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Encyclopedia > Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford

Portrait of Mary Pickford circa 1913
Born Gladys Louise Smith
April 8, 1892(1892-04-08)
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Died May 29, 1979 (aged 87)
Santa Monica, California, United States
Years active 1909 - 1933
Spouse(s) Owen Moore (1911-1920)
Douglas Fairbanks (1920-1936)
Charles Rogers (1937-1979)

Mary Pickford (April 8, 1892May 29, 1979) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian motion picture star, as well as a co-founder of the film studio United Artists and one of the original 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Known as "America's Sweetheart," "Little Mary" and "the girl with the curls," she was one of the first Canadian pioneers in early Hollywood and one of film's greatest pioneers. Her influence in the development of film acting was enormous. Because her international fame was triggered by moving images, she is a watershed figure in the history of modern celebrity. And as one of silent film's most important performers and producers, her contract demands were central to shaping the Hollywood industry. In consideration of her contributions to American cinema, the American Film Institute named Pickford 24th among the greatest female stars of all time. Mary Pickford is a song written and produced by Mike Batt for the Georgian-born, British singer Katie Melua. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 424 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (453 × 640 pixel, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date circa 1913 Author Marceau Permission see below File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ... Owen Moore (December 12, 1886 - June 9, 1939) was born in Fordstown Crossroads, County Meath, Ireland. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... Charles Buddy Rogers (August 13, 1904 – April 21, 1999) was an Academy Award-winning American actor and jazz musician. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Coquette is a 1929 film which tells the story of a flirtatious young woman whose father warns off her honorable boyfriend, only to cause tragedy. ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A film studio is a controlled environment for the making of a film. ... This article is about the film studio. ... Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ... Motion pictures have been a part of the Canadians. ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ...

Contents

Early life

Mary Pickford was born Gladys Louise Smith in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Her father, John Charles Smith, was the son of British Methodist immigrants, and worked a variety of odd jobs. Her mother, Charlotte Hennessy, was from an Irish Catholic family. She had two younger siblings, Jack and Lottie Pickford, who would also become actors. To please the relatives, Pickford's mother baptized her in both the Methodist and Catholic churches (and used the opportunity to change her middle name to "Marie"). She was raised Roman Catholic after her father, an alcoholic, left his family in 1895, and died three years later of a cerebral hemorrhage. Charlotte, who had worked as a seamstress throughout the separation, began taking in boarders. Through one of these lodgers, the seven-year-old Pickford won a bit part at Toronto's Princess Theatre in a stock company production of The Silver King. She subsequently acted in many melodramas with the Valentine Company in Toronto, capped by the starring role of Little Eva in Uncle Tom's Cabin, the most popular play of the 19th century. Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Charlotte Hennessy, born Elsie Charlotte Printer, and also known as Charlotte Smith Pickford, (1873 - 22 March 1928) was a Canadian-born, American actress, and the mother of Mary, Lottie, and Jack Pickford. ... Irish Catholics are persons of predominantly Irish descent who adhere to the Roman Catholic faith. ... John Charles Smith (August 18, 1896 - January 3, 1933) was a Canadian-born American actor. ... Lottie Pickford, born Charlotte Smith on June 9, 1895 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada died December 9, 1936 in Los Angeles, California, was a silent-film actress. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A intracranial hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ... Charlotte Hennessy, born Elsie Charlotte Printer, and also known as Charlotte Smith Pickford, (1873 - 22 March 1928) was a Canadian-born, American actress, and the mother of Mary, Lottie, and Jack Pickford. ... The Princess Theatre (same name used by off-Broadway 50th Street Theatre in 1980s) was a joint venture between The Shubert Brothers, (Lee Shubert, Samuel S. Shubert, and Jacob J. Shubert) producer Ray Comstock and actor-director Holbrook Blinn. ... Little Eva (June 29, 1943 – April 10, 2003) was an American singer. ... Uncle Toms Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly, is American author Harriet Beecher Stowes fictional anti-slavery novel. ...


Early career

By late 1900, acting had become a family enterprise, as Pickford, her mother and two younger siblings toured the United States by rail in third-rate companies and plays. After six impoverished years, Pickford gave herself a single summer to land a leading role on Broadway, planning to quit acting if she failed. She landed a supporting role in a 1907 Broadway play, The Warrens of Virginia. The play was written by William C. DeMille, whose brother, the then-unknown Cecil B. DeMille, also appeared in the cast. David Belasco, the producer of the play, insisted that Gladys Smith assume the stage name Mary Pickford.[1] After completing the Broadway run and touring the play, however, Pickford was once again out of work. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Willam C. DeMille (July 25, 1878 - March 8, 1955) was a screenwriter and film director from the silent movie era through the early 1930s. ... Cecil Blount DeMille (August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was one of the most successful filmmakers during the first half of the 20th century. ... David Belasco, between 1898 and 1916. ...

