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Encyclopedia > Marvel Comics
Marvel Comics
Type A subsidiary of Marvel Entertainment
Founded 1939 by Martin Goodman, as Timely Comics
Headquarters 417 5th Avenue, New York City, New York
Key people Joe Quesada, Editor-in-chief
Dan Buckley, Publisher, C.O.O.
Industry Comics
Website marvel.com

Marvel Comics is an American comic book company owned by Marvel Publishing, Inc., a division of Marvel Entertainment, Inc. The first cover appearance of Namor the Sub-Mariner on Marvel Mystery Comics #4, February, 1940. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Marvel Entertainment, Inc. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Street sign at corner of Fifth Avenue and East 57th Street Fifth Avenue, early morning photograph, looking south from Thirty-eighth Street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the center of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ... Buckley at the 2007 New York Comic-Con. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... An American comic book is a small magazine originating in the United States containing a narrative in the comics form. ... Marvel Entertainment, Inc. ...


Marvel counts among its characters such well-known properties as Spider-Man, the X-Men and their member Wolverine, the Fantastic Four, The Hulk, Thor, Captain America, Iron Man, Daredevil, Ghost Rider and many others. Most of Marvel's fictional characters are depicted as inhabiting a single shared world; this continuity is known as the Marvel Universe. Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the superhero. ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Tony Stark) is a fictional comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Johnny Blaze, or John Blaze, is a fictional, supernatural superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... This article is about the shared universe setting used by many Marvel Comics titles. ...


The comic book arm of the company was founded in 1939 as Timely Publications[1] and was generally known as Atlas Comics in the 1950s. Marvel's modern incarnation dates from the early 1960s, with the launching of Fantastic Four and other superhero titles created by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, and others. Marvel has since become one of the largest American comics companies, along with DC Comics. Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...

Contents

History

Timely Comics

Main article: Timely Comics
The Timely logo, inspired by Captain America.
The Timely logo, inspired by Captain America.
Marvel Comics #1 (Oct. 1939), the first comic from Marvel precursor Timely Comics. Art by Frank R. Paul
Marvel Comics #1 (Oct. 1939), the first comic from Marvel precursor Timely Comics. Art by Frank R. Paul

Marvel Comics was founded by pulp-magazine publisher Martin Goodman in 1939 as Timely Publications, based at his existing company at 330 West 42nd Street, New York City, New York. Goodman's official titles were editor, managing editor, and business manager, with Abraham Goodman officially listed as publisher.[1] The company's roots go back further, to Goodman's first Western pulp, in 1933. A precursor of one Marvel character, the jungle lord Ka-Zar, first appeared in a 1936 pulp; he was adapted to a comic-book story in the first Timely Comics release, and the name became that of a different Marvel jungle lord introduced in the 1960s. Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... http://www. ... http://www. ... Marvel Comics #1 This image is a book cover. ... Marvel Comics #1 This image is a book cover. ... The first cover appearance of Namor the Sub-Mariner on Marvel Mystery Comics #4, February, 1940. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Frank Rudolph Paul (April 18, 1884 - June 29, 1963) was an illustrator of US pulp-magazines in the science fiction field. ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ... An agent or representative of musicians and/or recording artists, whose main job is to supervise their business affairs, and the proper handling of their financial matters. ... Cover of a book by Louis LAmour, one of Western fictions most prolific authors. ... Ka-Zar (pronounced KAY-sar) is the name of three jungle-dwelling fictional characters. ...


Timely's first publication was Marvel Comics #1 (Oct. 1939), contained the first appearance of Carl Burgos' android superhero, the Human Torch, and the first generally available appearance of Bill Everett's anti-hero Namor the Sub-Mariner, among other features. The contents of that sales blockbuster[2] were supplied by an outside packager, Funnies, Inc., but by the following year Timely had a staff in place. With the second issue the series title changed to Marvel Mystery Comics. The first cover appearance of Namor the Sub-Mariner on Marvel Mystery Comics #4, February, 1940. ... Carl Burgos is an American comic book and advertising artist, born April 18, 1917, New York City; died 1984. ... “Mechanoid” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... The Human Torch is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics-owned superhero. ... Bill Everett (May 18, 1917 – February 27, 1973) was a comic book writer/illustrator most famous for the creation of Namor the Sub-Mariner and co-creating Daredevil for Marvel Comics. ... In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... Funnies, Inc. ... The first cover appearance of Namor the Sub-Mariner on Marvel Mystery Comics #4, February, 1940. ...


The company's first true editor, writer-artist Joe Simon, teamed with soon-to-be industry legend Jack Kirby to create one of the first patriotically themed superheroes, Captain America, in Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941). It, too, proved a major sales hit, with a circulation of nearly one million.[2] A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Joe Simon (born 1915) was a comic book author and cartoonist who created or co-created many memorable characters in the Golden Age. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... This article is about the superhero. ...


While no other Timely character would be as successful as these "big three", some notable heroes — many continuing to appear in modern-day retcon appearances and flashbacks — include the Whizzer, Miss America, the Destroyer, the original Vision, and Paul Gustavson's Angel. Timely also published one of humor cartoonist Basil Wolverton's best-known features, "Powerhouse Pepper",[3] [4] as well as a children's funny animal line whose most popular characters were Super Rabbit and the duo Ziggy Pig and Silly Seal. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Several fictional characters published by Marvel Comics have been known as the Whizzer. ... Miss America is a Golden Age superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about Marvel Comics superhero. ... The Vision (Aarkus) is a fictional character that appeared during the 1930-40s Golden Age of comic books. ... Paul Gustavson née Karl Paul Gustafson (born August 16, 1916, Ã…land, Finland; died 1977) was an American-immigrant comic-book writer and artist. ... This article is about the 1930-40s character. ... Mad #11 (May 1954). ... Powerhouse Pepper #3 (July 1948). ... Bugs Bunny, a typical funny animal character Funny animal is a cartooning term for the genre of comics and animated cartoons in which the main characters are humanoid or talking animals. ... Super-Rabbit is a Merrie Melodies cartoon starring Bugs Bunny parodying Superman. ... Ziggy Pig-Silly Seal Comics #6 (Sept. ...


Atlas Comics

Main article: Atlas Comics (1950s)
The Atlas logo, adopted in 1950.
The Atlas logo, adopted in 1950.

