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Encyclopedia > Martin Rees

The Right Honourable Martin John Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow, FRS (born 23 June 1942) is a professor of astronomy. He has been Astronomer Royal since 1995, and Master of Trinity College, Cambridge since 2004. The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt. ... FRS is an acronym which can stand for various phrases: As a title of UK citizens, Fellow of the Royal Society In computing, freely redistributable software In telecommunications, Family Radio Service In finance, Financial Records System This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... This article is about the year. ... A professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) (prof for short) is a senior teacher, lecturer and researcher, usually in a college or university. ... Astrometry: the study of the position of objects in the sky and their changes of position. ... Astronomer Royal is a senior post in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College Christ Church Master Martin Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rees was educated at Shrewsbury School and Trinity College, Cambridge, and studied in the United States before taking a professorship at Sussex University. Returning to Cambridge, he held the post of Plumian Professor until 1991 and was director of the Institute of Astronomy there. From 1992 to 2003 he was Royal Society Research Professor, and from 2003 Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics. He became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1979. Shrewsbury School is a leading British boys public school (UK), located in Shrewsbury in the county of Shropshire. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College Christ Church Master Martin Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... The University of Sussex is an English campus university located near the East Sussex village of Falmer, near Brighton and Hove and on the edge of the South Downs. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... The Plumian chair of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy is one of the two major Professorships in Astronomy at Cambridge University, alongside the Lowndean Professorship. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Institute of Astronomy or IoA is conventionally used by astronomers to refer to the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Cambridge (although there are departments at other universities with the same name). ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cosmology, from the Greek: κοσμολογία (cosmologia, κόσμος (cosmos) world + λογια (logia) discourse) is the study of the universe in its totality and by extension mans place in it. ... Spiral Galaxy ESO 269-57 Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, including the physical properties (luminosity, density, temperature and chemical composition) of astronomical objects such as stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, as well as their interactions. ... The Royal Society of London is claimed to be the oldest learned society still in existence and was founded in 1660. ...


In a career that has seen him publish over 500 research papers, he has made important contributions in the origin of cosmic microwave background radiation, as well as galaxy clustering and formation. His studies of the distribution of quasars proved a strong argument against the steady state theory, and he was one of the first to propose that enormous black holes power the quasars. He is also a well-respected and popular publicist of astronomy and science in general. In cosmology, the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) is a form of electromagnetic radiation discovered in 1964 that radiates throughout the universe in the microwave range. ... NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy in the constellation Coma Berenices, is about 56,000 light years in diameter and approximately 60 million light years distant. ... This view, taken with infrared light, is a false-color image of a quasar-starburst tandem with the most luminous starburst ever seen in such a combination. ... In cosmology, the steady state theory (also known as the Infinite Universe Theory) is a model developed in 1948 by Fred Hoyle, Thomas Gold, Hermann Bondi and others as a non-standard cosmology to the Big Bang theory (known, usually, as the standard cosmological model). ... A black hole is a concentration of mass great enough that the force of gravity prevents anything from escaping from it except through quantum tunneling behavior. ... Astrometry: the study of the position of objects in the sky and their changes of position. ... // What is science? There are various understandings of the word science. According to empiricism, scientific theories are objective, empirically testable, and predictive — they predict empirical results that can be checked and possibly contradicted. ...


On 29 March 2005, it was announced that he had been nominated as the next president of the Royal Society, the UK's national academy of science, and he is expected to take over the post in November 2005. His selection as a "people's peer" to sit as a crossbencher in the House of Lords was announced on 22 July 2005 and on 6 September he was created Baron Rees of Ludlow, of Ludlow in the County of Shropshire. March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in Leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Royal Society of London for the Improvement of Natural Knowledge, known simply as the Royal Society, claims to be the oldest learned society still in existence. ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... A cross-bencher is a member of the British House of Lords who is not aligned to any particular party. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... 22 July is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... Map sources for Ludlow at grid reference SO5174 Feathers Hotel, Ludlow (Photo by Mick Knapton) Ludlow is a town in Shropshire, situated almost on the border between England and Wales. ... Shropshire (abbreviated Salop or Shrops) is a traditional, ceremonial and administrative county in the West Midlands region of England. ...

