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Encyclopedia > Mary Shelley
Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley

Mary Shelley, portrait by Richard Rothwell (1840)
Born 30 August 1797(1797-08-30)
London, England
Died 1 February 1851 (aged 53)
Chester Square, London, England
Occupation Novelist

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 17971 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. She was married to the Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Chester Square is a small, residential garden square located in Londons exclusive Belgravia district, forming part of the areas development by the Grosvenor family. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Romantics redirects here. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Romantic poetry was part of the Romantic movement of European literature during the 18th-mid-19th centuries. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ...

Contents

Biography

Mary Shelley was born Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin in Somers Town, in London, in 1797. She was the second daughter of famed feminist, educator, and writer Mary Wollstonecraft. Her father was the equally famous anarchist philosopher, novelist, journalist, and atheist dissenter William Godwin. Her mother died of puerperal fever ten days after Mary was born.[1] Somers Town, named after the Somers family who owned the land, is an area of London south of Camden Town. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... Mary Wollstonecraft (circa 1797) by John Opie Mary Wollstonecraft (27 April 1759 – 10 September 1797) was a British writer, philosopher and feminist. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... “Atheist” redirects here. ... The term dissenter (from the Latin dissentire, to disagree), labels one who dissents or disagrees in matters of opinion, belief, etc. ... William Godwin William Godwin (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English political and miscellaneous writer, considered one of the important precursors of both utilitarian and liberal anarchist thought. ... Puerperal fever (from the latin puer, child), also called childbed fever or puerperal sepsis, is a serious form of septicaemia contracted by a woman during or shortly after childbirth or abortion. ...


Her father was left with the responsibility of safeguarding Mary and her older half-sister, Fanny Imlay. He hired a housekeeper and governess, Louisa Jones, to look after the house and care for the children. Louisa's love letters reveal that she was devoted to the girls, and that Mary's early years were extremely happy ones. Unfortunately for Mary, Louisa fell in love with one of Godwin's wilder and more irresponsible disciples, and Godwin did not approve of the relationship, cutting off all contact between her and his daughters. Mary was three years old when Louisa left. Frances Imlay (adopted as Frances Godwin) (1794-1816) was the daughter of British writer Mary Wollstonecraft and American writer Gilbert Imlay, and half-sister to Mary Godwin (later, Mary Shelley). ...


Godwin, however, had long realized that he could not raise his daughters by himself, and had been actively looking for a second wife. After courting a number of women, he met Mary Jane Clairmont, a widow with two young children. He soon fell in love with her and married her, although his friends did not approve of the match. Mary Jane Clairmont was a difficult woman with a quick temper and a sharp tongue, and she quarrelled frequently with her husband. She did not get on well with her step-daughters, especially Mary, whose attachment to Godwin Mary resented. She also disliked the amount of attention that Mary, as the daughter of the two most famous radicals of the time, received from visitors to the Godwin household. She made Mary do many of the household chores, invaded her privacy, and restricted her access to her father. She also ensured that her own daughter, Jane Clairmont (better known as Claire Clairmont), received more education than Mary Godwin, as she contrived to send her to boarding school. Claire Clairmont Clara Mary Jane Clairmont (April 27, 1798 – March 19, 1879), or Claire Clairmont as she was commonly known, was a stepsister of writer Mary Shelley. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ...


Nonetheless, Mary received an excellent education, which was unusual for girls at the time. She never went to school, but she was taught to read and write by Louisa Jones, and then educated in a broad range of subjects by her father, who gave her free access to his extensive library. In particular, she was encouraged to write stories, and one of these early works "Mounseer Nongtongpaw" was published by the Godwin Company's Juvenile Library when she was only eleven. "Mounseer Nongtongpaw" was a thirty-nine stanza expansion of Charles Dibdin's five-stanza song of the same name. Written in iambic tetrameter it tells of John Bull's trip to Paris, where all of his questions about the ownership of everything he sees meet with the same response: Je vous n'entends pas ("I don't hear you"). He takes this phrase as referring to a Monsieur Nongtongpaw, whose wealth and possessions he greatly envies. At the same time, Godwin allowed her to listen to the conversations he had with many of the leading intellectuals and poets of the day. Mounseer Nongtongpaw; or, The Discoveries of John Bull in a Trip to Paris is an 1808 childrens book attributed Mary Shelley. ... Charles Dibdin (March 4?, 1745 - July 25, 1814), British musician, dramatist, novelist, actor and song-writer, the son of a parish clerk, was born in Southampton on or before the 4th of March 1745, and was the youngest of a family of eighteen. ... Iambic tetrameter is a meter in poetry. ... World War I recruiting poster An earlier John Bull where he actually IS a bull John Bull is a national personification of the Kingdom of Great Britain created by Dr. John Arbuthnot in 1712, and popularised first by British print makers and then overseas by illustrators and writers such as... This article is about the capital of France. ...


