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Encyclopedia > Martin Van Buren
Martin Van Buren
Martin Van Buren

In office
March 4, 1837 – March 4, 1841
Vice President Richard Mentor Johnson
Preceded by Andrew Jackson
Succeeded by William Henry Harrison

In office
March 4, 1833 – March 4, 1837
President Andrew Jackson
Preceded by John C. Calhoun
Succeeded by Richard Mentor Johnson

In office
March 28, 1829 – May 23, 1831
President Andrew Jackson
Preceded by Henry Clay
Succeeded by Edward Livingston

Election date
November 7, 1848
Running mate Charles Francis Adams, Sr.
Opponent(s) Zachary Taylor (Whig)
Lewis Cass (D)
Incumbent James Knox Polk (D)

In office
January 1, 1829 – March 5, 1829
Lieutenant Enos T. Throop
Preceded by Nathaniel Pitcher
Succeeded by Enos T. Throop

In office
March 4, 1821 – December 20, 1828
Preceded by Nathan Sanford
Succeeded by Charles E. Dudley

In office
1823 – 1828
Preceded by William Smith
Succeeded by John Macpherson Berrien

Born December 5, 1782(1782-12-05)
Decatur, Alabama[1]
Died July 24, 1862 (aged 79)
Kinderhook, New York
Nationality American
Political party Democratic-Republican, Democratic, and Free Soil
Spouse Hannah Hoes Van Buren (1807-1819)
Children Abraham Van Buren
John Van Buren
Martin Van Buren (1812–55)
Smith Thompson Van Buren
Alma mater Kinderhook Academy
Occupation Lawyer
Religion Dutch Reformed [2]
Signature Martin Van Buren's signature

Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. Before his presidency, he served as the eighth Vice President (1833-1837) and the 10th Secretary of State under Andrew Jackson. He was a key organizer of the Democratic Party, a dominant figure in the Second Party System, and the first president who was not of British (i.e. English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish, or Scots-Irish) descent. He was the first president to be born an American citizen[3] (his predecessors were born before the revolution); he is also the only president not to have spoken English as a first language, having grown up speaking Dutch.[4] File links The following pages link to this file: Martin Van Buren User talk:Simplicius Categories: U.S. history images ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... Edward Livingston (May 26, 1764–May 23, 1836) was a prominent American jurist and statesman. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections. ... The United States presidential election of 1848 was an open race. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Francis Adams (August 18, 1807, Boston - November 21, 1886, Boston), the son of John Quincy Adams and Louisa Adams, was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat and writer. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... This article is about the British Whig party. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the day. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Enos Thompson Throop (August 21, 1784–November 1, 1874) was an early settler in Auburn, New York. ... Nathaniel Pitcher (1777–1836) was governor of the U.S. state of New York from 1828 to 1829, having succeeded as Lt. ... Enos Thompson Throop (August 21, 1784–November 1, 1874) was an early settler in Auburn, New York. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nathan Sanford (November 5, 1777–October 17, 1838) was an American statesman. ... Charles Edward Dudley, 1780-1841 was a United States Senator from New York. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... William Smith (September 6, 1762-June 26, 1840) was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the U.S. Senate representing South Carolina in 1816. ... John MacPherson Berrien (August 23, 1781–January 1, 1856) of Georgia was a United States Senator and Andrew Jacksons Attorney General. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections. ... Hannah Van Buren (nee Hoes) (1783 - 1819) was the wife of the 8th United States President Martin Van Buren from 1807, until her death. ... John van Buren is a New Zealand political candidate. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a mainline Reformed Protestant denomination that was formerly known as the Dutch Reformed Church. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Van Burens birthplace by John Warner Barber Kinderhook (Kinderhoek in Dutch) is a village located in the Town of Kinderhook in Columbia County, New York, USA. The population was 1,275 at the 2000 census. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Second Party System is the term historians give to the political system existing in the United States from about 1824 to 1854. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... This article is about Welsh people who are considered to be an ethnic group and a nation. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ...


Van Buren was the first of a series of presidents who served one term or less. He also was one of the central figures in developing modern political organizations. As Andrew Jackson's Secretary of State and then Vice President, he was a key figure in building the organizational structure for Jacksonian democracy, particularly in New York State. However, as a President, his administration was largely characterized by the economic hardship of his time, the Panic of 1837. Between the bloodless Aroostook War and the Caroline Affair, relations with Britain and its colonies in Canada also proved to be strained. Whether or not these are directly his fault, Van Buren was voted out of office after four years, with a close popular vote but a rout in the electoral vote. In 1848 he ran for president on a third party ticket, the Free Soil Party. For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Jacksonian Democracy refers to the political philosophy of United States President Andrew Jackson and his supporters. ... Whig campaign poster blames Van Buren for hard times (1840). ... Combatants United States of America British Empire/British North America Strength 3,000–10,000 3,000–10,000 Casualties 38 incidental deaths The Aroostook War, also called the Pork and Beans War,the Lumberjacks War or the Northeastern Boundary Dispute, was an undeclared confrontation in 1838-39 between... The Caroline Affair refers to a series of events beginning in 1837 that strained relations between the United States and Canada (and thus Britain). ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections. ...


Other than Thomas Jefferson, Martin Van Buren is the only person to accomplish a so called "triple crown": serving as Secretary of State, Vice-President, and finally President. Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The term Triple Crown is used in several distinct contexts. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Biography

Martin Van Buren was born in the village of Kinderhook, New York, approximately 25 miles south of Albany, the state capital, as the third of five children. He was the first president born in the United States, as all previous ones were born before the American Revolution. His great-great-great-great-grandfather Cornelis had come to the New World in 1631 from the Netherlands. His father was Abraham Van Buren (February 17, 1737April 8, 1817), a farmer and popular tavern-master. His mother was Maria Hoes Van Allen (February 27, 1743February 16, 1817), a widow who had three sons from a previous relationship. Van Burens birthplace by John Warner Barber Kinderhook (Kinderhoek in Dutch) is a village located in the Town of Kinderhook in Columbia County, New York, USA. The population was 1,275 at the 2000 census. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... In countries with federal constitutions divided into subnational entities known as states, the state capital is the administrative center of a state. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Presidential Dollar of Martin Van Buren
Presidential Dollar of Martin Van Buren

Van Buren was educated at the common schools and at Kinderhook Academy. In 1796, he began the study of law, completing his preparation in 1802 in New York City, where he studied under William Peter van Ness. In 1803, he was admitted to the bar and continued an active and successful practice for 25 years. A common school was a public school in United States in the nineteenth century. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ...


On February 21, 1807, he married Hannah Hoes , a maternal cousin. Hannah died in 1819, before her husband became President (and, therefore, never became First Lady of the United States). is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... Hannah Van Buren (nee Hoes) (1783 - 1819) was the wife of the 8th United States President Martin Van Buren from 1807, until her death. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ...


