulder and right shoulder), while the priest says the Trinitarian formula, "In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit", to which the people answer: "Amen." Then the priest "signifies the presence of the Lord to the community gathered there by means of the Greeting. By this Greeting and the people’s response, the mystery of the Church gathered together is made manifest" (General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 50).[1] The greetings are derived from the beginnings of the Pauline epistles. For other uses, see Sign of the cross (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Then the priest invites those present to take part in the Act of Penitence, of which the Missal proposes three forms, the first of which is the Confiteor. This is concluded with the priest's prayer of absolution, "which, however, lacks the efficacy of the Sacrament of Penance" (GIRM 51). "On Sundays, especially in the Season of Easter, in place of the customary Act of Penitence, from time to time the blessing and sprinkling of water to recall Baptism may take place" (GIRM 51). In the Roman Catholic Church, the Penitential Rite is a part of the Introductory Rites of the Mass. ... Mea culpa is a Latin phrase that translates into English as my fault, or my own fault. In order to emphasize the message, the adjective maxima may be inserted, resulting in mea maxima culpa, which would translate as my most [grievous] fault. ...


"After the Act of Penitence, the Kyrie is always begun, unless it has already been included as part of the Act of Penitence. Since it is a chant by which the faithful acclaim the Lord and implore his mercy, it is ordinarily done by all, that is, by the people and with the choir or cantor having a part in it" (GIRM 52). Kyrie is the vocative case of the Greek word κύριος (kyrios - lord) and means O Lord; it is the common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called Kyrie eleison which is Greek for Lord, have mercy. ...


"The Gloria in Excelsis Deo is a very ancient and venerable hymn in which the Church, gathered together in the Holy Spirit, glorifies and entreats God the Father and the Lamb. ... It is sung or said on Sundays outside the Seasons of Advent and Lent, on solemnities and feasts, and at special celebrations of a more solemn character" (GIRM 53). In accordance with that rule, the Gloria is omitted at funerals and is considered optional at weddings. It is also omitted for ordinary feast-days of saints, weekdays, and Votive Masses. It is also optional, in line with the perceived degree of solemnity of the occasion, at Ritual Masses such as those celebrated for Marriage("Nuptial Mass"), Confirmation or Religious Profession, at Masses on the Anniversary of Marriage or Religious Profession, and at Masses for Various Needs and Occasions. Gloria in Excelsis Deo (Latin for Glory to God in the highest) is the title and beginning of the Great Doxology used in the Roman Catholic Mass, Divine Service of the Lutheran Church and in the services of many other [1] Christian churches. ... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, implicitly coupled with Redemptoris, the coming of the Saviour) is a holy season of the Christian church, the period of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Christ, also known as the season of Christmas. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Funeral (disambiguation). ... Nuptial is the adjective of wedding. It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. ... See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... Profession, in a religious sense, is a public avowal of faith according to a traditional formula. ...


"Next the priest invites the people to pray. All, together with the priest, observe a brief silence so that they may be conscious of the fact that they are in God’s presence and may formulate their petitions mentally. Then the priest says the prayer which is customarily known as the Collect and through which the character of the celebration is expressed" (GIRM 54). In Christian liturgy, a collect is both a liturgical action and a short, general prayer. ...


The Liturgy of the Word

On Sundays and solemnities, three Scripture readings are given. On other days there are only two. If there are three readings, the first is from the Old Testament (a term wider than Hebrew Scriptures, since it includes the Deuterocanonical Books), or the Acts of the Apostles during Eastertide. The first reading is followed by a Responsorial Psalm, a complete Psalm or a sizeable portion of one. A cantor, choir or lector leads, and the congregation sings or recites a refrain. The second reading is from the New Testament. Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible refers to the common portions of the Jewish and Christian canons. ... Deuterocanonical books is a term used since the sixteenth century in the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Christianity to describe certain books and passages of the Christian Bible, in contrast to the protocanonical books which are contained in the Hebrew Bible. ... The Acts of the Apostles is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... Eastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Day and continues until Pentecost in the Christian liturgical calendar, thus spanning a total of seven weeks. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... A cantor is a musician working in a church with responsibilities for the singing in the church. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


The final reading and high point of the Liturgy of the Word is the proclamation of the Gospel. This is preceded by the singing or recitation of the Gospel Acclamation, typically an Alleluia with a verse of Scripture, which may be omitted if not sung. Alleluia is replaced during Lent by a different acclamation of praise. All stand while the Gospel is chanted or read by a deacon or, if none is available, by a priest. To conclude the Gospel reading, the priest or deacon proclaims: "This is the Gospel of the Lord" (in the United States, "The Gospel of the Lord") and the people respond, "Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ." The priest or deacon then kisses the book. Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... Hallelujah, Halleluyah, or Alleluia, is a transliteration of the Hebrew word הַלְלוּיָהּ meaning [Let us] praise (הַלְלוּ) God (יָהּ) (or Praise (הַלְלוּ) [the] Lord (&#1497... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... The Gospel in Christian liturgy refers to a reading from the Gospels used during various religious services and mass. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ...