Pickford with camera circa 1916
Pickford with camera circa 1916

On April 19, 1909, the Biograph Company director D. W. Griffith screen-tested her at the company's New York studio for a role in the nickelodeon film Pippa Passes. The role went to someone else, but Griffith was immediately taken with Pickford, who instinctively grasped that movie acting was simpler and more intimate than the stylized stage acting of the day. Most Biograph actors earned $5 a day, but after a single day in the studio, Griffith agreed to pay Pickford $10 a day against a guarantee of $40 a week.[2] Like everyone at Biograph, Pickford played both bit parts and leading roles, playing mothers, ingenues, spurned women, spitfires, slaves, native Americans, and a prostitute. As Pickford said of her whirlwind success at Biograph: "I played scrubwomen and secretaries and women of all nationalities... I decided that if I could get into as many pictures as possible, I'd become known, and there would be a demand for my work." In 1909, Pickford appeared in 51 films — almost one a week. She also introduced her friend Florence La Badie to D. W. Griffith, which launched La Badie's very successful film acting career. is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, was a motion picture company founded in 1895 and active until 1928. ... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ... Pippa Passes was a dramatic piece, as much play as poetry, by Robert Browning published in 1841 as the first volume of his Bells and Pomegranates series. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... Florence M.L. La Badie (born possibly April 27, 1888 - October 13, 1917) was the daughter of Joseph E. La Badie and his wife Amanda from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


In January 1910 she traveled with a Biograph crew to Los Angeles. Many other companies wintered on the West Coast, escaping the weak light and short days that hampered winter shooting in the East. Pickford added to her 1909 Biographs (Sweet and Twenty, They Would Elope, and To Save Her Soul, to name a few) with films from California. Like the other players in Griffith's company, her name was not listed in the credits, but Pickford had been noticed by audiences within weeks of her first film appearance. In turn, exhibitors capitalized on her popularity by advertising on sandwich boards outside their nickelodeons that a film featuring "The Girl with the Golden Curls," "Blondilocks" or "The Biograph Girl" was inside.[3] Pickford left Biograph in December 1910, and spent 1911 with the Independent Motion Picture Company (later Universal Studios) and Majestic. Unhappy with their creative standards, she returned to work with Griffith in 1912, and gave some of her greatest performances in films such as "Friends," "The Mender of Nets," "Just Like a Woman" and "The Female of the Species." That year, Pickford also introduced Dorothy and Lillian Gish (both friends from her days touring melodrama) to Griffith. [4]:115 Both became major silent stars, in comedy and tragedy respectively. The American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, was a motion picture company founded in 1895 and active until 1928. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... A sandwich board is a type of advertisement composed of two boards carried by an individual, one in front and one behind, creating a sandwich effect. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Dorothy Gish photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Dorothy Gish (March 11, 1898 - June 4, 1968) was an American actress. ... Lillian Diana de Guiche (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993), was an Oscar-nominated American actress, better known as Lillian Gish. ...


In late 1912, Pickford made her last Biograph, The New York Hat, in order to return to Broadway in the David Belasco production of A Good Little Devil. The experience was the major turning point in her career; Pickford, who had always hoped to conquer the Broadway stage, discovered she missed movie acting. Pickford would reprise her role in a 1914 film adaption of A Good Little Devil, and as a result, Pickford's career as a film actress was given a phenominal push [5]. In 1913 she decided to turn her energies exclusively toward film. In the same year, Adolph Zukor formed Famous Players in Famous Plays (later Paramount), one of the first American feature film companies. Pickford left the stage to join his roster of stars. She instantly attracted a following, appearing in such comedy-dramas as In the Bishop's Carriage (1913) and Hearts Adrift (1914). Her appearance as a tomboyish guttersnipe in 1914's Tess of the Storm Country sent her fame into the stratosphere. Pickford's effect in this and similar roles was summed up by the February 1916 issue of Photoplay, "luminous tenderness in a steel band of gutter ferocity".[4]:126 [citation needed] By 1916, Pickford was arguably the most recognized woman in the world, despite now trailing rising film actor Charlie Chaplin in terms of popularity[6]. Cukor Adolf (Adolph Zukor) (January 7, 1873–June 10, 1976) was the founder of Paramount Pictures Studios, and one of the greatest film moguls of all time. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Edna Purviance on the cover of Photoplay magazine Photoplay was one of the first film fan magazines. ...


Stardom

Pickford earned the right not only to act in her own movies, but to produce them and (through the creation of United Artists) control their distribution. She was also the first actress to receive more than a million dollars per year.[1] Pickford starred in 52 features. Pickford's signature "Little Girl" roles became an instant hit [7]. At United Artists, Pickford's stardom was able to rise even further[8]. This article is about the film studio. ...


The arrival of sound, however, was her undoing. She played a reckless socialite in Coquette (1929), a role were she no longer had her famous "Little Girl" hair curls, but rather a 1920s bob; Pickford had cut her hair while also going through a nervous breakdown in the wake of her mother's death in 1928, and earned vast criticism from her loyal fans after this action took place as well[9]. Pickford's hair had become a symbol of female virtue, and cutting it was front-page news in The New York Times and other papers. Through this new haircut, Pickford abandoned her "Little Girl" roles, and decided to play more mature roles[8]. Unfortunately, though Coquette was a success and won her an Academy Award for Best Actress[10], the public failed to respond to these more sophisticated roles. Like most movie stars of the silent era, Pickford's career faded as talkies became more popular among audiences [10]. Her next film after Coquette, The Taming of The Shrew-which was also her husband Douglas Fairbanks' first sound film-, was a disaster at the box office[11]. By then in her forties, Pickford was unable to play the teenage spitfires so adored by her fans; nor could she play the soigne heroines of early sound. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Woman sporting bob with finger waves, 1920s A bob is a short haircut that became modern for women in the early 1920s. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


She retired from acting in 1933, though she continued to produce films for others, including Sleep, My Love (1948), an update of Gaslight with Claudette Colbert. Retirement is the point where a person stops employment completely. ... Sleep, My Love is a 1948 film directed by Douglas Sirk, and starring Claudette Colbert, Robert Cummings and Don Ameche. ... Gaslight is a 1944 film, considered film noir, directed by George Cukor starring Ingrid Bergman and Charles Boyer. ... Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 – July 30, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning French-born American actress. ...