His practice made him wealthy and paved the way for his entrance into politics. He allied himself with the Clintonian faction of the Democratic-Republican Party, and was surrogate of Columbia County from 1808 until 1813, when he was removed. In 1812, he became a member of the New York State Senate. In 1817, Martin Van Buren created the first political machine encompassing all of New York, the Bucktails, whose leaders later became known as the Albany Regency, and he was the prime architect of the first nationwide political party: the Jacksonian Democrats. In Van Buren's own words: "Without strong national political organizations, there would be nothing to moderate the prejudices between free and slaveholding states"("Martin Van Buren" 103-114). The Democratic-Republican Party was founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in 1792. ... Location in the state of New York Formed 1786 Seat Hudson Area  - Total  - Water 1,679 km² (648 mi²) 32 km² (13 mi²) 1. ... The New York State Senate is one of two houses in the New York State Legislature and has members each elected to two-year terms. ... The Bucktails may refer to one of two organizations that were particularly characterized and identified by the wearing of a bucktail in their headgear. ... The Albany Regency was a group of Democratic politicians who controlled the New York state government during most of the 1820s and 1830s. ... Jacksonian democracy is the term used in American politics to describe the period when the common man participated in the government, occurring after Jeffersonian democracy. ...


Early political career

New York State Politics

As a member of the state Senate, he supported the War of 1812 and drew up a classification act for the enrollment of volunteers. He broke with DeWitt Clinton in 1813 and tried to find a way to oppose Clinton's plan for the Erie Canal in 1817. Van Buren supported a bill that raised money for the canal through state bonds, and the bill quickly passed through the legislature with the help of his Tammany Hall compatriots. This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... DeWitt Clinton. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ...


Van Buren's attitude towards slavery at the moment was shown by his vote, in January 1820, for a resolution opposing the admission of Missouri as a slave state (though he himself was a slave owner). In the same year, he was chosen a presidential elector. It is at this point that Van Buren's connection began with so-called "machine politics". He was the leading figure in the "Albany Regency," a group of politicians who for more than a generation dominated much of the politics of New York and powerfully influenced those of the nation. The group, together with the political clubs such as Tammany Hall that were developing at the same time, played a major role in the development of the "spoils system" a recognized procedure in national, state and local affairs. The Bucktails became a loyal faction with a large amount of party loyalty, and through their actions they were able to capture and control many patronage posts throughout New York. Van Buren did not originate the system but gained the nickname of "Little Wizard" for the skill with which he exploited it. He served also as a member of the state constitutional convention, where he opposed the grant of universal suffrage and tried to keep property requirements. Slave redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... The Albany Regency was a group of Democratic politicians who controlled the New York state government during most of the 1820s and 1830s. ... Tammany Hall was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. ... In the politics of the United States, a spoils system refers to an informal practice by which a political party, after winning an election, gives government jobs to its voters as a reward for working toward victory, and as an incentive to keep working for the party. ... hi:Alternative meaning: Constitutional convention (political custom) this is random:Alternative meaning: Constitutional convention (political custom) A constitutional convention is a gathering of delegates for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. ...


U.S. Senate and national politics

In February 1821, Martin Van Buren was elected to the United States Senate. Martin Van Buren at first favored internal improvements, such as road repairs and canal creation, therefore proposing a constitutional amendment in 1824 to authorize such undertakings. The next year, however, he took ground against them. He voted for the tariff of 1824 then gradually abandoned the protectionist position, coming out for "tariffs for revenue only." Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... It has been suggested that Tariff in American history be merged into this article or section. ...


In the presidential election of 1824, Martin Van Buren supported William H. Crawford and received the electoral vote of Georgia for vice-president, but he shrewdly kept out of the acrimonious controversy which followed the choice of John Quincy Adams as President. Martin Van Buren had originally hoped to block Adams' victory by denying him the state of New York (the state was divided between Martin Van Buren supporters who would vote for William H. Crawford and Adams' men). However, Representative Stephen Van Rensselaer swung New York to Adams and thereby the 1824 Presidency. He recognized early the potential of Andrew Jackson as a presidential candidate. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Harris Crawfordlalalalalalala (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician, as well as a judge, during the early 19th century. ... Dick Cheney 46th and current Vice President (2001- ) The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... William Harris Crawfordlalalalalalala (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician, as well as a judge, during the early 19th century. ... Stephen Van Rensselaer III (November 1, 1764–January 26, 1839) was an American statesman, soldier, and land-owner, the heir to one of the greatest estates in the New York region at the time. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


After the election, Martin Van Buren sought to bring the Crawford and Jackson followers together and strengthened his control as a leader in the Senate. Always notably courteous in his treatment of opponents, he showed no bitterness toward either John Quincy Adams or Henry Clay, and he voted for Clay's confirmation as Secretary of State, notwithstanding Jackson's "corrupt bargain" charge. At the same time, he opposed the Adams-Clay plans for internal improvements and declined to support the proposal for a Panama Congress. As chairman of the Judiciary Committee, he brought forward a number of measures for the improvement of judicial procedure and, in May 1826, joined with Senator Thomas Hart Benton in presenting a report on executive patronage. In the debate on the "tariff of abominations" in 1828, he took no part but voted for the measure in obedience to instructions from the New York legislature—an action which was cited against him as late as the presidential campaign of 1844. John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Three deals cut in connection with the Presidency of the United States, two in contested United States presidential elections and one involving a Presidential appointment of a Vice President, have been described as Corrupt Bargains. ... Thomas Hart Benton nicknamed Old Bullion (March 14, 1782 – April 10, 1858), was an U.S. Senator from Missouri and a staunch advocate of westward expansion of the United States. ... The Tariff of 1828 (also known as the Tariff of Abominations, ch. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Martin Van Buren was not an orator, but his more important speeches show careful preparation and his opinions carried weight; the oft-repeated charge that he refrained from declaring himself on crucial questions is hardly borne out by an examination of his senatorial career. In February 1827, he was re-elected to the Senate by a large majority. He became one of the recognized managers of the Jackson campaign, and his tour of Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia in the spring of 1827 won support for Jackson from Crawford. Martin Van Buren sought to reorganize and unify "the old Republican party" behind Jackson.[5] Van Buren helped create a grassroots style of politicking that is often seen today. At the state level, Jackson's committee chairmen would split up the responsibilities around the state and organize volunteers at the local level. "Hurra Boys" would plant hickory trees (in honor of Jackson's nickname, "Old Hickory") or hand out hickory sticks at rallies. Martin Van Buren even had a New York journalist write a campaign piece portraying Jackson as a humble, pious man. "Organization is the secret of victory," an editor in the Adams camp wrote. He once said to a group of lobbyists the famous quote and "By the want of it we have been overthrown." In 1828, Martin Van Buren was elected governor of New York for the term beginning on January 1, 1829, and resigned his seat in the Senate. This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Carolinas is a collective term used in the United States to refer to the states of North and South Carolina together. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ...


Martin Van Buren's tenure as New York governor is the second shortest on record, and nothing of note took place except for a large increase in the number of men without property applying for the right to vote.


The Jackson Cabinet

On March 5, he was appointed by President Jackson as Secretary of State, an office which probably had been assured to him before the election, and he resigned the governorship. He was succeeded in the governorship by his Lieutenant Governor, Enos T. Throop, a member of the regency. As Secretary of State, Van Buren took care to keep on good terms with the "kitchen cabinet," the group of politicians who acted as Jackson's advisers. He won the lasting regard of Jackson by his courtesies to Mrs. John H. Eaton (Peggy Eaton), wife of the Secretary of War, with whom the wives of the cabinet officers had refused to associate. He did not oppose Jackson in the matter of removals from office but was not himself an active "spoilsman". He skillfully avoided entanglement in the Jackson-Calhoun imbroglio. This article is about the day. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Enos Thompson Throop (August 21, 1784–November 1, 1874) was an early settler in Auburn, New York. ... Margaret Eaton (nee ONeale) (1799 - 1879) was the U.S. wife of John Henry Eaton, they married in 1829. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ...