A bishop, priest or deacon may then give a homily, a sermon that draws upon some aspect of the readings or the liturgy of the day. The homily is obligatory on Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation, and is highly encouraged for other days. In the Roman Catholic Church and in the Eastern Orthodox Church, a homily is usually given during Mass (or Divine Liturgy for Orthodox) at the end of the Liturgy of the Word. ... A sermon is an oration by a prophet or member of the clergy. ... In the Roman Catholic Church, the Holy Days of Obligation are the days, other than Sundays, on which the faithful are required to attend Mass. ...


On Sundays and solemnities, all then profess their Christian faith by reciting or singing the Nicene Creed or, especially from Easter to Pentecost, the Apostles' Creed, which is particularly associated with baptism and often used with Masses for children. Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Apostles Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum...


The Liturgy of the Word concludes with the General Intercessions or "Prayers of the Faithful." The priest speaks a general introduction, then a deacon or lay person addresses the congregation, presenting some intentions for prayer, to which the congregation responds with a short response such as: "Lord hear our prayer". The priest may conclude with a supplication. // Christianity In Christian practice, intercessory prayer is the act of one person praying for or on behalf of another person or situation. ... Supplication (also known as petitioning) is the most common form of prayer, wherein a person asks a supernatural deity to provide something, either for the person who is praying or for someone else on whose behalf a prayer of supplication is being made. ...


The Liturgy of the Eucharist

A linen corporal is spread over the center of the altar, and the Liturgy of the Eucharist begins with the ceremonial placing on it of bread and wine. These may be brought to thealtar in a procession, especially if Mass is celebrated with a large congregation.[5] The bread (wheaten and unleavened) is placed on a paten, and the wine (from grapes), mixed with a little water, is put in a chalice. As the priest places each on the corporal, he says a silent prayer over each individually, which, if this rite is unaccompanied by singing, he is permitted to say aloud, in which case the congregation responds to each prayer with: "Blessed be God forever." Then the priest washes his hands, "a rite that is an expression of his desire for interior purification."[6] The Corporal (from the Latin corpus, body) is a square white linen cloth, now usually somewhat smaller than the breadth of an altar, upon which the chalice and paten, and also the ciborium containing the smaller hosts for the Communion of the laity, are placed during the celebration of the... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A paten is a small plate, usually made of silver or gold, used to hold Eucharistic hosts. ... Chalice For other uses, see Chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet intended to hold drink. ...


The congregation, which has been seated during this preparatory rite, rises, and the priest gives an exhortation to pray: "Pray, brothers and sisters, that our sacrifice may be acceptable to God, the almighty Father." The congregation responds: "May the Lord accept the sacrifice at your hands, for the praise and glory of his name, for our good, and the good of all his Church." The priest then pronounces the variable prayer over the gifts that have been set aside.


The Eucharistic Prayer, "the center and summit of the entire celebration",[7] then begins with a dialogue between priest and people. This dialogue opens with the normal liturgical greeting, but in view of the special solemnity of the rite now beginning, the priest then exhorts the people: "Lift up your hearts." The people respond with: "We lift them up to the Lord." The priest then introduces the great theme of the Eucharist, a word originating in the Greek word for giving thanks: "Let us give thanks to the Lord, our God," he says. The congregation joins in this sentiment, saying: "It is right to give him thanks and praise." In the Eastern Christian liturgy, the anaphora is that part of the Liturgy having to do specifically with the consecration and offering of the Eucharist, as opposed to scripture readings, etc. ...


The priest then continues with one of many Eucharistic Prayer prefaces, which lead to the Sanctus acclamation: "Holy, Holy, Holy Lord God of power and might, Heaven and Earth are full of your glory, Hosanna in the Highest, Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, Hosanna in the Highest." Sanctus is the Latin word for holy, and is the name of an important hymn of Christian liturgy. ...


In some countries, including the United States, the people kneel immediately after the singing or recitation of the Sanctus. However, the general rule is that they kneel somewhat later, for the Consecration,[8] when, according to Catholic faith, the underlying reality or substance of the bread and wine is converted into the body and blood of Christ (see Transubstantiation). To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... Main article: Eucharist (Catholic Church) Transubstantiation (in Latin, transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ occurring in the Eucharist according to the teaching of some Christian Churches, including the Roman Catholic Church. ...

Mass at the Grotto at Lourdes. The chalice is displayed to the people immediately after the consecration of the wine.

The Eucharistic Prayer includes the Epiclesis, through which the Church implores the power of the Holy Spirit that the gifts that have been set aside may become Christ's body and blood and that the Communion may be for the salvation of those who will partake of it.[9] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1543x1102, 411 KB) Summary Photograph taken by me on 28 July 2006 Lima 10:04, 3 September 2006 (UTC) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1543x1102, 411 KB) Summary Photograph taken by me on 28 July 2006 Lima 10:04, 3 September 2006 (UTC) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... This article is about the French pilgrimage location. ... In Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Assyrian Church of the East, Roman Catholic, Anglican, Old Catholic, United Methodist, and Lutheran churches, the epiclesis (also sometimes spelled epiklesis, since it is a transliterated Greek word) is that part of the prayer of consecration of the Eucharistic elements (bread and wine) by which...


