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Encyclopedia > Mary Landrieu
Mary Landrieu
Mary Landrieu

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 7, 1997
Serving with David Vitter
Preceded by J. Bennett Johnston

Born November 23, 1955 (1955-11-23) (age 52)
Arlington, Virginia
Political party Democratic
Spouse Frank Snellings
Alma mater Louisiana State University
Religion Roman Catholic

Mary Loretta Landrieu (born November 23, 1955) is the Senior Democratic United States senator from the state of Louisiana, as well as the first, and as of 2008, only woman from that state to be elected to the Senate. (Senator Landrieu was not the first female to serve as a senator from Louisiana, as she was preceded by Senators Rose Long (1935) and Elaine Edwards (1972), both appointed.) She is the daughter of former New Orleans mayor Moon Landrieu and the sister of current Louisiana Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landrieu. By national standards, Landrieu is one of the more conservative Democrats in the U.S. Senate. She is a member of the New Democrat Coalition. She is up for re-election in 2008 in what is expected to be a tight race.[1] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 473 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2400 × 3040 pixels, file size: 2. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... David Bruce Vitter (born May 3, 1961) is an American Republican politician, currently serving as the junior U.S. Senator from Louisiana. ... John Bennett Johnston, Jr. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. State. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Elaine Schwartzenburg Edwards (born March 8, 1929) was a member of the United States Senate and the wife of Edwin Edwards. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Maurice Edwin Moon Landrieu (born July 23, 1930) is a former judge, mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana, and United States secretary of housing and urban development. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources. ... The New Democrat Coalition is an organization within the United States House of Representatives, currently chaired by Representatives Jim Davis of Florida, Ron Kind of Wisconsin, and Adam Smith of Washington. ... The Louisiana United States Senate election will be held on November 4, 2008. ...

Contents

Personal life

Landrieu was born in Arlington, Virginia to Verna Satterlee and former New Orleans mayor Maurice Edwin Landrieu,[2] and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. She was raised as a Roman Catholic and attended Ursuline Academy of New Orleans. She graduated from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge in 1977 where she was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. She was a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives from 1980 to 1988. She then served as Louisiana state treasurer from 1988 to 1996. Landrieu was an unsuccessful candidate in the 1995 gubernatorial race in Louisiana — she finished third in the state's qualifying primary (sometimes referred to as the "jungle" primary) — thus failing to make the run-off, which effectively becomes the general election in Louisiana. The eventual winner was Democrat-turned-Republican Murphy J. "Mike" Foster, Jr.. Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Maurice Edwin Moon Landrieu (born July 23, 1930) is a former judge, mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana, and United States secretary of housing and urban development. ... NOLA redirects here. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Ursuline Academy is a private, Roman Catholic, all-girls high school in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... For the Canadian restaurant, see Baton Rouge (restaurant). ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... The Louisiana House of Representatives is the lower house in the Louisiana State Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... A governor is an official who heads the government of a colony, state or other sub-national state unit. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... An example of runoff voting. ... A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ... Former Gov. ...


Landrieu and her husband, attorney Frank Snellings (born 1949), who grew up in Monroe, have two adopted children, Connor and Mary Shannon. For information on the type of fish called Lawyer, see the article on Burbot. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The city of Monroe is the parish seat of Ouachita Parish, in the US state of Louisiana. ...


1996 Senate election

Landrieu was elected to the U.S. Senate seat previously held by John Bennett Johnston, Jr., in 1996. She defeated the Republican candidate Woody Jenkins of Baton Rouge by 5,788 votes out of 1.7 million cast, the narrowest national result of the 33 races for the U.S. Senate that year and one of the closest election margins in Louisiana history. At the same time, Democrat Bill Clinton carried Louisiana by a considerable margin — 927,837 votes to 712,586 cast for Republican Bob Dole. Louisiana was admitted to the Union on April 30, 1812. ... John Bennett Johnston, Jr. ... GOP redirects here. ... Louis Elwood Woody Jenkins (born January 3, 1947) is a former broadcasting executive in Baton Rouge who was a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives from 1972-2000. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ...


