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Encyclopedia > Martin O'Malley
Martin O'Malley

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 17, 2007 -
Lieutenant(s) Anthony G. Brown
Preceded by Robert Ehrlich

Born January 18, 1963 (1963-01-18) (age 44)
Flag of Washington, D.C. Washington, D.C.
Political party Democratic
Spouse Catherine Curran O'Malley
Profession Lawyer
Religion Roman Catholic

Martin Joseph O'Malley (born January 18, 1963) is a Democratic politician and the 61st and current Governor of Maryland. Previously, he served as Mayor of Baltimore City from 1999 to 2007. He attended Our Lady of Lourdes School in Bethesda, Maryland, and then enrolled at Gonzaga College High School located in Washington D.C. [1], graduating in 1981. O'Malley went on to college at The Catholic University of America and then to law school at the University of Maryland School of Law. Robert L. Ehrlich, the 60th and current Governor of Maryland. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... Current Lt. ... Anthony G. Brown (born November 21, 1961 in Huntington, New York) is an American politician. ... For the entrepreneur and businessman, see Robert Ehrlich. ... January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Washington,_D.C..svg The flag of Washington, D.C. It is from openclipart. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... Catherine Curran OMalley (born August 18, 1962), is a Maryland state judge. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Nickname: Motto: The Greatest City in America,[3] Get in on it. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... Gonzaga College High School is a prestigious Jesuit high school for boys located in Washington, DC. The school is named in honor of St. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Catholic University of America (abbreviated CUA), located in Washington, D.C., is unique as the national university of the Roman Catholic Church and as the only higher education institution founded by U.S. Roman Catholic bishops. ... University of Maryland School of Law is a law school located in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. ...

Contents

Political development

In December of 1982, O'Malley, while still in college, signed on with the Gary Hart for President campaign. In late 1983, O'Malley volunteered to go to Iowa. He phone-banked, organized volunteers, and even played guitar and sang [2] at small fundraisers and other events. Hart was the surprising runner-up in the caucus, and O'Malley headed to other states such as Pennsylvania and Oklahoma. Initially polling at 1%, Hart rose to become the biggest challenger to Walter Mondale. Hart became the “new ideas” candidate, but eventually lost the nomination. Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Political campaign Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A political campaign is an organized effort to influence the decision making process within a group. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A fundraiser is an event or campaign whose primary purpose is fundraising. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... Official language(s) English, Pennsylvania Dutch Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ...


O'Malley finished college at The Catholic University of America in 1985. Later that year he enrolled at the University of Maryland School of Law in Baltimore, earning his JD in 1988 and passing the bar that same year. The Catholic University of America (abbreviated CUA), located in Washington, D.C., is unique as the national university of the Roman Catholic Church and as the only higher education institution founded by U.S. Roman Catholic bishops. ... University of Maryland School of Law is a law school located in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. ...


In 1986, while in law school, O'Malley was named by then-Congresswoman Barbara Mikulski as her state field director for her successful primary and general election campaigns for the U.S. Senate. Later he served as a legislative fellow in Senator Mikulski’s office from 1987-1988. Barbara Ann Mikulski (born July 20, 1936), a member of the Democratic Party, is the current Class 3 United States Senator representing the State of Maryland. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...


In 1988, he began dating his future wife, Catherine Curran, the daughter of the State's Attorney General. Later that year, O’Malley was hired as an Assistant State's Attorney for the City of Baltimore. He would hold that position until 1990. The State Attorney (also called States Attorney or District Attorney or D.A.) is an appointed or elected official who is often the chief law enforcement officer of his or her respective county circuit or district. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United...


In 1990, O'Malley ran for the Maryland State Senate in District 43. He lost the Democratic Primary to John A. Pica Jr. by 44 votes. [3] A year later he ran for a vacant Baltimore City Council seat to represent the 3rd District. He served from 1991 to 1999. As Councilman, he served as Chairman of the Legislative Investigations Committee and Chairman of the Taxation and Finance Committee. The Maryland State Senate is the upper house of the General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maryland. ...


Mayor of Baltimore City

O'Malley announced his campaign for Mayor of Baltimore in 1999. He won the Democratic Primary with over 50% of the vote. He was then elected Mayor of Baltimore in the General election with over 90% of the vote [4]. In 2004, O'Malley was re-elected in the general election with 88% of the vote, defeating Republican challenger Elbert (Ray) Henderson. The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...