The central part is the Institution Narrative and Consecration, recalling the words of sacrifice and actions at his Last Supper, which he told his disciples to do in his memory,[10] thus instituting the Mass. The words of institution are the words of Jesus Christ as recorded in the New Testament used in some forms of Christian liturgy to consecrate the Eucharist. ... The Last Supper in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci. ...


Immediately after the Consecration and the display to the people of the consecrated elements, the priest invites the people to proclaim "the mystery of faith", and the congregation joins in reciting the Memorial Acclamation. The Roman Missal gives three forms for this acclamation. (A fourth, added in the 1973 English translation ("Christ has died ...") and another, permitted in Ireland ("My Lord and my God"), are unlikely to be kept in the forthcoming revision of that translation.) To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... In the Roman Catholic Church, the Memorial Acclamation, also called the Mystery of Faith is a part of the Eucharistic Prayer of the Mass recited by the congregation. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


The Eucharistic Prayer also includes the Anamnesis, expressions of offering, and intercessions for the living and dead. Anamnesis (Greek: αναμνησις = recollection, reminiscence) is a term used in medicine, philosophy, psychoanalysis, and religion. ...


It concludes with a doxology, with the priest lifting up the paten with the host and the deacon (if there is one) the chalice, and the singing or recitation of the Amen by the people. The unofficial term "The Great Amen" is sometimes applied to this Amen. A doxology (from the Greek doxa, glory + logos, word or speaking) is a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian worship services, often added to the end of canticles, psalms, and hymns. ... This article is about the Hebrew word. ...


The Communion rite

All together recite or sing the "Lord's Prayer" ("Pater Noster" or "Our Father"). The priest introduces it with a short phrase and follows it up with the prayer: "Deliver us, Lord, from every evil, and grant us peace in our day. In your mercy keep us free from sin and protect us from all anxiety as we wait in joyful hope for the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ." The people then add the doxology: "For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours, now and forever." The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... A doxology (from the Greek doxa, glory + logos, word or speaking) is a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian worship services, often added to the end of canticles, psalms, and hymns. ...


Next comes the rite of peace (pax). After praying: "Lord Jesus Christ, you said to your apostles: 'I leave you peace, my peace I give you.' Look not on our sins, but on the faith of your Church, and grant us the peace and unity of your kingdom where you live for ever and ever ", the priest wishes the people the peace of Christ: "The peace of the Lord be with you always." The deacon or, in his absence, the priest may then invite those present to offer each other the sign of peace. The form of the sign of peace varies according to local custom. A handshake is common in many countries, including the United States. In India a person will give the sign of peace by joining his or her hands and bowing to another. In the Philippines the sign of peace is usually a smile and a polite nod. The Holy Kiss is a punk rock band from San Francisco, California whose members include Matty Rue Morgue (vox, slide guitar), who, channels the grit and grace of Tom Waits through the body of a modern-day Lestat. ...


While the "Lamb of God" ("Agnus Dei" in Latin) litany is sung or recited, the priest breaks the host and places a piece in the main chalice; this is known as the rite of fraction and commingling. Image of the Lamb of God. ... A lamb holding a Christian banner is a typical symbol for Agnus Dei. ...


If extraordinary ministers of Holy Communion are required, they may come forward at this time, but they are not allowed to go to the altar itself until after the priest has received Communion (General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 162). The priest then presents the transubstantiated elements to the congregation, saying: "This is the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world. Happy are those who are called to his supper." Then all repeat: "Lord, I am not worthy to receive you, but only say the word and I shall be healed." The priest then receives Communion and, with the help, if necessary, of extraordinary ministers, distributes Communion to the people, who, as a rule,[11] approach in procession. When receiving Holy Communion, the communicant bows his or her head before the Sacrament as a gesture of reverence, and may receive the consecrated host either on the tongue or in the hand, at the discretion of each communicant.[12] The distributing minister says: "The body of Christ" or "The blood of Christ", according as the element distributed is the consecrated bread or the consecrated wine, or: "The body and blood of Christ", if both are distributed together (by intinction).[13] The communicant responds: "Amen." Intinction is the Eucharistic practice of dipping the consecrated bread, or host, into the consecrated wine before distributing it to the communicant. ...


While Communion is distributed, an appropriate song is recommended. If that is not possible, a short antiphon is recited before the distribution begins. This article is about the musical term. ...


"The sacred vessels are purified by the priest, the deacon, or an instituted acolyte after Communion or after Mass, insofar as possible at the credence table" (GIRM 279). Then the priest concludes the Liturgy of the Eucharist with the Prayer after Communion, for which the people are invited to stand.