Sales of all comic books declined drastically in the post-war era as the superheroic übermensch archetype popular during the Depression and the war years went out of fashion. Like other comics companies, Timely — generally known as Atlas Comics in the 1950s — followed pop-cultural trends with a variety of genres, including funny animals, Western, horror, war, crime, humor, romance, spy fiction and even fantasy, all with varying degrees of success. An attempted superhero revival from 1953 to 1954, with the Human Torch, the Sub-Mariner and Captain America, lasted only from late 1953 to mid-1954. Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... http://www. ... http://www. ... Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Funny animal is a slang term used to describe a genre of cartoons and comics in which the main characters are anthropomorphic animals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Horror can mean several things: Horror (emotion) Horror fiction Horror film This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... War comics are a genre of comics that gained popularity in English-speaking countries following the Second World War. ... Look up Humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: it is patent nonsense. ... For the video game, see Spy Fiction (video game). ... A number of fantasy comics abound on the web. ...


From 1952 to late 1956, Goodman distributed his comics to newsstands through his self-owned distributor, Atlas. He then switched to American News Company, the nation's largest distributor and a virtual monopoly — which shortly afterward lost a Justice Department lawsuit and discontinued the business. As historian and author Gerard Jones explains, the company in 1956 This article is about the economic term. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... It has been suggested that civil trial be merged into this article or section. ... Gerard Jones is an American writer, born July 10, 1957 in Cut Bank, Montana, raised in Los Gatos and Gilroy, California. ...

...had been found guilty of restraint of trade and ordered to divest itself of the newsstands it owned. Its biggest client, George Delacorte, announced he would seek a new distributor for his Dell Comics and paperbacks. The owners of American News estimated the effect that would have on their income. Then they looked at the value of the New Jersey real estate where their headquarters sat. They liquidated the company and sold the land. The company ... vanished without a trace in the suburban growth of the 1950s.[5]
Amazing Adventures Vol. 1, #3 (Aug. 1961), the first modern comic labeled "Marvel Comics" (MC below Comics Code seal). Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciler) & Dick Ayers (inker).
Amazing Adventures Vol. 1, #3 (Aug. 1961), the first modern comic labeled "Marvel Comics" (MC below Comics Code seal). Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciler) & Dick Ayers (inker).

The final comic to bear the Atlas globe logo was Dippy Duck #1, one of the company's two releases with an October 1957 cover date. The other Patsy Walker #73, was the first both without the globe with the "Ind." tag. Dell Comics was the comic book publishing arm of Dell Publications, which got its start in pulp magazines. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x601, 71 KB) Summary Cover, Amazing Adventures Vol. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x601, 71 KB) Summary Cover, Amazing Adventures Vol. ... Amazing Adventures is the name of several anthology-format comic book series, all but one published by Marvel Comics. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Richard Dick Ayers is a comic book artist and cartoonist, born April 28th, 1924, in Ossining, New York. ...


Although Timely's titles occasionally used a cover treatment reading "A Marvel Magazine" as early as All Surprise Comics #12 (Winter 1946/47; see logo below), and though for several months in 1949 and 1950 the company's comics bore a circular logo labeled "Marvel Comic", the first comic book formally branded as "Marvel Comics" was the science-fiction anthology Amazing Adventures #3, which showed the "MC" box on its cover. Cover-dated August 1961, it was published May 9, 1961.[6] This article is about the comic book company. ... Amazing Adventures is the name of several anthology-format comic book series, all but one published by Marvel Comics. ...


At that point, Goodman attempted a new direction by following the current drive-in science fiction-movie trend, launching or revamping six titles to offer that genre of story: Strange Worlds #1; World of Fantasy #15; Strange Tales #67; Journey into Mystery #50; Tales of Suspense #1; and Tales to Astonish #1. Their space-fantasy tales proved unsuccessful, and by the end of 1959, most of these titles (Strange Worlds and World of Fantasy being canceled) were devoted to B-movie monsters. Most featured a line-up of Jack Kirby-drawn stories (often inked by Dick Ayers) followed by Don Heck's atmospheric rendering of jungle/prison escapes and weird adventures, or stories by artists such as Paul Reinman or Joe Sinnott, followed by a Stan Lee-Steve Ditko twist-ending bagatelle, which were sometimes daringly self-reflexive.[7] Drive-in, a facility such as a bank, restaurant, theatre or even a church where one can literally drive in with an automobile for service. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ... Strange Worlds was the name of two American, science-fiction anthology comic book series of the 1950s, the first published by Avon Comics, the second by a Marvel Comics predecessor, Atlas Comics. ... World of Fantasy #17 (April 1959). ... Strange Tales was the name of several comic book anthology series that have been published by Marvel Comics. ... Journey into Mystery is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... - ==References== - *Tales of Suspense #1-99 (Marvel Comics, January 1959 - March 1968) - *Marvel Select: Tales of Suspense #1 (1996) - - - - - - - - - Categories: | | ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... The term B-movie originally referred to a film designed to be distributed as the lower half of a double feature, often a genre film featuring cowboys, gangsters or vampires. ... This article is about monsters as a kind of legendary creature. ... Richard Dick Ayers is a comic book artist and cartoonist, born April 28th, 1924, in Ossining, New York. ... Don Heck (January 2, 1929-1995) was a comic book artist best known for co-creating the character Iron Man, and for his long run penciling The Avengers in the 1960s. ... Paul Reinman is an American comic book artist (born 1910, Germany) best known as one of Jack Kirbys Silver Age inkers, including on the first issues of The Incredible Hulk and The Uncanny X-Men. ... Joe Sinnott (born October 16, 1926, Saugerties, New York, United States) is an American comic book artist. ... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ...


Marvel also expanded its line of girl-humor titles during this time, introducing Kathy ("the teen-age tornado!") (Oct. 1959) and the short-lived Linda Carter, Student Nurse (Sept. 1961).


1960s

The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961). Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciler) and unconfirmed inker.
The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961). Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciler) and unconfirmed inker.

In the wake of DC Comics' success reviving superheroes in the late 1950s and early 1960s, particularly with The Justice League of America, Marvel decided to follow suit.[8] Cover to Fantastic Four #1, November, 1961. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #1, November, 1961. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... The Justice League of America, featuring the Flash, Superman, Aquaman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Martian Manhunter, and Green Lantern. ...


