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Encyclopedia > Mary Todd Lincoln
Mary Todd Lincoln

Mary Todd Lincoln
Born December 13, 1818(1818-12-13)
Lexington, Kentucky, USA
Died July 16, 1882 (aged 63)
Springfield, Illinois, USA
Occupation First Lady of the United States
Spouse Abraham Lincoln

Mary Ann Todd Lincoln (December 13, 1818July 16, 1882) was the First Lady of the United States when her husband, Abraham Lincoln, served as the sixteenth President, from 1861 until 1865. Shortcut: WP:-( Vandalism is indisputable bad-faith addition, deletion, or change to content, made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of the encyclopedia. ... Shortcut: WP:-( Vandalism is indisputable bad-faith addition, deletion, or change to content, made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of the encyclopedia. ... Mary Todd Lincoln (19th century photograph) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies, from left, Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies, from left, Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early Life

Born in Lexington, Kentucky, she was the daughter of Robert Smith Todd and Eliza Parker, Mrs. Todd, prominent residents of the city. They were slaveholders, as were their other relatives. At the age of twenty, Mary Todd moved to Illinois where her sister Elizabeth was living. Elizabeth introduced Mary to the young lawyer who would later become her husband; she was also courted by Stephen A. Douglas. Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Slave redirects here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant Because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for president in 1860. ...


Family

Abraham and Mary Lincoln were married on November 4, 1842. is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Their children were:

  1. Robert Todd Lincoln : Springfield, Illinois (August 1, 1843July 26, 1926) in Manchester, Vermont
  2. Edward (Eddie) Baker Lincoln : Springfield (March 10, 1846February 1, 1850) in Springfield
  3. William (Willie) Wallace Lincoln : Springfield (December 21, 1850February 20, 1862) in Washington, D.C.
  4. Thomas (Tad) Lincoln : Springfield (April 4, 1853July 16, 1871) in Chicago, Illinois.

Robert Todd Lincoln (August 1, 1843 – July 26, 1926) was the first son of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Ann Todd. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Manchester, Vermont Manchester is a town located in Bennington County, Vermont. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... William Wallace Lincoln William Wallace Lincoln, the third son of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd Lincoln, was born on December 21, 1850. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Thomas (Tad) Lincoln. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...

Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

The assassination of Abraham Lincoln. From left to right: Henry Rathbone, Clara Harris, Mary Todd Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln and John Wilkes Booth.
The assassination of Abraham Lincoln. From left to right: Henry Rathbone, Clara Harris, Mary Todd Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln and John Wilkes Booth.

The Lincolns' marriage was troubled at times. Of their four sons, only Robert and Tad survived into adulthood, and only Robert outlived his mother. Image File history File linksMetadata Lincolnassassination. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Lincolnassassination. ... Henry Reed Rathbone (July 1, 1837 – August 14, 1911) was present at the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and was sitting with his fiancée, Clara Harris, next to the President and his wife at the time of its occurence. ... This article lacks information on the subject matters importance. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) was an American actor from Maryland, who fatally shot President of the United States Abraham Lincoln at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ...

Mary Todd Lincoln in 1846.
Mary Todd Lincoln in 1846.

Mary Lincoln was well-educated and interested in public affairs, and shared her husband's fierce ambition. However, she was high-strung and touchy, and sometimes acted irrationally. She was almost instantly unpopular upon her arrival in the capital. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 443 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (491 × 665 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 443 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (491 × 665 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Newspapers at the time criticized her for using taxpayers' money to refurnish the White House (which had become quite worn and shabby) as well as to fund her personal shopping sprees. During the Civil War, there were persistent rumors that she was a Confederate sympathizer, and even a Confederate spy (several relatives served in the Confederate forces--three of her brothers died fighting for the South). Popular legend states that President Lincoln, upon hearing the rumors, personally vouched for her loyalty to the United States in a surprise appearance before the Committee on the Conduct of the War. Her visits with Union soldiers in the numerous hospitals in and around Washington went largely unnoticed by her contemporaries. [1] For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... The Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War was a United States Congressional investigating committee created to handle issues surrounding the American Civil War. ...

