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Encyclopedia > Marshall Scholarship
The official logo of the Marshall Scholarship is a blended image of the US and UK flags.
The official logo of the Marshall Scholarship is a blended image of the US and UK flags.
A portrait of George C. Marshall, for whom the scholarships are named.

Marshall Scholarships were created by the British Parliament when the Marshall Aid Commemoration Act was established on July 31, 1953. The scholarships serve as a living gift to the United States of America in recognition of the post World War II European recovery effort most commonly known as the Marshall Plan. Image File history File links The logo of the Marshall Scholarship. ... Image File history File links The logo of the Marshall Scholarship. ... Download high resolution version (587x671, 216 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: George Marshall Categories: U.S. history images ... Download high resolution version (587x671, 216 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: George Marshall Categories: U.S. history images ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Map of Cold-War era Europe showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ...


Widely considered among the most prestigious awards a graduating American undergraduate can receive, the Marshall Scholarships serve to provide highly qualified students with two fully funded years of study, with a possible third year extension, at any university in the United Kingdom. In addition to pure academic pursuits, the program serves to provide the future leaders of America with an insight into the "British ideals and way of life" and strengthen the "unique relationship" that exists between the United States and the United Kingdom.


Although the Marshall Scholarships share much in common with the Rhodes Scholarships (restricted to just Oxford University), the major difference centers on a Marshall Scholar's freedom to attend any UK university including the ability to attend a different university each year during a scholar's tenure. A significant portion of scholars choose to attend either Oxford, Cambridge, or one of the major London institutions, but during the past 50 years scholars have attended a wide range of universities throughout the UK. Also, since its inception the Marshall Scholarship has been open to both men and women, while the Rhodes scholarship only became open to women beginning in 1977 following the passage of the British Sex Discrimination Act of 1975. The first class of Marshall Scholars, which began academic study in the fall of 1954, consisted of eight men and four women selected from a pool of 700 applicants. Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...

Contents

Overview of the Scholarships

Selection criteria

The published objectives of the Marshall Scholarships are outlined as follows:

  1. To enable intellectually distinguished young Americans, their country's future leaders, to study in the UK.
  2. To help scholars gain an understanding and appreciation of contemporary Britain.
  3. To contribute to the advancement of knowledge in science, technology, the humanities and social sciences and the creative arts at Britain's centres of academic excellence.
  4. To motivate scholars to act as ambassadors from the USA to the UK and vice versa throughout their lives thus strengthening British American understanding.
  5. To promote the personal and academic fulfilment of each scholar.

With these objectives in mind, the selection criteria are set out to select roughly 40 scholars each year from an extremely competitive pool of America's top undergraduate students. The selection process is run through the eight major British Embassy and Consulate Regions in the United States (Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, and Washington DC). Selection committees, consisting of former scholars and other distinguished individuals, centered in each region receive applications consisting of personal statements and essays which are used to select a short list of candidates for interviews. The committee then interviews each of the finalists prior to making the final decisions on the year's awards. Although most of the responsibility for selecting the recipients is in the hands of the committee, a few formal guidelines have been outlined in the official selection criteria. Most notably:

"As future leaders, with a lasting understanding of British society, Marshall Scholars will strengthen the enduring relationship between the British and American peoples, their governments and their institutions. Marshall Scholars are talented, independent and wide-ranging in their interests, and their time as Scholars will enhance their intellectual and personal growth. Their direct engagement with Britain through its best academic programmes will contribute to their ultimate personal success."

and

"In appointing Scholars the selectors will look for distinction of intellect and character as evidenced both by their scholastic attainments and by their other activities and achievements. Preference will be given to candidates who display a potential to make a significant contribution to their own society. Selectors will also look for strong motivation and seriousness of purpose, including the presentation of a specific and realistic academic programme."

The impact of the Scholarships

In a letter to the first class of Marshall Scholars, George Marshall echoed his own words in initially presenting his ideas for European recovery by saying "A close accord between our two countries is essential to the good of mankind in this turbulent world of today, and that is not possible without an intimate understanding of each other. These scholarships point the way to the continuation and growth of the understanding which found its necessity in the terrible struggle of the war years." For other people named George Marshall, see George Marshall (disambiguation). ...


Now, over 50 years after the British Parliament created the program, the Marshall Scholarships have had a clear impact on the world and in particular the special relationship that exists between the US and UK. Marshall Scholars can be found as CEOs, on the Supreme Court, as members of Congress, in Presidential Cabinets, as university Presidents, Pulitzer Prize winning authors, and leaders in a wide range of academic and professional disciplines.