Editor/writer Stan Lee and freelance artist Jack Kirby created the Fantastic Four, reminiscent of the non-superpowered adventuring quartet the Challengers of the Unknown that Kirby had created for DC in 1957. Eschewing such comic-book tropes as secret identities and even costumes at first, having a monster as one of the heroes, and having its characters bicker and complain in what was later called a "superheroes in the real world" approach, the series represented a change that proved to be a great success. Marvel began publishing further superhero titles featuring such heroes and antiheroes as the Hulk, Spider-Man, Thor, Ant-Man, Iron Man, the X-Men and Daredevil, and such memorable antagonists as Doctor Doom, Magneto, Galactus, the Green Goblin, and Doctor Octopus. The most successful new series was The Amazing Spider-Man, by Lee and Ditko. Marvel even lampooned itself and other comics companies in a parody comic, Not Brand Echh (a play on Marvel's dubbing of other companies as "Brand Echh", a la the then-common phrase "Brand X").[9] For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... Cover to Challengers of the Unknown #7, 1959. ... Yellowjacket. ... Doctor Doom (Victor von Doom) is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Universe. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... It has been suggested that Power Cosmic be merged into this article or section. ... The Green Goblin is a Marvel Comics supervillain and an archenemy of Spider-Man. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of a comic book published by Marvel Comics, a television program and a daily newspaper comic strip featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Not Brand Echh was a Marvel Comics comic book published in the 1960s. ...


Marvel's comics were noted for focusing on characterization to a greater extent than most superhero comics before them. This was true of The Amazing Spider-Man, in particular. Its young hero suffered from self-doubt and mundane problems like any other teenager. Marvel superheroes are often flawed, freaks, and misfits, unlike the perfect, handsome, athletic heroes found in previous traditional comic books. Some Marvel heroes looked like villains and monsters. In time, this non-traditional approach would revolutionize comic books.


Comics historian Peter Sanderson wrote that in the 1960s,

DC was the equivalent of the big Hollywood studios: After the brilliance of DC's reinvention of the superhero ... in the late 1950s and early 1960s, it had run into a creative drought by the decade's end. There was a new audience for comics now, and it wasn't just the little kids that traditionally had read the books. The Marvel of the 1960s was in its own way the counterpart of the French New Wave.... Marvel was pioneering new methods of comics storytelling and characterization, addressing more serious themes, and in the process keeping and attracting readers in their teens and beyond. Moreover, among this new generation of readers were people who wanted to write or draw comics themselves, within the new style that Marvel had pioneered, and push the creative envelope still further.[10]

Lee became one of the best-known names in comics, with his charming personality and relentless salesmanship of the company. His "voice" permeates the stories, the letters and news pages, and even the hyperbolic house ads of many of the Marvel Comics of the first half of the 1960s: his sense of humor and generally lighthearted manner, and the exaggerated depiction of the Bullpen (Lee's name for the staff) as one big, happy family. The artists — who eventually co-plotted the stories based on the busy Lee's rough synopsis or even simple spoken concept, in what became known as the Marvel Method — contributed greatly to Marvel's product and success. Kirby in particular is generally credited for many of the cosmic ideas and characters of Fantastic Four and The Mighty Thor, such as the Watcher, the Silver Surfer and Ego the Living Planet, while Steve Ditko is recognized as the driving artistic force behind the moody atmosphere and street-level naturalism of Spider-Man and the surreal atmosphere of Dr. Strange. Lee, however, continues to receive credit for his well-honed skills at dialogue and story sense, for his keen hand at choosing and motivating artists and assembling creative teams, and for his uncanny ability to connect with the readers. These included nickname endearments in the credits and in the monthly "Bullpen Bulletins" and letters pages, with readers given humanizing hype about the likes of artists and writers "Jolly Jack Kirby", "Rascally Roy Thomas", "Jazzy Johnny Romita" and others, right down to letterers "Swingin' Sammy Rosen" and "Adorable Artie Simek". ... François Truffauts New Wave film Jules et Jim The New Wave (French: la Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... The Marvel Method, pioneered by and exemplified in the works of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, is a method of comic book creation wherein the author (in this case, Stan Lee) would plot out the rough outline of a story, and the artist (Kirby), while drawing it, would help fill... Marvel Select The Watcher figure In the fictional Marvel Comics universe, the Watchers are an extraterrestrial species of near-omnipotent immortal beings who watch the universe with advanced technology. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... Ego the Living Planet is a fictional extraterrestrial being that appears in the Marvel Universe. ... Naturalism is a movement in theater, film, and literature that seeks to replicate a believable everyday reality, as opposed to such movements as Romanticism or Surrealism, in which subjects may receive highly symbolic, idealistic, or even supernatural treatment. ... Doctor Strange is a sorcerer, featured in Marvel Comics. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... John Romita, Sr. ... Sam Rosen, often credited as S. Rosen, lettered many of the Silver Age comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Artie Simek lettered a number of the Silver Age comic books published by Marvel Comics. ...

The Avengers #4 (Mar. 1964), with (l-r), the Wasp, Giant-Man, Captain America, Iron Man, Thor and (inset) the Sub-Mariner. Cover art by Jack Kirby & George Roussos.
The Avengers #4 (Mar. 1964), with (l-r), the Wasp, Giant-Man, Captain America, Iron Man, Thor and (inset) the Sub-Mariner. Cover art by Jack Kirby & George Roussos.

Lesser-known staffers during the company's industry-changing growth in the 1960s (some of whom worked primarily for Marvel publisher Martin Goodman's umbrella magazine corporation) included circulation manager Johnny Hayes, subscriptions person Nancy Murphy, bookkeeper Doris Siegler, merchandising person Chip Goodman (son of publisher Martin) and Arthur Jeffrey, described in the December 1966 "Bullpen Bulletin" as "keeper of our MMMS [Merry Marvel Marching Society] files, guardian of our club coupons and defender of the faith". Cover of Avengers #4 This image is a book cover. ... Cover of Avengers #4 This image is a book cover. ... The Avengers are a fictional superhero team appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... The Wasp (Janet van Dyne) is a comic book superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Yellowjacket. ... This article is about the superhero. ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Tony Stark) is a fictional comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional character, featured in Marvel Comics. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... George Roussos a. ... Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ... Merry Marvel Marching Society (often referred to by the abbreviation M.M.M.S.) was a fan club of sorts for Marvel Comics started by Marvel editor Stan Lee in 1964. ...


In the fall of 1968, company founder Goodman sold Marvel Comics and his other publishing businesses to the Perfect Film and Chemical Corporation. It grouped these businesses in a subsidiary called Magazine Management Co. Goodman remained as publisher.[11]


1970s

In 1970, Stan Lee saw the opportunity to market a British audience without using reprinted American material. In October 1976, Marvel created "a British hero for British people", Captain Britain, first released exclusively in Britain and later in America. Captain Britain (Brian Braddock), briefly known as Britannic, is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ...


