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Encyclopedia > Mary Poppins (film)
Mary Poppins
Directed by Robert Stevenson
Produced by Walt Disney
Written by P.L. Travers (books)
Bill Walsh
Don DaGradi
Starring Julie Andrews
Dick Van Dyke
David Tomlinson
Glynis Johns
Karen Dotrice
Matthew Garber
Music by Richard M. Sherman
Robert B. Sherman
Distributed by Buena Vista Pictures
Release date(s) August 27, 1964
Running time 139 minutes
Language English
Budget $6,000,000
IMDb profile

Mary Poppins is a 1964 American musical film starring Julie Andrews and produced by Walt Disney, based on the Mary Poppins books series by P. L. Travers and illustrated by Mary Shepard. Songs in the film are by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. It is rated G by the MPAA, G in Australia and U in the United Kingdom. Robert Stevenson (March 31, 1905-November 4, 1986) was an English film writer and director. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... ... Bill Walsh (September 30, 1913 - January 27, 1975) was a film producer and screenwriter who primarily worked on live-action films for Walt Disney Productions. ... Don DaGradi was a Disney writer who started out as a layout artist on 1940s cartoons including Der Fuehrers Face in 1943. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Glynis Johns (born 5 October 1923) is a Tony Award-winning British stage and film actress, dancer, pianist and singer (notably of Send in the Clowns in Stephen Sondheims A Little Night Music). ... Karen Dotrice (born 9 November 1955) is a British actress known primarily for her role as the daughter in Walt Disneys feature film adaptation of the Mary Poppins book series. ... Matthew Adam Garber (25 March 1956[1] – 13 June 1977[2]) was an English actor best known for his role as Michael Banks in Walt Disneys Mary Poppins. ... Richard Sherman redirects here. ... Robert B. Sherman (born December 19, 1925) (see also: Sherman Brothers) is an Academy Award-winning American songwriter who specializes in musical films with his brother Richard M. Sherman. ... The Buena Vista Motion Pictures Group is a collection of affiliated motion picture studios, all subsidaries of The Walt Disney Company. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For the 1964 Academy Award winning motion picture, see Mary Poppins (film). ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... This article is about the Mary Poppins series of childrens books. ... Childrens books redirects here. ... Pamela Lyndon Travers (9 August 1899 - 23 April 1996) was born Helen Lyndon Goff in Maryborough, Queensland, Australia, was the author of Mary Poppins and a student of G. I. Gurdjieff. ... Mary Shepard Daughter of E.H. Shepard illustrator of Winnie the Pooh and Wind in the Willows. ... Richard Sherman redirects here. ... Robert B. Sherman (born December 19, 1925) (see also: Sherman Brothers) is an Academy Award-winning American songwriter who specializes in musical films with his brother Richard M. Sherman. ... MPAA redirects here. ...


In 2006, this film ranked #6 on the American Film Institute's list of best musicals. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ...

Contents

Plot

The film begins with the young and pretty Mary Poppins perched on a cloud high above London in Spring 1910 [1]. The action descends to earth where Bert, a cockney jack-of-all-trades, introduces the audience to the well-to-do, but troubled, Banks family, headed by the cold and aloof Mr. Banks, who has formed the idea that a British household ought to be run with the strict authority of a British bank. His wife is the loving but highly distracted suffragette Mrs. Banks. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... St Mary-le-Bow The term cockney is often used to refer to working-class people of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the womens suffrage movement, originally in the United Kingdom. ...


The Banks' latest nanny quits out of exasperation after the Banks children, Jane and Michael run off in pursuit of a wayward kite. Angered at the children and convinced they are unruly, she leaves despite Mrs Banks askng her to stay. Mr Banks returns home from a good day at the bank, but his glee is short-lived when Mrs Banks reveals the children are missing. Shortly a policeman arrives with the Banks children, Jane and Michael, who are in fear of their father. Mr Banks' grief quickly turns to anger and he disciplines his children severely. The children ask their father to help repair their damaged kite, but he dismisses them and advertises for an authoritarian nanny-replacement. Jane and Michael draft their own advertisement asking for a fun and caring person, but the disgusted Mr. Banks tears up the paper and throws in the fireplace. Unnoticed, the note's remains float up the chimney. A nanny is a person who looks after the child or children of one family in their -- the childs -- home. ... For other uses, see Kite (disambiguation). ... For the band, see The Police. ...


The next day there is a queue of old and disagreeable nanny candidates waiting at the door. However, a strong gust of wind blows the queue away, and Mary Poppins flies down with her umbrella to apply. Mr. Banks is stunned to see that this calmly defiant new nanny has responded to the children's ad despite the fact he destroyed it. As he puzzles, Mary Poppins hires herself and begins work.


The children face surprises of their own: Mary possesses a bottomless carpetbag, and makes contents of the children's nursery come to life and tidy themselves. The magic continues with a countryside outing via one of "screever" Bert's chalk pavement drawings, and a tea-party in midair with Mary's "Uncle Albert", who floats uncontrollably whenever he laughs. Magic satchel is a term often used in reference to computer role-playing games. ...


Mr. Banks grows uncomfortable with his children's stories of their adventures, but Mary effortlessly inverts his attempted dismissal of her services into a plan to take his children with him to the bank where he is employed. Unfortunately, Mr. Dawes, Mr. Banks' extremely elderly employer, aggressively tries to persuade Michael to invest his money in the bank. When Michael protests, the other customers misunderstand, and start a run that forces the bank to suspend business. The children flee and wander into the slums of the East End of London. Fortunately, they run into Bert, now employed as a chimney sweep. He takes them safely home, explaining that their father does not hate them, but that he has problems of his own, and that unlike the children, has no one to turn to but himself. For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... A poster for the 1896 Broadway melodrama The War of Wealth depicts a typical 19th century bank panic in the U.S. A bank run (also known as a run on the banks) is a type of financial crisis. ... A slum is an overcrowded and squalid district of a city or town usually inhabited by the very poor. ... The term East End is most commonly used to refer to the East End of London. ... Chimney sweep in the 1850s A chimney sweep, or a climbing boy, is a person who cleans chimneys for a living. ...