In O'Malley's first year in office, he adopted a statistics-based tracking system first modeled after "'Compstat,'" which was employed by former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani to assist the New York City Police Department. O'Malley broadened this results driven government model across all government services. The program shifted Baltimore’s way of “doing government” from an antiquated patronage-based system to a contemporary, high-tech, performance-based system that zeroes in on areas of under-performance, using computerized databases to track targets and results. There is a weekly meeting in which city department managers meet with the Mayor’s office and are brought to task for their results. The power of information technology has been harnessed to manage the complexities of modern urban systems and procedures. CitiStat has saved Baltimore residents more than $350 million.[1] In 2004, O'Malley's CitiStat accountability tool won Harvard University’s prestigious Innovations in American Government award [5]. NY redirects here. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ...

Stained Glass window of Mayor Martin O'Malley.
Stained Glass window of Mayor Martin O'Malley.

As one of O’Malley’s top five accomplishments, his administration said that he “cut property taxes to new 30 year low” [6]. On the other hand, "he sought and won an income tax increase which was enacted in 2001".[7] This claim is arguable because while the rate was decreased all of the assessed valued were increased resulting in an overall tax increase which is proven by city budget statistics. [8] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


During his first Mayoral campaign, O’Malley’s most prominent campaign promise was to bring down Baltimore’s homicide count to 175. O'Malley claims that Baltimore “has brought about nearly a 40% reduction in violent crime, which leads the nation” [9]. Still, in 2006, Baltimore was ranked the twelfth most dangerous city. This ranking represents a substantial improvement from the previous year, when it was ranked the sixth most dangerous city.[2] Homicide (Latin homicidium, homo human being + caedere to cut, kill) refers to the act of killing another human being. ...


Baltimore’s reported homicide rate continues to be five times that of New York City, which has the lowest crime rate of America's large cities.[3] To the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Unified Crime Reports for 2000 and 2003, violent crimes -- which include homicide, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault -- in Baltimore (that were reported to law enforcement officials) declined from 16,003 in 2000 (O'Malley's first year in office) to 13,789 in 2003. This only includes reported crimes. There were 261 reported homicides in Baltimore in 2000; 256 in 2001; 253 in 2002; and 270 in 2003. [10] This has increased to 276 homicides in 2004. In 2005 there was some relief with 269 homicides, however that number was surpassed in December 2006. WJZ News reported "Despite promises to reduce the city's homicide rate, Baltimore's homicide numbers have risen above [2005]'s statistics. With several days left in 2006, Baltimore City Police have recorded 272 homicides this year, three more than [2005]." [11] All statistics are based on reported homicides. Unexplained deaths are not reported homicides. New York, NY redirects here. ...


Controversy

However, the crime statistics from Baltimore are disputed. [12][13] Members of the Democratic-controlled Baltimore City Council as well as the Washington Post and Baltimore Sun newspapers have questioned the crime statistics released by the O'Malley administration since they differ with official FBI crime reports. They claim that crime in Baltimore is seriously underreported. The Washington Post, however, characterizes these accusations as coming from "O'Malley's political foes -- Democrat and Republican alike" and says that "[t]o date, no evidence has surfaced of a systemic manipulation of crime statistics."[4] ...


O'Malley lauds many of his achievements in the Baltimore City Public School System, stating that his administration has greatly improved schools and that they “are on the mend for the first time in decades.” As one of his five most prominent achievements, O'Malley claims that his administration “improved student test scores across the board.” It is difficult to deny that much more improvement still needs to be made in all aspects of school quality. A national study on the graduation rates in the nation's 50 biggest cities found Baltimore to be second to last with respect to dropout rates (with Detroit in last place). [14]. As the city school system is independently controlled by a board jointly appointed by the mayor and the governor of Maryland, a structure adopted in 1997 as part of litigation in the Federal court system, no single political leader or single level of government (city or state) has responsibility for or authority over the city schools, and it is difficult to hold specific elected officials responsible for either the successes or failures of the city school system. [15] The school systems logo The Baltimore City Public School System (BCPSS) is a public school district in the state of Maryland that serves the youth of city of Baltimore (in distinction to the county of Baltimore). ...