In 1971, Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Stan Lee was approached by the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare to do a comic book story about drug abuse. Lee agreed and wrote a three-part Spider-Man story portraying drug use as dangerous and unglamorous. However, the industry's self-censorship board, the Comics Code Authority, refused to approve the story because of the presence of narcotics, deeming the context of the story irrelevant. Lee, with Goodman's approval, published the story regardless in The Amazing Spider-Man #96-98 (May-July 1971), without CCA approval. The storyline was well-received and the CCA's argument for denying its approval was criticized as counterproductive. The Code was subsequently revised the same year.[12] For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Seal The United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare (also known as HEW) was a cabinet level department of the United States government from 1953 until 1979. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The seal of the Comics Code Authority, which appears on the covers of approved comic books. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of a comic book published by Marvel Comics, a television program and a daily newspaper comic strip featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ...

Howard the Duck #8 (Jan. 1977). Cover art by Gene Colan and Steve Leialoha.
Howard the Duck #8 (Jan. 1977). Cover art by Gene Colan and Steve Leialoha.

Goodman retired as publisher in 1972 and was succeeded by Lee, who stepped aside from running day-to-day operations at Marvel. A series of new editors-in-chief oversaw the company during another slow time for the industry. Once again, Marvel attempted to diversify, and with the updating of the Comics Code achieved moderate success with titles themed to horror (Tomb of Dracula), martial arts, (Shang-Chi: Master of Kung Fu), sword-and-sorcery (Conan the Barbarian, Red Sonja), satire (Howard the Duck) and science fiction ("Killraven" in Amazing Adventures). Some of these were published in larger-sized black-and-white magazines, targeted for mature readers. Marvel was able to capitalize on its successful superhero comics of the previous decade by acquiring a new newsstand distributor and greatly expanding its comics line. Marvel pulled ahead of rival DC Comics in 1972, during a time when the price and format of the standard newsstand comic were in flux. Goodman increase the price and size of Marvel's November 1971 cover-dated comics from 15 cents for 36 pages total to 25 cents for 52 pages. DC followed suit, but Marvel the following month dropped its comics to 20 cents for 36 pages, offering a lower-priced product with a higher distributor discount.[13] Cover of Howard The Duck #8. ... Cover of Howard The Duck #8. ... This article is about the character and comic book series. ... Gene Colan (born September 1, 1926, the Bronx, New York City, New York) is an American comic book artist who sometimes worked under the name Adam Austin. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... Horror can mean several things: Horror (emotion) Horror fiction Horror film This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Tomb of Dracula is a horror comic book published by Marvel Comics from April 1972 to August 1979. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Shang-Chi: Master of Kung Fu is a comic book published by Marvel Comics from the 1970s and 1980s featuring Shang-Chi, the son of Fu Manchu, who exhibits extraordinary skills in the martial arts. ... This article is about a fantasy sub-genre. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Red Sonja, a warrior woman out of majestic Hyrkania, is a low fantasy sword and sorcery heroine created by Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... This article is about the character and comic book series. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Jonathan Raven, better known as Killraven, the Warrior of the Worlds, is a freedom fighter in a post-apocalyptic alternate future (Earth-691) of the fictional Marvel Universe. ... Amazing Adventures is the name of several anthology-format comic book series, all but one published by Marvel Comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


In 1973, Perfect Film and Chemical Corporation changed its name to Cadence Industries, which in turn renamed Magazine Management Co. as Marvel Comics Group. Goodman, now completely disconnected from Marvel, created a new company called Atlas/Seaboard Comics in 1974, reviving Marvel's old Atlas name, but this project lasted only a year-and-a-half.[14] Atlas/Seaboard is the term that comic book historians and collectors use to refer to the short-lived line of comics published as Atlas Comics by Seaboard Periodicals, to differentiate it from Atlas Comics, the former name of Marvel Comics. ...


In the mid-1970s, Marvel was affected by a decline of the newsstand distribution network. Cult hits such as Howard the Duck were the victims of the distribution problems, with some titles reporting low sales when in fact they were being resold at a later date in the first specialty comic-book stores. An attempt by Marvel to buy DC[citation needed] was frustrated by DC's refusal to sell its entire library of characters (wanting to retain control of Superman and Batman), and DC was later folded into Warner Communications by owner Kinney National Company. Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Warner Communications, formerly Kinney National Company, was the parent company for Warner Bros. ... Kinney National Company was formed in 1966 when the Kinney Parking Company and the National Cleaning Company merged. ...


By the end of the decade, Marvel's fortunes were reviving, thanks to the rise of direct market distribution (selling through those same comics-specialty stores instead of newsstands) and the sales increase of previously borderline books — such as the canceled '60s title The Uncanny X-Men, revived to become a hit series under the team of writer Chris Claremont and artist John Byrne, or the more naturalistic, urban-crime superhero comic Daredevil, by writer/artist Frank Miller.[citation needed] Direct market in the comic book industry is the dominant distribution and retail network in North America and elsewhere in the market for English-language comics. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist. ...


1980s

Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars #1 (May 1984), cover art by Mike Zeck
Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars #1 (May 1984), cover art by Mike Zeck

By the 1980s, one-time DC wunderkind Jim Shooter was Marvel's Editor-in-Chief. Although a controversial personality, Shooter cured many of the procedural ills at Marvel (including repeatedly missed deadlines) and oversaw a creative renaissance at the company. This renaissance included institutionalizing creator royalties, starting the Epic imprint for creator-owned material in 1982, and launching a brand-new (albeit ultimately unsuccessful) line named New Universe, to commemorate Marvel's 25th anniversary, in 1986. However, Shooter was responsible for the introduction of the company-wide crossover (Contest of Champions, Secret Wars) and was accused by many creators, especially near the end of his tenure, of exercising his job in a draconian manner and interfering with the writers' creative process.[citation needed] Image File history File links Secretwars1. ... Image File history File links Secretwars1. ... Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars is the name of a twelve-issue Marvel Comics comic book limited series produced between 1984 and 1985, and a Mattel toy line that reflected the series. ... Mike Zeck in an American comic book illustrator. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Epic Comics was a creator-owned imprint of Marvel Comics started in 1982, lasting through the mid-1990s, and being briefly revived on a small scale in the mid-2000s. ... Creator ownership is an arrangement in which the creator or creators of a work of fiction retain full ownership of the material, regardless of whether it is self-published or by a corporate publisher. ... Promotional Advertisement for The New Universe, Marvel Comics Group, circa 1986. ... Contest of Champions is a 1982 mini-series by Marvel Comics. ... Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars is the name of a twelve-issue Marvel Comics comic book limited series produced between 1984 and 1985, and a Mattel toy line that reflected the series. ...