Concluding rite

After the Prayer after Communion, announcements may be made. The Missal says these should be brief. The priest then gives the usual liturgical greeting and imparts his blessing. The liturgy concludes with a dialogue between the priest and congregation. The deacon, or in his absence, the priest himself then dismisses the people. The Latin formula is simply "Ite, missa est", but the 1973 English Missal gives a choice of dismissal formulas. The congregation responds: "Thanks be to God." The priest and other ministers then leave, often to the accompaniment of a recessional hymn. The Ite missa est is the concluding salutation of the Mass (liturgy) of the Roman Catholic Church. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


Time of celebration of Mass

Since the Second Vatican Council, the time for fulfilling the obligation to attend Mass on Sunday or a Holy Day of Obligation now begins on the evening of the day before (in theory, after First Vespers), and most parish churches do celebrate the Sunday Mass also on Saturday evening. By long tradition and liturgical law, Mass is not celebrated at any time on Good Friday (but Holy Communion is distributed, with hosts consecrated at the evening Mass of the Lord's Supper on Holy Thursday, to those participating in the Celebration of the Passion of the Lord) or on Holy Saturday before the Easter Vigil, in other words, between the annual celebrations of the Lord's Supper and the Resurrection of Jesus (see Easter Triduum). The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... In the Roman Catholic Church, the Holy Days of Obligation are the days, other than Sundays, on which the faithful are required to attend Mass. ... Good Friday is the Friday before Easter (Easter always falls on a Sunday). ... Holy Saturday is the day before Easter in the Christian calendar. ... The Easter Vigil, also called the Paschal Vigil or the Great Vigil of Easter, is a service held in many Christian churches as the first official celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus. ... Easter Triduum, or Holy Triduum, or Paschal Triduum is a term used by some Christian churches, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church, and many Anglicans, to denote, collectively, the three days from the evening of Maundy Thursday (or Holy Thursday) to the evening of Easter Sunday. ...


Deacons, priests and bishops are required to celebrate the Liturgy of the Hours daily, but are not obligated to celebrate Mass daily. "Apart from those cases in which the law allows him to celebrate or concelebrate the Eucharist a number of times on the same day, a priest may not celebrate more than once a day" (canon 905 of the Code of Canon Law), and "a priest may not celebrate the Eucharistic Sacrifice without the participation of at least one of the faithful, unless there is a good and reasonable cause for doing so" (canon 906). The Liturgy of the Hours is usually recited in full in monastic communities. ...


Priests may be required by their posts to celebrate Mass daily, or at least on Sundays, for the faithful in their pastoral care. The bishop of a diocese and the pastor of a parish are required to celebrate or arrange for another priest to celebrate, on every Sunday or Holy Day of Obligation, a Mass "pro populo" - that is, for the faithful entrusted to his care. In the Roman Catholic Church, the Holy Days of Obligation are the days, other than Sundays, on which the faithful are required to attend Mass. ...


For Latin-Rite priests, there are a few general exceptions to the limitation to celebrate only one Mass a day (General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 204). By very ancient tradition, they may celebrate Mass three times at Christmas (the Midnight Mass or "Shepherd's Mass", the Dawn Mass and the Day Mass, each of which has its own readings and chants).


On All Souls' Day they may also, on the basis of a privilege to all priests by Pope Benedict XV in August 1915, celebrate Mass three times, but not immediately one after the other; only one of the three Masses may be for the personal intentions of the priest, while the other two Masses must be applied, one for all the faithful departed, the other for the intentions of the Pope. A priest who has concelebrated the Chrism Mass, which may be held on the morning of Holy Thursday, may also celebrate or concelebrate the Mass of the Lord's Supper that evening. A priest may celebrate or concelebrate both the Mass of the Easter Vigil and Mass during Easter day (the Easter Vigil "should not begin before nightfall; it should end before daybreak on Sunday"; and may therefore take place at midnight or in the early hours of Easter morning). Finally, a priest who has concelebrated Mass at a meeting of priests or during a pastoral visitation by a bishop or a bishop's delegate, may celebrate a second Mass for the benefit of the laity. Pope Benedict XV (Latin: ), (Italian: Benedetto XV), (November 21, 1854 – January 22, 1922), born Giacomo Paolo Giovanni Battista della Chiesa, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from September 3, 1914 to January 22, 1922; he succeeded Pope Pius X (1903–14). ...


In addition to these general permissions, the Local Ordinary may, for a good reason, permit priests to celebrate twice (they are then said to "binate," and the act is "bination") on weekdays, and three times ("trinate," and "trination") on Sundays and Holy Days (canon 905 §2). Examples would be: if a parish priest were to need to celebrate the usual, scheduled daily Mass of a parish, and a funeral later in the morning, or three Masses to accommodate all of the parishioners in a very populous parish on Sundays. In particularly difficult circumstances, the Pope can grant the diocesan bishop permission to give his priests faculties to trinate on weekdays and quadrinate on Sundays.


In many countries, the bishop's power to permit priests to celebrate two Masses on one day and three Masses on one day is widely availed of, so that it is common for priests assigned to parish ministry to celebrate at least two Masses on any given Sunday, and two Masses on several other days of the week. Permission for four Masses on one day has been obtained in order to cope with large numbers of Catholics either in mission lands or where the ranks of priests are diminishing.