Relationships

Pickford was married three times. She first married Owen Moore (1886–1939), an Irish-born silent film actor, on January 7, 1911. It is believed she became pregnant by Moore in the early 1910s, but had a miscarriage or an abortion; some accounts suggest this led to her inability to have children.[4]:125 The couple had numerous marital problems, notably Moore's alcoholism, insecurity about living in the shadow of Pickford's fame, and bouts of domestic violence. The couple lived apart for several years, and Pickford became secretly involved in a relationship with Douglas Fairbanks. Owen Moore (December 12, 1886 - June 9, 1939) was born in Fordstown Crossroads, County Meath, Ireland. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Miscarriage or spontaneous abortion is the natural or spontaneous end of a pregnancy at a stage where the embryo or the fetus is incapable of surviving, generally defined in humans at a gestation of prior to 20 weeks. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Domestic disturbance redirects here. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ...


Pickford and Fairbanks' romance was well along by the time they toured the U.S. in 1918 in support of Liberty Bond sales for the World War I effort, and the phrase "by the clock" became a secret message of their love. (Once during their courtship, Fairbanks was discussing his mother's recent death as the couple was driving. When he finished the story, the car clock stopped. The pair took this as a signal that Fairbanks' late mother approved of their relationship.) Liberty Bond poster by Winsor McCay A Liberty Bond was a special type of war bond that was sold in the United States to support the allied cause in World War I. It could be redeemed for the original value of the bond plus interest. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

Portrait circa 1921
Portrait circa 1921

Pickford divorced Moore on March 2, 1920, and married Fairbanks on March 28 of the same year. The tone of their European honeymoon was set by a riot in London as fans tried to touch Pickford's hair and clothes (she was dragged from her car and badly trampled). In Paris, a similar riot erupted at an outdoor market, with Pickford locked in a meat cage for her own protection, then pulled to safety through an open window. The couple's triumphant return to Hollywood was witnessed by vast crowds who turned out to hail them at railway stations across the United States. Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A honeymoon is the traditional trip taken by newlyweds to celebrate their marriage with seclusion and sexual intimacy. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The Mark of Zorro (1920) and a series of other swashbucklers gave the popular Fairbanks a more romantic, heroic image, and Pickford continued to epitomize the virtuous but fiery girl next door. Even at private parties, people instinctively stood up when Pickford entered a room; she and her husband were often referred to as "Hollywood royalty." Their international acclaim was so vast that foreign heads of state and dignitaries who visited the White House usually asked if they could also visit Pickfair, the couple's mansion in Beverly Hills.[1] The Mark of Zorro is a silent movie released in 1920 by United Artists starring Douglas Fairbanks. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Pickfair was a Hollywood mansion named appropriately by its original residents, silent film actors Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford. ...


Dinners at Pickfair were legendary. Charlie Chaplin, Fairbanks' best friend, was often present. Other guests included George Bernard Shaw, Albert Einstein, Elinor Glyn, Helen Keller, H. G. Wells, Lord Mountbatten, Fritz Kreisler, Amelia Earhart, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Noel Coward, Max Reinhardt, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Austen Chamberlain, and Sir Harry Lauder. Lauder's nephew, Matt Lauder, Jr., a professional golfer who owned a property at Eagle Rock, near Pasadena, California, taught Fairbanks to play golf. Pickford and Fairbanks were the first actors to leave their handprints in the courtyard cement at Grauman's Chinese Theatre (Pickford also left her footprints). Nonetheless, the public nature of Pickford's second marriage strained it to the breaking point. Both she and Fairbanks had little time off from producing and acting in their films. When they weren't acting or attending to United Artists, they were constantly on display as America's unofficial ambassadors to the world—leading parades, cutting ribbons, making speeches. Yaweh redirects here. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was a world-renowned Irish author. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... Elinor Glyn (October 17, 1864 - September 23, 1943), born Nellie Sutherland in Jersey, was the author of It, Three Weeks, Beyond the Rocks, and other novels in a similarly softcore vein. ... Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was a deafblind American author, activist and lecturer. ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (June 25, 1900 – August 27, 1979) was a British admiral and statesman and an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... Fritz Kreisler (February 2, 1875 – January 29, 1962) was an Austria-born American violinist and composer; one of the most famous violinists of his day. ... Amelia Mary Earhart (24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared deceased 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) was an Academy Award winning English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... There are two Max Reinhardts: Max Reinhardt (theatre director) Max Reinhardt (publisher) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... Sir Harry Lauder, KBE (4 August 1870 - 26 February 1950) was a very famous Scottish entertainer, described by Sir Winston Churchill as Scotlands greatest ever ambassador! // Early Years Born Henry Lauder at 4 Bridge Street Portobello, the residence of his mother’s father, he was the eldest son of... The Eagle Rock Eagle Rock is a neighborhood in northeastern Los Angeles, California. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The pressures increased when their film careers both began to founder at the end of the silent era. Fairbanks' restless nature found an outlet in almost-constant overseas travel (something which Pickford did not enjoy). The relationship was fatally damaged when Fairbanks' romance with Lady Sylvia Ashley became public in the early 1930s. This led to a long separation and a final divorce on January 10, 1936. Fairbanks' son by his first wife, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., claimed that his father and Pickford regretted their inability to reconcile for the rest of their lives. Sylvia Ashley (April 1, 1904 – June 29, 1977) was an English model, actress and socialite, who was best-known for her marriages. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. ...