In 1981 Marvel purchased the DePatie-Freleng Enterprises animation studio from famed Looney Tunes director Friz Freleng and his business partner David H. DePatie. The company was renamed Marvel Productions and it produced well-known animated TV series and movies featuring such characters as G.I. Joe, The Transformers, Jim Henson's Muppet Babies, and such TV series as Dungeons & Dragons, as well as cartoons based on Marvel characters, including Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends. DePatie-Freleng Enterprises (sometimes abbreviated to DFE) was a Hollywood-based animation production company, active from 1963 to 1981. ... Isadore Friz Freleng (August 21, 1906[1]–May 26, 1995) was an animator, cartoonist, director, and producer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... David DePatie worked with Friz Freleng to create the animated character known as the Pink Panther. ... First production logo used after Marvel acquired DePatie-Freleng Enterprises The 1980s Spider-Man Marvel logo used when New World bought Marvel. ... Cover of G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #1, published by Marvel Comics Since its debut in 1982, the comic book history of G.I. Joe has seen three separate publishers and four main-title series, all of which have been based off of the Hasbro toyline of the... Transformers are fictional alien robots and the titular characters of a popular[1] Hasbro toy line and its spin-offs. ... ҉Jim Hensons Muppet Babies is an American animated television series that aired from 1984 to 1990 on CBS in first-run episodes, and then until 1992 in reruns. ... Dungeons & Dragons is an American animated television series, that was a co-production of Marvel Productions and TSR. Based on TSRs Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, the show was popular in the US, and ran for three seasons on CBS. The shows story editors were Hank Saroyan and... Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends is an animated series produced by Marvel Productions Ltd. ...


In 1986, Marvel was sold to New World Entertainment, which within three years sold it to MacAndrews and Forbes, owned by Revlon executive Ronald Perelman. Perelman took the company public on the New York Stock Exchange and oversaw a great increase in the number of titles Marvel published. As part of the process, Marvel Productions sold its back catalog to Saban Entertainment (acquired in 2001 by Disney), and Marvel management closed the animation studio, opting to outsource.[citation needed] New World Pictures logo from the late 1980s; New Worlds other divisions used similar logos New World Communications was a major television production company and television station owner in the United States from the late 1980s to the mid-1990s. ... Revlon (NYSE: REV) is an American cosmetics company. ... Ronald Owen Perelman (born January 1, 1943) is an American billionaire investor that made his fortune buying beleaguered corporations and re-selling them later for enormous profits. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Saban Entertainment was an independent television production company formed in 1983 by music and television producers Haim Saban and Shuki Levy as Saban Records, a U.S. subsidiary of Saban International Paris (now SIP Animation) who provided music soundtracks to shows made by other companies (most notably DIC). ... Disney redirects here. ...


1990s

Spider-Man #1, later renamed "Peter Parker: Spider-Man" (Aug. 1990; black & gold edition). Cover art by Todd McFarlane.
Spider-Man #1, later renamed "Peter Parker: Spider-Man" (Aug. 1990; black & gold edition). Cover art by Todd McFarlane.

Marvel earned a great deal of money and recognition during the early decade's comic-book boom, launching the highly successful 2099 line of comics set in the future (Spider-Man 2099, etc.) and the creatively daring though commercially unsuccessful Razorline imprint of superhero comics created by novelist and filmmaker Clive Barker. Yet by the middle of the decade, the industry had slumped and Marvel filed for bankruptcy amidst investigations of Perelman's financial activities regarding the company.[citation needed] Spiderman 1 cover, art by Todd McFarlane. ... Spiderman 1 cover, art by Todd McFarlane. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ... Marvel 2099 is a Marvel Comics imprint, begun in 1993, that explores one possible future of the Marvel Universe. ... Spider-Man 2099 (Miguel OHara) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a fictional character created by Peter David and Rick Leonardi in 1992. ... Hokum & Hex #1 (Sept. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... For the South African football (soccer) coach, see Clive Barker (soccer). ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ...


In 1990, Marvel began selling Marvel Universe Cards with trading card maker Impel. These were collectible trading cards that featured the characters and events of the Marvel Universe, which would spawn several more series of cards and imitations by DC.[citation needed] Marvel Universe Cards were collectible trading cards based on the characters and events of the Marvel Universe. ... Various trading cards A trading card (or collectible card) is a small card which is intended for trading and collecting. ...


Marvel in 1992 acquired Fleer Corporation, known primarily for its trading cards, and shortly thereafter created Marvel Studios, devoted to film and TV projects. Avi Arad became director of that division in 1993, with production accelerating in 1998 following the success of the film Blade. [citation needed] The Fleer Corporation, founded by Frank H. Fleer in the mid-19th century, was the first company to successfully manufacture bubblegum. ... A trading card (or collectible card) is a small card which is intended for trading and collecting. ... Marvel Studios is an American television and motion picture studio based in Beverly Hills, California. ... Avi Arad (Hebrew: אבי ארד) is an Israeli-American businessman. ... Blade is a 1998 film starring Wesley Snipes and Stephen Dorff, loosely based on the published stories of the Marvel Comics character Blade. ...


In 1994, Marvel acquired the comic book distributor Heroes World to use as its own exclusive distributor. As the industry's other major publishers made exclusive distribution deals with other companies, the ripple effect resulted in the survival of only one other major distributor in North America, Diamond Comic Distributors Inc. [citation needed] North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Diamond Comic Distributors, Inc. ...