Contents


Honours

Awards

Named after him The Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics is jointly awarded each year by the American Astronomical Society and American Institute of Physics for outstanding work in astrophysics. ... This page is about the year 1984. ... The Gold Medal is the highest award of the Royal Astronomical Society. ... The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) began as the Astronomical Society of London in 1820 to support astronomical research (mainly carried on at the time by gentleman astronomers rather than professionals). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The Catherine Wolfe Bruce gold medal is awarded every year by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific for outstanding lifetime contributions to astronomy. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Bruno Rossi Prize is awarded annually by the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society for a significant contribution to High Energy Astrophysics, with particular emphasis on recent, original work. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... The Henry Norris Russell Lectureship is awarded each year by the American Astronomical Society in recognition of a lifetime of excellence in astronomical research. ... The American Astronomical Society (AAS) is a US society of professional astronomers and other interested individuals, headquartered in Washington, DC. The main aim of the AAS is provide a political voice for its members and organise their lobbying. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Royal Society of London for the Improvement of Natural Knowledge, known simply as the Royal Society, claims to be the oldest learned society still in existence. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Crafoord Prize was established by Holger Crafoord, the inventor of the artificial kidney and his wife Anna-Greta Crafoord in 1980. ... James E. Gunn is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Astronomy at Princeton University. ... Philip James Edwin Peebles (born April 25, 1935) is an Canadian-American astronomer. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

An asteroid is a small, solid object in our Solar System, orbiting the Sun. ...

Publications

  • Gribbin, John; Rees, Martin (1989). Cosmic Coincidences: Dark Matter, Mankind, and Anthropic Cosmology, Bantam. ISBN 0553347403.
  • "New perspectives in astrophysical cosmology", 1995.
  • "Gravity's fatal attraction: black holes in the universe", 1995.
  • "Before the beginning - our universe and others", 1997.
  • "Just Six Numbers", 2000.
  • "Our Cosmic Habitat", 2001.
  • "Our Final Hour" (UK title: "Our Final Century"), 2003, ISBN 0465068626.
  • La lucciola e il riflettore, Di Renzo Editore, Roma, 2004

Our Final Hour is a 2003 book by the British Astronomer Royal Sir Martin Rees. ...

Quote

"Once the threshold is crossed when there is a self-sustaining level of life in space, then life's long-range future will be secure irrespective of any of the risks on Earth (with the single exception of the catastrophic destruction of space itself). Will this happen before our technical civilisation disintegrates, leaving this as a might-have-been? Will the self-sustaining space communities be established before a catastrophe sets back the prospect of any such enterprise, perhaps foreclosing it for ever? We live at what could be a defining moment for the cosmos, not just for our Earth." ~ Our Final Century by Martin Rees

Artists conception of a space habitat called the Stanford torus, by Don Davis Space colonization, also called space settlement and space humanization, is the hypothetical permanent autonomous (self-sufficient) human habitation of locations outside Earth. ...

External links

Preceded by:
Sir Arnold Wolfendale
Astronomer Royal
1995–
Succeeded by:
Preceded by:
Amartya Sen
Master of Trinity College, Cambridge
2004–
Succeeded by:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Martin Rees - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (579 words)
The Right Honourable Martin John Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow, FRS (born 23 June 1942) is a professor of astronomy.
Rees was educated at Shrewsbury School and Trinity College, Cambridge, and studied in the United States before taking a professorship at Sussex University.
Martin Rees nomination for new President of the Royal Society (29 March 2005)
Guardian Unlimited | Life | The end of the world as we know it (maybe) (2892 words)
Martin Rees is rather chirpy for a horseman of the apocalypse.
Rees started off as a research fellow at Cambridge, did a couple of stints in America, and by 1972 he had been appointed professor of astronomy at Sussex University.
Rees says that astronomy, the science of the very large, and atomic physics, the science of the very small, are easy compared to the science of the everyday scale - the human scale.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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