Jenkins refused to accept defeat and charged massive election fraud, orchestrated by the Democratic political organization of New Orleans, which provided Landrieu's narrow margin of victory. He took his case to the Republican-majority U.S. Senate and petitioned for nullification of the results of the Senate election and ordering new balloting. In a hearing, carried live by C-SPAN, the Senate Rules Committee in a party-line 8-7 vote agreed to investigate the charges. The decision briefly placed Landrieu's status in the U.S. Senate under a cloud. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration is responsible for dealing with the rules of the United States Senate, with administration of congressional buildings, and with credentials and qualifications of members of the Senate, including responsibility for dealing with contested elections. ...


The investigation dragged on for over ten months, angering the Democrats and exacerbating partisan friction in the day-to-day sessions of the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Committee to which Landrieu was assigned as a freshman member of the 105th Congress. Finally, in October 1997, the Rules Committee issued a report noting numerous instances of major electoral irregularities, but concluding that a new election at that late stage would place too onerous a burden on the state of Louisiana and recommended letting the election result stand. The 105th Congress met from January 7, 1997 to January 5, 1999. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


The Landrieu-Jenkins contest was not the only U.S. Senate election in 20th century Louisiana in which the results were hotly disputed. Future Senator John H. Overton of Alexandria, the seat of Rapides Parish, claimed the renomination and hence reelection of Senator Joseph E. Ransdell of Lake Providence, the seat of East Carroll Parish, was tainted. In 1932, Senator Edwin S. Broussard of New Iberia claimed that his primary defeat by Overton was fraudulent. In both cases, the Senate seated the certified winners, Ransdell and Overton, respectively. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... John Holmes Overton (September 17, 1875 - May 14, 1948) was a lawyer, congressman and a Democratic United States Senator from Louisiana. ... Alexandria is a city in Louisiana and the parish seat of Rapides Parish. ... Rapides Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ... Joseph Eugene Ransdell (October 7, 1858 - July 27, 1954) was a United States Representative and Senator from Louisiana. ... The town of Lake Providence is the parish seat of East Carroll Parish, in the US state of Louisiana. ... East Carroll Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edwin Sidney Broussard (December 4, 1874 - November 19, 1934) was a United States Senator from Louisiana. ... The city of New Iberia (French: La Nouvelle-Ibérie) is the parish seat of Iberia Parish, in the US state of Louisiana, 125 miles (201 km) west of New Orleans. ...


Landrieu as senator

Landrieu narrowly won re-election in the 2002 mid-term election. She defeated Suzanne Haik Terrell of New Orleans. Without her large base from Orleans Parish, Landrieu would have been unseated. Some experts and pundits had considered Landrieu as a possible running mate for presidential candidate John Kerry in the 2004 election before Kerry's selection of then Senator John Edwards of North Carolina. With the departure of John B. Breaux from the Senate in December 2004, his seat being taken by Republican David Vitter, Landrieu became Louisiana's senior senator. She faces voters again in 2008. Terrell ran for Louisiana attorney general in 2003 and was defeated by Charles Foti, a Landrieu supporter from Orleans Parish. Also see: 2002 (number). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Midterm elections are elections in the United States in which members of Congress... Suzanne Haik Terrell is a politician in Louisiana. ... New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... John Berlinger Breaux (last name pronounced BRO) was a United States senator from Louisiana from 1987 until 2005. ... David Bruce Vitter (born May 3, 1961) is an American Republican politician, currently serving as the junior U.S. Senator from Louisiana. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... A.G. Charles C. Foti Charles C. Foti is the current Attorney General of the state of Louisiana, United States, serving since 2004. ...


Committee Assignments

  • Committee on Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development
    • Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government
    • Subcommittee on Homeland Security
    • Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Legislative Branch (Chairman)
    • Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans' Affairs, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs
  • Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship
  • Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs
    • Ad Hoc Subcommittee on Disaster Recovery (Chairman)
    • Ad Hoc Subcommittee on State, Local, and Private Sector Preparedness and Integration
    • Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce, and the District of Columbia
  • Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
    • Subcommittee on Energy
    • Subcommittee on National Parks
    • Subcommittee on Public Lands and Forests

Gang of 14

Sen. Landrieu (center) joins Women of the Storm from the Gulf Coast .