By 1812, the animosity between Mary and her step-mother had grown to such an extent that William Godwin sent her to board with an acquaintance, William Baxter, who lived in Dundee, Scotland. Mary's stay with the Baxter family had a profound effect on her: they provided her with a model of the type of closely-knit, loving family to which she would aspire for the rest of her life. Moreover, in the 1831 Preface to Frankenstein, she claims that this period of life led to her development as a writer: "I lived principally in the country as a girl, and passed a considerable time in Scotland. I made occasional visits to the more picturesque parts; but my habitual residence was on the blank and dreary northern shores of the Tay, near Dundee. Blank and dreary on retrospection I call them; they were not so to me then. They were the eyry of freedom, and the pleasant region where unheeded I could commune with the creatures of my fancy. I wrote then—but in a most common-place style. It was beneath the trees of the grounds belonging to our house, on the bleak sides of the woodless mountains near, that my true compositions, the airy flights of my imagination, were born and fostered. I did not make myself the heroine of my tales. Life appeared to me too common-place an affair as regarded myself. I could not figure to myself that romantic woes or wonderful events would ever be my lot; but I was not confined to my own identity, and I could people the hours with creations far more interesting to me at that age, than my own sensations."[2] For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ...


Shelley

On a visit home in 1812, she met Percy Bysshe Shelley, a political radical and free-thinker like her father, when Percy and his first wife Harriet visited Godwin's home and bookshop in London. By 1814, Percy Shelley was paying frequent visits to Godwin, and had struck up a friendship with his daughter, Mary. He sought in her the commonality of interests and the intellectual companionship that was missing in his marriage to Harriet. Initially, Percy’s relationship with his wife was a happy one, as she made an effort to share in his studies and his intellectual pursuits. After their daughter Eliza Ianthe Shelley was born, however, Harriet gave up on their intellectual life completely, and she did not pay as much attention to Percy’s interests. Shelley was not pleased with this change: as the eldest son of a wealthy baronet with a mother and four younger sisters who adored him, he was accustomed to being the centre of attention for the women in his life. Consequently, Percy looked for that companionship and sympathy elsewhere, and found it in Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin. As the daughter of William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, she was a revolutionary, a poet, an intellectual; all qualities that Percy felt were lacking in his wife. Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ...


Mary had her reasons for being attracted to Percy. By that time, Percy had become a central figure in the Godwin household. William Godwin was dependent upon him not only for intellectual stimulation and emotional sympathy, but also for financial support, as Percy was giving him massive amounts of money in order to alleviate his poverty. As a result, the Godwin family had developed an obsession with him; when Mary came home in 1814, her father and sisters spoke about little else apart from Percy, and her stepmother repeatedly wrote about how beautifully dressed but proud and unsociable Harriet was. So, when Mary met Percy two years after their brief encounter in 1812, it is little wonder that she would have been fascinated by and attracted to him. She also saw in him her ideal man: a young, passionate, deeply-committed poet who shared her love for her father.

St Pancras Old Church in 1815. The River Fleet has since been covered over.
St Pancras Old Church in 1815. The River Fleet has since been covered over.

Inevitably, Mary and Percy began a romantic and sexual relationship with each other. Mary had the habit of visiting St Pancras Churchyard, where her mother was buried, and reading Wollstonecraft's works, and Percy started accompanying her on these walks. Although Jane chaperoned them, they would have her walk some distance away from them, claiming that they wished to speak about philosophical matters. On 26 June, they officially declared their love for each other. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... St Pancras Old Church in 1815. ... Entrance to the Fleet River, Samuel Scott, c. ... St Pancras Old Church in 1815. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Unfortunately for them, William Godwin discovered their relationship, and forbade them to see each other again. His principled opposition to marriage and support of free love did not extend to his own daughter. Mary initially tried to do as her father wished, but, after Percy threatened to commit suicide if he could not be with her, she realised that she needed to pursue their relationship. The term free love has been used since at least the nineteenth century to describe a social movement that rejects marriage, which is seen as a form of social bondage, especially for women. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