Creatively and commercially, the '90s were dominated by the use of gimmickry to boost sales, such as variant covers, cover enhancements, regular company-wide crossovers that threw the universe's continuity into disarray, and even special swimsuit issues. In 1996, Marvel had almost all its titles participate in the Onslaught Saga, a crossover that allowed Marvel to relaunch some of its flagship characters, such as the Avengers and the Fantastic Four, in the Heroes Reborn universe, in which Marvel defectors Jim Lee and Rob Liefeld were given permission to revamp the properties from scratch. After an initial sales bump, sales quickly declined below expected levels, and Marvel discontinued the experiment after a one-year run; the characters returned to the Marvel Universe proper. In 1998, the company launched the imprint Marvel Knights, taking place within Marvel continuity; helmed by soon-to-become editor-in-chief Joe Quesada, and featuring tough, gritty stories showcasing such characters as the Inhumans, Black Panther and Daredevil, it achieved substantial success.[citation needed] This article needs to be wikified. ... Premier issue of Marvel Swimusit Illustrated From 1991 through 1995, Marvel Comics published an annual tongue-in-cheek Marvel Illustrated Swimsuit issue. ... ... The Avengers are a fictional superhero team appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... Heroes Reborn was an event in which Marvel Comics temporarily outsourced the production of several of its most famous comic books to the studios of its popular former employees Jim Lee and Rob Liefeld. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rob Liefeld (born October 3, 1967 in Anaheim, California) is an American comic book writer, illustrator, and publisher. ... This article is about the shared universe setting used by many Marvel Comics titles. ... Cover art from Inhumans #1 (Nov 1998) by Jae Lee. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ... The Inhumans are a fictional race of superhumans in the Marvel Comics Universe, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. ... The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ...


Marvel goes public

Marvel's logo, adopted in the 1990s.
Marvel's logo, adopted in the 1990s.

In 1991, Pereleman took Marvel public in a stock offering underwritten by Merrill Lynch and First Boston Corporation. Following the rapid rise of this immediately popular stock, Perleman issued a series of junk bonds that he used to acquire other children's entertainment companies. Many of these bond offerings were purchased by Carl Icahn Partners, which later wielded much control during Marvel's court-ordered reorganization after Marvel went bankrupt in 1996. In 1997, after protracted legal battles, control landed in the hands of Isaac Perlmutter, owner of the Marvel subsidiary Toy Biz. With his business partner Avi Arad, publisher Bill Jemas, and editor-in-chief Bob Harras, Perlmutter helped revitalize the comics line.[citation needed] http://www. ... http://www. ... A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... Credit Suisse First Boston (CSFB) is a bulge bracket New York City based investment banking and financial services firm. ... High yield debt (non-investment grade or junk bond) is a business term referring to a corporate debt instrument, usually a bond, that has a higher yield (compared to investment grade debt) because of a high perceived credit risk (default risk). ... For alternative meanings, see bond (a disambiguation page). ... Carl Celian Icahn (born February 16, 1936) is an American billionaire financier, corporate raider, and private equity investor. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... Toy Biz logo. ... Avi Arad (Hebrew: אבי ארד) is an Israeli-American businessman. ... Bill Jemas is a founding partner at 360ep, a management firm dedicated to cross-pollinating entertainment properties against various forms of media, such as film, video games, comic books and consumer products. ... Robert Bob Harras was editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics from 1995 to 2000. ...


2000s

With the new millennium, Marvel Comics escaped from bankruptcy and again began diversifying its offerings. In 2001, Marvel withdrew from the Comics Code Authority and established its own Marvel Rating System for comics. The first title from the era to not have the code was X-Force #119 (Oct. 2001). It also created new imprints, such as MAX, a line intended for mature readers, and Marvel Age, developed for younger audiences. In addition to this is the highly successful Ultimate Marvel imprint, which allowed Marvel to reboot their major titles by deconstructing and updating its major superhero and villain characters to introduce to a new generation. This imprint exists in a universe parallel to mainstream Marvel continuity, allowing writers and artists freedom from the characters' convoluted history and the ability to redesign them, and to maintain their other ongoing series without replacing the established continuity. This also allowed Marvel to capitalize on an influx of new readers unfamiliar with comics but familiar with the characters through the film and TV franchises. The company has also revamped its graphic novel division, establishing a bigger presence in the bookstore market. As of 2007, Marvel remains a key comics publisher, even as the industry has dwindled to a fraction of its peak size decades earlier.[citation needed] The seal of the Comics Code Authority, which appears on the covers of approved comic books. ... The Marvel Rating System is a system for rating the content of comic books, with regard to appropriateness for different age groups. ... X-Force was a Marvel Comics superhero team, one of many spin-offs of the popular X-Men franchise. ... This article is about imprints in publishing. ... MAX is an imprint of Marvel Comics for adult audiences, launched in 2001 after Marvel broke with the Comics Code Authority and established its own rating system. ... Marvel Age is an imprint of Marvel Comics intended for younger audiences, including children, established in 2003. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ...


Stan Lee, no longer officially connected to the company save for the title of "Chairman Emeritus", remains a visible face in the industry. In 2002, he sued successfully for a share of income related to movies and merchandising of Marvel characters, based on a contract between Lee and Marvel from the late 1990s; according to court documents, Marvel had used "Hollywood accounting" to claim that those projects' "earnings" were not profits. Marvel Comics' parent company Marvel Entertainment continues to be traded on the New York Stock Exchange as MVL. Some of its characters have been turned into successful film franchises, the highest-grossing being those of the X-Men, starting in 2000, and Spider-Man, beginning in 2002[15] Emeritus (IPA pronunciation: or ) is an adjective that is used in the title of a retired professor, bishop or other professional. ... In accountancy, Hollywood accounting is the practice of distributing the profit earned by a large project to corporate entities which, though distinct from the one responsible for the project itself, are typically owned by the same people. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film, based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ...


In 2006, Marvel's fictional crossover event "Civil War" established federal superhero registration in the Marvel universe, creating a political and ethical schism throughout it. Also that year, Marvel created its own wiki.[16] It has been suggested that Gaming crossovers be merged into this article or section. ... Civil War is a Marvel Comics summer 2006 crossover event, based around a core limited series of the same name written by Mark Millar and penciled by Steve McNiven. ... In Marvel Comics fictional Marvel Universe, the Registration Acts - the Mutant Registration Act (or MRA) and Super-human Registration Act (SRA or sometimes SHRA) - are legislative bills which, when passed into law, enforce the mandatory registration of super-powered individuals with the government. ... Look up Wiki in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Editors-in-chief

The Marvel editor-in-chief oversees the largest-scale creative decisions taken within the company. While the fabled Stan Lee held great authority during the decades when publisher Martin Goodman privately held his company, of which the comics division was a relatively small part, his successors have been to greater and lesser extents subject to corporate management. Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ...


