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Encyclopedia > Martlesham Heath
Map sources for Martlesham Heath at grid reference TM2547
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Map sources for Martlesham Heath at grid reference TM2547

Martlesham Heath village is situated 6 miles east of Ipswich, in Suffolk, England. This was an ancient area of heathland and latterly the site of Martlesham Heath Airfield. A "new village" was established there in the mid-1970’s and this has developed into a modern community, based on a traditional village pattern. Download high resolution version (1802x2589, 189 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Ipswich Categories: GFDL images | GBdot ... Download high resolution version (1802x2589, 189 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Ipswich Categories: GFDL images | GBdot ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Ipswich is the county town of Suffolk in East Anglia, England, and a local government district on the estuary of the River Orwell. ... Suffolk (pronounced suffuk) is a large traditional and administrative county in the East Anglia region of eastern England. ... Martlesham Heath Airfield was first used by the Royal Flying Corps in January 1917. ...

Contents


History

There is evidence of settlement in this area since the Bronze Age, with a number of round barrows surviving to the present. The main community of Martlesham grew up to the north-east, initially on the highest ground, where Martlesham Church is still located, then, later, centring on the point where the main London-to-Yarmouth road crosses the River Finn, a tributary to the Deben. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Round barrows are one of the most common types of archaeological monuments. ... Image:Martlesham - Suffolk dot. ...


White's 1844 directory of Suffolk describes Martlesham as "a neat village near the confluence of a rivulet with the Deben" but mentions that the parish includes "a large, sandy, and unenclosed heath, extending about 2 miles S.W., and affording pasturage for numerous herds of sheep and cattle." Enclosure (also historically inclosure) is the process of subdivision of common land for individual ownership. ...


Martlesham Heath Airfield

In 1917, the Experimental Aircraft Flight of the Central Flying School was transferred from Upavon, Wiltshire to a site on the heathland at Martlesham and, on 16th January, 1917, Martlesham Heath Airfield was officially opened, as an experimental airfield. The unit was renamed the "Aeroplane Experimental Unit, Royal Flying Corps". After the end of World War I the site continued to be used and was, once again, renamed as the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment (A&AEE) of the Royal Air Force. Martlesham Heath Airfield was first used by the Royal Flying Corps in January 1917. ... The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I. Origin and Early History Formed by Royal Warrant on May 13, 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers. ... Clockwise from top: Trenches in frontline, a British Mark I Tank crossing a trench, the Royal Navy battleship HMS Irresistible sinking after striking a mine at the battle of the Dardanelles, a Vickers machine gun crew with gas masks and a Sopwith Camel biplane. ... The Royal Air Force (often abbreviated to RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ...


At the outbreak of the Second World War, the A&AEE was removed to a site in Hampshire, owing to the proximity of Martlesham Heath to the East Coast and its vulnerability to enemy attack. The airfield then took on a new role as a base for fighter squadrons defending Britain. Wing Commander (later Group Captain) Douglas Bader, D.S.O., D.F.C. served at Martlesham Heath with 222 and 242 Squadrons, in 1940. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... A Wing Commanders sleeve/shoulder insignia A Wing Commanders command flag Wing Commander is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia A Group Captains command flag Group Captain is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader (February 21, 1910 (St Johns Wood, London) - September 5, 1982), was a successful fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. ...


At the end of hostilities, there was no longer a role for Martlesham Heath as an operational RAF airfield and no prospect of the A&AEE returning, but the site was again used for a number of experiments with planes and armaments. However, its use declined in the 1950s, and the airfield was closed in the early 1960s.


Various proposals were put forward for the development of the site, including the proposal that it should become a civil airport. Parts of the old airfield were let out to light industry and storage companies. In 1963 the lease of the site was sold by the Air Ministry to Bradford Property Trust, Ltd, for a price of £72,500.


The new village

In 1968, the Post Office announced that they would be relocating their Research Department from Dollis Hill to a new centre to be built at Martlesham Heath. The building work took place in the early 1970s and this site has remained as the central research and development facility through the changes that have taken place with the separation of British Telecom from the Post Office; the privatisation of British Telcommunications plc; and the subsequent development of the site into the current Adastral Park complex. 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The British General Post Office (GPO) was officially established in 1660 by Charles II and it eventually grew to combine the functions of both the state postal system and telecommunications carrier. ... The Post Office Research Station at Dollis Hill, London, was first established in 1921 and opened by the Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald in 1933. ... Dollis Hill is an area of North-West London, England. ... BT Group plc (formerly known as British Telecommunications) which trades as BT (and previously as British Telecom) is the privatised former UK state telecommunications operator . ...


In 1972 a proposal was presented by Bradford Property Trust to the Planning Department of the local Council to develop a "New Village" of Martlesham Heath, with houses for 3000 people, with associated shops, schools and recreational facilities. This was accepted and has resulted in the development of the present community of Martlesham Heath. The vision of this development was to create a completely new community, but based on a traditional pattern. Hence, the village is centred on a village green, with a pub, church and cricket pavilion. In order to maintain a consistent appearance of the village, homeowners at Martlesham Heath are restricted by covenants which restrict changes that they can make to their houses and gardens: for example, residents are prevented from attaching external television aerials to their houses. 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ...

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2588x1232, 475 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ...

References

  • David Dymond and Peter Northeast: A History of Suffolk, Phillimore, 1985. ISBN 0-850334829
  • William White: History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Suffolk, 1844
  • Gordon Kinsey: Martlesham Heath, Terence Dalton Ltd, 1975. ISBN 0-900963484
  • Paul Firman: Martlesham - The Good and Bad Old Days, The Martlesham Monthly, ISBN 0-954200403

  Results from FactBites:
 
Martlesham Heath Brief History (551 words)
Martlesham main claim to fame is the establishment of the RAF Experimental Aircraft flight and the subsequent history associated with the airfield during the Second World War.
Martlesham Heath Airfield was officially opened, as an experimental airfield.
RAF Martlesham Heath is a former Royal Air Force airfield in England.
Martlesham Heath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (676 words)
Martlesham Heath village is situated 6 miles east of Ipswich, in Suffolk, England.
The main community of Martlesham grew up to the north-east, initially on the highest ground, where Martlesham Church is still located, then, later, centring on the point where the main London-to-Yarmouth road crosses the River Finn, a tributary to the Deben.
In order to maintain a consistent appearance of the village, homeowners at Martlesham Heath are restricted by covenants which restrict changes that they can make to their houses and gardens: for example, residents are prevented from attaching external television aerials to their houses.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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