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Encyclopedia > Mary Webb

Mary Webb (March 25, 1881October 8, 1927), was an English romantic novelist of the early 20th century, whose novels are set chiefly in the Shropshire countryside and among Shropshire characters and people which she knew and loved well. is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Shropshire (pronounced /, -/), alternatively known as Salop[6] or abbreviated Shrops[7], is a county in the West Midlands of England. ...

Contents

Life

She was born Gladys Mary Meredith in the Shropshire village of Leighton, 8 miles (13 km) southeast of Shrewsbury. Her father was a schoolteacher, who inspired his daughter with his own love of literature and the local countryside. On her mother's side she was descended from a family related to Sir Walter Scott. Mary loved to explore the countryside around her home, and developed a gift of detailed observation and description, of both people and places, which infuses her poetry and prose. Shropshire (pronounced /, -/), alternatively known as Salop[6] or abbreviated Shrops[7], is a county in the West Midlands of England. ... For other places with the same name, see Shrewsbury (disambiguation). ... For the first Premier of Saskatchewan see Thomas Walter Scott Sir Walter Scott (August 14, 1771 - September 21, 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe. ...


At the age of 20 she developed symptoms of Graves' disease, a thyroid disorder (which resulted in bulging protuberant eyes and a throat goitre), and was the cause of ill health throughout her life and probably contributed to her early death. This affliction gave her great sympathy with the suffering, and finds its fictional counterpart in the disfiguring harelip of Prue Sarn, the heroine of Precious Bane. Graves disease is a thyroid disorder characterized by goiter, exophthalmos, and hyperthyroidism. ... A goitre (BrE), or goiter (AmE) (Latin struma), also called a bronchocele, is a swelling in the neck (just below Adams apple or larynx) due to an enlarged thyroid gland. ... Cleft lip is a congenital deformity caused by a failure in facial development during pregnancy. ...


In 1912 she married Henry Webb, a teacher who at first supported her literary interests. They lived for a time in Weston-super-Mare, before moving back to Mary's beloved Shropshire where they worked as market gardeners until Henry secured a job as a teacher at the Priory School. Weston-super-Mare is an English seaside resort town in North Somerset, population 65,000 (1991 estimate). ... Market gardening on an outlying island to supply the needs of Hong Kong In agriculture, market gardening is the relatively small-scale production of fruits, vegetables and flowers as cash crops, frequently sold directly to consumers and restaurants. ...


The couple lived briefly in Rose Cottage near the village of Pontesbury between the years 1914 and 1916, during which time she wrote The Golden Arrow.[1] Her time in the village was commemorated in 1957 by the opening of the Mary Webb School[2] Pontesbury is a large village in Shropshire, England and is near to the county town, Shrewsbury. ...


The publication of The Golden Arrow in 1917 enabled them to move to Lyth Hill, Bayston Hill a place Mary loved, buying a plot of land and building Spring Cottage. , Bayston Hill is a large village and parish in the English county of Shropshire. ...


In 1921 they bought a second property in London hoping that she would be able to achieve greater literary recognition. This, however, did not happen. By 1927 she was suffering increasingly bad health, her marriage was failing, and she returned to Spring Cottage alone. She died at St Leonards on Sea, aged 46. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Although part of the Borough of Hastings, and an ancient parish in its own right, the area that became known as St Leonards-on-Sea was only laid out in the 19th Century in its present form by James Burton as a place of elegant houses designed for the well...


In her own lifetime, although she was acclaimed by John Buchan and by Rebecca West, who hailed her as a genius, and won the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse for Precious Bane, she won little respect from the general public. It was only after her death that the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Stanley Baldwin, earned her posthumous success through his approbation, referring to her as a neglected genius at a Literary Fund dinner in 1928. As a result, her collected works were republished in a standard edition by Jonathan Cape, becoming best sellers in the 1930s and running into many editions. John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ... Dame Rebecca West, DBE (December 21, 1892–March 15, 1983), whose real name was Cicely (she later changed it to Cicily) Isabel Fairfield, was a British-Irish feminist and writer famous for her novels and for her relationship with H. G. Wells. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Jonathan Cape has been since 1987 an imprint of Random House. ...


Though her work is still well-loved by aficionados, it is currently out of fashion and only two of her novels are in print. Her writing is notable for its descriptions of nature, and of the human heart. She has a deep sympathy for all her characters and is able to see good and truth in all of them.