On June 24, 1937, Pickford married her last husband, actor and band leader Charles 'Buddy' Rogers[12]. They adopted two children: Roxanne (born 1944, adopted 1944) and Ronald Charles (born 1937, adopted 1943, a.k.a. Ron Pickford Rogers). As a PBS American Experience documentary noted that Pickford's relationship with her children was tense, and she eventually criticized their physical imperfections, including Ronnie's small stature and Roxanne's crooked teeth. Both children would later remark that their mother was too self-absorbed to provide real maternal love. In 2003, Ronnie recalled that "Things didn't work out that much. You know. But I'll never forget her. I think that she was a good woman." [13] is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... Charles Buddy Rogers (b. ... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... American Experience (sometimes abbreviated AmEx) is a television program airing on the PBS network in the United States. ...


In March 1928, her mother Charlotte died of breast cancer, followed by her brother Jack in 1933 and sister Lottie in 1936. Fairbanks, meanwhile, died of a stroke in 1939. Upon hearing of his death, she reportedly began to weep in front of her new husband Rogers, saying "My darling is gone." [1] But according to Pickford, she held her tears back for fear of hurting Rogers, and only allowed herself to weep when she found herself alone on a train. [Pickford, The Woman Who Made Hollywood, page 313.] Still, as her marriage to Rogers worn on, Pickford often rhapsodized about Fairbanks, and from time to time mistakenly addressed Buddy Rogers as "Douglas." [Pickford, The Woman Who Made Hollywood, page 350.] Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ...


Ronald and Roxanne each left Pickfair at a young age. Pickford and Rogers stayed together for over four decades until Pickford's death from a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 87. A intracranial hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ...


The film industry

Pickford used her stature in the movie industry to promote a variety of causes. During World War I, she was the most prominent film star to promote the sale of Liberty Bonds, an exhausting series of fund-raising speeches that kicked off in Washington, D.C., where she sold bonds alongside Charles Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, and Marie Dressler. Five days later she spoke on Wall Street to an estimated 50,000 people. Though Canadian-born, she was a powerful symbol of Americana, kissing the American flag for cameras and auctioning one of her world-famous curls for $15,000. In a single speech in Chicago she sold an estimated five million dollars' worth of bonds. She was christened the U.S. Navy's official "Little Sister"; the Army named two cannons after her and made her an honorary colonel. For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... Marie Dressler (born November 9, 1868; died July 28, 1934) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian actress. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...

Pickford gives President Herbert Hoover a ticket for a film industry benefit for the unemployed, November 12, 1931.

At the end of World War I, Pickford conceived of the Motion Picture Relief Fund, an organization to help financially needy actors. Leftover funds from her work selling Liberty Bonds were put toward its creation, and in 1921, the Motion Picture Relief Fund (MPRF) was officially incorporated, with Joseph Schenck voted its first president and Mary Pickford as its vice president. In 1932, Pickford spearheaded the "Payroll Pledge Program," a payroll-deduction plan for studio workers who gave one half of one percent of their earnings to the MPRF. As a result, in 1940 the Fund was able to purchase the land and build the Motion Picture Country House and Hospital. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 468 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (531 × 680 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/gif) Description: U.S. President Herbert Hoover and film star Mary Pickford. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 468 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (531 × 680 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/gif) Description: U.S. President Herbert Hoover and film star Mary Pickford. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... The Motion Picture & Television Fund is a charitable organization that offers assistance and care to those in the motion picture and television industries without resources. ... Joseph M. Schenck, born December 25, 1878 - died October 22, 1961, was a pioneer executive who played a key role in the development of the United States film industry. ... The Motion Picture & Television Country House and Hospital is a motion picture and television industry complex complete with a retirement community, with individual cottages, and a fully licensed, acute-care hospital, located at 23388 Mulholland Drive in Woodland Hills, California. ...


But Pickford's most profound influence (beyond her acting) was to help reshape the film industry itself. When she entered features, Hollywood believed that the movies' future lay in reproducing Broadway plays for a mass audience. Pickford, who entered feature film with two Broadway credits but a far greater following among fans of nickelodeon flickers, became the world's most popular actor in a matter of months. In response to her astonishing popularity, Hollywood rethought its vision of features as "canned theatre," and focused instead on actors and material that were uniquely suited to film, not the footlights.