The position evolved sporadically. In the earliest years, the company had a single editor overseeing the entire line. As the company grew, it became increasingly common for individual titles to be overseen separately. The concept of the "writer-editor" evolved, stemming from when Lee wrote and managed most of the line's output. Overseeing the line in the 1970s was a series of chief editors, though the titles were used intermittently. Confusing matters further, some appear to have been appointed merely by extending their existing editorial duties. By the time Jim Shooter took the post in 1978, the position of editor-in-chief was clearly defined., This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1994, Marvel briefly abolished the position, replacing Tom DeFalco with five "group editors", though each held the title "editor-in-chief" and had some editors underneath them. It reinstated the overall editor-in-chief position later in the year, installing Bob Harras. Joe Quesada became editor-in-chief in 2000. Tom DeFalco (born June 26, 1950) is an American comics writer and editor. ... Robert Bob Harras was editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics from 1995 to 2000. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ...

Joe Simon (born 1915) was a comic book author and cartoonist who created or co-created many memorable characters in the Golden Age. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Vincenzo Francisco Gennaro Di Fago (born November 28, 1914, Yonkers, New York, United States; died June 13, 2002) was an American comic-book artist and writer who served as interim editor of Timely Comics, the Golden Age predecessor of Marvel Comics, while editor Stan Lee did his World War II... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... Black-and-white or black and white) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ... Gerard F. Gerry Conway (September 10, 1952 - ) is an American writer of comic books and television shows. ... Archie Goodwin (September 8, 1937 – March 1, 1998) was an American comic book writer, editor, and artist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tom DeFalco (born June 26, 1950) is an American comics writer and editor. ... Robert Bob Harras was editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics from 1995 to 2000. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ...

Offices

Located in New York City, Marvel has been successively headquartered in the McGraw-Hill Building (where it originated as Timely Comics in 1939); in suite 1401 of the Empire State Building; at 635 Madison Avenue (the actual location, though the comic books' indicia listed the parent publishing-company's address of 625 Madison Ave.); 575 Madison Avenue; 387 Park Avenue South; 10 East 40th Street; and 417 Fifth Avenue. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The original McGraw-Hill building on 42nd Street (33 stories, 485 ft / 148 m) was completed in 1931, the same year as the completion of the Empire State Building. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York on the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... Madison Avenue, looking north from 40th Street Madison Avenue is a north-south avenue in the borough of Manhattan in New York City that carries northbound one-way traffic. ... 10 East 40th Street from the main branch of the New York Public Library 10 East 40th Street is a skyscraper located in the Murray Hill section of New York City, between Fifth Avenue and Madison Avenue, taking the width of the block between 40th and 39th Streets. ... Street sign at corner of Fifth Avenue and East 57th Street Fifth Avenue, early morning photograph, looking south from Thirty-eighth Street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the center of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ...


Marvel characters in other media

Marvel characters and stories have been adapted to many other media. Some of these adaptations were produced by Marvel, while others were produced by companies licensing Marvel material.


Television programs

Many television series, both live action and animated, have been based on Marvel Comics characters. These include multiple series for popular characters such as Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four. Of particular note were the animated series from the mid to late 90's, which were all part of the same Marvel animated universe. Below is a list of television series and accompanying made for TV movies based on Marvel Comics properties. ... The Marvel animated universe. ...


Additionally, a handful of television movies based on Marvel Comics characters have been made.


Films

Marvel characters have been adapted into films including the Blade, Spider-Man, and X-Men trilogies; the Fantastic Four, Hulk, and The Punisher duologies; Daredevil, Elektra, Ghost Rider, Iron Man, and Man-Thing. Below is a list of films based on Marvel Comics characters and properties. ... Blade is a 1998 film starring Wesley Snipes and Stephen Dorff, loosely based on the published stories of the Marvel Comics character Blade. ... Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film, based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Fantastic Four is a 2005 superhero film based on the Marvel Comics comic Fantastic Four. ... Hulk is a 2003 superhero film based on the comic book series The Incredible Hulk published by Marvel Comics. ... For the 1989 movie starring Dolph Lundgren, see The Punisher (1989 film) . The Punisher is a 2004 movie, based on the Marvel Comics character, starring Thomas Jane as Frank Castle and John Travolta as Howard Saint, the gangster who orders the death of Castles entire family. ... Daredevil is a 2003 movie directed by Mark Steven Johnson, who also wrote the screenplay. ... Elektra is a 2005 movie directed by Rob Bowman. ... Ghost Rider is a 2007 superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Ghost Rider. ... This article is about the upcoming live action film. ... Man-Thing, as portrayed in the 2005 TV-movie Man-Thing is a 2005 telefilm, directed by Brett Leonard and featuring the Marvel Comics creature created by Stan Lee, Roy Thomas and Gerry Conway. ...


Additionally, a series of direct-to-DVD animated films began in 2006 with Ultimate Avengers. Ultimate Avengers (also known as Ultimate Avengers: The Movie) is a direct-to-video animated film based on the Marvel comic book The Ultimates. ...


Imprints

The funny animal title All Surprise Comics #12 (Winter 1946-47) was labeled "A Marvel Magazine" nearly 15 years before the publisher formally adopted the name. Cover artist unknown.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bugs Bunny, a typical funny animal character Funny animal is a cartooning term for the genre of comics and animated cartoons in which the main characters are humanoid or talking animals. ... Marvel Next is an initiative that was launched by Marvel Comics in early 2005. ... Icon Comics is an imprint of Marvel Comics for creator-owned titles. ... Marvel Age is an imprint of Marvel Comics intended for younger audiences, including children, established in 2003. ... Cover art from Inhumans #1 (Nov 1998) by Jae Lee. ... Characters from the MC2 universe. ... MAX is an imprint of Marvel Comics for adult audiences, launched in 2001 after Marvel broke with the Comics Code Authority and established its own rating system. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ...