The museum at the Tourist Information Centre in Much Wenlock includes a lot of information on Mary Webb including a display of photographs of the filming of her novel Gone to Earth in 1950. Much Wenlock is a town in Shropshire, England. ...


Her cottage on Lyth Hill can still be seen, but much extended and modernised.


Works

  • The Spring of Joy (Essays and Poems) (published 1917)
  • The Golden Arrow (1916)
  • Gone to Earth (1917)
  • The House in Dormer Forest (1920)
  • Seven For A Secret (1922)
  • Precious Bane (1924)
  • Armour Wherein He Trusted (unfinished)

Precious Bane is a novel by Mary Webb, first published in 1924. ...

Dramatic adaptations

Gone to Earth is the story of Hazel Woodus, a child of nature with a pet fox who simply wants to be herself, living among the remote Shropshire hills of the Welsh Marches with her harpist coffin-building father, but gets drawn into the world of normal human relationships through her great beauty, marrying a local church minister, but also becoming the object of the local fox-hunting squire's obsessive love for her. She casts herself down a mineshaft to escape, clutching her beloved fox. Gone to Earth was filmed in 1950 by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, starring Jennifer Jones as Hazel Woodus. However, it was later re-edited, shortened and retitled for its American release, and fell into relative obscurity. In 1985 the full 110-minute restored version was released by the National Film Archive, to great acclaim. The Welsh Marches (Welsh: Y Mers) is an area along the border of England and Wales in the island of Great Britain. ... For the Stevie Nicks album, see The Wild Heart (album). ... Michael Latham Powell (September 30, 1905 – February 19, 1990) was a British film director, renowned for his partnership with Emeric Pressburger which produced a series of classic British films. ... Emeric Pressburger in Paris. ... Jennifer Jones (born as Phylis Lee Isley on March 2, 1919) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ...


Precious Bane is set in the years after the Battle of Waterloo, and tells the story of Prue Sarn, disfigured by a harelip which her superstitious neighbours regard as a sign that she is a witch, and how she falls in love with a visiting weaver, Kester Woodseaves. It was produced as a television play by the BBC in 1989, with Janet McTeer as Prue, Clive Owen as her brother Gideon, and John Bowe as Kester. It was first produced as a television play by French Television (ORTF) in 1968, with Dominique Labourier as Prue, Josep Maria Flotats as Gedeon and Pierre Vaneck as Kester; the director was Claude Santelli; the title was 'Sarn' (French translation for the title of the novel). Combatants French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Prussia United Netherlands Hanover Nassau Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Strength 73,000 67,000 Anglo-Allies 60,000 Prussian (48,000 engaged by about 18:00) Casualties 25,000 killed or wounded 7,000... Cleft lip is a congenital deformity caused by a failure in facial development during pregnancy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Janet McTeer (8 May 1961-) is a British actor. ... Clive Owen (born October 3, 1964) is a Golden Globe and BAFTA winning critically acclaimed English actor, now a regular performer in Hollywood and independent American films. ... John Bowe (born 1 February 1950 in Cheshire, England) is an actor best known for his performances on television. ...


References

  1. ^ Mary Coles, Gladys (1990). Mary Webb. Stroud: Seren Books. ISBN 1-85411-034-9. 
  2. ^ About us. The Mary Webb School and Science College. Retrieved on 2007-10-17.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • The Mary Webb Society
  • Project Gutenberg Text of Gone to Earth
  • Richard Moult - artist & composer - has composed music to several Mary Webb poems
  • Literary Heritage - West Midlands - profile and e-texts of all her novels

  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC - Shropshire - Culture and Arts - The Write Stuff (713 words)
Novelist and poet Mary Webb is the Shropshire Novelist.
Mary's second novel Gone to Earth (1917), which was later made into a film, was written in response to her sadness at the cruelty of war.
After the war Mary Webb's name was largely forgotten and only in the last ten years has it begun to emerge and her work to be reassessed.
Mary Webb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (654 words)
Mary Webb ( March 25, 1881 - October 8, 1927), was an English romantic novelist of the early 20th century, whose novels are set chiefly in the Shropshire countryside which she knew and loved well.
She was born Gladys Mary Meredith in the Shropshire village of Leighton, 13 km SE of Shrewsbury.
Mary loved to explore the countryside around her home, and developed a gift of detailed observation and description, which infuses her poetry and prose.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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