Mary Todd Lincoln
Mary Todd Lincoln

After their 11-year-old son Willie died suddenly of typhoid fever at the White House, Mrs. Lincoln sought out mediums and spiritualists to contact the dead boy, only to lose another small fortune the Lincolns could not afford.[2] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1115x1376, 308 KB)Mary Todd Lincoln source File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1115x1376, 308 KB)Mary Todd Lincoln source File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


After the President's assassination in April 1865, former Lincoln aides and Cabinet members openly attacked Mrs. Lincoln for being a spendthrift, difficult and arrogant (Lincoln's wartimes aides John Nicolay and John Hay privately referred to her as "the hell-cat"). [3] John George Nicolay (1832–1901) was an American (German-born) biographer. ... John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln. ...


In 1868, a former seamstress and confidante, Elizabeth Keckly, published Behind the Scenes, (or, Thirty years a slave, and four years in the White House). When the book proved controversial, Robert Todd Lincoln had it suppressed. Elizabeth Keckly (1818-1907) was a house slave who bought her freedom and became a custom dressmaker. ...


The deaths of her husband and her three sons, Edward, William (Willie), and Thomas (Tad), in time led to an overpowering sense of grief and the gradual onset of depression. Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ...


Mrs. Lincoln's "spend-thrift" ways and eccentric behavior concerned her son Robert. To gain control of his mother's finances, Robert had her committed to an insane asylum in Batavia, Illinois in 1875,[4] but she was free to move about the grounds and was released three months later. She never forgave her eldest son for what she regarded as his betrayal. A psychiatric hospital (also called a mental hospital or asylum) is a hospital specializing in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... Batavia is a city in Kane County, Illinois. ...


Mrs. Lincoln spent the next four years abroad taking up residence in Pau, France. She spent much of this time travelling in Europe. Aquitaine Region flag Coat of arms The location of Pau is shown on this map of the historical and cultural area of Gascony. ...


Mrs. Lincoln's late years were marked by declining health. In 1879, she suffered spinal cord injuries in a fall from a step ladder. On her return to the US aboard an ocean liner in 1880, actress Sarah Bernhardt allegedly prevented her from falling down a staircase and sustaining further injury. She also suffered from cataracts that severely affected her eyesight. This may have contributed to her falls. Sarah Bernhardt (October 23, 1844 – March 26, 1923) was a French stage actress. ... Cataract is also used to mean a waterfall or where the flow of a river changes dramatically. ...


Death

Mary Todd Lincoln's crypt
Mary Todd Lincoln's crypt

Mrs. Lincoln died at the Springfield, Illinois home of her sister Elizabeth on July 16, 1882, aged 63. She was interred within the Lincoln Tomb in Oak Ridge Cemetery in Springfield. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 877 KB) Summary Mary Todd Lincolns crypt, opposite Image:Lincolns Tomb, Interior. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x800, 877 KB) Summary Mary Todd Lincolns crypt, opposite Image:Lincolns Tomb, Interior. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Abraham Lincolns tomb at Oak Ridge Cemetery The receiving vault (foreground) and the tomb (background) Custodians residence next to the tomb Lincolns Tomb in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Illinois, is the final resting place of 16th President of the United States Abraham Lincoln, his wife, Mary Todd... Oak Ridge Cemetery is a cemetery located in Springfield, Illinois in the United States. ...


Of Robert's children, Jessie Harlan Lincoln Beckwith (1875 - 1948) had two children (Mary Lincoln Beckwith ["Peggy," 1898 - 1975] and Robert ("Bud") Todd Lincoln Beckwith (1904 - 1985), neither of whom had children of their own. Robert's other daughter, Mary Todd Lincoln ("Mamie") (1869 - 1938) married Charles Bradley Isham in 1891. They had one son, Lincoln Isham (1892 - 1971). Lincoln Isham married Leahalma Correa in 1919, but died without children.


