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Encyclopedia > Martin Opitz von Boberfeld

Martin Opitz von Boberfeld (December 23, 1597August 20, 1639), German poet, was born in Bolesławiec (Bunzlau) in Silesia, the son of a prosperous citizen. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (488x748, 244 KB) Martin Opitz Copperplate print, 15,2 x 9,4 cm; Paulus Fürst Excud. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... Events 17 January - A court case in Guildford recorded evidence that a certain plot of land was used for playing “kreckett” (i. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... A poet is someone who writes poetry. ... BolesÅ‚awiec (-Polish, German: Bunzlau) is a town in southwestern Poland (Lower Silesia) with 41,300 inhabitants (2000). ... Prussian Silesia, 1871, outlined in yellow; Silesia at the close of the Seven Years War in 1763, outlined in cyan (areas now in the Czech Republic were Austrian-ruled at that time) Silesia (Czech: ; German: ; Polish: ; Silesian: Åšlonsk / Åšlónsk) is a historical region in central Europe. ...


He received his early education at the gymnasium of his native town, of which his uncle was rector, and in 1617 attended the high school—"Schonaichianum"—at Beuthen (Bytom) where he made a special study of French, Dutch and Italian poetry. In 1618 he entered the University of Frankfurt-on-Oder as a student of literae humaniores, and in the same year published his first essay, Aristarchus, sive De contemptu linguae Teutonicae, a plea for the purification of the German language from foreign adulteration. Bytom ( ; German: ) is a city in southern Poland with 205,560 inhabitants (1999). ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... University of Frankfurt may refer to two (or three) German universities: the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main) in Frankfurt am Main the European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder) (Europa-Universität Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder)) in Frankfurt (Oder), or its historical predecessor... Aristarchus of Samothrace, Gr. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ...


In 1619 he went to Heidelberg, where he became the leader of the school of young poets which at that time made that university town remarkable. Visiting Leiden in the following year he sat at the feet of the famous Dutch lyric poet Daniel Heinsius (1580-1655), whose Lobgesang Jesu Christi and Lobgesang Bacchi he had already translated into alexandrines. After being for a short year (1622) professor of philosophy at the gymnasium of Weissenburg (Alba Iulia) in Transylvania, he led a wandering life in the service of various territorial nobles. Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... A view of the city from the castle (Schloss) The castle (Schloss) above the town Shopping district Heidelberg and the other cities of the Neckar valley View from the so called alley of philosophers (Philosophenweg) towards the Old Town, with Heidelberg Castle, Heiliggeist Church and the Old Bridge Heidelberg is... Leyden redirects here. ... Daniel Heinsius (or Heins) ( June 9, 1580 - February 25, 1655), one of the most famous scholars of the Dutch Renaissance, was born at Ghent. ... An alexandrine is a line of poetic meter. ... The Death of Socrates, by Jacques-Louis David (1787) depicts the philosopher Socrates carrying out his own execution. ... Alba Iulia (Hungarian: Gyulafeh r, German: Karlsburg) is a city in Alba county, Transylvania, Romania with a population of 66,369, located on the Mureş river. ... Map of Romania with Transylvania in yellow Transylvania (Romanian: or Transilvania; Hungarian: ; German: ; Serbian: or Erdelj / Ердељ) is a historical region in the center of Romania. ...


In 1624 he was appointed councillor to Duke George Rudolf of Legnica Liegnitz and Brzeg Brieg in Silesia, and in 1625, as reward for a requiem poem composed on the death of Archduke Charles of Austria, was crowned poet laureate by the emperor Ferdinand II who a few years later ennobled him under the title "von Boberfeld." He was elected a member of the Fruitbearing society ("Fruchtbringende Gesellschaft")in 1629, and in 1630 he went to Paris, where he made the acquaintance of Hugo Grotius. He settled in 1635 in the Hanse city of Danzig (Gdańsk), where Ladislaus IV of Poland made him his historiographer and secretary. There he died of the plague on August 20, 1639. Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... Legnica ( , formerly Lignica; German: ) is a town in Silesia in southwestern Poland. ... Legnica (pronounce: [lεgniʦa], formerly Lignica, German Liegnitz) is a town in south-western Poland, with 108,000 inhabitants (1995). ... Brzeg (German: ) is a town in southwestern Poland with 42,00 inhabitants (2006), situated in the Opole Voivodship. ... Brzeg is a town in south-western Poland with 39,900 inhabitants (1995), situated in the Opole Voivodship. ... Prussian Silesia, 1871, outlined in yellow; Silesia at the close of the Seven Years War in 1763, outlined in cyan (areas now in the Czech Republic were Austrian-ruled at that time) Silesia (Czech: ; German: ; Polish: ; Silesian: Åšlonsk / Åšlónsk) is a historical region in central Europe. ... Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Victorious Archduke Charles of Austria during the Battle of Aspern_Essling (May 21_22, 1809) The epileptic younger brother of Holy Roman Emperor Francis II, Archduke Charles of Austria (Erzherzog Karl) (September 5, 1771 - April 30, 1847) achieved respect both as a commander and as a reformer of Austrias army. ... Emperor Ferdinand II Ferdinand II (July 9, 1578 – February 15, 1637), of the House of Habsburg, reigned as Holy Roman Emperor from 1620-1637. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Hugo Grotius Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; Delft, 10th April 1583 - Rostock, 28th August 1645) worked as a jurist in the United Provinces (now the Netherlands) and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... The foundations of the Hanseatic League (German: Hanse), an alliance of trading cities that for a time in the later Middle Ages and the Early Modern period maintained a trade monopoly over most of Northern Europe and the Baltic, can be seen as early as the 12th century, with the... GdaÅ„sk (IPA: ; German: , Kashubian: , Late Latin: ; older English Dantzig; also other languages) is the sixth-largest city in Poland, and also its principal seaport and the capital of the Pomeranian Voivodeship. ... Reign in Poland From November 8, 1632 until May 20, 1648 Reign in Russia From 1610 until 1635 Elected in Poland On November 8, 1632 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Elected in Russia In 1610 Coronation On February 6, 1633 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal... Bubonic plague is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease plague, which is caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ...