A departing Mrs. Banks hires Bert to sweep the family's chimney and mind the children. Mary arrives back from her day off to caution the children about the hazards of this activity, and sure enough, the children are sucked up to the roof. Bert and Mary follow them and lead a tour of the rooftops of London that concludes with a joyful dance with Bert's chimney-sweep colleagues. A volley of fireworks from the Banks' eccentric neighbor, Admiral Boom, sends the entire gathering back down the Banks' chimney. For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ...


Mr. Banks arrives home, forcing Mary to conclude the festivities. Banks then receives a phone call from work ordering him to return immediately for disciplinary action. As Mr. Banks gathers his strength, Bert points out that while Mr. Banks does need to make a living, his offspring's childhood will come and go in a blink of an eye, and he needs to be there for them while he can. The Banks children approach their father to apologize, and Michael gives Mr. Banks his tuppence in the hope that it will make things alright. Banks gently accepts the offering.


A sombre and thoughtful Mr. Banks walks alone through the nighttime streets. At the bank, he is formally humiliated and fired for causing the first run on the bank since the "Boston Tea Party" of 1773. However, after being at a loss when ordered to give a statement, Mr. Banks invokes Mary Poppins' all purpose word "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!" to tweak Mr Dawes. He gives Dawes the tuppence, tells the old man one of Uncle Albert's jokes and raucously departs. Dawes mulls over the joke, finally "gets it" and floats up into the air, laughing... This article is about a 1773 American protest. ... Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (pronounced ) is an English word in the song with the same title in the musical film Mary Poppins. ...


The next morning, the winds have changed direction, and so Mary must depart. Meanwhile, the Banks adults cannot find Mr. Banks, and fear that he might have become suicidal. However, Mr. Banks, now loving and joyful, reappears with the now-mended kite and cheerfully summons his children. The greatly-relieved Mrs. Banks supplies a tail for the kite, using one of her suffragette ribbons. They all leave the house without a backward glance as Mary Poppins watches from a window. In the park with other kite-flyers, Mr. Banks meets Mr. Dawes Jr., who says that his father literally died laughing. Instead of being mournful, the son is delighted his father died happy, and rehires Mr. Banks to fill the opening.


Her work done, Mary Poppins takes to the air with a fond farewell from Bert.


Production history

The first book was the main basis for the Walt Disney film Mary Poppins, a musical with mixed live action and animation premiered on August 27, 1964. It was the Sherman Brothers, who composed the music and song score, and who were also involved in the picture's development, who suggested that the setting be changed from the 1930s to the Edwardian era. The multiple Academy Award-winning film is considered by many critics[citation needed] to be the best of Disney's live-action musicals and it made a major film star of Julie Andrews, who was making her movie acting debut after a successful stage career. Andrews got the prime role of Mary Poppins soon after being passed over by Jack Warner and replaced with Audrey Hepburn for the role of Eliza Doolittle in his screen version of My Fair Lady, even though Andrews had originated the role on Broadway. Ironically, Andrews beat Hepburn for the coveted Best Actress Awards in both the Golden Globes and Academy Awards for their respective roles. For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929) – January 20, 1993) was an English Academy Award-, Tony Award-, Grammy Award-, and Emmy Award-winning film and stage actress, fashion icon, and humanitarian. ... My Fair Lady is an Academy Award-winning 1964 film adaptation of the stage musical, My Fair Lady, based in turn on the play Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...


Disney cast Dick Van Dyke in the key supporting role of Bert, thanks to his work on The Dick Van Dyke Show. Van Dyke also played the senior Mr. Dawes in the film. Although he is fondly remembered for this film, Van Dyke's attempt at a cockney accent (lapsing out of it at times) was nonetheless widely ridiculed and is still frequently parodied. It is still often cited as one of the worst attempts at a British accent by an American actor,[2] a fact acknowledged with good humour by Van Dyke himself on the 2004 DVD release of the film. Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ... The Dick Van Dyke Show is an American television situation comedy which initially aired on CBS from October 3, 1961 to June 1, 1966, created by Carl Reiner and starring Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore. ... St Mary-le-Bow The term cockney is often used to refer to working-class people of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. ...

Mary Poppins (right, behind) as portrayed by Julie Andrews in the most famous adaptation of the character.

According to the 40th Anniversary DVD release of the film in 2004, Walt Disney first attempted to purchase the film rights to Mary Poppins from P.L. Travers as early as 1938 but was rebuffed because Travers did not believe a film version of her books would do justice to her creation. In addition, Disney was known at the time primarily as a producer of cartoons and had yet to produce any major live action work. For more than 20 years, Disney periodically made efforts to convince Travers to allow him to make a Poppins movie. He finally succeeded in 1961, although Travers demanded and got script approval rights. The process of planning the film and composing the songs took about two years. Travers objected to a number of elements that actually made it into the movie. Rather than original songs, she wanted the soundtrack to feature known standards of the Edwardian period in which the movie was set. She also objected to the animated sequence. However, Disney overruled her, citing contract stipulations that he had final say on the finished print. Much of their correspondence is part of the Travers collection of papers in the Mitchell Library of New South Wales, Australia. The relationship between Travers and Disney is detailed in Mary Poppins She Wrote, a biography of Travers, by Valerie Lawson, published by Aurum Press in the United Kingdom. The biography is the basis for two documentaries on Travers, The Real Mary Poppins and The Shadow of Mary Poppins. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Cartoons started in the 1930s and 40s. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It succeeded the Victorian period and is sometimes extended to include the period up to the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912, the start of World War... : See State Library of New South Wales for its Mitchell Library section of Australiana. ... NSW redirects here. ...


