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Encyclopedia > Mashona

Shona (or ChiShona) is a native language of Zimbabwe; the term is also used to identify those Bantu tribes in Southern Africa who speak one of the Shona languages. Shona proper is an official language of Zimbabwe, along with Ndebele and English. Numbering about 6,225,000 (SIL 1989), Shona speakers comprise more than 80% of Zimbabwe's population. Shona is also spoken by a substantial number of residents of Mozambique. Other countries that host Shona language speakers are Zambia and Botswana. The total number of Shona speakers is at least 7,000,000 (UBS 1990). Map showing the approximate distribution of Bantu (dull yellow) vs. ... There are two versions of Ndebele in South Africa, they both belong to the Nguni group of Bantu Languages. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... SIL International is a non-profit, faith-based, scientific organization with the main purpose to study, develop and document lesser-known languages for the purpose of expanding linguistic knowledge, promoting world literacy and aiding minority language development. ...


Shona is a written standard language with a codified orthography and grammar. It is taught in school but is not the general medium of instruction in other subjects. It has a literature and is described through monolingual and bilingual dictionaries (chiefly Shona - English).


Shona is a member of the large family of Bantu languages. In Guthrie's zonal classification of Bantu languages, zone S10 designates a dialect continuum commonly called Shona, including Shona proper, Manyika, Nambya, and Ndau, spoken in Zimbabwe; Tawara and Tewe, found in Mozambique; and Ikalanga of Botswana. Map showing the approximate distribution of Bantu (dull yellow) vs. ... Malcolm Guthrie (1903-1972), professor of Bantu languages, is known primarily for his classification of Bantu languages (Guthrie 1971). ... A dialect continuum is a range of dialects spoken across a large geographical area, differing only slightly between areas that are geographically close, and gradually decreasing in mutual intelligibility as the distances become greater. ... Ndau is one of the shona dialects. ...


Shona speakers most likely moved into present day Zimbabwe during the great Bantu expansion.


Bibliography

  • Biehler, E. (1950) A Shona dictionary with an outline Shona grammar (revised edition). The Jesuit Fathers.
  • Brauner, Sigmund (1995) A grammatical sketch of Shona : including historical notes. Köln: Rüdiger Koppe.
  • Carter, Hazel (1986) Kuverenga Chishóna : an introductory Shona reader with grammatical sketch (2nd edition). London: SOAS.
  • Doke, C. M. (1931) Report on the Unification of the Shona Dialects. Stephen Austin Sons.
  • Mutasa, David (1996) 'The Problems of Standardizing Spoken Dialects: The Shona Experience', Language Matters, 27, 79–93.

External links

Wikipedia
Shona language edition of Wikipedia
  • Shona - English Dictionary

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATTLE BREEDS -- MASHONA (1613 words)
As might be expected there are close genetic similarities, especially between the Mashona and Nkone, but surveys of transferrin types and estimated haemoglobin gene frequencies from herds throughout the century have shown that animals do in fact all into distinct breed groups.
However, probably the first serious written record on Mashona cattle was contained in a letter written by a member of the Pioneer Column, Mr.
The true Mashona, as I remember it, had very short legs, bone very fine, a long thin tail, with a bush at the end of it, not unlike the bush on a lion's tail.
Breeds of Livestock - Mashona Cattle (1622 words)
Mashona cattle originated from the Shona people of eastern Zimbabwe.
They are bred in a wide spreading territory covering most of the eastern half of Zimbabwe and an adjoining region of Mozambique that is free of the tsetse fly.
As might be expected there are close genetic similarities, especially between the Mashona and Nkone, but surveys of transferring types and estimated hemoglobin gene frequencies from herds throughout the century have shown that animals do in fact all into distinct breed groups.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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