As a result, on 18 July 1814 at 5:00 in the morning, Mary and Percy eloped to France, with Mary's stepsister, Jane Clairmont, in tow. The young couple could not get married, however, because Percy was still legally wed to Harriet. This was Percy's second elopement, as he had also eloped with Harriet three years before. Upon their return several weeks later, the young couple were dismayed to find that Godwin refused to see them. He did not talk to Mary for 2 years is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... To elope, most literally, merely means to run away. ... Claire Clairmont Clara Mary Jane Clairmont (April 27, 1798 – March 19, 1879), or Claire Clairmont as she was commonly known, was a stepsister of writer Mary Shelley. ...


Mary consoled herself with her studies and with Percy, who set himself up in the roles of tutor and mentor as well as lover to the young woman. He drew up a programme of study in literature and languages that Mary followed diligently throughout their first few years together. Percy, too, was more than satisfied with his new partner during this period. He exulted that Mary was "one who can feel poetry and understand philosophy," and he enjoyed discussing literary and political issues with her.


Nonetheless, the couple's life together was not idyllic. Percy's father, Sir Timothy Shelley, disapproved of his son's abandonment of his pregnant wife and his relationship with Mary Shelley, and cut off his son's allowance as a result. By that time, Percy was deeply in debt as a result of his own profligate spending habits and the generous loans that he had made to William Godwin, among other individuals. He spent several months on the run from his creditors and apart from Mary.


At the same time, Mary was beginning to realise that Percy's all-consuming focus on the intellectual and abstract meant that he tended to be narcissistic and self-centred, and that he was frequently unaware of or indifferent to the impact of his actions and demands on the people around him.


For instance, as part of his commitment to free love, Percy Shelley attempted to set up a radical community of friends who was gay. would share everything in common, including sexual partners. Around the central relationship between himself and Mary, he tried to set up secondary sexual relationships between himself and Claire Clairmont, and Mary and his best friend Thomas Hogg. Mary was distressed by this turn of events, as she had hoped that Percy would provide her with the stable family and sense of belonging that she had always desired. Moreover, although Mary was fond of Thomas Hogg as a friend and companion and reciprocated his attentions, she was not sexually attracted to him, and refused to sleep with him. Her pregnancy with her first child may have influenced her decision not to engage in a sexual relationship with another man as well. Her relationship with her step-sister Claire had also deteriorated by that point, and she wanted Percy to send her away from their household, but he refused to compromise his vision of how his community should be organised. Thomas Jefferson Hogg (1792 - 1862) was a British biographer. ...


Even more devastating for Mary, however, were the events surrounding the birth and death of their first child, Clara, in February 1815. Born two months prematurely, Clara was a sickly child and was not expected to live. Nonetheless, Percy left Mary to nurse the child on her own and to entertain Thomas Hogg, while he went on walks and errands with Claire, and consulted the doctor for his own weak heart. When the child died early in March, Mary fell into a deep depression, yet Percy was again indifferent to her and spent more time with Claire than his primary partner.


Mary bore the couple's second child on 24 January 1816, a boy whom the couple called William after her father. This time, the pregnancy went smoothly, and William grew to become a favourite of the household, earning the nickname "Lovewill" for his beauty and his charm. His father took a greater interest in him than he had in Clara, although scholars like Anne K. Mellor have argued that it was largely a narcissistic one, as Percy hoped to raise the child in his own image. is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Trip to Switzerland and Frankenstein

In May 1816, the couple and their son travelled to Lake Geneva in the company of Claire Clairmont. Their plan was to spend the summer near the famous and scandalous poet Lord Byron, whose recent affair with Claire had left her pregnant. Lake Geneva or Lake Léman (French Lac Léman, le Léman, or Lac de Genève) is the second largest freshwater lake in Central Europe (after Lake Balaton). ... Byron redirects here. ...


From a literary perspective, it was a productive and successful summer. Percy began work on "Hymn To Intellectual Beauty" and "Mont Blanc"; Mary, in the meantime, was inspired to write an enduring masterpiece of her own.