An astute businesswoman, Pickford became her own producer within three years of her start in features. According to her Foundation, "she oversaw every aspect of the making of her films, from hiring talent and crew to overseeing the script, the shooting, the editing, to the final release and promotion of each project." Pickford first demanded (and received) these powers in 1916, when she was under contract to Adolph Zukor's Famous Players In Famous Plays (later Paramount). He also acquiesced to her refusal to participate in block-booking, the widespread practice of forcing an exhibitor to show a bad film of the studio's choosing in order to also show a Pickford film. In 1916, Pickford's films were distributed, singly, through a special distribution unit called Artcraft. In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ...


In 1919, she increased her power by co-founding United Artists (UA) with Charlie Chaplin, D. W. Griffith, and her soon-to-be husband, Douglas Fairbanks. Before UA's creation, Hollywood studios were vertically integrated, not only producing films but forming chains of theaters. Distributors (also part of the studios) then arranged for company productions to be shown in the company's movie venues. Filmmakers relied on the studios for bookings; in return they put up with what many considered creative interference. United Artists broke from this tradition. It was solely a distribution company, offering independent film producers access to its own screens as well as the rental of temporarily unbooked cinemas owned by other companies. Pickford and Fairbanks produced and shot their films after 1920 at the jointly owned Pickford-Fairbanks studio on Santa Monica Boulevard. The producers who signed with UA were true independents, producing, creating and controlling their work to an unprecedented degree. As a co-founder, as well as the producer and star of her own films, Pickford became the most powerful woman who has ever worked in Hollywood. As a result of this haircut, Pickford was no longer able to play her signature teenage roles in her upcoming movies, and had to instead play adult roles[8]. By 1930, Pickford's career as an actress had greatly faded [10]. This article is about the film studio. ... Yaweh redirects here. ... David Llewelyn Wark D.W. Griffith (January 22, 1875 – July 23, 1948) was an American film director. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... California State Route 2; the Santa Monica Boulevard segment is highlighted in red, Alvarado Street is highlighted in green, the Glendale Freeway is highlighted in blue, and the Angeles Crest Highway is highlighted in purple. ...


When she retired from acting in 1933, Pickford continued to produce films for United Artists, and she and Chaplin remained partners in the company for decades. Chaplin left the company in 1955, and Pickford followed suit in 1956, selling her remaining shares for three million dollars. [14]


Later years

After retiring from the screen, Pickford developed alcoholism, the addiction that had afflicted her father. Other alcoholics in the family included her first husband Owen Moore, her mother Charlotte, and her younger siblings Lottie and Jack[15]. Charlotte died of cancer in March 1928. Within a few years, Lottie and Jack died of alcohol-related causes. These deaths, her divorce from Fairbanks, and the end of silent films left Pickford deeply depressed. Her relationship to her adopted children, Roxanne and Ronald, was turbulent at best. Gradually, Pickford became a recluse, remaining almost entirely at Pickfair, allowing visits only from Lillian Gish, her stepson Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., and a few select others. In the mid-1960s, she often received visitors only by telephone, speaking to them from her bedroom. Buddy Rogers often gave guests tours of Pickfair, including views of a genuine western bar she had bought for Douglas Fairbanks, and a portrait of Pickford in the drawing room. Painted at the height of her fame, it emphasizes her girlish beauty and spun-gold curls. A print of this image now hangs in the Library of Congress.[14] Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Owen Moore (December 12, 1886 - June 9, 1939) was born in Fordstown Crossroads, County Meath, Ireland. ... Lillian Diana de Guiche (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993), was an Oscar-nominated American actress, better known as Lillian Gish. ... Douglas Elton Fairbanks, Jr. ... Charles Buddy Rogers: Actor, jazz musician. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


In addition to her Oscar as best actress for Coquette (1929), Mary Pickford received an Academy Honorary Award for a lifetime of achievements in 1976. The Academy sent a TV crew to her house to record her short statement of thanks upon acceptance of the award. Her frail, doll-like appearance and her nearly unintelligible speech shocked viewers, some of whom still remembered the vital, take-charge character Pickford played in silent features.[citation needed] The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Death

Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California
Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California

Before her death, Pickford began to worry that she had lost her Canadian citizenship through her marriages to three U.S. citizens. She then petitioned the Canadian government to restore her Canadian citizenship. Due to the immigration laws in place at the time of each marriage, the Canadian government wasn't sure Pickford had ever lost her citizenship. They officially declared her to be a Canadian, and she became a dual citizen. She died of cerebral hemorrhage on May 29, 1979, at the age of 87, and was buried in the Garden of Memory of the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California. Buried alongside her in the Pickford private family plot are her mother Charlotte, her siblings Lottie and Jack Pickford, and the family of Elizabeth Watson, Charlotte's sister, who had helped raise Mary in Toronto. [16] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 829 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mary Pickford Academy of Motion Picture... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 829 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mary Pickford Academy of Motion Picture... A intracranial hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Gates of Forest Lawn Forest Lawn Memorial Park is a cemetery in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California. ... Nickname: Location of Glendale within Los Angeles County and the State of California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... John Charles Smith (August 18, 1896 - January 3, 1933) was a Canadian-born American actor. ...


Legacy

The "Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study" at 1313 Vine Street in Hollywood, constructed by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, opened in 1948 as a radio and television studio facility. The "Mary Pickford Theater" at the Library of Congress is named in her honor.[14] Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ...


There is also a movie theatre in Cathedral City, California, called "The Mary Pickford Theatre"[17]. The Fountain of Life in front of the city hall Cathedral City is a city located in Riverside County, California. ...