A number of other changes were necessary to condense the story into feature length. In the movie, there are only two Banks children, Jane and Michael. The satirical and mysterious aspects of the original book gave way to a cheerful and "Disneyfied" tone. Mary Poppins' character as portrayed by Andrews in the film is somewhat less vain and more sympathetic toward the children than the rather cold and intimidating nanny of the original book. Bert, as played by Van Dyke, was a composite of several characters from Travers' stories. Travers demanded that any suggestions of romance between Mary and Bert be eliminated, so lyrics were written for "Jolly Holiday" that clearly indicated that their friendship was purely platonic (some subtle hints of romance remain, however). Platonic idealism is the theory that the substantive reality around us is only a reflection of a higher truth. ...


As mentioned above, Van Dyke played two roles in the film. Andrews did at least three: she provided the robin's whistling harmony during "A Spoonful of Sugar", and was also one of the Pearly singers during "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious". David Tomlinson, besides playing Mr. Banks, also provided the voice of Mary's talking umbrella as well as numerous other voice-over parts (including that of Admiral Boom's first mate). During the "Jolly Holiday" sequence, the three singing cockney geese were voiced by Marni Nixon. Nixon would later play one of Julie Andrews' fellow nuns in The Sound Of Music, as well as the voice-over for Audrey Hepburn in My Fair Lady. Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies 7-10, see text. ... A pearly King and Queen A Pearly King (feminine form Pearly Queen) is a person dressed in a traditional cockney costume covered in mother-of-pearl buttons. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An umbrella or parasol (sometimes colloquially, gamp, brolly, or bumbershoot) is a canopy designed to protect against precipitation or sunlight. ... Marni Nixon (born February 22, 1930) is a singer whose renown for dubbing the singing voices of featured actresses in movies earned her the sobriquet The Ghostess with the Mostess. She was born Margaret McEathron in Altadena, California and began singing at a young age in choruses. ... For other uses, see Nun (disambiguation). ... Rodgers and Hammersteins The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. ...


International release dates

is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...

Academy Awards

The film received 13 Academy Awards nominations and won 5 awards[3]: Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...

Nominated The Academy Award for Best Actress is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... As defined by Rule Sixteen of the Academy Awards Rules, the Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... The Song of the Year is one of the two most prestigious awards in the Grammies, if not in all of the music industry. ... The illusions used in the film, television, and entertainment industries to simulate the imagined events in a story are traditionally called special effects (a. ...

The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... My Fair Lady is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, based on George Bernard Shaws Pygmalion. ... The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is awarded each year to a cinematographer for his work in one particular motion picture. ... This Academy Award was first given for movies made in 1948 when separate awards were given for black-and-white and color movies. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... People called Robert Stevenson or similar names include: Robert Stevenson (director), film director Robert Stevenson (lighthouse engineer), Scottish lighthouse engineer Robert Stevenson (actor and politician) Robert Louis Stevenson, Scottish writer and grandson of the lighthouse engineer Robert Stevenson Robert Stephenson, railway engineer Robert Stevenson (footballer), captain of Woolwich Arsenal and... The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... This is a list of films that have received an Oscar for best sound. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ... Becket or the Honor of God is a Tony Award-winning play written in French by Jean Anouilh. ...

Songs

In 2004, "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" was ranked #36 in the American Film Institute's list of the 100 Greatest Songs in Movie History. Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ... Sister Suffragette is the fictional pro-suffrage protest song sung by Mrs. ... Glynis Johns (born 5 October 1923) is a Tony Award-winning British stage and film actress, dancer, pianist and singer (notably of Send in the Clowns in Stephen Sondheims A Little Night Music). ... Hermione Baddeley (November 13, 1906 - August 19, 1986) was a celebrated British character actress of theatre, film and television. ... Reta Shaw (b. ... Lanchester in Naughty Marietta Elsa Lanchester (October 28, 1902 - December 26, 1986 in Woodland Hills, California) was an Oscar-nominated English character actress who became a naturalized American citizen in 1950 along with her husband, actor Charles Laughton. ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... The Life I Lead is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Perfect Nanny is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... Karen Dotrice (born 9 November 1955) is a British actress known primarily for her role as the daughter in Walt Disneys feature film adaptation of the Mary Poppins book series. ... Matthew Adam Garber (25 March 1956[1] – 13 June 1977[2]) was an English actor best known for his role as Michael Banks in Walt Disneys Mary Poppins. ... A Spoonful of Sugar is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Robert B. Sherman and Richard M. Sherman. ... Jolly Holiday is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins. ... Ravenscrofts 1970 gospel album Great Hymns in Story and Song Thurl Arthur Ravenscroft (February 6, 1914 – May 22, 2005) was an American voice actor and singer with a deep, booming voice. ... Marni Nixon (born February 22, 1930) is a singer whose renown for dubbing the singing voices of featured actresses in movies earned her the sobriquet The Ghostess with the Mostess. She was born Margaret McEathron in Altadena, California and began singing at a young age in choruses. ... Paul Frees (June 22, 1920 - November 2, 1986) was a voice actor born in Chicago. ... Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (pronounced ) is an English word in the song with the same title in the musical film Mary Poppins. ... J. Pat OMalley (March 15, 1904 - February 27, 1985) was an English singer and actor of Irish extraction. ... Stay Awake is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... I Love to Laugh(Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious) is the nineth volume of Disney Sing Along Songs featuring songs from Disneys Musical Masterpiece Mary Poppins. ... Ed Wynn (November 9, 1886 - June 19, 1966) was a popular United States entertainer, born Isaiah Edwin Leopold in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Feed the Birds (Tuppence a Bag) is a song written by the Sherman Brothers (Richard M. Sherman & Robert B. Sherman) and featured in the 1964 motion picture Mary Poppins. ... Fidelity Fiduciary Bank is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... Chim Chim Cher-ee is the Oscar winning song from Mary Poppins, the 1964 musical motion picture. ... The Academy Award for Best Song is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are songwriters and composers. ... Step in Time is a song and dance number from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... A Man Has Dreams is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... Feed the Birds (Tuppence a Bag) is a song written by the Sherman Brothers (Richard M. Sherman & Robert B. Sherman) and featured in the 1964 motion picture Mary Poppins. ... Lets Go Fly A Kite is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ...