Defunct

Amalgam Comics was a metafictional American comic book publisher, and part of a collaboration between Marvel Comics and DC Comics, in which the two comic book publishers merged their characters to create new ones (e. ... Curtis Magazines was a short lived imprint of Marvel Comics that existed from 1971 to 1975. ... Epic Comics was a creator-owned imprint of Marvel Comics started in 1982, lasting through the mid-1990s, and being briefly revived on a small scale in the mid-2000s. ... Marvel 2099 is a Marvel Comics imprint, begun in 1993, that explores one possible future of the Marvel Universe. ... Marvel Absurd is a Marvel Comics imprint, under which comics based on Ren & Stimpy, Earthworm Jim and Beavis and Butt-head were published. ... Marvel Age is an imprint of Marvel Comics intended for younger audiences, including children, established in 2003. ... Malibu Comics was a comic book publisher in the late 1980s and early 1990s, best known for its Ultraverse line of superhero titles. ... Marvel Edge was a short-lived Marvel Comics imprint lasting from 1995 to 1996, right before the Onslaught Saga. ... Marvel Music was a short-lived Marvel Comics imprint published in the mid-90s. ... The Mighty World of Marvel #1: The very first Marvel UK title published in 1972. ... Promotional Advertisement for The New Universe, Marvel Comics Group, circa 1986. ... Paramount Comics is the name of a former comic book imprint of Marvel Comics that was active for about two years beginning in 1996. ... Hokum & Hex #1 (Sept. ... Peter Porker, the Spectacular Spider-Ham #1 one of the first titles published by the imprint. ... DC Comics Tsunami was a character in the 1980s series All-Star Squadron and its spin-off Young All-Stars, both of which took place during World War Two. ...

See also

Marvel Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Within Marvel Comics, most tales take place within the fictional Marvel Universe, this in turn is part of a larger multiverse. ... For decades -in particular, since the 1960s- Marvel Comics has been telling noteworthy fictional stories. ... There are several different extraterrestrial races in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This is a list of major characters appearing in the Marvel Universe, which encompasses most fictional characters created for and owned by Marvel Comics. ... This is a list of cosmic entities (also referred to as cosmic beings) appearing in the Marvel Universe. ... Below is a list of feature films based on Marvel characters and properties. ... Marvel Comics (q. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book company. ... List of teams and Organisations: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Related articles External Links List of teams and Organisations A Acolytes AIM (Advanced Idea Mechanics... The following in a list of the charcters and teams that first appeared in Marvel Comics Golden Age (under both of Marvels previous names, Atlas Comics & Timely Comics). ... Toy Biz v. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Per statement of ownership, dated Oct. 2, 1939, published in Marvel Mystery Comics #4 (Feb. 1940), p. 40; reprinted in Marvel Masterworks: Golden Age Marvel Comics Volume 1 (Marvel Comics, 2004, ISBN 0-7851-1609-5), p. 239
  2. ^ a b Per researcher Keif Fromm, Alter Ego #49, p. 4 (caption), Marvel Comics #1, cover-dated October 1939, quickly sold out 80,000 copies, prompting Goodman to produce a second printing, cover-dated November 1939. The latter is identical except for a black bar over the October date in the inside-front-cover indicia, and the November date added at the end. That sold approximately 800,000 copies. Per Fromm also, the first issue of Captain America Comics sold nearly one million copies.
  3. ^ Grand Comics Database: "Powerhouse Pepper"
  4. ^ A Smithsonian Book of Comic-Book Comics (Smithsonian Institution / Harry N. Abrams, 1981)
  5. ^ Jones, Gerard. Men of Tomorrow: Geeks, Gangsters, and the Birth of the Comic Book (Basic Books, 2004; trade paperback ISBN 0-465-03657-0
  6. ^ Library of Congress copyright information at Grand Comics Database: Amazing Adventures #3
  7. ^ Hembeck.com (Nov. 12 2004): "Tales of the Mysterious Mr. Ditko (and the Not-So-Mysterious Mr. Lee...)", by Fred Hembeck
  8. ^ Apocryphal legend has it that in 1961, Timely and Atlas publisher Martin Goodman was playing golf with either Jack Liebowitz or Irwin Donenfeld of rival DC Comics, then known as National Periodical Publications, who bragged about DC's success with the Justice League (which had debuted in The Brave and the Bold #28 [Feb. 1960] before going on to its own title). However, film producer and comics historian Michael Uslan partly debunked the story in a letter published in Alter Ego #43 (Dec. 2004), pp. 43-44:
    Irwin said he never played golf with Goodman, so the story is untrue. I heard this story more than a couple of times while sitting in the lunchroom at DC's 909 Third Avenue and 75 Rockefeller Plaza office as Sol Harrison and [production chief] Jack Adler were schmoozing with some of us ... who worked for DC during our college summers.... [T]he way I heard the story from Sol was that Goodman was playing with one of the heads of Independent News, not DC Comics (though DC owned Independent News). ... As the distributor of DC Comics, this man certainly knew all the sales figures and was in the best position to tell this tidbit to Goodman. ... Of course, Goodman would want to be playing golf with this fellow and be in his good graces. ... Sol worked closely with Independent News' top management over the decades and would have gotten this story straight from the horse's mouth.
    Goodman, a publishing trend-follower aware of the JLA's strong sales, confirmably directed his comics editor, Stan Lee, to create a comic-book series about a team of superheroes. According to Lee in Origins of Marvel Comics (Simon and Schuster/Fireside Books, 1974), p. 16:
    Martin mentioned that he had noticed one of the titles published by National Comics seemed to be selling better than most. It was a book called The [sic] Justice League of America and it was composed of a team of superheroes. ... ' If the Justice League is selling ', spoke he, ' why don't we put out a comic book that features a team of superheroes?'
  9. ^ Time (Oct. 31, 1960): "The Real Brand X"
  10. ^ Sanderson, Peter. IGN.com (Oct. 10, 2003): Comics in Context #14: "Continuity/Discontinuity"
  11. ^ Daniels, Les, Marvel: Five Fabulous Decades of the World's Greatest Comics (Harry N. Abrams, New York, 1991), p. 139. ISBN 0-8109-3821-9.
  12. ^ Nyberg, Amy Kiste. Seal of Approval: History of the Comics Code. University Press of Mississippi, Jackson, Miss., 1998
  13. ^ Daniels, Ibid., pp.154-155
  14. ^ Atlas Archives
  15. ^ Box Office Moho: Marvel Comics
  16. ^ Marvel Universe wiki

The first cover appearance of Namor the Sub-Mariner on Marvel Mystery Comics #4, February, 1940. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ... Irwin Donenfeld was the son of Harry Donenfeld, cofounder of the DC Comics company, and worked for them from 1948 to 1967. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Michael Uslan is the originator of the Batman movies and was the first professor to teach Comic Book Folklore at an accredited university. ... Jack Adler is an artist who worked as an inker for DC comics. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Les Daniels (born 1943) is an American writer of historical horror fiction. ...

References

Joe Simon (born 1915) was a comic book author and cartoonist who created or co-created many memorable characters in the Golden Age. ... Captain America #111 (March 1969): Sterankos signature surrealism. ...

External links


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