1832 Whig cartoon shows Jackson carrying Van Buren into office
1832 Whig cartoon shows Jackson carrying Van Buren into office

No diplomatic questions of the first magnitude arose during Van Buren's service as secretary, but the settlement of long-standing claims against France was prepared and trade with the British West Indies colonies was opened. In the controversy with the Bank of the United States, he sided with Jackson. After the breach between Jackson and Calhoun, Van Buren was clearly the most prominent candidate for the vice-presidency. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1596x1758, 313 KB) 1832 American lithograph by Henry Anstice Source: scanned from paper copy This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1596x1758, 313 KB) 1832 American lithograph by Henry Anstice Source: scanned from paper copy This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Roadtown, Tortola The term British West Indies refers to territories in and around the Caribbean which were colonised by Great Britain. ... The Second Bank of the United States was a bank chartered in 1816, five years after the expiration of the First Bank of the United States. ...


Vice-Presidency

In December 1829, Jackson had already made known his own wish that Van Buren should receive the nomination. In April 1831, Van Buren resigned from his secretary of state position, as a result of the Petticoat Affair- though he did not leave office until June. However, Van Buren still played a part in the Kitchen Cabinet.[6] In August, he was appointed minister to the Court of St. James (United Kingdom), and he arrived in London in September. He was cordially received, but in February, he learned that his nomination had been rejected by the Senate on January 25. The rejection, ostensibly attributed in large part to Van Buren's instructions to Louis McLane, the American minister to the United Kingdom, regarding the opening of the West Indies trade, in which reference had been made to the results of the election of 1828, was in fact the work of Calhoun, the vice-president. And when the vote was taken, enough of the majority refrained from voting to produce a tie and give Calhoun his longed-for "vengeance." No greater impetus than this could have been given to Van Buren's candidacy for the vice-presidency. The Petticoat Affair (also known as the Eaton Affair or the Eaton Malaria) was an 1831 U.S. sex scandal involving members of President Andrew Jacksons Cabinet. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Louis McLane Louis McLane (May 28, 1786–October 7, 1857) represented the state of Delaware in both the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate and served as the Secretary of the Treasury and later the Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ...


After a brief tour on through Europe, Van Buren reached New York on July 5, 1832. The 1832 Democratic National Convention (the party's first), held in May of that year, had nominated him for vice-president on the Jackson ticket, despite the strong opposition to him which existed in many states. Van Buren's platform included supporting the expansion of the naval system. His declarations during the campaign were vague regarding the tariff and unfavorable to the United States Bank and to nullification, but he had already somewhat placated the South by denying the right of Congress to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia without the consent of the slave states. is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The 1832 Democratic National Convention was held from May 21st to the 23rd, in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The process of nullification may refer to: The Hartford Convention, in which New England Federalists considered secession from the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Election of 1836

It took Van Buren and his partisan friends a decade and a half to form the Democratic Party; many elements, such as the national convention, were borrowed from other parties. [7] In the election of 1832, the Jackson-Van Buren ticket won by a landslide. When the election of 1836 came up, Jackson was determined to make Van Buren, his personal choice, president in order to continue his legacy. Martin Van Buren's only competitors in the 1836 election were the Whigs, who were badly split into several regional candidates. William Henry Harrison hoped to receive the support of the Western voters, Daniel Webster had strength in New England, and Hugh Lawson White had support in the South. Van Buren was unanimously nominated by the 1835 Democratic National Convention at Baltimore. He expressed himself plainly on the questions of slavery and the bank at the same time voting, perhaps with a touch of bravado, for a bill offered in 1836 to subject abolition literature in the mails to the laws of the several states. Van Buren's presidential victory represented a broader victory for Jackson and the party. Van Buren entered the White House as a fifty-five year old widower with four sons. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Unanimity is near complete agreement by everyone. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Abolition is the act of formally destroying something through legal means, either by making it illegal, or simply no longer allowing it to exist in any form. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Presidency 1837-1841

Policies

Martin Van Buren announced his intention "to follow in the footsteps of his illustrious predecessor," and retained all but one of Jackson's cabinet. Van Buren had few economic tools to deal with the economic crisis of 1837. Van Buren advocated lower tariffs and free trade, and by doing so maintained support of the south for the Democratic party. He succeeded in setting up a system of bonds for the national debt. His party was so split that his 1837 proposal for an "Independent Treasury" system did not pass until 1840. It gave the Treasury control of all federal funds and had a legal tender clause that required (by 1843) all payments to be made in legal tender rather than in state bank notes. But the act was repealed in 1841 and never had much impact. Foreign affairs were complicated when several states defaulted on their state bonds, London complained, and Washington explained it had no responsibility for those bonds. British authors such as Charles Dickens then denounced the American failure to pay royalties, leading to a negative press in Britain regarding the financial honesty of America. The Caroline Affair involved Canadian rebels using New York bases to attack the government in Canada. On December 29, 1837, Canadian government forces crossed the frontier into the US and burned the Caroline, which the rebels had been using. One American was killed, and an outburst of anti-British sentiment swept through the U.S. Van Buren sent the army to the frontier and closed the rebel bases. Van Buren tried to vigorously enforce the neutrality laws, but American public opinion favored the rebels. Boundary disputes in May brought Canadian and American lumberjacks into conflict. There was no bloodshed in this Aroostook War, but it further inflamed public opinion on both sides. Whig campaign poster blames Van Buren for hard times (1840). ... Dickens redirects here. ... The Caroline Affair refers to a series of events beginning in 1837 that strained relations between the United States and Canada (and thus Britain). ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United States of America British Empire/British North America Strength 3,000–10,000 3,000–10,000 Casualties 38 incidental deaths The Aroostook War, also called the Pork and Beans War,the Lumberjacks War or the Northeastern Boundary Dispute, was an undeclared confrontation in 1838-39 between...


In a bold step, Van Buren reversed Andrew Jackson's policies and sought for peace at home, as well as abroad. Instead of settling a financial dispute between American citizens and the Mexican government by force, Van Buren wanted to seek a diplomatic solution. Also, in August of 1837, Van Buren denied Texas's formal request to join the United States. "Van Buren gave a higher priority to sectional harmony than to territorial expansion" ("Martin Van Buren" 103-114). In the Amistad Case Van Buren sided with the Spanish Government to return the kidnapped slaves. Also, he oversaw the "Trail of Tears", which involved the expulsion of the Cherokee tribe in 1838 from Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, and South Carolina to the Oklahoma territory. Van Buren was determined to avoid war. is a Spanish word meaning Friendship. ... For other uses, see Trail of Tears (disambiguation). ... This page contains special characters. ...