Deleted songs

A number of other songs were written for the film by the Sherman Brothers and either rejected or cut for time. Richard Sherman, on the 2004 DVD release, indicated that more than 30 songs were written at various stages of the film's development. No cast recordings of any of these songs have been released to the public, only demos or later performances done by the songwriters — with the exception of the rooftop reprise of "Chim-Chim-Cheree" and the "smoke staircase yodel" mentioned below. Robert B. Sherman & Richard M. Sherman at the London Palladium in 2002 during the premiere of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Stage Musical. ...

  • "The Chimpanzoo", was originally to follow "I Love to Laugh" during the Uncle Albert "ceiling tea party" sequence, but it was dropped from the soundtrack just before Julie Andrews and company were to record it. The fast-paced number was not unveiled to the public until Richard Sherman, aided by recently uncovered storyboards, performed it on the 2004 DVD edition. The recreation suggests it was to have been another sequence combining animation and live action.
  • "Practically Perfect" was intended to introduce Mary but instead the melody of the piece was used for "Sister Suffragette" (used to introduce Winifred (Mrs. Banks)). A different song with the same name was written for the stage musical.
  • "The Eyes of Love", a romantic ballad, was intended for Bert and Mary, but according to the Shermans this song was vetoed by Julie Andrews herself.
  • "Mary Poppins Melody" was to be performed when Mary introduces herself to the children. Elements of the song later became part of "Stay Awake". The melody was the basis for a couple of other songs that were ultimately cut from the film.
  • "A Name's a Name". Heard on a recording taken of a meeting between the Sherman Brothers and P.L. Travers, this song was originally intended for the nursery scene that later became "A Spoonful of Sugar." The melody was reused for "Mary Poppins Melody".
  • "You Think, You Blink" was a short piece that Bert was to sing just before entering the chalk painting (and starting the "Jolly Holiday" sequence). In the film, Dick Van Dyke simply recites the lyric instead of singing it.
  • "West Wind" was a short ballad to be sung by Mary. The song was later retitled "Mon Amour Perdu" and used in the later Disney film, Big Red.
  • "The Right Side" was to be sung by Mary to Michael Banks after he gets out of bed cranky. It was recycled for the Disney Channel television series, Welcome to Pooh Corner as Winnie the Pooh's personal theme song.
  • "Measure Up" was to accompany the scene in which Mary takes the tape measure to Jane and Michael.
  • "Admiral Boom" was to be the theme song for the cannon-firing neighbor of the Banks Residence, but it was cut by Walt Disney as being unnecessary. The melody of the song remains in the film, and the bombastic theme is heard whenever Boom appears onscreen. One line from this song ("The whole world takes its time from Greenwich, but Greenwich, they say, takes its time from Admiral Boom!") is spoken by Bert early in the film.
  • "Sticks, Paper and Strings" was an early version of "Let's Go Fly a Kite."
  • "Lead the Righteous Life", an intentionally poorly-written hymn, was to have been sung by Katie Nanna (Elsa Lanchester) along with Jane and Michael prior to Mary Poppins' arrival. The melody was later reused for a similar song in The Happiest Millionaire
  • "The Pearly Song" was not deleted per se but was instead incorporated into "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious".

The Compass Sequence, a precursor to "Jolly Holiday", was to be a multiple-song sequence. A number of possible musical components have been identified: Storyboards are graphic organizers such as a series of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of previsualizing a motion graphic or interactive media sequence, including website interactivity. ... Sister Suffragette is the fictional pro-suffrage protest song sung by Mrs. ... The Eyes of Love was a song written by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman for Walt Disneys Mary Poppins. ... Stay Awake is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... Mon Amour Perdu was the retitled name of the West Wind, a deleted ballad intended to be sung by Mary Poppins in the original Mary Poppins film. ... Big Red is a 1962 American a family-oriented adventure film from Disney Studios. ... The Right Side is a song from the Welcome to Pooh Corner Cable TV series which premiered in 1983 on the Disney Channel (which was also that channels inaugural season). ... For the Disney Channel in other countries, see Disney Channel around the world. ... Welcome to Pooh Corner was a live-action/puppet television series airing on The Disney Channel, featuring the characters from the Winnie-the-Pooh universe portrayed by actors in human-sized puppet suits, except Roo, who was usually a traditional puppet. ... Pooh redirects here. ... Self-retracting pocket tape measure plastic tape measure A tape measure or measuring tape is a ribbon of cloth, plastic, or metal with linear-measure markings, often in both imperial and metric units. ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ... This article is about Greenwich in England. ... For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ... Lanchester in Naughty Marietta Elsa Lanchester (October 28, 1902 - December 26, 1986 in Woodland Hills, California) was an Oscar-nominated English character actress who became a naturalized American citizen in 1950 along with her husband, actor Charles Laughton. ... The Happiest Millionaire is a 1967 musical film, based upon the true story of Philadelphia millionaire Anthony J. Drexel Biddle. ...

