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Encyclopedia > Martyrs' Memorial
Martyrs' Memorial, Oxford
Martyrs' Memorial, Oxford

The Martyrs' Memorial is an imposing stone monument positioned at the intersection of St Giles', Magdalen Street and Beaumont Street in Oxford, England just outside Balliol College. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 432 KB) Martyrs Memorial, Oxford, 2005-03-17. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 432 KB) Martyrs Memorial, Oxford, 2005-03-17. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Full name Balliol College Motto - Named after John de Balliol Previous names - Established 1263 Sister College St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham (academic) Location Broad Street Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford...


Designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott, the monument was completed in 1843 after two years' work, having replaced "a picturesque but tottering old house". The Victorian Gothic memorial, whose design dates from 1838, has been likened to the spire of some sunken cathedral. The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 - March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches and cathedrals. ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


The inscription on the base of the Martyrs' Memorial reads as follows:

"To the Glory of God, and in grateful commemoration of His servants, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Hugh Latimer, Prelates of the Church of England, who near this spot yielded their bodies to be burned, bearing witness to the sacred truths which they had affirmed and maintained against the errors of the Church of Rome, and rejoicing that to them it was given not only to believe in Christ, but also to suffer for His sake; this monument was erected by public subscription in the year of our Lord God, MDCCCXLI".

This inscription goes a long way to explaining the reasons behind the Memorial's erection, some 300 years after the event it commemorates, revealing as much about the religious controversies of the 1840s as those of the 1550s. Much of the Anglican Church was profoundly alarmed in the 1840s at the burgeoning Newmanite or Tractarian movement also known as the Oxford Movement, which sought to prove that the key doctrines of the Church of England were Roman Catholic. Low Church opponents, led by the Reverend Golightly, raised funds for setting up the Martyrs' Memorial to remind the inhabitants of Oxford (and the nation at large) that the Church of England's founding fathers had been martyred by the Roman Catholic Church. Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 - March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. Born in 1489 at Nottingham, Cranmer was educated at Jesus College, Cambridge and became a priest following the death of his first wife. ... Nicholas Ridley (died October 16, 1555) was an English clergyman. ... Hugh Latimer (d. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the 20th century Oxford Movement or Group see Moral Rearmament The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... Founding Fathers are persons instrumental not only in the establishment (founding) of a political institution, but also in the origination of the idea of the institution. ... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for his or her religious faith. ... The Roman Catholic Church believes its founding was based on Jesus appointment of Saint Peter as the primary church leader, later Bishop of Rome. ...


Cuthbert Bede (in his novel The Adventures of Mr Verdant Green) wrote about the setting of the Martyrs' Memorial thus in 1853: 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

"He who enters the city, as Mr Green did, from the Woodstock Road, and rolls down the shady avenue of St Giles', between St John's College and the Taylor Buildings, and past the graceful Martyrs' Memorial, will receive impressions such as probably no other city in the world could convey."

The actual site of the execution is 20 metres away in Broad Street. The site is marked by a cross sunk in the road.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Christian martyrs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (310 words)
A Christian martyr is one who chooses to die, usually by means of a cruel or tortured means like stoning, crucifixion, beheading, etc., instead of renouncing a core principle or belief about their Christian faith.
The first Christian martyr was Saint Stephen as recorded in the Acts of the Apostles (6:8-8:3) who was stoned to death for his faith.
Stephen was killed (i.e., martyred) for his support, belief and faith in Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah.
Martyrs' Memorial - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (324 words)
The Martyrs' Memorial is a rather imposing stone monument positioned at the intersection of St Giles', Magdalen Street and Beaumont Street in Oxford, England just outside Balliol College.
Much of the Anglican Church was profoundly alarmed in the 1840s at the burgeoning Newmanite or Tractarian movement also known as the Oxford Movement, which sought to prove that the key doctrines of the Church of England were Roman Catholic.
Low Church opponents, led by the Reverend Golightly, raised funds for setting up the Martyrs' Memorial to remind the inhabitants of Oxford (and the nation at large) that the Church of England's founding fathers had been martyred by the Roman Catholic Church.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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