In 1987, O'Malley was arrested by the Montgomery County, Maryland police and charged with drunk driving. Court records show the charge was eventually dismissed by a judge. [16] The character questionnaire part of the application O'Malley filed with the Maryland Board of Bar Examiners in 1988 to be permitted to take the Maryland bar examination required O'Malley to disclose under penalties of perjury his 1987 arrest for drunk driving. Disclosure of such a charge by an applicant, not just disclosure of convictions, is mandatory under the rules for bar examination applications approved by the Court of Appeals of Maryland, the highest court in the state, which, under the state constitution, has the authority to grant a license to practice law in Maryland and to suspend the license or to disbar an attorney for misconduct. In October 2006, during O'Malley's campaign for the office of Governor of Maryland, the 1987 drunk driving arrest became public for the first time when it was reported by the Baltimore Sun newspaper. O'Malley was then asked by the reporters if he had disclosed the arrest to the bar examiners on his character questionnaire. O'Malley said that he did not remember. The Clerk of the Court of Appeals of Maryland, not the office of the Maryland Board of Bar Examiners, has custody of the bar applications of all Maryland lawyers who in the past were admitted to practice in the state by the Court of Appeals. O'Malley refused to authorize the Clerk of the Court of Appeals to release to the media and the public a copy of his 1988 bar application. When the President of the Maryland State Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Police issued a statement about ten days before the November 7, 2006, election saying that voters had a right to see a copy of his 1988 application to take the Maryland bar examination, O'Malley ignored him and his campaign staff accused the FOP, which had endorsed the re-election of Republican Governor Bob Ehrlich, of having made their demand for release of the bar application for purely partisan political reasons. The reports during the 2006 gubernatorial election campaign on this matter in the Baltimore Sun and Washington Post never once mentioned the fact that an individual who makes false statements or does not disclose information required by rule of court to be disclosed on a Maryland bar examination application is subject to indictment by a grand jury for the felony crime of perjury. [17][18]


Media attention

In 2002, Esquire magazine named O’Malley “The Best Young Mayor in the Country,” and in 2005, TIME magazine named him one of America’s “Top 5 Big City Mayors” [19]. In August of 2005, Business Week Magazine Online named O'Malley as one of five "New Faces" in the Democratic Party. Business Week said that O'Malley "has become the party's go-to guy on protecting the homeland. The telegenic mayor has developed a detailed plan for rail and port safety and has been an outspoken critic of White House security priorities." [20] Esquire is a magazine for men owned by the Hearst Corporation. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


Homeland security

In 2003, national Democratic leaders asked him to give the Democratic Response to the President’s weekly radio address in which he spoke about Homeland Security.


During the 2004 presidential campaign, Sen. John Kerry invited O'Malley to speak on the topic in Wisconsin. In 2004, O'Malley was one of the featured speakers at the Democratic National Convention in the FleetCenter in Boston, Massachusetts. In his speech, he focused on Homeland Security stating “Sadly and unforgivably almost three years after that fateful day when thousands of moms and dads, sons and daughters didn’t come from work on September 11th, America’s cities and towns, America’s ports and borders and America’s heartland remain needlessly vulnerable” [21]. As the only mayor to speak at the Democratic National Convention, O'Malley proved that he was a “rising star” in the Democratic Party. Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... The FleetCenter is a sports arena in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


In August 2005, O'Malley was invited to speak to the National Press Club to give a mayoral perspective on homeland security issues. Again he criticized the Bush Administration, stating, "In Washington today, the traditional strong defense values of the party of Abraham Lincoln are found only in the words carved on the cold walls of his memorial." O'Malley also stated that increased Homeland Security funding supported the "values of our republic – what former Senator Gary Hart would call 'the Fourth Power' – the moral exponent of our military, economic, and diplomatic powers" [22]. The National Press Club is an association of journalists based in Washington, DC. It is well-known for its gatherings with invited speakers, including many presidential candidates and other influential politicians. ...


Governor of Maryland

2006 Gubernatorial elections

O'Malley was nominated by the Democratic Party to challenge incumbent Maryland Governor Robert Ehrlich in the November 2006 election. O'Malley featured the news article “Running early, running hard" [23] on his new web site, launched June 2005. It states, "O'Malley has yet to officially announce his run for governor, but that doesn’t mean he hasn’t been busy on the campaign trail." The Maryland gubernatorial election of 2006 was held on November 7, 2006. ... For the entrepreneur and businessman, see Robert Ehrlich. ...


O'Malley selected Anthony G. Brown, Delegate from Prince George's County, lawyer, and Iraq War veteran, as his running mate. O'Malley was expected to face Montgomery County Executive Doug Duncan in the Democratic primary. However, Duncan dropped out of the race on June 22, 2006, citing clinical depression. Anthony G. Brown (born November 21, 1961 in Huntington, New York) is an American politician. ... Prince Georges County is a suburban county located in the state of Maryland immediately east of Washington, D.C.. It is notable as the wealthiest majority-African-American county in the country. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The relevance of particular information in (or previously in) this article or section is disputed. ... Doug Duncan Douglas M. Duncan (born October 25, 1955) is a Democratic politician from Maryland who has served as County Executive of Montgomery County since 1994. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Friends of O'Malley also have speculated that he could be a presidential candidate in 2012 [24].