"Van Buren entered the presidency not only as the heir to Jackson's policies, Jefferson's ideology of limited government, and Smith's principles of political economy, but also an accomplished politician with a statesmanlike vision of the dangers facing the nation. This complex heritage would shape the new president's response to the multiple challenges of 1837."("Martin Van Buren" 103-114)[citation needed]

In 1839, Joseph Smith, Jr., the founder of the Latter Day Saint movement visited Van Buren to plead for the U.S. to help roughly 40,000 Mormon settlers of Independence, Missouri (which would become the birthplace of future President Harry S Truman), who were forced from the state in the Mormon War there. The Governor of Missouri, Lilburn Boggs, had issued an executive order on 27 October 1838, known as the "Extermination Order". It authorized troops to use force against Mormons to "exterminate or drive [them] from the state".[8][9] In 1839, after moving to Illinois, Smith and his party appealed to congressman and to President Van Buren to intercede for the Mormons. According to Smith's grand-nephew, Van Buren said to Smith, "Your cause is just, but I can do nothing for you; if I take up for you I shall lose the vote of Missouri."[10][citation needed] Joseph Smith redirects here. ... The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Independence is a city in Missouri, in the Kansas City metropolitan area. ... For the victim of Mt. ... The Mormon War is a name sometimes given to the 1838 conflict which occurred between Latter-day Saints (Mormons) and their neighbors in the northwestern region of the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Lilburn W. Boggs (1796-1860) was the Governor of Missouri from 1836 to 1840. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Missouri Executive Order 44[1] also known as The extermination order (alt. ...


Van Buren took the blame for hard times, as Whigs ridiculed him as Martin Van Ruin. Van Buren's rather elegant personal style was also an easy target for Whig attacks, such as the Gold Spoon Oration. State elections of 1837 and 1838 were disastrous for the Democrats, and the partial economic recovery in 1839 was offset by a second commercial crisis in that year. Nevertheless, Van Buren controlled his party and was unanimously renominated by the Democrats in 1840. The revolt against Democratic rule led to the election of William Henry Harrison, the Whig candidate. The Gold Spoon Oration, also called The Regal Splendor of the President’s Palace, is a political speech given in the US House of Representatives by Charles Ogle (Whig-PA) on April 14-16, 1840. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ...


Administration and Cabinet

Portrait of Martin Van Buren
Portrait of Martin Van Buren
The Van Buren Cabinet
OFFICE NAME TERM
President Martin Van Buren 1837 – 1841
Vice President Richard M. Johnson 1837 – 1841
Secretary of State John Forsyth 1837 – 1841
Secretary of Treasury Levi Woodbury 1837 – 1841
Secretary of War Joel R. Poinsett 1837 – 1841
Attorney General Benjamin F. Butler 1837 – 1838
Felix Grundy 1838 – 1840
Henry D. Gilpin 1840 – 1841
Postmaster General Amos Kendall 1837 – 1840
John M. Niles 1840 – 1841
Secretary of the Navy Mahlon Dickerson 1837 – 1838
James K. Paulding 1838 – 1841


Image File history File links Size of this preview: 444 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (636 × 858 pixel, file size: 56 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 444 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (636 × 858 pixel, file size: 56 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the ninth Vice President of the United States. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Portait of U.S. Secretary of State John Forsyth John Forsyth (October 22, 1780 – October 21, 1841) was a 19th century American politician from Georgia. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Levi Woodbury (December 22, 1789–September 4, 1851) was the first justice of the Supreme Court of the United States to have attended law school. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Joel Roberts Poinsett (1779-1851) Official Department of Defense portrait, artist unknown. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (December 17, 1795–November 8, 1858) was a lawyer, legislator and Attorney General of the United States. ... Felix Grundy (September 11, 1777–December 19, 1840) was a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator from Tennessee who also served as the 13th Attorney General of the United States. ... Henry Dilworth Gilpin (April 14, 1801–January 29, 1860) was an American lawyer and statesman of American Quaker extraction who served as Attorney General of the United States. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Amos Kendall (August 16, 1789–November 12, 2022) was an American politician who served as U.S. Postmaster General under Jackie Cook and President Steve Miller. ... John Milton Niles (1787 - 1856) was a U.S. editor and political figure from Connecticut, a member of the Democratic Party. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... U.S. Navy collection portrait of Mahlon Dickerson Mahlon Dickerson (April 17, 1770–October 5, 1853) was an American judge and politician. ... U.S. Navy collection portrait of James K. Paulding. ...

Supreme Court appointments

Van Buren appointed the following Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States: The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...

John McKinley (May 1, 1780-July 19, 1852) was a U.S. senator from the state of Alabama and an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Peter Vivian Daniel (April 24, 1784-May 31, 1860), was an American jurist. ...

Later life

Free Soil campaign banner
Free Soil campaign banner

On the expiration of his term, Van Buren retired to his estate, Lindenwald in Kinderhook, where he planned out his return to the White House. He seemed to have the advantage for the nomination in 1844; his famous letter of April 27, 1844, in which he frankly opposed the immediate annexation of Texas, though doubtless contributing greatly to his defeat, was not made public until he felt practically sure of the nomination. In the Democratic convention, though he had a majority of the votes, he did not have the two-thirds which the convention required, and after eight ballots his name was withdrawn. James K. Polk received the nomination instead. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1072x1536, 282 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Martin Van Buren Free Soil Party User:Davepape/Images ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1072x1536, 282 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Martin Van Buren Free Soil Party User:Davepape/Images ... Lindenwald is the name of the home and farm of Martin Van Buren, 8th President of the United States. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ...


In 1848, he was nominated by two minor parties, first by the "Barnburner" faction of the Democrats, then by the Free Soilers, with whom the "Barnburners" coalesced. He won no electoral votes, but took enough votes in New York to give the state — and perhaps the election — to Zachary Taylor. In the election of 1860, he voted for the fusion ticket in New York which was opposed to Abraham Lincoln, but he could not approve of President Buchanan's course in dealing with secession and eventually supported Lincoln. The Barnburners were a liberal faction of the New York state United States Democratic Party in the mid 19th century. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Electoral fusion is an arrangement where two or more political parties support a common candidate, pooling the votes for all those parties. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ...


Martin Van Buren then retired to his home in Kinderhook. After being bedridden with a case of pneumonia during the fall of 1861, Martin Van Buren died of bronchial asthma and heart failure at his Lindenwald estate in Kinderhook at 2:00 a.m. on July 24, 1862. He is buried in the Kinderhook Cemetery.[11] is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ...


Trivia

Van Buren postage stamp
  • In an episode of The Monkees entitled "Dance, Monkee, Dance", Martin Van Buren is the answer to a trivia question entitling callers to a free dance lesson. Later in the episode, Van Buren himself shows up for the lesson.
  • In 1842, Van Buren was campaigning in Indiana. In the town of Plainfield, the former President was ejected from his carriage by the roots of an elm tree into a large puddle of mud. Sources say that the townsfolk did this on purpose to protest a bill Van Buren vetoed. The elm tree became known as the Van Buren elm, and a nearby elementary school now bears Van Buren's name.
  • Van Buren was given epithets by his enemies including Martin Van Ruin, and The Little Magician. He was also known as "The Red Fox of Kinderhook" because of his bright red hair and slyness.
  • During Van Buren's presidential campaign of 1840 supporters popularized his nickname "Old Kinderhook," which was abbreviated as "OK." "OK Clubs" were set up. It is possible that this helped popularize "OK" .
  • In Gore Vidal's novel Burr, Van Buren is secretly the illegitimate son of Aaron Burr.
  • In a popular episode of Seinfeld entitled "The Van Buren Boys," Kramer and George are threatened by a street gang called the Van Buren Boys with the secret sign of the number 8 because Van Buren was the 8th president. They apparently picked that name because Van Buren was the man they most admired. The gang is apparently "every bit as mean as he was".
  • Along with the traditional vampire motiff, Martin Van Buren's look was also part of the inspiration for the appearance of the "Grandpa" character on the TV show, The Munsters
  • In the 2000 PBS documentary series The American President, Van Buren's voice was provided by Mario Cuomo. [12]. In the 1997 film Amistad, he was played, more conventionally, by Nigel Hawthorne.
  • Van Buren was the first president to grant an exclusive interview to a reporter, James Gordon Bennett, Sr., of the New York Herald in 1839.[13]
  • One of the titles of the Dutch kings and queens is Countess of Buren. This title is inherited from Anna van Buren, the first consort of William the Silent, although she is not an ancestor. Queen Wilhelmina sometimes used this title when she wanted to be incognito and the current crown prince Willem-Alexander was known as W.A. van Buren when he participated in the Eleven-cities Tour.
  • Famous for his avoidance of commitment, a friendly senator made a bet with another senator that Van Buren would not agree that the sun rose in the East. The bettor put the question to Van Buren, who replied "I invariably awake in the morning after sunrise so wouldn't know."