  • "South Sea Island Symphony"
  • "Chinese Festival Song"
  • "Tim-buc-too" — elements of this were reused for "The Chimpanzoo" which was also cut
  • "Tiki Town" — the melody was reused for "The Chimpanzoo"
  • "North Pole Polka"
  • "Land of Sand" — later rewritten as "Trust in Me" for the animated version of The Jungle Book
  • "The Beautiful Briny" — later used in Bedknobs and Broomsticks
  • "East is East" — another variation on the unused "Mary Poppins Melody".

The North Pole Polka was a song written by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman for Walt Disneys Mary Poppins. ... The Jungle Book is a 1967 animated feature film, released on October 18th. ... The Beautiful Briny is a song written by Robert and Richard Sherman for the 1971, Walt Disney musical film production Bedknobs and Broomsticks. ... Bedknobs and Broomsticks is a 1971 musical film produced by Walt Disney Productions, which combines live action and animation; it premiered on October 7, 1971. ...

Deleted Scores and Music

  • The "Step in Time" sequence ends with the chimney sweeps being scattered by an onslaught of fireworks fired from Admiral Boom's house. In the final film, the scene plays out with sound effects and no music. The DVD release included the original version of the scene which was accompanied by a complex instrumental musical arrangement that combined "Step in Time", the "Admiral Boom" melody (see above), and "A Spoonful of Sugar". This musical arrangement can be heard on the film's original soundtrack.
  • Andrews recorded a brief reprise of "Chim-Chim-Cheree" which was to have accompanied Mary, Bert, and the children as they marched across the rooftops of London (an instrumental reprise of "A Spoonful of Sugar" was used as a march instead; however, Andrews and Dick Van Dyke can still be seen and heard singing a reprise of "Chim-Chim-Cheree" in that sequence, just before the other chimney sweeps appear for the "Step in Time" number).
  • The robin Mary Poppins whistles with in "A Spoonful of Sugar" originally sang a lyric as well.
  • Andrews also recorded a brief yodel which breaks into the first line of "A Spoonful of Sugar" which was to have been used to "activate" the smoke staircase prior to the "Step in Time" number. Although cut from the film, footage of Andrews performing this exists and was included on the 2004 DVD. The DVD also indicates that an alternate version of the yodel performed by Dick Van Dyke may also exist.

For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... Yodeling (or yodelling, jodeling) is a form of singing that involves singing an extended note which rapidly and repeatedly changes in pitch from the vocal chest register (or chest voice) to the head register (or head voice), making a high-low-high-low sound. ...

Home video releases

Mary Poppins was first released in the Early 1980s on VHS and laserdisc. In 1994, it was re-released as part of the Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection. In 1998, this movie became Disney's first DVD. Two years later, it was released on VHS and DVD as part of the Gold Classic Collection. In 2004, it had its 2-Disc DVD Release in a Digitally Restored 40th Anniversary Edition. Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... The Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection (Walt Disney Coleccion Maestra in Spanish) is a line of videos released by Walt Disney Home Video from 1994 to 1999. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ...


Followup

  • In a poll conducted by Channel 4 (UK TV channel) in 2003, Mary Poppins was voted the 5th best musical of all time [4].

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner), which blends traditional animation and live action. ... Disney Parks Worldwide logo Walt Disney Parks and Resorts is the division of The Walt Disney Company that conceives, builds and manages the companys theme parks and vacation resorts, as well as a variety of additional family-oriented leisure enterprises. ...

The Cat That Looked at a King

In 2004, Julie Andrews appeared in an animated/live action short that was produced by DisneyToon Studios for the 40th Anniversary DVD release of the 1964 film. Entitled The Cat That Looked at a King, the film was based upon part of the P.L. Travers book Mary Poppins Opens the Door and could be seen as something of a sequel or followup to the movie. DisneyToon Studios is an animation studio and a division of Disney Feature Animation. ... Mary Poppins Opens the Door is the third childrens book by author P.L. Travers to feature the magical English nanny Mary Poppins. ...


The film opens in the modern day with two British children looking at chalk drawings at the same location where Bert did his artwork in the original movie (the set was recreated, down to the last detail using the originals, according to Julie Andrews). Andrews, dressed in modern clothes, greets the children and takes them into the chalk drawing where they watch the tale unfold. The King and the Prime Minister are both voiced by David Ogden Stiers, while the king's wife is voiced by Sarah Ferguson and the cat by Tracey Ullman. David Ogden Stiers (born October 31, 1942) is an American character actor, voice actor and musician, most noted for his role in the television sitcom M*A*S*H, and the science fiction drama The Dead Zone. ... Sarah, Duchess of York (born 15 October 1959) is the former wife of Prince Andrew, Duke of York. ... Tracey Ullman (born December 30, 1959) is a English comedian, actress, singer, dancer, screenwriter, and author, who is most famous for being the host of her eponymous variety television show. ...


Whether Andrews is playing a modern-day Mary Poppins or not is left to the viewer's imagination, although some sources identify Andrews' character as Mary Poppins.[1]


Characters

Audio-animatronic versions of Mary Poppins and Bert in The Great Movie Ride.
Audio-animatronic versions of Mary Poppins and Bert in The Great Movie Ride.

The Great Movie Ride is an attraction at Walt Disney Worlds Disney-MGM Studios theme park in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. ...

Mary Poppins

"Practically perfect in every way". She comes down from the clouds in response to the Banks children's advertisement for a Nanny. She is not only firm in her use of authority, but kind and gentle as well (a major departure from the original books). Mary Poppins is a fictional character and the protagonist of Pamela Travers Mary Poppins books and all of its adaptations. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...