Special Masses

Nuptial Mass and other Ritual Masses

A Nuptial Mass[2] is simply a Mass within which the sacrament of Holy Matrimony is celebrated. Other sacraments too are celebrated within Mass. This is necessarily so for the sacrament of Orders, and is normal, though not obligatory, for the sacrament of Confirmation, as well as that of Holy Matrimony. Unless the date chosen is that of a major liturgical feast, the prayers are taken from the section of the Roman Missal headed "Ritual Masses". This section has special texts for the celebration within Mass of Baptism, Confirmation, Anointing of the Sick, Orders, and Holy Matrimony, leaving Confession (Penance or Reconciliation) as the only sacrament not celebrated within a celebration of the Eucharist. There are also texts for celebrating, within Mass, Religious Profession, the Dedication of a Church, and several other rites. In the Christian faith, marriage is viewed as a lifelong union of a man and a woman before God. ... The Roman Missal (Missale Romanum) is the liturgical book that contains the texts and rubrics for the celebration of the Latin rite of Mass. ...


If one of a couple being married in a Catholic church is not a Catholic, the rite of Holy Matrimony outside Mass is to be followed. However, if the non-Catholic has been baptized in the name of all three persons of the Trinity (and not only in the name of, say, Jesus, as is the baptismal practice in some branches of Christianity), then, in exceptional cases and provided the bishop of the diocese gives permission, it may be considered suitable to celebrate the marriage within a Mass, except that, according to the general law, Communion is not given to the non-Catholic (Rite of Marriage, 8). This article is about the Christian Trinity. ...


The Mass in Anglicanism

See also: Anglican Eucharistic theology

"Mass" is one of many terms used to describe the Eucharist in the Anglican tradition, the others being "Holy Communion," "Holy Eucharist," or "the Lord's Supper." In the English-speaking Anglican world, the term used frequently connotes the Eucharistic theology of the one using it. "Mass" is considered an Anglo-Catholic term, "Lord's Supper" is associated with evangelical or low church Anglicans, while broad church Anglicans prefer the terms "Eucharist" or "Holy Communion." Anglican Eucharistic theology is divergent in practice, reflecting the essential comprehensiveness of the tradition. ... Eucharistic theology treats doctrines of the Holy Eucharist. ... ... Low church is a term of distinction in the Church of England or other Anglican churches, initially designed to be pejorative. ... Broad church is a term referring to latitudinarian churches in the Church of England. ...


The structure of the rite

The liturgy of the mass is typically derived from the Anglican prayer books authorised by the national churches of the Communion. The structure of the liturgy, crafted in the tradition of the Elizabethan Settlement, allows for a variety of theological interpretations, and generally follows the same rough shape. Some or all of the following elements may be altered or absent depending on the rite used by the province or national church: A Modern Prayer Book The Book of Common Prayer is the prayer book of the Church of England and also the name for similar books used in other churches in the Anglican Communion. ... The Elizabethan Religious Settlement was Elizabeth I’s response to the religious divisions created over the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary I. This response was set out in two Acts of the Parliament of England. ...

  • The Gathering of the Community: Beginning with a Trinitarian-based greeting or seasonal acclamation; followed by the Collect for Purity; the Gloria in Excelsis Deo, Kyrie eleison, and/or Trisagion; and then the collect of the day. During Lent and/or Advent especially, this part of the service may begin or end with a penitential rite.
  • The Proclamation of the Word: Usually two to three readings of Scripture, one of which is always from the Gospels, plus a psalm (or portion thereof) or canticle. This is followed by a sermon or homily; the recitation of the Apostles', Nicene or Athanasian Creeds; the prayers of the congregation or a general intercession, a general confession and absolution, and the passing of the peace.
  • The Celebration of the Eucharist: The gifts of bread and wine are received, along with other gifts (such as money and/or food for a food bank, etc.), and an offertory prayer is recited. Following this, a Eucharistic Prayer (called "The Great Thanksgiving") is offered. This prayer consists of a dialogue (the Sursum Corda), a preface, the sanctus and benedictus, the words of institution, and the epiclesis. The Lord's Prayer usually follows, followed by the fraction (the breaking of the bread), the Prayer of Humble Access, the Agnus Dei, and the distribution of the sacred elements (the bread and wine). After all who have desired to have received, there is a post-Communion prayer. A doxology or general prayer of thanksgiving may follow. The service concludes with a Trinitarian blessing and the dismissal.