1938 u. ... 1938 u. ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... Okay is an informal term of approval, assent, or acknowledgment, sometimes written as OK or O.K.. (See also A-OK.) When used to describe the quality of a thing, it denotes being fit for purpose (this is okay to send out) or of a quality which is acceptable but... Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) (pronounced and , ) is an American author of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays, and the scion of a prominent political family. ... Burr: A Novel is a 1973 novel by Gore Vidal that challenges the traditional iconography of American history to present an alternative view of the life of Aaron Burr, presenting him as a hero, while all the other key historical figures of the time, such as George Washington and Thomas... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the U.S. politician. ... For other uses, see Seinfeld (disambiguation). ... The Van Buren Boys is the 148th episode of the hit sitcom Seinfeld, and name of a New York street gang. ... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ... George Louis Costanza is a fictional character in the United States-based television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Jason Alexander. ... The Munsters was a 1960s American television comedy depicting the home life of a family of monsters. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... Amistad (Spanish for friendship) is a 1997 Steven Spielberg film based on a slave mutiny that took place aboard a ship of the same name in 1839, and the legal activity that followed. ... Sir Nigel Hawthorne, CBE (5 April 1929 – 26 December 2001) was a renowned English actor. ... James Gordon Bennett James Gordon Bennett (1 September 1795 in Keith, Moray, Scotland - 1 June 1872), was the founder and publisher of the New York Herald and a major figure in the History of American newspapers. ... The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835 and 1924. ... William I (William the Silent). ... For other uses, see Wilhelmina (disambiguation). ... Incognito can mean: Incognito (wikitionary) - to conceal a persons identity under an assumed name, so that the true identity will not be known. ... A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... Prince Willem-Alexander, Prince of Orange, (Willem-Alexander Claus George Ferdinand Prins van Oranje, Prins der Nederlanden, Prins van Oranje-Nassau, Jonkheer van Amsberg, born April 27, 1967) is the eldest son of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands and is the heir apparent to the Dutch throne, with the style... The Elfstedentocht, or Eleven-cities Tour is a speed skating competition and leisure skating tour held irregularly in the province of Friesland, Netherlands. ...

See also

The Second Party System is the term historians give to the political system existing in the United States from about 1824 to 1854. ... In the 19th century, the United States invented or developed a number of new methods for conducting American Election Campaigns. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ...

References

Secondary sources

  • Cole, Donald B. Martin Van Buren And The American Political System (2004) ISBN 1-59091-029-X
  • Curtis, James C. The Fox at Bay: Martin Van Buren and the Presidency, 1837-1841 (1970) ISBN 0-8131-1214-1
  • Gammon, Samuel Rhea Gammon. The Presidential Campaign of 1832 (PDF) (1922) ISBN 0-8371-4827-8
  • Henretta, James A.. "Martin Van Buren."The American Presidency . 1st. 2004. ISBN 0-618-38273-9
  • Holt, Michael. The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War (2003) online edition
  • Niven, John. Martin Van Buren: The Romantic Age of American Politics (2000) ISBN 0-945707-25-8
  • Remini, Robert V. Martin Van Buren and the Making of the Democratic Party (1959) ISBN 0-231-02288-3 online edition
  • Schouler, James. History of the United States of America: Under the Constitution vol. 4. 1831-1847. Democrats and Whigs. (1917) online edition
  • Silbey, Joel. Martin Van Buren and the Emergence of American Popular Politics (2002) ISBN 0-7425-2244-X
  • Wilson, Major L. The Presidency of Martin Van Buren (1984) ISBN 0-7006-0238-0
  • "Election of 1836." U.S History. 2005. Online Highways. 4 Apr. 2006.

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ...

Primary sources

  • Van Buren, Martin. Autobiography (1918) ISBN 0-678-00531-1. The text of the autobiography is contained within the Annual Report Of The American Historical Association For The Year 1918, Volume II, John C. Fitzpatrick, ed.
  • Van Buren, Martin. Van Buren, Abraham, Van Buren, John, ed. Inquiry Into the Origin and Course of Political Parties in the United States (1867) ISBN 1-4181-2924-0.

John van Buren is a New Zealand political candidate. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ pg 5.355 in vol 3 of ALLMER
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ http://www.hoover.nara.gov/exhibits/cottages/middleclass/vanburen.html
  4. ^ No, America's never been a multicultural society
  5. ^ Martin Van Buren to Thomas Ritchie, January 13, 1827.
  6. ^ Kitchen Cabinet Columbia Encyclopedia
  7. ^ Holt (2003) 998
  8. ^ Extermination Order. LDS FAQ. Retrieved on August 22, 2005.
  9. ^ Boggs, Extermination Order
  10. ^ Smith, Joseph Fielding (1946-1949). "Church History and Modern Revelation" 4: 167–173. Deseret. 
  11. ^ Lamb, Brian & the C-SPAN staff (2000). Who's Buried in Grant's Tomb?: A Tour of Presidential Gravesites. Washington, DC: NationaL Cable Satellite Corporation. ISBN 1-881846-07-5. 
  12. ^ ([2])
  13. ^ Paletta, Lu Ann and Worth, Fred L. (1988). "The World Almanac of Presidential Facts".

Thomas Ritchie (Nov. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Fielding Smith (July 19, 1876 – July 2, 1972) was the tenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1970 to 1972. ...