She was played by Julie Andrews.The film was very popular with the public, and Andrews won a Best Actress Oscar award for her role. Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ...


Bert

Bert, portrayed by Dick Van Dyke, is a jack-of-all-trades and Mary's closest normal friend who is notable in that he is completely accustomed to her magic. Their interaction, such as in the song "Jolly Holiday", makes it clear they have known each other for a long time, and that this kind of story has repeated itself many times. When she sails away at the end of the film, he asks her not to stay away too long. Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ...


Bert has at least four jobs during the movie: a one-man band, a sidewalk chalk artist (or "screever"), a chimney sweep, and a kite seller. Bert also hints at selling hot chestnuts. His various street-vending jobs meet with mixed financial success, but he retains his cheery disposition. Chimney sweep in the 1850s A chimney sweep, or a climbing boy, is a person who cleans chimneys for a living. ...


Bert also indirectly assists Mary Poppins in her mission to save the Banks family, as he plays a key role in helping the Banks children and Mr. Banks to understand each other better.


Mrs. Banks

Mrs. Winifred Banks, played by Glynis Johns, is the wife of George Banks and the mother of Jane and Michael. She is more fully developed in the movie than in the books. She is depicted as a member of Emmeline Pankhurst's suffragette movement and appears to neglect her children for her duties as a suffragette. Her main outfit is a blue and orange Edwardian-style dress with a white and blue sash that reads "Votes for Women" in black letters. She wears white gloves in the film (as did most Edwardian English women). Her song in the movie is "Sister Suffragette", which she sings with the other two women of the household staff. Glynis Johns (born 5 October 1923) is a Tony Award-winning British stage and film actress, dancer, pianist and singer (notably of Send in the Clowns in Stephen Sondheims A Little Night Music). ... Statue of Emmeline Pankhurst in Victoria Tower Gardens next to the Houses of Parliament, Westminster. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the womens suffrage movement, originally in the United Kingdom. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It is sometimes extended to include the period to the start of World War I in 1914 or even the end of the war in 1918. ... For the German DJ/producer team, see Sash!. // A sash consists of a cloth belt used to hold a robe together, and usually tied about the waist. ... A glove (Middle English from Old English glof) is a type of garment which covers the hand. ... Sister Suffragette is the fictional pro-suffrage protest song sung by Mrs. ... The household is the basic unit of analysis in many microeconomic and government models. ...


She is more sensitive to the needs of the children than her husband is, but also finds herself starved for his attention. As with the children, it is clear she loves George very much, but he is too wrapped up in his view of the way things "ought to be" to return her love satisfactorily. She only refers to him by his name and "dear", which was common among Edwardian wives. (George only addresses his wife by her name only, common among Edwardian husbands.) Mrs Banks was originally named "Cynthia", but this was quickly changed to the more "English-sounding" Winifred. Dear, a common term that dates back to the 1500s, is an appellative udsed to describe husbands, wives, girlfriends, boyfriends, or anyone else that is adored. ... Look up English, english in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Mrs. Banks' four "Votes for Women" sashes from the movie have all survived. One can be seen being "pulled out" of Richard M. Sherman's "special musicians' trunk" on the Musical Journey seen on the 2004 DVD release. Richard Sherman redirects here. ...


As an interesting side-bar, Mrs. Banks and Mary Poppins never speak to each other, at least in the movie. In the book, they do speak to one another. This article is about the Mary Poppins series of childrens books. ...


Mr. Banks

George Banks, played by David Tomlinson, is Mary Poppins' employer. He works at the Dawes Tomes Mousley Grubbs Fidelity Fiduciary Bank in the City of London, and lives at 17 Cherry Tree Lane with his wife, Winifred, and their children. He is a very driven and disciplined man (he could be called a "Type A personality" by modern standards) who hates the women's suffrage movement and tends to treat his children, wife, and servants as assets rather than persons — a fact clearly evidenced in his song "The Life I Lead". By the end of the movie, Mr. Banks' attitude towards his family, his job, and Mary Poppins herself has changed dramatically. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fidelity Fiduciary Bank is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... In some psychological theories, the Type A personality, also known as the Type A Behavior Pattern, is a set of characteristics that includes being impatient, excessively time-conscious, insecure about ones status, highly competitive, hostile and aggressive, and incapable of relaxation. ... For other uses, see Hate (disambiguation). ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... Servant has a number of meaning: A servant is another word for domestic worker, a person who is hired to provide regular household or other duties, and receives compensation. ... This article is about the business definition. ... The Life I Lead is a song from Walt Disneys film Mary Poppins, and it is composed by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. ... Moral character or character is an evaluation of an individuals moral qualities. ...


Melodies in the score punctuate the children's need for their father's attention and love, and most of the dramatic tension in the film involves his journey from disconnected family autocrat to fully engaged family man.


According to the Special Edition Soundtrack Bonus Disc, Mary Poppins was George's own nanny when he was a child. Travers intended to have the script hint this strongly in a few places, but it was largely left out of the movie, except for the following words in Bert's opening song, "Can't put me finger on what lies in store. .. But I feel what's to 'appen, all 'appened before. ..!" and George's own statement to the elder Mr. Dawes that "Poppins" was "my nanny". However, in Banks' initial interview with Mary Poppins, there is little or no indication that the two have ever met before, and his description of her as "my nanny" could easily be meant in the same way as "my maid" or "my cook".