The trinitarian formula is the phrase in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit (original Greek εις το ονομα του πατρος και του υιου και του αγίου πνεύματος, eis to onoma tou patros kai tou huiou kai tou hagiou pneumatos), or words to that form and effect referring to the persons of the Holy Trinity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about... The Collect for Purity is the name traditionally given to the collect prayed near the beginning of the Eucharist in most Anglican rites. ... Gloria in Excelsis Deo (Latin for Glory to God in the highest) is the title and beginning of the Great Doxology used in the Roman Catholic Mass, Divine Service of the Lutheran Church and in the services of many other [1] Christian churches. ... Kyrie is a Greek word that means Lord or Oh, Lord. ... The Trisagion (Thrice Holy) is a standard hymn of the Divine Liturgy in most of the Eastern Orthodox Churches, Oriental Orthodox Churches and Eastern Catholic Churches. ... In Christian liturgy, a collect is both a liturgical action and a short, general prayer. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, implicitly coupled with Redemptoris, the coming of the Saviour) is a holy season of the Christian church, the period of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Christ, also known as the season of Christmas. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... A canticle is a hymn (strictly excluding the Psalms) taken from the Bible. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A sermon is an oration by... In the Roman Catholic Church and in the Eastern Orthodox Church, a homily is usually given during Mass (or Divine Liturgy for Orthodox) at the end of the Liturgy of the Word. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Apostles Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... The Athanasian Creed (Quicunque vult) is a statement of Christian doctrine traditionally ascribed to St. ... Offertory (from the ecclesiastical Latin offertorium, French offertoire, a place to which offerings were brought), the alms of a congregation collected in church, or at any religious service. ... Then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (now Benedict XVI) presiding at the 2005 Easter Vigil Mass. ... Sursum Corda Cooperative is a small neighborhood located in Washington, DC, bounded by North Capitol Street on the east, First Street NW to the west, K Street NW to the south, and M Street NW to the north. ... Sanctus is the Latin word for holy, and is the name of an important hymn of Christian liturgy. ... Benedictus is: a prayer that is said at Lauds. ... In Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Assyrian Church of the East, Roman Catholic, Anglican, Old Catholic, United Methodist, and Lutheran churches, the epiclesis (also sometimes spelled epiklesis, since it is a transliterated Greek word) is that part of the prayer of consecration of the Eucharistic elements (bread and wine) by which... The Fraction is the ceremonial act of breaking the bread during Communion in some Christian denominations. ... The Prayer of Humble Access was an integral part of the early Books of Common Prayer of the Church of England, and has continued to be used throughout the Anglican Communion. ... A lamb holding a Christian banner is a typical symbol for Agnus Dei. ... A doxology (from the Greek doxa, glory + logos, word or speaking) is a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian worship services, often added to the end of canticles, psalms, and hymns. ...

Special masses

The Anglican tradition includes separate rites for nuptial masses, funeral masses, and votive masses. The Eucharist is an integral part of many other sacramental services, including ordination and Confirmation. Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ...


Ceremonial

see also Anglican Eucharistic theology Anglican Eucharistic theology is divergent in practice, reflecting the essential comprehensiveness of the tradition. ...


A few Anglo-Catholic parishes use Anglican versions of the Tridentine Missal, such as the English Missal, The Anglican Missal, or American Missal, for the celebration of mass, all of which are intended primarily for the celebration of the Eucharist. Many Anglo-Catholic parishes in the Church of England use the Mass of Paul VI or A Manual of Anglo-Catholic Devotion (successor to the earlier A Manual of Catholic Devotion). In the Episcopal Church USA, a traditional-language, Anglo-Catholic adaptation of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer has been published (An Anglican Service Book).[3] All of these books contain such features as meditations for the presiding celebrant(s) during the liturgy, and other material such as the rite for the blessing of palms on Palm Sunday, propers for special feast days, and instructions for proper ceremonial order. These books are used as a more expansively Catholic context in which to celebrate the liturgical use found in the Book of Common Prayer and related liturgical books. These are supplemented by books specifying ceremonial actions, such as A Priest's Handbook by David Michno, Ceremonies of the Eucharist, by Howard E. Galley, and Ritual Notes by E.C.R. Lamburn. Other guides to ceremonial include the General Instruction of the Roman Missal, Ceremonies of the Modern Roman Rite (Peter Elliott), Ceremonies of the Roman Rite Described (Adrian Fortescue), and The Parson's Handbook (Percy Dearmer). The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... The English Missal is a prayer book published first by W.Knott & son Limited in 1933 as a compilation of those prayers and rubrics which had come to be used by Anglo-Catholic churches in conjunction with the Book of Common Prayer and which derived largely from the Roman Catholic... The Anglican Missal was first produced in England in the late 1800s by the Society of Saints Peter and Paul. ... The Anglican Missal was first produced in England in the late 1800s by the Society of Saints Peter and Paul. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Episcopal Church or the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the American Church of the Anglican Communion. ... For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... The Proper (Latin proprium) is that part of the Christian liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the Liturgical Year, or of a particular saint or significant event. ... For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... The General Instruction of the Roman Missal or GIRM is the liturgical document which governs the celebration of the Eucharist in the Catholic Church with the force of canon law. ... The dust-jacket cover of 13th revised edition of The Parsons Handbook by Percy Dearmer. ... The Revd Dr Percy Dearmer MA (Oxon), DD, in 1911. ...


Lutheranism

In the Book of Concord, Article XXIV ("Of the Mass") of the Augsburg Confession (1530) begins thus: "Falsely are our churches accused of abolishing the Mass; for the Mass is retained among us, and celebrated with the highest reverence." The Book of Concord or Concordia is a compilation of the major theological documents of early Lutheranism. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Augsburg Confession The Augsburg Confession, also known as the Augustana from its Latin name, Confessio Augustana, is the primary confession of faith of the Lutheran Church and one of the most important documents of the Lutheran reformation. ...