On May 23, 2005, Landrieu was among the Gang of 14, the group of moderate senators who forged a compromise on the use of the judicial filibuster and blocked the Republican leadership's attempt to implement the so-called nuclear option over the organized filibustering by Senate Democrats of judicial nominees in the U.S. Senate. Under the agreement, the Democrats would retain the power to filibuster a Bush judicial nominee only in an "extraordinary circumstance" and the three most conservative Bush appellate court nominees (Janice Rogers Brown, Priscilla Owen and William Pryor) would receive a vote by the full Senate. The Gulf of Mexico is a major body of water bordered and nearly landlocked by North America. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gang of 14 (sometimes called the Mod Squad, with mod standing for moderate) was a term coined to describe the bipartisan group of moderate Senators who successfully negotiated a compromise to avoid the deployment of the so-called nuclear option over the organized use of the filibuster by Senate... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... The nuclear option, usually called the constitutional option, and sometimes the Byrd option, is a method by which changes can be made to the standard parliamentary procedure of the United States Senate by a simple majority vote, contrary to the requirements of the written rules. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... The Honorable Janice Rogers Brown Janice Rogers Brown (born May 11, 1949 in Greenville, Alabama) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. ... Priscilla Owen (born in Palacios, Texas, October 4, 1954) is a judge in the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. ... William H. Pryor, Jr. ...


Landrieu supports eliminating the estate tax permanently, and voted for the tax cut passed in 2001. On November 17, 2005, she was one of only four Democrats to vote against repealing the portions of the tax cuts passed in 2001 and 2003 that more liberal Democrats have charged unfairly benefit the wealthy. She voted for the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005 and the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act. In 2004, Landrieu was one of only six Democrats to vote against renewing the ban on semi-automatic firearms. She has also been one of the few Democrats to support drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Inheritance tax, also known in some countries outside the United States as a death duty and referred to as an estate tax within the U.S, is a form of tax levied upon the bequest that a person may make in their will to a living person or organisation. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... The Federal Assault Weapons Ban (AWB) was a subtitle of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that included a prohibition on the sale to civilians of certain semi-automatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans... Walther P99, a semi-automatic pistol from the late 1990s A semi-automatic firearm is a gun that requires only a trigger pull for each round that is fired, unlike a single-action revolver, a pump-action firearm, a bolt-action firearm, or a lever-action firearm, which require the... The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) covers 19,049,236 acres (79,318 km²) in northeastern Alaska, in the North Slope region. ...


Landrieu voted for the confirmation of Chief Justice John Roberts in 2005, but in 2006, she opposed Samuel Alito, though she did vote in favor of cloture to send the nomination to an up-or-down vote. This article is about the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... In parliamentary procedure, cloture (pr: KLO-cher) (also called closure, and sometimes a guillotine) is a motion or process aimed at bringing debate to a quick end. ...


Subsequent to the 2006 midterm election, in which the Democratic Party gained control of both houses of Congress, Landrieu announced (along with Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe of Maine) the formation of a "centrist coalition" of moderate senators of both parties, the goal of which they announced to be reducing partisan rancor in the new Senate.


Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina destroyed Landrieu's lakeside New Orleans home. The senator has become a national spokeswoman for victims of the hurricane and has complained of "the staggering incompetence of the national government."[3] In an interview with Chris Wallace, Landrieu called the evacuation of New Orleans prior to Hurricane Katrina "the best evacuation." She also commented that "most mayors in this country have a hard time getting their people to work on a sunny day." This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... There are several notable individuals named Christopher Wallace: The Notorious B.I.G., a rap artist Chris Wallace (journalist), newscaster at ABC, NBC, and Fox News, and son of Mike Wallace (journalist) Chris Wallace (musician), a country music singer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other...