The Banks children

While the Banks family in the original novel had several children, only Jane and Michael appear in the movie. They were played by Karen Dotrice and Matthew Garber. Despite Katie Nanna's stormy departure, suggesting that the children are impossibly undisciplined, the children themselves come across as mostly sweet and innocent. Karen Dotrice (born 9 November 1955) is a British actress known primarily for her role as the daughter in Walt Disneys feature film adaptation of the Mary Poppins book series. ... Matthew Adam Garber (25 March 1956[1] – 13 June 1977[2]) was an English actor best known for his role as Michael Banks in Walt Disneys Mary Poppins. ...


All they want is for their father to love them, and they have falsely interpreted his indifference to their needs as disliking them. They have tried to live up to his demands on them, which has only left them with shaky self-esteem. Those elements come together in a bit of dialogue early in the film, in which they explain that they did not run away from Katie Nanna, their kite took them away from her. They say that the kite is not very good, because they made it themselves. They suggest to their father that if he could help them with it, it would turn out better. At that point, Banks is too wrapped up in his philosophy, that a British household should be run like a British bank, to take this strongest of hints.


After inadvertently causing a run on the bank, the children give their father their tuppence, expressing the hope that it will make things right. At that moment, Mr. Banks finally understands, and his priorities take a 180-degree turn, leading to the film's happy resolution.


Minor characters

  • Ellen, the maid (Hermione Baddeley)
  • Mrs. Brill, the cook (Reta Shaw)
  • Admiral Boom, the Banks's neighbor and a naval capain. He fires a cannon from his roof every day. He is known for his punctuality. (Reginald Owen)
  • Mr. Binnacle, Admiral Boom's first mate (Don Barclay)
  • Constable Jones (Arthur Treacher)
  • Katie Nanna, the disgruntled nanny who quits the Banks family. (Elsa Lanchester)
  • Mr. Dawes Sr., the elderly director of the bank where Mr. Banks works (Dick Van Dyke); he literally dies laughing toward the end of the film
  • Mr. Dawes Jr., the director's son and member of the board (Arthur Malet)
  • Uncle Albert, a jolly, portly gentleman who loves to laugh uncontrollably and floats up every time he does so (Ed Wynn); it also happens to other characters in the movie
  • The bird woman (Jane Darwell in her final film appearance)

Hermione Baddeley (November 13, 1906 - August 19, 1986) was a celebrated British character actress of theatre, film and television. ... Reta Shaw (b. ... Reginald Owen, or John Reginald Owen, (August 5, 1887–November 5, 1972) was a British character actor known for playing in many film roles in British and American movies and later in television programs. ... Disambiguation: The rank First Mate also refers to a executive officer The First Mate portrayed in Raiders of the Lost Ark The First Mate (????) is known as Simone Katangas closest companion in the Katanga Anthologies. ... Don Barclay (1892-12-26 – 1975-10-16) was an American actor. ... Arthur Treachers Fish and Chips is a fast food seafood restaurant chain with, as of 2003, 177 stores which serve fish and chips. ... Lanchester in Naughty Marietta Elsa Lanchester (October 28, 1902 - December 26, 1986 in Woodland Hills, California) was an Oscar-nominated English character actress who became a naturalized American citizen in 1950 along with her husband, actor Charles Laughton. ... Richard Wayne “Dick” Van Dyke (born December 13, 1925) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor, presenter and entertainer, with a career spanning 5 decades. ... Arthur Malet (born 24 September 1927, Lee-on-Solent, England) is an actor. ... Ed Wynn (November 9, 1886 - June 19, 1966) was a popular United States entertainer, born Isaiah Edwin Leopold in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Jane Darwell (October 15, 1879 – August 13, 1967) was an Academy Award-winning American theater and film actress. ...