Forced to stay indoors one evening because of cold and rainy weather (see "Year Without a Summer"), the group of young writers and intellectuals, sexually enthralled by the ghost stories from the book Fantasmagoriana, decided to have a ghost-story writing contest. Byron and Percy Shelley abandoned the project relatively soon, with Byron publishing his fragment at the end of Mazeppa. Byron's physician Dr. John Polidori's contribution remains uncertain; he identifies The Modern Oedipus as the work in question in the introduction to the novel, but, in her preface to the 1831 edition of Frankenstein, Mary claims that he had a terrible idea about a skull-headed lady who was punished for peeping through keyholes. Mary herself had no inspiration for a story, which was a matter of great concern to her. However, Luigi Galvani's report of his 1783 investigations in animating frog legs with electricity were mentioned specifically by her as part of the reading list that summer in Switzerland. One night, perhaps attributable to Galvani's report, Mary had a waking dream; she recounted the episode in this way: “My imagination, unbidden, possessed and guided me, gifting the successive images that arose in my mind with a vividness far beyond the usual bounds of reverie…I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together—I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half-vital motion…What terrified me will terrify others; and I need only describe the spectre which had haunted my midnight pillow.”[2] This nightmare served as the basis for the novel that she entitled Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus (1818).[2] Development of global average temperatures during the last 1000 years. ... Tales of the Dead was an English language collection of horror fiction, published in 1813 by the publishing house White, Cochrane and Co. ... John William Polidori (September 7, 1795 - August 24, 1821) is credited by some as the creator of the vampire genre of fantasy fiction. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... The current usage of the term nightmare refers to a dream which causes the sleeper a strong unpleasant emotional response. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ...


Return to England

Returning to England in September 1816, Mary and Percy were stunned by two family suicides in quick succession. On 9 October 1816, Mary's older half-sister, Fanny Imlay, left the Godwin home and took her own life at a distant inn. On 10 December, Percy's first wife, Harriet, drowned herself in London's Hyde Park. Discarded and pregnant, Claire had not welcomed Percy's invitation to join Mary and himself in their new household. is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Hyde Park” redirects here. ...


On 30 December 1816, shortly after Harriet's death, Percy and Mary were married at St Mildred's Church in London, now with Godwin's blessing. Their attempts to gain custody of Percy's two children by Harriet failed, but their writing careers enjoyed more success when, in the spring of 1817, Mary finished Frankenstein. is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ...


Over the following years, Mary's household grew to include her own children by Percy, occasional friends, and Claire's daughter, Allegra Byron, by Byron. Shelley moved his ménage from place to place, first in England and then in Italy. Mary suffered the death of her infant daughter Clara outside Venice, after which her young son Will died too, in Rome, as Percy moved the household yet again. By now Mary had resigned herself to her husband's self-centred restlessness and his romantic enthusiasms for other women. The birth of her only surviving child, Percy Florence Shelley, consoled her somewhat for her losses. Clara Allegra Byron Clara Allegra Byron (January 15, 1817 - April 20, 1822), initially named Alba, meaning dawn, or white, by her mother, was the illegitimate daughter of George Gordon, Lord Byron and Claire Clairmont, the stepsister of Mary Shelley[1]. Born in Bath, England, she initially lived with her mother... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...


Eventually the group settled in Pisa. For the summer of 1822, they moved to Lerici, a fishing village close to La Spezia in Italy, but it was an ill-fated choice. It was here that Claire learned of her daughter's death at the Italian convent to which Byron had sent her, and that Mary almost died of a miscarriage, being saved only by Percy's quick thinking. And it was from there, in July 1822, that Percy sailed away up the coast to Livorno, to meet Leigh Hunt, who had just arrived from England. Caught in a storm on his return, Percy Bysshe Shelley drowned at sea on 8 July 1822, aged 29, along with his friend Edward Williams and a young boat attendant. Percy left his last long poem, a shadowy work called The Triumph Of Life, unfinished. Mary also had another source for her story writing because of the time she spent in Switzerland. She had the idea of Frankenstein living there and there is a very famous scene in Frankenstein set on Mount Chamonix, where Frankenstein meets the creature and talks to him for the first time; the time Shelley spent in Geneva must have inspired her. Mary died, aged 53, on 1 February 1851 at Chester square in London, England. Leaning Tower of Pisa. ... Lerici is a commune in the province of La Spezia in Liguria. ... La Spezia (Spèsa in the local dialect of Ligurian) is a city in the Liguria region of northern Italy, at the head of La Spezia Gulf, and capital city of the province of La Spezia. ... Livorno (archaic English: ) is a port city on the Tyrrhenian Sea on the western edge of Tuscany, Italy. ... An artists rendering of James Henry Leigh Hunt James Henry Leigh Hunt (October 19, 1784 - August 28, 1859) was an English essayist and writer. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Writings