O'Malley defeated incumbent Gov. Ehrlich in the November 7, 2006, gubernatorial election by a 6.5% margin.[25]


Term as Governor

O'Malley was sworn in as Governor on January 17, 2007. The Maryland Constitution required that he submit the budget proposal, developed jointly by the incoming and outgoing administrations, for the coming fiscal year two days later. January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ...


The State of Maryland faces significant fiscal challenges including structural deficits as severe as $5 billion over the next four years. In response, many Maryland lawmakers have suggested overhauling the antiquated tax structure found in Maryland to make it modern, inclusive and fair.[citation needed]


In years past, slot machine gambling has been a heated topic in the General Assembly – both houses in Maryland government. Proponents claim slots could help ease the burden of Maryland's severe structural deficit. O'Malley's predecessor, Governor Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr. made slot machine gambling a priority from the beginning of his four-year term. However, associated legislation was not passed. O'Malley has said that he supports the implementation of a limited number of slot machines only at horse racing tracks to help sustain the horse racing industry.


Accomplishments in O'Malley's first two months in office include legislation to save the Maryland terrapin [26] and closing a prison [27]. The Diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) is the State Reptile of the U.S. state of Maryland. ...


Family

O'Malley is the son of Tom and Barbara O'Malley. He is married to state district judge Catherine Curran O'Malley (Katie). Martin and Katie first met in 1986 while he was working on now-U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski’s primary and general election campaign; while Katie was working on her father J. Joseph Curran, Jr.’s campaign for Attorney General of Maryland. They began to date in 1988 and were married in 1990 during his first unsuccessful campaign for political office. Catherine Curran OMalley (born August 18, 1962), is a Maryland state judge. ... Joseph Curran J. Joseph Curran, Jr. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33...


The couple had their first child, Grace, in 1991. They now live in the governor's mansion in Annapolis with their children, Grace, Tara, William, and Jack. The family had attended St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church in Baltimore.


O'Malley’s father in law, J. Joseph Curran, Jr., served as Attorney General of Maryland from 1987-2007. Due to a possible inherent conflict of interest in potentially having two close family members at the position of Governor and Attorney General, some had suggested that Curran should step down from his post. Curran decided not to seek reelection on May 7, 2006, citing his age and having accomplished a great deal, rather than his relation to O'Malley. [28] Joseph Curran J. Joseph Curran, Jr. ... Attorney General J. Joseph Curran. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (128th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


In Other Media

O'Malley was the inspiration for the fictional Mayor of Baltimore Tommy Carcetti on the HBO drama The Wire. The Carcetti character is a Caucasian politician in a majority African American city who won against two African American Democratic candidates in the primary election before winning the general election. Also like O'Malley, Carcetti intends to run for Governor of Maryland. Tommy Carcetti is a fictional Baltimore politician played by Aidan Gillen on the HBO drama The Wire. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is an American premium cable television network. ... This article is about the television series. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


Martin O'Malley appeared in the film Ladder 49 as himself, then-mayor of Baltimore. Ladder 49 is a 2004 drama movie about firefighters. ...


Electoral History

Maryland Gubernatorial Election 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Martin O'Malley 942,279 52.7
Republican Robert Ehrlich (Incumbent) 825,464 46.2 -5.4

This article does not adequately cite its references. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... For the entrepreneur and businessman, see Robert Ehrlich. ...

Sources

Notes

  1. ^ "Editorial: Why not a statewide CitiStat?". The Baltimore Examiner. June 6, 2006. URL retrieved 31 March 2007.
  2. ^ "DC Ranks High On Most Dangerous City List". W*USA 9. October 30, 2006. URL retrieved March 23, 2007.
  3. ^ "San Jose Remains 'Safest Big City in America'". City of San Jose, California. November 21, 2005. URL retrieved March 23, 2007.
  4. ^ Wagner, John. "O'Malley Finds Issue Can Cut Both Ways". The Washington Post. March 3, 2006. Page B05. URL retrieved March 23, 2007.

June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 1 day remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... WUSA, W*USA 9 is the Washington, D.C. affiliate of the CBS television network. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (63rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (83rd in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ...

Electoral history

2006 Maryland Gubernatorial Election

Martin O'Malley (D) 52.2%
Robert Ehrlich (R) (inc.) 46.7%
Ed Boyd (Green) 0.9%
Christopher Driscoll (Populist) 0.1%

For the entrepreneur and businessman, see Robert Ehrlich. ... Ed Boyd is a Baltimore resident and Green Party candidate for Governor of Maryland in the 2006 general election. ...

External links

Preceded by
Kurt L. Schmoke
Mayor of Baltimore
1999 – 2007
Succeeded by
Sheila Dixon
Preceded by
Robert Ehrlich
Governor of Maryland
2007 – present
Incumbent

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