Mary Poppins in popular culture

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Mary Poppins (film)
  • In an episode of That '70s Show, Red asks his son whether he is "ill-tempered", and Eric carefully says that he acts just like Mary Poppins.
  • The film Run Ronnie Run has a short segment parodying the rooftop chimneysweep dance.
  • The show MADtv (in Season 6) parodied the movie with Julie Andrews (played by Mo Collins) showing a cut scene where Mary Poppins hires illegal aliens to do the house work. Here are the parodies of the songs from that skit:
    • "Just a Few Illegal Aliens (Helps the Housework Get Done)" is a parody of "A Spoonful of Sugar."
    • "Chimmy Chonga" is a parody of "Chim Chim Cher-ee."
  • In The Odd Couple, Oscar, complaining about his neat-freak roommate Felix, says, "I'm stuck here with Mary Poppins 24 hours a day."
  • At the Frontierland Train Station in Walt Disney World, according to the Imagineer's Guide to the Magic Kingdom, there is a wooden leg with the name "Smith" written on it, a reference to the joke that kills Mr. Dawes.
  • In the opening scene of the VeggieTales episode The Wonderful Wizard of Ha's (parody of the Wizard of Oz), a scallion (she doesn't look anything like Petunia Rhubarb) sporting Mary's hairdo and carrying an umbrella and carpet bag is whizzed into the scene, saying with a Valley-Girl accent "This isn't London. Is it? Sorry!...." before being blown away again.
  • In the 3-2-1 Penguins! video series, Jason and Michelle Conrad represent Jane and Michael Banks. Grandmum represents Mary Poppins, whereas Jason and Michelle's parents represent Mr. George Banks and Mrs. Winifred Banks. The Penguin crew (Zidgel, Fidgel, Midgel, and Kevin) represent the penguin waiters that appeared singing "Jolly Holiday". Granddad represents jack-of-all-trades Bert.
  • One episode of Doctor Who, the popular science fiction BBC television show, "The Fires of Pompeii", incorporates a running gag from the film. A Roman family living in Pompeii protect their valuable objects from breakage due to earthquakes caused by Mount Vesuvius, similar to the Banks family protecting their valuables from the cannon fire of Admiral Boom.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Simpsoncalifragilisticexpiala(Annoyed Grunt)cious, also known as Simpsoncalifragilisticexpiala(doh)cious[2] is the thirteenth episode of The Simpsons eighth season and originally aired February 7, 1997. ... The Simpsons Movie is the working title for an animated film based on the television series The Simpsons. ... Simon Phillip Cowell (born 7 October 1959) is a British artist and repertoire (A&R) executive for Sony BMG in the United Kingdom and a television producer, more commonly known as a judge on television programmes such as Pop Idol, The X Factor, American Idol and Britains Got Talent. ... This article is about the Mary Poppins series of childrens books. ... For the current American Idol season, see American Idol (season 7). ... The Fairly OddParents is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series created by Butch Hartman about the adventures of a boy who has two fairy godparents. ... Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (pronounced ) is an English word in the song with the same title in the musical film Mary Poppins. ... That 70s Show is an American television sitcom that centered on the lives of a group of teenagers living in the fictional town of Point Place, Wisconsin, from May 17, 1976 to December 31, 1979. ... Run Ronnie Run is a movie spin-off from the popular HBO sketch comedy show Mr. ... For other uses, see Mad TV (disambiguation). ... For the American football player, see Mo Collins (football player) Maureen Mo Ann Collins (born July 7, 1965 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American actress and comedian. ... Illegal Aliens is a 2007 movie starring Anna Nicole Smith and Joanie Laurer. ... Walter Matthau and Art Carney in the 1965 Broadway production The Odd Couple was a hit 1965 Broadway play by Neil Simon, followed by a successful film and television series, as well as other derivative works and spinoffs, many featuring one or more of the same actors. ... Frontierland is one of the themed lands at the many Magic Kingdom-style parks run by Disney around the world. ... Cinderella Castle, at the center of the Magic Kingdom, is Walt Disney World Resorts most recognizable icon Introduction Owned and operated by The Walt Disney Company, the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, USA is home to four theme parks, two water parks, several resort hotels and golf courses... Imagineer could refer to: Walt Disney Imagineering Imagineer (company), a video game developer An Engineer who only imagines things (aka the best kind of Engineer) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... VeggieTales is a series of English language childrens computer animated films featuring anthropomorphic vegetables and conveying moral themes based on Christianity and often compatible with Judaism. ... {{Infobox_Film | name = [[inage| caption = | writer = Phil Vischer | director = Brian Roberts | producer = J. Chris Wall | starring = Phil Vischer,Mike Nawrocki | released = October 9, 2007| runtime = 45 minutes | language = English | preceded_by = God Made You Special | followed_by = Huckleberry Larry | imdb_id = | }} The Wonderful Wizard of Has is the 33rd episode in the VeggieTales... See: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum The Wizard of Oz (1939 movie) starring Judy Garland The Wizard of Oz (stage) Stage versions starting in 1903 The Wizard of Oz (animated series) The Wizard of Oz (game) The Wizard of Oz (movie) Various film versions See also... Green onions redirects here. ... 3-2-1 Penguins! is a series of Christian animated videos (on VHS and DVD) for all ages. ... Cobra Starship is an alternative rock band created by Midtown bassist/lead vocalist Gabe Saporta as a side project. ... Gwen Renée Stefani (born October 3, 1969) (pronounced [1]), is an American singer, songwriter, fashion designer, and occasional actress. ... Gabriel Eduardo Saporta (born October 11, 1979 in Montevideo, Uruguay) is the former lead singer, bassist and lyricist for the punk band Midtown, and is currently the lead singer and lyricist for the band Cobra Starship. ... Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (pronounced ) is an English word in the song with the same title in the musical film Mary Poppins. ... This article is about the television series. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ...

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious Backwards

  • About one minute into the musical number for "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious", Mary turns to Bert and claims to tell him how to say Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious backwards: "You can say it backwards, which is docious-ali-expi-listic-fragi-cali-repus". On the February 21, 2008 broadcast of ABC's World News with Charles Gibson, Robert Krullwich found that when using audio equipment to play what Mary says backwards, this proves to be false. Julie Andrews has said that Tony Walton, who was her husband at the time, came up with the "backwards" word by reversing the syllables instead of the order of each letter. Only "repus" is the reversed version of "super".

To truly reverse every letter, the word becomes "suoicodilaipxecitsiligarfilacrepus". This was used in the musical play's version of the song. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (pronounced ) is an English word in the song with the same title in the musical film Mary Poppins. ... World News with Charles Gibson (previously known as World News Tonight and often abbreviated as WNT) is the ABC television networks flagship news program. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Tony Walton (born Anthony John Walton, 24 October 1934) is an English Oscar, Tony and Emmy-winning set and costume designer. ...


See also

For the 1964 Academy Award winning motion picture, see Mary Poppins (film). ... The purpose built Lion King theater in Hamburg New Amsterdam Theater in New York City Advertisement for Beauty and the Beast Disney Theatrical, formally known as Walt Disney Theatrical Productions is the stageplay and musical production arm of The Walt Disney Company. ... While it is impossible to objectively determine the greatest film of all time, it is possible to discuss the films that have been regarded as the greatest ever. ...

References

  1. ^ Mr Banks' introductory song "The life I lead" contains the lyrics: "It's 1910" and "King Edward's on the throne". King Edward VII died on 1910-05-06, so both Edward VII and George V were kings in 1910 at various times.
  2. ^ "Connery 'has worst film accent'", BBC News / Entertainment / Film, BBC, 2003-06-30. Retrieved on 2006-06-15. 
  3. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058331/awards
  4. ^ 100 Greatest Musicals : Channel 4 Films Channel 4, Retrieved on 24 June 2006

Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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