Mary Pickford received a posthumous star on Canada's Walk of Fame in Toronto in 1999. In 2006, along with fellow deceased Canadian stars Fay Wray, Lorne Greene and John Candy, Pickford was featured on a Canadian postage stamp. [18] In 2007, the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences has sued the estate of the deceased Buddy Rogers' second wife, the late Beverly Rogers, in order to stop the public sale of one of Pickford's Oscars.[19] She was the recipient of an honorary doctorate degree from Iowa Wesleyan College, Mount Pleasant, Iowa. Canadas Walk of Fame acknowledges the achievements and accomplishments of successful Canadians. ... Vina Fay Wray (September 15, 1907 – August 8, 2004) was a Canadian–American actress. ... Lorne Greene in his role as Ben Cartwright in Bonanza Lorne Greene as Commander Adama in Battlestar Galactica Lorne Greene O.C., LL.D. (February 12, 1915 – September 11, 1987) was a Canadian actor best known for two iconic roles on American television. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization, founded on May 11, 1927 in California to advance the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


Partial chronology

  • 1909: discovered by David Wark Griffith at Biograph, worked for $5 a week, which he quickly increased to $8 a week.
  • 1911: I.M.P., $175 a week, with the employment of her mother and siblings guaranteed. Unhappy with the quality of I.M.P. films, Pickford sued to be released from her contract and won on the grounds that being under 21, she had been too young to contract with I.M.P.
  • 1911: Majestic Film Corp., $225 a week, with the employment of her husband, Owen Moore, as an actor and director, guaranteed.
  • 1912: back to Biograph, $175 a week, a pay cut she justified with the belief that the key to a great career was to "get yourself with the right associates." This period featured some of Pickford's most mature and varied work. Owen Moore signed with Victor Films and an unpublicized marital separation began.
  • 1913: appeared as the star (with Lillian Gish in a small role) in Belasco's Broadway production A Good Little Devil for $175 a week, raised to $200 a week.
  • 1913: Pickford moved to feature film by signing with Adolph Zukor's Famous Players in Famous Plays, for $500/week (D.W. Griffith had balked at paying more than $300).
  • 1914: Pickford became an international phenomenon through her roles as barefoot adolescents and urchins in the features Hearts Adrift and Tess of the Storm Country. Within the U.S., she was called "America's Sweetheart." In the country of her birth, she was "Canada's Sweetheart" and she became "The World's Sweetheart" overseas. Pickford asked Zukor for double her previous salary, and received it ($1,000/wk.).
  • 1915: At her request, her salary at Famous Players was again doubled, to $2000 a week, plus half the profits of her films. The movie Rags contained one of Pickford's ground-breaking roles as a self-described "hellcat."
  • 1916: Pickford formed her own producing unit, the Pickford Film Corporation, within Famous Players, and installed her mother as treasurer. She had a voice in the selection of her roles and the film's final cut. She chose her own directors and approved the supporting cast and the advertising. She was required to make only six films a year, a saner quota that earlier years, in which she made nine or more. She was paid annually $10,000 a week plus half the profits in her films, or half a million dollars, whichever was greater. As the contract's duration was two years, Pickford was guaranteed at least a million dollars. Famous Players also created a special unit called Artcraft to distribute Pickford's features, rather than blockbooking them, a practice Pickford vehemently opposed.
  • 1917: Pickford toured the United States with Fairbanks and Chaplin, supporting U.S. involvement in World War I and promoting Liberty Bonds. She played three of her legendary roles as children in The Poor Little Rich Girl, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, and A Little Princess. On the other hand, she was thoroughly adult in an anti-German propaganda picture The Little American, and the western A Romance of the Redwoods, both directed by Cecil B. DeMille.
  • 1918: She signed a contract with First National to make three films for $675,000 (about $10 million in 2005-terms). Pickford also received 50 percent of all profits, and complete creative control from script to the final cut. Meanwhile, Famous Players released one of her greatest films, the tragedy Stella Maris, in which she played a double role, as well as M'liss (another ragged spitfire) and the war comedy Johanna Enlists.
  • 1919: Pickford co-founded United Artists with Charles Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks and D.W. Griffith. During U.A.'s start-up, Pickford's films for First National were released, including Daddy Long-Legs (from the book by Jean Webster) and the violent melodrama The Heart o' the Hills.
  • 1923: Hoping to expand her image, Pickford convinced Ernst Lubitsch to direct her next film. After considering Faust, they settled on Rosita, the story of a Spanish street-singer who attracts the attention of the lecherous king. Though the role catered to Pickford's gift for playing sweet-but-fiery women in rags, it introduced a note of sexual sophistication which many of her fans loathed. Plans for future films with Lubitsch were abandoned. For the next few years she appeared in a series of superlative productions, culminating in Sparrows (1926), which blended German expressionism to Hollywood production values.
  • 1925: Pickford purchased 132 reels of camera negatives and prints from her Biograph period, 1909–1912, nearly 70 percent of her short films for that studio.
  • 1927: United Artists, under Pickford's direction, opened their flagship Spanish Gothic movie theatre in downtown Los Angeles. Pickford became deeply involved in the design of the theatre, and two Anthony Heinsbergen murals in the auditorium feature her. Theatre architect Howard Crane opened two other UA theatres in the same year, in Chicago and Detroit. The Los Angeles theatre has become known as the University Cathedral of Dr. Eugene Scott. The romantic comedy My Best Girl was released with her future husband, Charles Rogers, playing the male interest.
  • 1929: Pickford starred in a sound film, Coquette, a production that did well at the box office, earning $1.4 million. Pickford used the break from silent film to establish a more flirtatious and sophisticated adult character. Her performance earned her an Oscar. In the same year, Pickford appeared with her husband Douglas Fairbanks in a sound version of The Taming of the Shrew.
  • 1933: Pickford starred with Leslie Howard in Secrets, a money-losing film which proved her last.
  • 1937: Pickford founded Mary Pickford Cosmetics, a beauty company.
  • 1941: Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, Walt Disney, Orson Welles, Samuel Goldwyn, David O. Selznick, Alexander Korda, and Walter Wanger founded the Society of Independent Motion Picture Producers.
  • 1949: Pickford and her husband Buddy Rogers formed Pickford-Rogers-Boyd, a radio and television-production company.
  • 1951: Columbia Pictures and producer Stanley Kramer announced that Pickford would star in The Library, her first picture since 1933. She withdrew a month before filming was to begin in 1952. The anti-censorship screenplay was eventually filmed as Storm Center (1956), with Bette Davis in the lead.
  • 1956: Pickford sold her stock interest in United Artists, one-third of the company's shares. By 1951, the company had been losing more than $100,000 a week.
  • 1976: Pickford received an Academy Honorary Award for a lifetime of achievements.
  • Mary Pickford has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6280 Hollywood Boulevard. Her handprints and footprints can be seen in the courtyard of Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood.