The last person known to be of direct Lincoln lineage, Robert's grandson "Bud" Beckwith, died in 1985. [5]


Trivia

  • Her great uncle John Todd was killed in the last battle of the American Revolution-the Battle of Blue Licks.
  • Her sister Elizabeth Todd was the daughter-in-law of Illinois Governor Ninian Edwards. Elizabeth's daughter Julia Edwards married Edward L. Baker, editor of the "Illinois State Journal" and son of Congressman David Jewett Baker.
  • Her half sister Emilie Todd married CS General Benjamin Hardin Helm, son of Kentucky Governor John L. Helm. Governor Helm's wife was a 1st cousin 3 times removed of Colonel John Hardin who was related to three Kentucky congressman.
  • A cousin was Kentucky Congressman/US General John Blair Smith Todd.
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Her nephew William L. Todd created the original Bear Flag for the California Republic in 1846.
  • In 1880 the French actress Sarah Bernhardt saved Mrs. Lincoln from serious injury during an Atlantic crossing when the ship they were traveling on, L'Amerique, was hit by an enorumous wave that knocked Mrs. Lincoln down and sent her rolling across the deck toward a companionway. As she was about to plunge headfirst down the stairs, Bernhardt was able to grab one of her legs and save her.

John Todd (March 27, 1750–August 18, 1782) was a frontier military officer during the American Revolutionary War and the first administrator of the Illinois County of the U.S. state of Virginia before that state ceded the territory to the federal government. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... Combatants Kentucky militia (United States) Great Britain, American Indians Commanders John Todd † Stephen Trigg † Daniel Boone William Caldwell Alexander McKee Simon Girty Strength 182 militiamen 50 rangers 300 natives Casualties 72 killed, 11 captured about 11 killed The Battle of Blue Licks was fought on August 19, 1782, and was... Ninian Edwards (March 17, 1775–July 20, 1833) was a U.S. political figure. ... Benjamin Hardin Helm (June 2, 1831–September 20, 1863) was a Kentucky politician, attorney, Confederate Brigadier General, and the brother-in-law of Abraham Lincoln. ... John LaRue Helm John LaRue Helm (July 4, 1802–September 8, 1867) was one of the most illustrious sons of Elizabethtown and Hardin County. ... John Hardin (1753-1792) was an officer in the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War. ... John Blair Smith Todd (April 4, 1814–January 5, 1872) was a Delegate from Dakota Territory to the United States House of Representatives. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The modern Bear Flag of California The flag of California was first flown during the Bear Flag Revolt and was adopted by the California state legislature in 1911. ... A replica of the first Bear Flag now on display at El Presidio de Sonoma, or Sonoma Barracks, established in 1836 by Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo as a part of Mexicos strategy to halt Russian incursions into the region. ... Sarah Bernhardt (October 23, 1844 – March 26, 1923) was a French stage actress. ...

See Also

For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Robert Todd Lincoln (August 1, 1843 – July 26, 1926) was the first son of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Ann Todd. ... Elizabeth Keckly (1818-1907) was a house slave who bought her freedom and became a custom dressmaker. ... Mary Todd Lincoln House at 578 West Main Street in Lexington, Kentucky was the family home of the future first lady and wife of the 16th President. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, Simon & Schuster, 2005 (ISBN 0-684-82490-6).
  2. ^ Mary Todd & Abraham Lincoln Research Site
  3. ^ Simmons, Dawn Langley (1970). A Rose For Mrs. Lincoln. Beacon. ISBN 0807054488. 
  4. ^ Doug Wead, All the Presidents' Children: Triumph and Tragedy in the Lives of America's First Families, Simon & Shuster, 2003, p. 179. ISBN 074344633X
  5. ^ Mark E. Neely, Jr., The Abraham Lincoln Encyclopedia, McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1982 (ISBN 0-07-046145-7).
Preceded by
Harriet Lane
First Lady of the United States
1861 – 1865
Succeeded by
Eliza McCardle Johnson

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