While Martin Luther rejected parts of the Roman Rite Catholic Mass (specifically the Canon of the Mass) as heretical and not conforming to the Bible,[citation needed] he replaced it with a revised rite, and later with the venacular Deutsche Messe. His argument was based on Hebrews 7:27, which contrasts the Old Testament priests who needed to make a sacrifice for sins on a regular basis with the single priest Christ who only offers his body once as a sacrifice, and also on Hebrews 9:26, 9:28, and 10:10. Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain Catholic Encyclopedia Canon of the Mass (Canon Missæ, Canon Actionis) is the name used in the Roman Missal of the Tridentine period for the part of the Mass that began after the Sanctus with the words Te igitur. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Deutsche Messe, or The German Mass, (Deutsche Messe und Ordnung des Gottesdiensts) was published by Martin Luther in 1526. ...


Most Lutherans still refer to their service as the mass. The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ...


References

  1. ^ Missa here is a Late Latin substantive corresponding to the word missio in classical Latin (The Liturgy of the Mass in Catholic Encyclopedia). "In antiquity, missa simply meant 'dismissal'. However in Christian usage it gradually took on a deeper meaning. The word 'dismissal' has come to imply a 'mission'. These few words succinctly express the missionary nature of the Church" (Pope Benedict XVI, Sacramentum caritatis, 51).
  2. ^ Council of Trent, Session 22, Chapter I
  3. ^ Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1374-1376
  4. ^ Summorum Pontificum.
  5. ^ "It is praiseworthy for the bread and wine to be presented by the people" (GIRM, 73).
  6. ^ GIRM, 76
  7. ^ GIRM, 78
  8. ^ General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 43
  9. ^ General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 79c
  10. ^ Luke 22:19; 1 Corinthians 11:24-25
  11. ^ GIRM, 160
  12. ^ GIRM, 160
  13. ^ GIRM, 287

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) - in the Latin original, Institutio Generalis Missalis Romani (IGMR) - is the detailed document governing the celebration of Mass of the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church, and is printed at the start of recent editions of the Roman Missal. ...

See also

Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ... By Pre-Tridentine Mass is meant the successive forms of the liturgy of the Mass of the Roman Rite up to 1570, when Pope Pius V, to whom the task was entrusted by the 1545-1563 Council of Trent, ordered the general adoption, within the Latin-Rite or Western Church... The Tridentine Mass (Pontifical High Mass) being celebrated at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Wyandotte, Michigan - 1949. ... The Mass of Pope Paul VI is the liturgy of the Catholic Mass of the Roman Rite as revised after the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965). ... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Like other churches in the Catholic tradition, the Anglican Communion recognises seven sacraments. ... For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... Lutheran Book of Worship is a hymnal and prayer book used by several Lutheran denominations in North America. ... Lutheran Worship is one of the official hymnals of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. ... Deutsche Messe, or The German Mass, (Deutsche Messe und Ordnung des Gottesdiensts) was published by Martin Luther in 1526. ... The Divine Service (German: Gottesdienst) is the liturgy of the Lutheran Church which is used during the celebration of the Eucharist. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Ecclesial communities contrasted in relation to Eucharistic theology: // Orthodox Christianity the Eucharistic mystery bears an objective, Real Presence, par excellence. ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ... The Latin Rite is one of the 23 sui iuris particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ... A Pontifical High Mass in the Roman rite before the changes brought forth by Vatican II is a Mass celebrated by a bishop that does not omit any elements which are omitted in the pontifical low mass, such as incense. ... For the General Roman Calendar as it was in 1955, see Traditional Catholic Calendar. ... Aleister Crowley wrote The Gnostic Mass—technically called Liber XV or Book 15—in 1913 while travelling in Moscow. ... Chantry is a term for the English establishment of a shrine or chapel on private land where monks or priests would say (or chant) prayers on a fixed schedule, usually for someone who had died. ... The Mass, a form of sacred musical composition, is a choral composition that sets the fixed portions of the Eucharistic liturgy (principally that of the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Church, generally known in the US as the Episcopal Church, and also the Lutheran Church) to music. ...

External links

Roman Catholic doctrine

Present form of the Roman rite of the Mass

Tridentine form of the Roman rite of the Mass In 1970, the New American Bible (NAB) was first published. ... | image= | translation_title=The New Jerusalem Bible| full_name=The New Jerusalem Bible | abbreviation=NJB | complete_bible_published=1966 | textual_basis= | translation_type=Roman Catholic | copyright=Copyright 1966 Darton, Longman & Todd | genesis_1:1-3=In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. ...

(For links on Post-Tridentine vs. "Tridentine" controversy, see Mass of Paul VI) The Mass of Pope Paul VI is the liturgy of the Catholic Mass of the Roman Rite as revised after the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965). ...