  • Mounseer Nongtongpaw; or, The Discoveries of John Bull in a Trip to Paris, Juvenile Library, 1808
  • History of Six Weeks' Tour through a Part of France, Switzerland, Germany, and Holland, with Letters Descriptive of a Sail round the Lake of Geneva, and of the Glaciers of Chamouni, with contributions by Percy Byshhe Shelley, Hookham, 1817
  • Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (novel), three volumes, Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones, 1818, revised edition, one volume, Colburn & Bentley, 1831, two volumes, Carey, Lea, & Blanchard, 1833
  • Mathilda (1819 novel), edited by Elizabeth Nitchie, University of North Carolina Press, 1959
  • Valperga; or The Life and Adventures of Castruccio, Prince of Lucca (novel), three volumes, Whittaker, 1823.
  • Editor of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Posthumous Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Hunt, 1824
  • The Last Man (novel), three volumes, Colburn, 1826, two volumes, Carey, Lea, & Blanchard, 1833
  • The Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck (novel), three volumes, Colburn & Bentley, 1830, two volumes, Carey, Lea, & Blanchard, 1834
  • Lodore (novel), three volumes, Bentley, 1835, one volume, Wallis & Newell, 1835
  • Falkner (novel) three volumes, Saunders & Otley, 1837, one volume, Harper & Brothers, 1837
  • Editor of P. B. Shelley, The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, four volumes, Moxon, 1839
  • Rambles in Germany and Italy in 1840, 1842, and 1843, two volumes, Moxon, 1844
  • The Choice: A Poem on Shelley's Death, edited by H. Buxton Forman, [London], 1876
  • The Mortal Immortal (short story), Mossant, Vallon, 1910
  • Proserpine and Midas: Two Unpublished Mythological Dramas, edited by A. Koszul, Milford, 1922
  • Contributor to Volumes 86-88 and 102-103 in The Cabinet of Biography, Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopedia, 1835-1839
  • Contributor of stories, reviews, and essays for London Magazine, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Examiner, and Westminster Review
  • Contributor of stories to an annual gift book, The Keepsake, 1828-1838
  • Collections of Mary Shelley's works are housed in Lord Abinger's Shelley Collection on deposit at the Bodleian Library, the New York Public Library, the Huntington Library, the British Library, and in the John Murray Collection
  • Excluding many collections, such as Mary and Shelley's journals and letters
  • The Bride of Modern Italy (?)
  • The Dream (?)
  • Ferdinando Eboli (?)
  • The Invisible Girl (?)
  • Roger Dodsworth:The Reanimated Englishman (1826)
  • The Sisters of Albano (?)
  • The Transformation (?)

This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Mary Shelley wrote the short novel Matilda in 1819, but it was not published until 1959. ... Valperga, or the Life and Adventures of Castruccio, Prince of Lucca is an 1823 historical novel by Mary Shelley, set in Lucca, Valperga. ... This article is about the novel. ... The Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck: A Romance is an 1830 historical novel by Mary Shelley about the life of Perkin Warbeck. ... Lodore, also published under the title The Beautiful Widow, is the penultimate novel by Mary Shelley, completed in 1833 and published in 1835. ... Proserpine is a 1820 verse drama by Mary Shelley, based on the Roman myth of the abduction of Proserpine from Ceres by Pluto. ... The London Magazine is a historied publication of arts, literature, and miscellaneous interests. ... Blackwoods Magazine was a British magazine and miscellany printed between 1817 and 1980. ... This article is about publication entitled Examiner The Examiner The Examiner was a weekly paper founded by Leigh and John Hunt in 1808. ... The Westminster Review was founded in 1823 by Jeremy Bentham and James Mill as a journal for philosophical radicals, and was published from 1824 to 1914. ... Entrance to the Library, with the coats-of-arms of several Oxford colleges The Bodleian Library, the main research library of the University of Oxford, is one of the oldest libraries in Europe, and in England is second in size only to the British Library. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Huntington Library is an educational and research institution established by Henry Huntington in San Marino, California. ... British Library main building, London The British Library (BL) is the national library of the United Kingdom. ...