Opitz was the head of the so-called First Silesian School of poets, and was during his life regarded as the greatest German poet. Although he would not to-day be considered a poetical genius, he may justly claim to have been the "father of German poetry" in respect at least of its form; his Buch von der deutschen Poeterey (1624) put an end to the hybridism that had until then prevailed, and established rules for the "purity" of language, style, verse and rhyme. A rhyme is a repetition of identical or similar sounds in two or more different words and is most often used in poetry. ...


Opitz's own poems are in accordance with the rigorous rules which he laid down. They are mostly a formal and sober elaboration of carefully considered themes, and contain little beauty and less feeling. To this didactic and descriptive category belong his best poems, Trost-Gedichte in Widerwãrtigkeit des Krieges (written 1621, but not published until 1633); Zlatna, oder von der Ruhe des Gemüths (1622); Lob des Feldlebens (1623); Vielgut, oder vom wahren Glück (1629), and Vesuvius (1633). These contain some vivid poetical descriptions, but are in the main treatises in poetical form.


In 1624 Opitz published a collected edition of his poetry under the title Acht Bücher deutscher Poematum (though, owing to a mistake on the part of the printer, there are only five books); his Dafne (1627), to which Heinrich Schütz composed the music, is the earliest German opera. In 1637 (printed at Danzig 1638 he dedicated the Geistliche Poemata (Religious Poems) to the Duchess of Silesia Der Durchlauchtigen Hochgebornen Fürstin und Frawen/ Frawen Sibyllen Margarethen, gebornen Hertzogin in Schlesien/ zur Lignitz und Briegk: Vermähleten deß Heiligen Röm. Reichs Gräffin von Dönhoff... Dantzig/den6.Tag deß intermonats/im 1637. Jahr. Sibylle Margarethe was the daughter of Dorothea of Brandenburg and the wife of Gerhard Dönhoff, brother of Magnus Ernst (Ernst Magnus Dönhoff) and Kaspar Dönhoff (Kasper Doenhoff). Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... Heinrich Schütz Heinrich Schütz (October 9, 1585 – November 6, 1672) was a German composer and organist, generally regarded as the most important German composer before Johann Sebastian Bach and is often considered to be one of the most important composers of the 17th century along with Claudio Monteverdi. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Dorothea of Brandenburg (1431 to 1495) was the daughter of Johan of Brandenburg and Barbara of Sachsen-Wittenberg. ... Magnus Ernst or Ernst Magnus Dönhoff (Denhoff) (1581-1642) was a Baltic-German and eastern Prussian noble (Reichsfürst) of the Holy Roman Empire since 1633 and noble (szlachcic) in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth; also Castellan of Parnawa (from 1635), voivode of Parnawa from 1640, starost of Derpsk, Telszew... Kasper D(o)enhoff (German: , Polish: , 1587-1645) was a Baltic-German noble (Reichsfürst) of the Holy Roman Empire and a noble (szlachcic), courtier and a diplomat at the court of the kings of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ...


Besides numerous translations, Opitz edited (1639) Das Annolied, a Middle High German poem of the end of the 11th century, and thus preserved it from oblivion since the original manuscript is now lost. The Annolied (Song of Anno) was composed in about 1100 in Early Middle High German rhyming couplets by a monk of Siegburg Abbey. ... Middle High German (MHG, German Mittelhochdeutsch) is the term used for the period in the history of the German language between 1050 and 1350. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ...


Reference: Martin Opitz Geistliche Poemata 1638, Erich Trunz Barock, Max Niemeyer Verlag Tübingen 1966en:Martin Opitz Martin Opitz von Boberfeld (December 23, 1597 - August 20, 1639), German poet, was born at Bunzlau/Boleslawiec in Silesia, the son of a prosperous citizen. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Martin Opitz Von Boberfeld (504 words)
Opitz was the head of the so-called First Silesian School of poets, and was during his life regarded as the greatest German poet.
Opitz's own poems are in accordance with the rigorous rules which he laid down.
In 1624 Opitz published a collected edition of his poetry under the title ''Acht Bücher deutscher Poematum'' (though, owing to a mistake on the part of the printer, there are only five books); his ''Dafue'' (1627), to which Heinrich Schutz composed the music, is the earliest German opera.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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