Anglican Doctrine and practice

  • The Anglican Missal online

Lutheran doctrine

  • Article 24 of the Augsburg Confession, regarding the Mass
  • Article 23 of the Defense of the Augsburg Confession, regarding the Mass
  • The Church of Sweden Service Book including the orders for High and Low Mass


 v  d  e 

Gregorian chants of the Roman Mass Image File history File links Sample of Gregorian chant; Kyrie orbis factor File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Gregorian chant is the central tradition of Western plainchant, a form of monophonic, unaccompanied sacred song of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ...

Ordinary:
Proper:
Accentus: The Ordinary of the Mass (Latin: Ordo Missae) is the set of texts of the Roman Catholic Church Latin Rite Mass that are generally invariable. ... The Proper (Latin proprium) is that part of the Christian liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the Liturgical Year, or of a particular saint or significant event. ... Accentus Ecclesiasticus is a Church music term, the counterpart of concentus. ...

 

Kyrie | Gloria | Credo | Sanctus | Agnus Dei | Ite missa est or Benedicamus Domino
Introit | Gradual | Alleluia or Tract | Sequence | Offertory | Communion
Collect | Epistle | Gospel | Secret | Preface | Canon | Postcommunion Kyrie is the vocative case of the Greek word κύριος (kyrios - lord) and means O Lord; it is the common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called Kyrie eleison which is Greek for Lord, have mercy. ... Gloria in Excelsis Deo (Latin for Glory to God in the highest) is the title and beginning of the Great Doxology used in the Roman Catholic Mass, Divine Service of the Lutheran Church and in the services of many other [1] Christian churches. ... The credo (Latin for I believe; pronounced ) is a statement of religious belief, such as the Nicene Creed (or, less often, another creed, such as the Apostles Creed). ... Sanctus is the Latin word for holy, and is the name of an important hymn of Christian liturgy. ... A lamb holding a Christian banner is a typical symbol for Agnus Dei. ... The Ite missa est is the concluding salutation of the Mass (liturgy) of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Benedicamus Domino (Latin for Let us bless the Lord) is a closing salutation used in the Roman Mass instead of the Ite missa est in Masses which lack the Gloria (such as those during Lent). ... The introit (Latin: introitus, entrance) is part of the opening of the celebration of the Mass. ... The Gradual (Latin: graduale, sometimes called the Grail) is a chant in the Roman Catholic Mass, sung after the reading or singing of the Epistle and before the Alleluia, or, during penitential seasons, before the Tract. ... Hallelujah, Halleluyah, or Alleluia, is a transliteration of the Hebrew word הַלְלוּיָהּ meaning [Let us] praise (הַלְלוּ) God (יָהּ) (or Praise (הַלְלוּ) [the] Lord (&#1497... The tract (Latin: tractus) is part of the proper of the Roman Mass, which is used instead of the Alleluia during Lenten or pre-Lenten seasons, and a few other penitential occasions, when the joyousness of an Alleluia is deemed inappropriate. ... In Latin poetry, a sequence (Latin sequentia) is a poem written in a non-classical metre, often on a sacred Christian subject. ... Offertory (from the ecclesiastical Latin offertorium, French offertoire, a place to which offerings were brought), the alms of a congregation collected in church, or at any religious service. ... The Communion is the Gregorian chant sung during the Eucharist in the Roman Mass. ... In Christian liturgy, a collect is both a liturgical action and a short, general prayer. ... An epistle (Greek επιστολη, epistolÄ“, letter) is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of persons, usually a letter and a very formal, often didactic and elegant one. ... The Gospel in Christian liturgy refers to a reading from the Gospels used during various religious services and mass. ... The Secret (Latin: Secreta, oratio secreta) is the prayer said in a low voice by the celebrant at the end of the Offertory in the Mass. ... In liturgical use the term Preface is applied to that portion of the Eucharistic service which immediately precedes the Canon or central portion; the preface, which begins at the words Vere dignum et justum est, aequum et salutare, It is very meet and just, right and salutary, is ushered in... This article incorporates text from the public domain Catholic Encyclopedia Canon of the Mass (Canon Missæ, Canon Actionis) is the name used in the Roman Missal of the Tridentine period for the part of the Mass that began after the Sanctus with the words Te igitur. ... Postcommunion (Latin: Postcommunio) is the text said or sung on a reciting tone following the Communion of the Mass. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mass (liturgy) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3056 words)
Mass is the term used to describe celebration of the Eucharist in the Western liturgical rites of the Roman Catholic Church, in the Anglo-Catholic tradition of Anglicanism, and in some largely High Church Lutheran regions: in Scandinavian countries the main non-Eucharistic Lutheran service is also known as "the Mass".
"Mass" is one of many terms used to describe the Eucharist in the Anglican tradition, the others being "Holy Communion," "Holy Eucharist," or "the Lord's Supper." In the English-speaking Anglcian world, the term used frequently connotes the Eucharistic theology of the one using it.
The liturgy of the mass is typically derived from the Anglican prayer books authorised by the national churches of the Communion.
Catholic Liturgy (138 words)
The Priesthood and the Sacrifice of the Mass by John A. Hardon, S.J. The Sacrifice of the Mass by Fr.
Eucharist as Sacrifice - Sacrament: Mass and Liturgy
The Eucharist as Sacrifice and Sacrament, Mass and Liturgy
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