David Lewelyn Wark Griffith (January 22, 1875 - July 23, 1948) was an American film director (commonly known as D. W. Griffith) probably best known for his film The Birth of a Nation. ... The American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, was a motion picture company founded in 1895 and active until 1928. ... Owen Moore (December 12, 1886 - June 9, 1939) was born in Fordstown Crossroads, County Meath, Ireland. ... Owen Moore (December 12, 1886 - June 9, 1939) was born in Fordstown Crossroads, County Meath, Ireland. ... Lillian Diana de Guiche (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993), was an Oscar-nominated American actress, better known as Lillian Gish. ... Cukor Adolf (Adolph Zukor) (January 7, 1873–June 10, 1976) was the founder of Paramount Pictures Studios, and one of the greatest film moguls of all time. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Liberty bonds are a special type of war bonds that were sold to support the allied cause in World War I. It could be redeemed for the orginal value of the bond with interest. ... Cecil Blount DeMille (August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was one of the most successful filmmakers during the first half of the 20th century. ... The First National Exhibitors Circuit was founded 1917 by the merger of 26 of the biggest First Run cinema chains in the United States of America, controlling more than 600 cinemas, more than 200 of them were First Run cinemas. ... This article is about the film studio. ... For the Jamaican musician named Charlie Chaplin, see Charlie Chaplin (singer). ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... David Lewelyn Wark Griffith (January 22, 1875 - July 23, 1948) was an American film director (commonly known as D. W. Griffith) probably best known for his film The Birth of a Nation. ... Jean Webster (1876-1916) Bibliography compiled from the Library of Congresss catalog: 1903 - When Patty Went to College 1905 - Wheat Princess 1907 - Jerry Junior 1908 - Four-Pools Mystery 1909 - Much Ado About Peter 1911 - Just Patty 1912 - Daddy-Long-Legs (novel) 1915 - Dear Enemy Categories: ... Ernst Lubitsch (January 28, 1892 – November 30, 1947), was a German-born Jewish film director. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Anthony Heinsbergen (December 13, 1894 - June 14, 1981) was an American muralist considered the foremost designer of North American movie theatre interiors. ... Charles Howard Crane (August 13, 1885 - August 14, 1952) Born in Hartford, Connecticut, C. Howard Crane was an architect who established a practice in Detroit, Michigan early in the 20th Century. ... The Los Angeles University Cathedral stands at 933 South Broadway between 9th and Olympic, in the heart of Los Angeles, California, USA. It was originally a movie palace, designed by the architect C. Howard Crane of the firm Walker & Percy Eisen, closely supervised by Mary Pickford. ... Dr. w. ... Coquette is a 1929 film which tells the story of a flirtatious young woman whose father warns off her honorable boyfriend, only to cause tragedy. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... Leslie Howard (April 3, 1893 - June 1, 1943) was an English stage and Academy Award nominated film actor. ... Secrets is a 1933 film starring Mary Pickford in her last role. ... Make-up redirects here. ... Yaweh redirects here. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Samuel Goldwyn (July 1882 (some sources say 17 August 1882, others 1879 [1]) – 31 January 1974) was an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning producer, also a well-known Hollywood motion picture producer and founding contributor of several motion picture studios. ... David O. Selznick David Oliver Selznick (May 10, 1902–June 22, 1965), was one of the icon Hollywood producers of the Golden Age. ... Sir Alexander Korda (September 16, 1893 - January 23, 1956) was a film director and producer, a leading figure in the British film industry and the founder of London Films. ... Walter Wanger (July 11, 1894 - November 18, 1968) was an important American film producer. ... The early title for what would become United Artists. ... Charles Buddy Rogers: Actor, jazz musician. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Stanley Kramer (September 29, 1913 – February 19, 2001) was a Jewish-American film director and producer. ... Original poster Storm Center is a 1956 American drama film directed by Daniel Taradash. ... For the singer, see Betty Davis, for the meteorologist, see Betty Davis (meteorologist). ... The Academy Honorary Award is given irregularly by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to celebrate motion picture achievements that are not covered by existing Academy Awards. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... Hollywood Boulevard as taken from the Kodak Theatre Hollywood Boulevard is an avenue in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States, beginning at Sunset Boulevard in the east and running northwest to Vermont Avenue, where it straightens out and runs due west to Laurel Canyon Boulevard. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...