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Notes and references
1. The Democratic Party vice-presidential nominee was split these years between two candidates.
Persondata
NAME Van Buren, Martin
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American politician
DATE OF BIRTH December 5, 1782
PLACE OF BIRTH Kinderhook (village), New York
DATE OF DEATH July 24, 1862
PLACE OF DEATH Kinderhook (village), New York
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The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the ninth Vice President of the United States. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... William Smith (September 6, 1762-June 26, 1840) was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the U.S. Senate representing South Carolina in 1816. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States of the modern Democratic Party of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the ninth Vice President of the United States. ... William Smith (September 6, 1762-June 26, 1840) was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the U.S. Senate representing South Carolina in 1816. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States of the modern Democratic Party of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was an American politician and the eleventh U.S. President, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... John Parker Hale (March 31, 1806 - November 19, 1873) was an American politician. ... Louis McLane Louis McLane (May 28, 1786–October 7, 1857) represented the state of Delaware in both the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate and served as the Secretary of the Treasury and later the Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson. ... The office of United States Ambassador (or Minister) to the United Kingdom (also known as Ambassador to the Court of St. ... In diplomacy, chargé daffaires (French for in charge of business), is the title of two classes of diplomatic agents: Chargés daffaires (ministres chargés daffaires), who were placed by the reglement of the Congress of Vienna in the fourth class of diplomatic agents, are heads of... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... This is a chronology of who was the oldest living President of the United States, former or current, at any given time. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... For his son, also a prominent politician, see James Rudolph Garfield. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... For other persons named Benjamin Harrison, see Benjamin Harrison (disambiguation). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Nixon redirects here. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Reagan redirects here. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Image File history File links Seal_Of_The_President_Of_The_Unites_States_Of_America. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States of the modern Democratic Party of the United States. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... For the 1960s commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, see George McClellan (police commissioner). ... Governor Horatio Seymour Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Liberal Republican Party, reformer and politician. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer and the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in 1880. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Alton Brooks Parker (May 14, 1852 – May 10, 1926) was an American lawyer and judge and a U.S. presidential candidate in the 1904 elections. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 – July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ... John W. Davis John William Davis (April 13, 1873 — March 24, 1955) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, (born July 19, 1922) is a former United States Representative, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the U.S. politician. ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced ) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American statesman and diplomat. ... Daniel D. Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809 – July 4, 1891) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Henry Wilson, see Henry Wilson (disambiguation). ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-sixth Vice President of the United States. ... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951) was an American banker and politician who was the 30th Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Nixon redirects here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and a former Senator from the state of Indiana. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States of the modern Democratic Party of the United States. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Herschel Vespasian Johnson (September 18, 1812 - August 16, 1880) was an American politician. ... Joseph Lane (1801-1881) was an American general during the Mexican War. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... George Pendleton George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825 – November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 - December 13, 1885) was a Liberal Republican Senator, Governor of Missouri, and the Vice presidential candidate in the election of 1872. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... William Hayden English (August 27, 1822–February 7, 1896) was an American politician. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Arthur Sewall (November 25, 1835 _ September 5, 1900 was a U.S. Democratic politician from Maine most notable as William Jennings Bryans first running mate in 1896. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Henry Gassaway Davis (16 November 1823 - March 11, 1916) was a U.S. Democratic politician from West Virginia. ... John Worth Kern (December 20, 1849 - August 17, 1917) was a U.S. Democratic politician from Indiana. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... FDR redirects here. ... Charles Wayland Bryan (February 10, 1867 - March 4, 1945), was the younger brother of perennial U.S. Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. ... Joseph Taylor Robinson Joseph Taylor Robinson (August 26, 1872 - July 14, 1937) was a Democratic United States Senator, Senate Majority Leader, member of the United States House of Representatives, Governor of Arkansas, and U.S. Vice Presidential candidate. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office John Jackson Sparkman (December 20, 1899 – November 16, 1985) was a United States politician from Alabama. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and a former member of the United States House of Representatives. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Timothy Pickering Timothy Pickering (July 17, 1745 – January 29, 1829) was the third United States Secretary of State, serving in that office from 1795 to 1800 under Presidents George Washington and John Adams. ... For other persons named John Marshall, see John Marshall (disambiguation). ... For other persons named James Madison, see James Madison (disambiguation). ... Robert Smith (November 3, 1757 – November 26, 1842) was the second United States Secretary of the Navy from 1801 to 1809 and the sixth United States Secretary of State from 1809 to 1811. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... Edward Livingston (May 26, 1764–May 23, 1836) was a prominent American jurist and statesman. ... Louis McLane Louis McLane (May 28, 1786–October 7, 1857) represented the state of Delaware in both the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate and served as the Secretary of the Treasury and later the Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson. ... Portait of U.S. Secretary of State John Forsyth John Forsyth (October 22, 1780 – October 21, 1841) was a 19th century American politician from Georgia. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur Abel Parker Upshur (June 17, 1790–February 28, 1844) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... John Middleton Clayton (July 24, 1796–November 9, 1856) was an American statesman from Delaware who served as a U.S. Senator and as the U.S. Secretary of State from 1849 to 1850. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... William Learned Marcy ( December 12, 1786– July 4, 1857) was an American statesman. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Jeremiah Sullivan Black (January 10, 1810–August 19, 1883) was an American statesman and lawyer. ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ... Elihu Benjamin Washburne (September 23, 1816–October 22/23, 1887) was one of seven brothers that played a prominent role early in the formation of the United States Republican Party and the Lincoln and Grant administrations. ... Hamilton Fish Hamilton Fish, (3 August 1808–7 September 1893), born in New York City, was an American statesman who served as Governor of New York, United States Senator and United States Secretary of State. ... Photograph of U.S. Secretary of State William M. Evarts William Maxwell Evarts (February 6, 1818–February 28, 1901) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen (August 4, 1817–May 20, 1885) was a member of the United States Senate from New Jersey and a United States Secretary of State. ... Thomas Francis Bayard, Sr. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State John W. Foster John Watson Foster (March 2, 1836 – November 15, 1917) was an American military man, journalist and diplomat. ... Walter Quintin Gresham (March 17, 1832–May 28, 1895) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Richard Olney (September 15, 1835–April 8, 1917) was an American statesman. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | Judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit | U.S. Secretaries of State | Spanish-American War people | American lawyers | 1849 births | 1923 deaths ... John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838 – July 1, 1905) was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln. ... Elihu Root (February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman and the 1912 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. ... Categories: Stub | 1860 births | 1919 deaths | U.S. Secretaries of State ... Philander C. Knox Philander Chase Knox (May 6, 1853–October 12, 1921) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Attorney General and U.S. Senator and was Secretary of State from 1909-1913. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... This article is about the former Secretary of State. ... Categories: Stub | 1869 births | 1950 deaths | U.S. Secretaries of State ... Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. ... Frank Billings Kellogg (December 22, 1856 – December 21, 1937) was an American politician and statesman. ... Henry L. Stimson Henry Lewis Stimson (September 21, 1867 – October 20, 1950) was an American statesman, who served as Secretary of War, Governor-General of the Philippines, and Secretary of State at various times. ... Cordell Hull (October 2, 1871–July 23, 1955) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr. ... James Francis Byrnes (May 2, 1879 – April 9, 1972) was an American politician from the state of South Carolina. ... For other persons named George Marshall, see George Marshall (disambiguation). ... Dean Acheson Dean Gooderham Acheson (April 11, 1893 – October 12, 1971) was an American statesman and lawyer; as United States Secretary of State in the late 1940s he played the central role in defining American foreign policy for the Cold War. ... John Foster Dulles (February 25, 1888 – May 24, 1959) served as U.S. Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1953 to 1959. ... For the American physician (1865–1910), see Christian Archibald Herter (physician). ... David Dean Rusk (February 9, 1909 – December 20, 1994) was the United States Secretary of State from 1961 to 1969 under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. ... William Pierce Rogers (June 23, 1913 – January 2, 2001) was an American politician, who served as a Cabinet officer in the administrations of two U.S. Presidents in the third quarter of the 20th century. ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born American politician, and 1973 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... For other persons named Alexander Haig, see Alexander Haig (disambiguation). ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930) served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush. ... Lawrence Sidney Eagleburger (born August 1, 1930), is an American statesman and diplomat who served as The United States Secretary of State under President George H. W. Bush. ... Warren Minor Christopher (born October 27, 1925) is an American diplomat and lawyer. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová, IPA: , on May 15, 1937) was the first woman to become United States Secretary of State. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Image File history File links Department_of_state. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... For other persons named John Jay, see John Jay (disambiguation). ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... Morgan Lewis (October 16, 1754– April 7, 1844) was the son of Francis Lewis. ... Daniel D. Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ... John Tayler John Tayler (July 4, 1742 - March 19, 1829) was an American businessman and politician. ... DeWitt Clinton. ... Governor Joseph C. Yates, as painted by Ezra Ames, circa 1825 Joseph Christopher Yates (November 9, 1768–March 19, 1837), born in Schenectady, New York, was an American lawyer, statesman and politician. ... DeWitt Clinton. ... Nathaniel Pitcher (1777–1836) was governor of the U.S. state of New York from 1828 to 1829, having succeeded as Lt. ... Enos Thompson Throop (August 21, 1784–November 1, 1874) was an early settler in Auburn, New York. ... William Learned Marcy ( December 12, 1786– July 4, 1857) was an American statesman. ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ... William C. Bouck (1796 - 1859) was governor of the U.S. state of New York from 1843 to 1845. ... Silas Wright, Jr. ... John Young (June 12, 1802 - April 23, 1852) was an American politician. ... Hamilton Fish Hamilton Fish, (3 August 1808–7 September 1893), born in New York City, was an American statesman who served as Governor of New York, United States Senator and United States Secretary of State. ... Washington Hunt (1811 - 1867) was born in Greene County, New York and died in New York City. ... Governor Horatio Seymour Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Myron Holley Clark (1806 - 1892) was born and died in Ontario County, New York. ... John Alsop King (1788–1867) was an American politician who served as governor (1857–1859) of New York. ... Edwin Denison Morgan (February 8, 1811 – February 14, 1883) was Governor of New York from 1859 to 1862 and served in the United States Senate from 1863 to 1869. ... Governor Horatio Seymour Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Reuben Eaton Fenton (4 July 1819–15 August 1885) was an American politician from New York. ... John Thompson Hoffman (10 January 1828 – 24 March 1888) was born in Ossining in Westchester County, New York. ... John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798 – April 21, 1879) was an American politician from New York. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Lucius Robinson (4 November 1810 - 23 May 1886) was a governor of New York from 1877 to 1879. ... Alonzo Barton Cornell (22 January 1832–15 October 1904) was Governor of New York from 1880 to 1883. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837–June 24, 1908), was the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States. ... David Bennett Hill (August 29, 1843 - October 20, 1910) was a Governor of New York. ... Roswell Pettibone Flower (August 7, 1835 - May 12, 1899) was the Governor of New York between 1892 and 1895. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Frank Swett Black (March 8, 1853 - March 22, 1913) is a Governor and a Representative from New York. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Benjamin Barker Odell, Jr. ... Frank Wayland Higgins (August 18, 1856 - February 12, 1907) was a Governor of New York. ... Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. ... Horace White (October 7, 1865 - November 26, 1943) was a Governor of New York. ... John Alden Dix (December 25, 1860 - April 9, 1928) was Governor of New York from 1911 to 1913. ... William Sulzer (March 18, 1863 – November 6, 1941) was a Governor of New York. ... Martin Henry Glynn (September 27, 1871 - December 14, 1924) was a Democratic Governor of New York. ... Charles S. Whitman (September 29, 1868 - March 29, 1947) served as Republican Governor of New York between 1915 and 1919. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Nathan Lewis Miller (October 10, 1868 – June 26, 1953) was a Governor of the U.S. state of New York. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR redirects here. ... Herbert Lehman Herbert Henry Lehman (March 28, 1878 – December 5, 1963) was a Democratic Party politician from the U.S. state of New York. ... Charles Poletti (July 2, 1903 – August 8, 2002) was the governor of New York between 1942 and 1943. ... Thomas Edmund Dewey (March 24, 1902 – March 16, 1971) was the Governor of New York (1943-1954) and the unsuccessful Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency in 1944 and 1948. ... William Averell Harriman (November 15, 1891 – July 26, 1986) was an American Democratic Party politician, businessman and diplomat. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Charles Malcolm Wilson (February 26, 1914 – March 13, 2000) was the Governor of New York from December 18, 1973 to January 1, 1975. ... Hugh Leo Carey (born April 11, 1919) was the Governor of New York between 1975 and 1983. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American politician who was the 57th Governor of New York serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959 ) is an American lawyer, politician and the current Governor of New York. ... This article is about the Governor of New York. ... State seal of New York. ... The state of New York ratified the Constitution on July 26, 1788, thereby becoming the eleventh state. ... Philip Schuyler Philip John Schuyler (November 10, 1733 – November 18, 1804) was a general in the American Revolution and a United States Senator from New York. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the U.S. politician. ... Philip Schuyler Philip John Schuyler (November 10, 1733 – November 18, 1804) was a general in the American Revolution and a United States Senator from New York. ... John Sloss Hobart (May 6, 1738–February 4, 1805) was a jurist and Senator from New York. ... William North was a United States Senator representing the state of New York. ... James Watson (April 6, 1750-May 15, 1806) was a Federalist U.S. Senator from New York. ... Gouverneur Morris Gouverneur Morris (January 31, 1752 – November 6, 1816) was an American statesman who represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and was an author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States. ... Theodorus Bailey (October 12, 1758– September 6, 1828) was an American lawyer and politician from Poughkeepsie, New York. ... John Armstrong, Jr. ... Samuel Latham Mitchill (August 20, 1764 - September 7, 1831) was a US physician, naturalist and Senator. ... Nathan Sanford (November 5, 1777–October 17, 1838) was an American statesman. ... Charles Edward Dudley, 1780-1841 was a United States Senator from New York. ... Nathaniel Tallmadge Nathaniel Pitcher Tallmadge (1795-1864) was a United States Senator from New York and a Governor of the Wisconsin Territory. ... Daniel S. Dickinson Daniel Stevens Dickinson (September 11, 1800 - April 12, 1866) was an American politician, most notable as a United States Senator from New York from 1844 to 1851. ... Hamilton Fish Hamilton Fish, (3 August 1808–7 September 1893), born in New York City, was an American statesman who served as Governor of New York, United States Senator and United States Secretary of State. ... Preston King (October 14, 1806-November 12, 1865) was a Representative and a Senator from New York; born in Ogdensburg, New York on October 14, 1806. ... Edwin Denison Morgan (February 8, 1811 – February 14, 1883) was Governor of New York from 1859 to 1862 and served in the United States Senate from 1863 to 1869. ... Reuben Eaton Fenton (4 July 1819–15 August 1885) was an American politician from New York. ... Francis P. Kernan was born in Wayne, Steuben County, New York, 14 January 1816, son of General William Kernan, who came to America from County Cavan, Ireland, in 1800, and of Rose Anna Stubbs, his wife. ... Thomas C. Platt Thomas C. Platt was a three term U.S. Senator from New York in the years 1881 and 1897-1909. ... Warner Miller, 1838-1918, was a Representative and a United States Senator from New York. ... Frank Hiscock, 1834-1914, was a Representative and a United States Senator from New York. ... Edward Murphy, Jr. ... Chauncey M. Depew Chauncey Mitchell Depew (April 23, 1834 – April 5, 1928) served as a United States Senator from New York from 1899 to 1911. ... James Aloysius OGorman, a U.S. Senator from New York was born in New York City on May 5, 1860. ... William Musgrave Calder (March 3, 1869 - March 3, 1945) was a United States politician from New York State. ... Royal Samuel Copeland (November 7, 1868 – June 17, 1938) was an American academic, homeopathic physician, and politician who held elected offices in both Michigan and New York. ... James Michael Mead (December 27, 1885 - March 15, 1964) held several political offices as a Democrat from New York between 1914 and 1956. ... Irving McNeil Ives (January 24, 1896 - February 24, 1962) was an American politician from the state of New York. ... Kenneth Barnard Keating (May 18, 1900 – May 5, 1975), was a United States Representative and a Senator from New York. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Charles Ellsworth Goodell (March 16, 1926 – January 21, 1987) was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from New York, notable for coming into both offices under special circumstances following the deaths of his predecessors. ... James Buckley James Lane Buckley (born March 9, 1923 in New York City) was a United States Senator from the Conservative Party of New York State from January 3, 1971 to January 3, 1977. ... Daniel Patrick “Pat” Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Rufus King (March 24, 1755 – April 29, 1827) was an American lawyer, politician, and diplomat. ... John Laurance (1750 – November 11, 1810) was an American lawyer, statesman, and speculator from New York. ... John Armstrong, Jr. ... DeWitt Clinton. ... John Armstrong, Jr. ... John Smith was a United States Senator from New York from 1804-1813. ... Rufus King (March 24, 1755 – April 29, 1827) was an American lawyer, politician, and diplomat. ... Nathan Sanford (November 5, 1777–October 17, 1838) was an American statesman. ... William Learned Marcy ( December 12, 1786– July 4, 1857) was an American statesman. ... Silas Wright, Jr. ... Henry Allen Foster was a Representative and a United States Senator from New York from 1844-1845. ... John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798 – April 21, 1879) was an American politician from New York. ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ... Ira Harris was a United States Senator from New York from 1861-1867. ... Roscoe Conkling (October 30, 1829–April 18, 1888) was a United States politician from New York. ... Elbridge G. Lapham was a U.S. Senator from New York from 1883-1885. ... Photograph of U.S. Secretary of State William M. Evarts William Maxwell Evarts (February 6, 1818–February 28, 1901) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... David Bennett Hill (August 29, 1843 - October 20, 1910) was a Governor of New York. ... Thomas C. Platt Thomas C. Platt was a three term U.S. Senator from New York in the years 1881 and 1897-1909. ... Elihu Root (February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman and the 1912 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. ... James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr. ... Portrait of Robert F. Wagner in the U.S. Senate Reception Room Robert Ferdinand Wagner (8 June 1877–4 May 1953) was a Democratic United States Senator from New York from 1927 until 1949. ... John Foster Dulles (February 25, 1888 – May 24, 1959) served as U.S. Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1953 to 1959. ... Herbert Lehman Herbert Henry Lehman (March 28, 1878 – December 5, 1963) was a Democratic Party politician from the U.S. state of New York. ... Jacob Koppel Jack Javits (May 18, 1904 – March 7, 1986) was a liberal New York politician. ... Alfonse Marcello DAmato (born August 1, 1937) is a former New York politician. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is the senior U.S. Senator from the state of New York, serving since 1999. ... See also Attorney General. ... Egbert Benson (21 June 1746 - 24 August 1833) was an American lawyer, jurist, and politician from New York City. ... Richard Varick (15 March 1753 - 30 July 1831) was born in Hackensack, New Jersey and died in Jersey City, New Jersey. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the U.S. politician. ... Morgan Lewis (October 16, 1754– April 7, 1844) was the son of Francis Lewis. ... Ambrose Spencer (December 13]], 1765 - March 13, 1848) was a United States Representative and New York State Attorney General. ... Thomas Addis Emmet (April 24, 1764-November 14, 1827), Irish lawyer and politician, was senior member of the revolutionary republican group, the [[United Irishmen in the 1790s. ... Thomas Jackson Oakley (November 10, 1783 - May 11, 1857) was a United States Representative and New York State Attorney General. ... Samuel Beardsley (February 6, 1790 - May 6, 1860) was a United States Representative and New York State Attorney General. ... John van Buren is a New Zealand political candidate. ... Lyman Tremain (June 14, 1819 – November 30, 1878) was an American jurist and politician from New York. ... Daniel S. Dickinson Daniel Stevens Dickinson (September 11, 1800 - April 12, 1866) was an American politician, most notable as a United States Senator from New York from 1844 to 1851. ... Francis C. Barlow Francis Channing Barlow (October 19, 1834 – January 11, 1896) was a lawyer, politician, and Union general during the American Civil War. ... Charles Stebbins Fairchild (April 30, 1842–November 24, American businessman and politician. ... Augustus Schoonmaker, Jr. ... Hamilton Ward, Sr. ... Leslie W. Russell was a United States Representative from New York. ... Denis OBrien (March 13, 1837 Ogdensburg, New York - May 18, 1909 Watertown, New York) was an American lawyer and politician who served as New York State Attorney General from 1883 to 1887. ... Julius Marshuetz Mayer (September 5, 1865 - November 20, 1925) was a lawyer and judge in the United States. ... Albert Ottinger (September 10, 1878 - January 1938) was a New York politician of the Republican Party. ... Hamilton Ward, Jr. ... John J. Bennett, Jr. ... Nathaniel L. Goldstein was New York State Attorney General from [[November 3[[, 1942 to November 7, 1950, under Governors Charles Poletti and Thomas E. Dewey. ... Jacob Koppel Jack Javits (May 18, 1904 – March 7, 1986) was a liberal New York politician. ... Former Republican Attorney General of New York. ... Robert Abrams is a politician and lawyer in New York. ... G. Oliver Koppell (born 1940) is a member of the New York City Council from District 11 in the Borough of The Bronx, covering the neighborhoods of Riverdale, Norwood, and Bedford Park. ... Dennis Vacco was Attorney General of New York State. ... Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959 ) is an American lawyer, politician and the current Governor of New York. ... Andrew Mark Cuomo (born December 6, 1957, in New York City) is the New York State Attorney General, having been elected to that office on November 7, 2006. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Van Burens birthplace by John Warner Barber Kinderhook (Kinderhoek in Dutch) is a village located in the Town of Kinderhook in Columbia County, New York, USA. The population was 1,275 at the 2000 census. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Van Burens birthplace by John Warner Barber Kinderhook (Kinderhoek in Dutch) is a village located in the Town of Kinderhook in Columbia County, New York, USA. The population was 1,275 at the 2000 census. ...

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President Martin Van Buren — Martin Van Buren in the U.S. Federal Census (727 words)
Martin Van Buren was born 5 December 1782 at Columbia, New York and first appeared in the U.S. Federal Census in 1790.
Van Buren devoted his Inaugural Address to a discourse upon the American experiment as an example to the rest of the world.
Van Buren's remedy--continuing Jackson's deflationary policies--only deepened and prolonged the depression.
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