Film

The Shelley circle and the genesis of the Frankenstein story in 1816 have been popular subjects for filmmakers, and Mary Shelley has been portrayed in a number of films:

Bride of Frankenstein is a horror/science fiction film released on April 22, 1935, a sequel to the 1931 film Frankenstein. ... James Whale (July 22, 1889 – May 29, 1957) was a ground-breaking British Hollywood film director, best known for his work in the horror movie genre, making such pictures as Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, and The Invisible Man. ... Lanchester in Naughty Marietta Elsa Lanchester (October 28, 1902 - December 26, 1986 in Woodland Hills, California) was an Oscar-nominated English character actress who became a naturalized American citizen in 1950 along with her husband, actor Charles Laughton. ... Gothic is a 1986 motion picture directed by Ken Russell. ... Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927), is an iconoclastic English film director, particularly well-known for his films about famous composers and his controversial, often outrageous pioneering work in film. ... Natasha Jane Richardson (born May 11, 1963 in London), is a Tony Award-winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, an enduring theatrical dynasty. ... Ivan Passer, (b. ... Alice Krige as Lady Jessica in the Children of Dune miniseries Alice Maud Krige (born June 28, 1954 in Upington, South Africa) is an actress best known for her role in the Star Trek series as the Borg Queen. ... Gonzalo Suárez Morilla (July 30, 1934, Oviedo), is a Spanish writer, screenwriter and film director. ... Frankenstein Unbound is a 1990 horror movie based on Brian Aldiss novel of the same name. ... Bridget Jane Fonda (born January 27, 1964) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-award nominated American actress. ... Sally Hawkins (b. ...

References

  1. ^ Bartlett, Jane. Is childbed fever history?. iVillage.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-10-06.
  2. ^ a b c Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft [1831] (1999). "Introduction", Frankenstein. Charlottesville, Va: University of Virginia Library. Retrieved on 2007-10-06. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Lives of the Great Romantics 3. Mary Shelley, vol.3, ed. Betty T. Bennett (Pickering and Chatto, London, 1999
  • Martin Garrett, A Mary Shelley Chronology (Palgrave, Basingstoke, and St Martin’s Press, New York, 2002)
  • Martin Garrett, Mary Shelley (British Library: London, 2002)
  • William St Clair, The Godwins and the Shelleys: the Biography of a Family (Faber and Faber, London, 1989)
  • Miranda Seymour, Mary Shelley (John Murray, London, 2000)
  • Emily W. Sunstein, Mary Shelley: Romance and Reality (Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 1989)

Betty T. Bennett (1935-2006) was Distinguished Professor of Literature and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences (1985-1997) at American University. ... Miranda Jane Seymour (born 1948), is an English literary critic, novelist, and biographer. ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Mary Shelley
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Mary Shelley
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Mary Shelley
  • Mary Shelley Memorial at Find A Grave
  • Free audiobook of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus from LibriVox (without prefaces and edition information)
  • Literary Encyclopedia biography
  • Biography
  • Chapter on Shelley from Traits of Character: Being Twenty-five Years' Literary and Personal Recollections by Eliza Rennie, a contemporary writer and friend
  • Brandeis University article on Mary's life and work
  • The first Full English translation of Fantasmagoriana (Tales of The Dead)
  • 'Mary Shelley's lost children's story found' Article about Maurice, or the Fisher's Cot, a newly discovered story by Mary Shelley
Persondata
NAME Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft
SHORT DESCRIPTION English romantic/gothic novelist
DATE OF BIRTH 30 August 1797
PLACE OF BIRTH London, England
DATE OF DEATH 1 February 1851
PLACE OF DEATH Bournemouth, England

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mary Shelley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1649 words)
Mary Shelley (30 August 1797 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus.
Mary Shelley was born Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin in London, England, the second daughter of famed feminist, educator and writer Mary Wollstonecraft and the equally famous anarchist philosopher, anarchic journalist and atheist dissenter, William Godwin.
Mary Shelley died of brain cancer on 1 February 1851, aged 53, in London and was interred at St. Peter's Churchyard in Bournemouth, in the English county of Dorset.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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