Filmography

see: Mary Pickford filmography

Awards
Preceded by
Janet Gaynor
for Seventh Heaven,
Street Angel and
Sunrise
Academy Award for Best Actress
1929
for Coquette
Succeeded by
Norma Shearer
for The Divorcee

Janet Gaynor (October 6, 1906 – September 14, 1984) was an American actress who, in 1928, became the first winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress. ... For other uses, see Seventh Heaven (disambiguation) Seventh Heaven is a 1927 silent film that was one of the first films to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture (then called Best Picture, Production). The film was written by H.H. Caldwell (titles), Benjamin Glazer, Katherine Hilliker (titles... Street Angel is a 1928 film about a woman who finds herself destitute and on the streets. ... Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (aka Sunrise) is a 1927 American film directed by F.W. Murnau. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Coquette is a 1929 film which tells the story of a flirtatious young woman whose father warns off her honorable boyfriend, only to cause tragedy. ... Edith Norma Shearer (August 10, 1902 (some sources indicate 1900) – June 12, 1983) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian-American actress. ... The Divorcee is a 1930 film that was written by Nick Grindé, John Meehan and Zelda Sears, from the novel Ex-Wife by Ursula Parrott. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Mary Pickford at Filmbug.. Filmbug. Retrieved on 2007-01-24.
  2. ^ Sunshine and Shadow, page 10.
  3. ^ Mary Pickford at Golden Silents.. Golden Silents. Retrieved on 2007-01-15.
  4. ^ a b c Whitfield, Eileen: Pickford: the Woman Who Made Hollywood, pages 115, 125, 126
  5. ^ When Mary Pickford Came to Me, Silent Era, David Belasco
  6. ^ Biography, Mary Pickford website
  7. ^ The Greatest Movie Star: Mary Pickford, Seraphic Secret, Robert J. Avrech at December 9, 2007
  8. ^ a b c Mary Pickford, PBS, People & Events, Mary Pickford, July 23, 2004
  9. ^ Fan Culture, PBS, People & Events, Mary Pickford
  10. ^ a b c The Long Decline, PBS People & Events, Mary Pickford
  11. ^ Douglas Fairbanks, PBS, People & Events, Mary Pickford
  12. ^ Howard Johns: Hollywood Celebrity Playground, Barricade Books, Fort Lee, NJ (2006). ISBN-13: 9781569803035 ISBN: 156980303X
  13. ^ Buddy Rogers, Mary Pickford and Their Children. American Experience. Retrieved on 2007-08-26.
  14. ^ a b c Biography at u-s-history.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-24.
  15. ^ Howard Johns: Hollywood Celebrity Playground, Barricade Books, Fort Lee, NJ (2006). ISBN-13: 9781569803035 ISBN: 156980303X
  16. ^ Alden, Whitman. "Mary Pickford Is Dead at 86; 'America's Sweetheart' of Films; Outshone Contemporaries.", New York Times, May 30, 1979, Wednesday. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. "Mary Pickford, who reigned supreme as "America's Sweetheart" in the era of silent films, died of a stroke yesterday in Santa Monica (Calif.) Hospital. She was 86 years old." 
  17. ^ Howard Johns: Hollywood Celebrity Playground, Barricade Books, Fort Lee, NJ (2006). ISBN-13: 9781569803035 ISBN: 156980303X
  18. ^ Canadians in Hollywood, Canada Post, Collecting, May 26, 2006
  19. ^ Siderious, Christina "Skip" (2007-09-01). The Oscar goes to... Court., Seattle Times, Local News, September 1, 2007

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... American Experience (sometimes abbreviated AmEx) is a television program airing on the PBS network in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alden Whitman (27 October 1913 - 4 September 1990) was an American journalist. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

Eileen Whitfield (born 1951) is a journalist and playwright in Toronto, Ontario. ... The University Press of Kentucky (UPK) is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and was organized in 1969 as successor to the University of Kentucky Press. ...

External links

Persondata
NAME Pickford, Mary
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Smith, Gladys Louise
SHORT DESCRIPTION Actor
DATE OF BIRTH 1892-4-8
PLACE OF BIRTH Toronto, Canada
DATE OF DEATH 1979-5-29
PLACE OF DEATH Santa Monica, California
For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mary Pickford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3255 words)
Pickford and Fairbanks were the first actors to leave their handprints in the courtyard cement at the Chinese Theater (Pickford also left her footprints).
The "Mary Pickford Theater" at the United States Library of Congress was named in her honor.
Pickford became deeply involved in the design of the theatre, and two Anthony Heinsbergen murals in the auditorium feature her.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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