Critics have condemned Louisiana's representatives over the state's handling of the Katrina crisis. However, FEMA contracted with Innovative Emergency Management for the now-infamous "Hurricane Pam" exercise, which predicted a 70 percent evacuation rate in New Orleans. State officials ended up coordinating the evacuation of 80 percent of the city[4], exceeding professionally-projected figures. New FEMA seal The Federal Emergency Management Agency or FEMA is an agency of the United States government dedicated to swift response in the event of disasters, both natural and man-made. ... Hurricane Pam was a hypothetical hurricane used as a disaster scenario to drive planning for a 13-parish area in Southeastern Louisiana, including the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Other Controversy

On August 3, 2007, Landrieu created much controversy when she and Louisiana Rep Charlie Melancon broke ranks with Democrats and sided with Republicans and the Bush Administration in voting for the Protect America Act, an amendment to the USA Patriot Act further expanding wiretap powers. Charles Joseph Charlie Melancon (pronounced Meh-law-soÉ´) (born October 3, 1947, in Napoleonville) is a Democrat who was elected in to represent Louisianas 3rd congressional district. ... In the United States, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which President George W. Bush signed into law...


Election History

United States Senator, 1996


Threshold > 50%


First Ballot, September 21, 1996

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome
Woody Jenkins Republican 322,244 (26%) Runoff
Mary Landrieu Democratic 264,268 (22%) Runoff
Richard Ieyoub Democratic 250,682 (20%) Defeated
David Duke Republican 172,244 (12%) Defeated
Others n.a. 249,913 (20%) Defeated

Second Ballot, November 5, 1996 Louis E. Woody Jenkins is a Louisiana State lawmaker. ... Richard Phillip Ieyoub, Sr. ... David Ernest Duke (born July 1, 1950) is a former member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, a candidate in presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties, and former Grand Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. ...

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome
Mary Landrieu Democratic 852,945 (50%) Elected
Woody Jenkins Republican 847,157 (50%) Defeated

United States Senator, 2002 Louis E. Woody Jenkins is a Louisiana State lawmaker. ...


Threshold > 50%


First Ballot, November 5, 2002

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome
Mary Landrieu Democratic 573,347 (46%) Runoff
Suzanne Haik Terrell Republican 339,506 (27%) Runoff
John Cooksey Republican 171,752 (14%) Defeated
Tony Perkins Republican 119,776 (10%) Defeated
Others n.a. 41,952 (3%) Defeated

Second Ballot, December 7, 2002 Suzanne Haik Terrell is a politician in Louisiana. ... John Cooksey (born August 20, 1941) is an ophthalmologist from Monroe who was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Louisiana from 1997-2003. ... Tony Perkins is weatherman on ABCS Good Morning America. ...

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome
Mary Landrieu Democratic 638,654 (52%) Elected
Suzanne Haik Terrell Republican 596,642 (48%) Defeated

Suzanne Haik Terrell is a politician in Louisiana. ...

See also

United States Senate election in Louisiana, 2008 The Louisiana United States Senate election will be held on November 4, 2008. ...


Footnotes

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Mary Landrieu
Political offices
Preceded by
Mary Evelyn Parker
Louisiana State Treasurer
1988 – 1996
Succeeded by
Ken Duncan
Preceded by
J. Bennett Johnston
United States Senator (Class 2) from Louisiana
1997 – present
Served alongside: John Breaux, David Vitter
Incumbent
GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mary Landrieu - Congresspedia (1477 words)
On May 23, 2005, Landrieu was among the Gang of 14, the group of moderate senators who forged a compromise on the use of the judicial filibuster, thus blocking the Republican leadership's attempt to implement the so-called nuclear option over the organized filibustering by Senate Democrats of judicial nominees in the US Senate.
Mary Landrieu was born November 23, 1955 in Arlington, Virginia and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Landrieu was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1996, defeating Woody Jenkins, and narrowly won reelection in 2002, defeating Suzanne Haik Terrell.
Mary Landrieu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1116 words)
Mary Landrieu was born in Arlington, Virginia, and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Landrieu was an unsuccessful candidate in the 1995 gubernatorial race in Louisiana—she finished third in the state's qualifying primary (sometimes referred to as the "jungle" primary)—thus failing to make the run-off which effectively becomes the general election in Louisiana.
Landrieu was elected to the U.S. Senate in the presidential election year of 1996, defeating Woody Jenkins by 5,788 votes out of 1.7 million cast, the narrowest national result of the 33 races for the U.S. Senate and one of the closest election margins in Louisiana history.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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