Selected notable Marshall Scholars

Graham T. Allison is a professor at Harvard University. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... John F. Kennedy School of Government The John F. Kennedy School of Government is a public policy school and one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Anne Applebaum (born 1964) is a journalist and author who has written extensively about issues related to communism and the development of civil society in Eastern Europe and the USSR / Russia. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... ... Bruce Edward Babbitt (born June 27, 1938), a Democrat, served as United States Secretary of the Interior and as Governor of Arizona. ... It has been suggested that Arizona Governors Mansion be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Bill Buford is an American author and journalist. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... William Joseph Burns is the Ambassador of the United States of America to the Russian Federation. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... ` Dolby (left) is inducted into the NIHF Ray Dolby (born January 18, 1933) is the American inventor of the noise reduction system known as Dolby NR. He is the founder and chairman of Dolby Laboratories, and a billionaire. ... Dolby Laboratories, Inc. ... Thomas Loren Friedman, OBE (born July 20, 1953) an American journalist, author and three-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, is an op-ed columnist for The New York Times. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Marty Kaplan is Associate Dean for Programs and Planning of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and director of the Norman Lear Center for the study of entertainment. ... The USC Annenberg School for Communication is the journalism and communication program at University of Southern California (USC). ... Based at the USC Annenberg School for Communication, the Norman Lear Center is a multidisciplinary research and public policy center exploring implications of the convergence of entertainment, commerce, and society. ... Nannerl Overholser Keohane is an American political scientist. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. The school, which officially became Duke University in 1924, traces its institutional roots to 1838. ... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Harold Hongju Koh Categories: Stub | Korean Americans ... Yale Law School, established in 1843 in New Haven, Connecticut, is a division of Yale University. ... Peter D. Kramer, M.D., is a psychiatrist and member of the faculty of Brown Medical School specializing in the area of depression and he has authored various books on the subject. ... Cover of Listening to Prozac Listening to Prozac: A Psychiatrist Explores Antidepressant Drugs and the Remaking of the Self is a book written by psychiatrist Peter D. Kramer. ... Nicole Krauss is an American writer who lives in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, with her husband, novelist Jonathan Safran Foer, and their dog, George. ... For other uses, see the disambiguation section. ... John McKee Spratt, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... Kathleen M. Sullivan (born August 20, 1955), scholar in constitutional law, is a professor at Stanford Law School and currently practices law at Quinn Emanuel Urquart Oliver & Hedges, LLP, a California law firm. ... Stanford Law School is a graduate school of Stanford University located in Stanford, California in the Silicon Valley. ... Mark Whitaker is the editor of Newsweek since November 1998. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Daniel H. Yergin (born February 6, 1947) is an American author and economic researcher. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ...

Interesting facts about the Marshall Scholarship

  • Distribution of Scholars: For the 2003-04 academic year there were 93 Marshall Scholars in residence at British Universities including those who were selected for the classes of 2001, 2002, and 2003. During this time there were 47 Scholars at Oxford University, 15 at Cambridge University, 21 at London based institutions, and the remaining Scholars at several other universities throughout the UK. Of these 93 Scholars, 69 were studying Arts and Social Sciences subjects while 24 were studying Science, Engineering or Mathematics.
  • Marshall Medals: As part of the celebrations for the 50th Anniversary of the Marshall Scholarships, Marshall Medals were awarded to a group of distinguished Americans in recognition of their contributions to US/UK relations. The recipients were Justice Stephen Breyer (1959 Marshall Scholar)), Dr. Ray Dolby (1957 Marshall Scholar), Thomas L. Friedman (1975 Marshall Scholar), President Nannerl Keohane (1961 Marshall Scholar), Christopher Makins, Senator Gerorge J. Mitchell, and U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell.
  • Traveling to the UK: In the early years of the Marshall Scholarship it was common for new Scholars to travel together to the UK via cruise ship, but now Scholars are usually flown to London from Washington DC following a welcoming program with top US and UK government and diplomatic officials.
  • Fictional Marshall Scholars: The West Wing character Will Bailey said that he was a "President of Cambridge Union on a Marshall Scholarship" during the season 4 episode "Artic Radar." In real life, a Marshall Scholar was elected Treasurer of the Cambridge Union for the Lent Term of 2006 and the Secretary and Vice President for Easter 2006 - Lent 2007.

The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... ` Dolby (left) is inducted into the NIHF Ray Dolby (born January 18, 1933) is the American inventor of the noise reduction system known as Dolby NR. He is the founder and chairman of Dolby Laboratories, and a billionaire. ... Thomas L. Friedman (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist, columnist, and author, currently working as an Op-Ed columnist for the New York Times. ... Nannerl Overholser Keohane is an American political scientist. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... The West Wing is a popular and widely acclaimed American television serial drama created by Aaron Sorkin and produced and co-written by John Wells. ... William Will Bailey, is a fictional character played by Joshua Malina on the television serial drama The West Wing, holding various posts in the White House Department of Communications. ... The Cambridge Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Cambridge Union, is one of the largest student societies at the University of Cambridge and one of the oldest in the world. ... The Cambridge Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Cambridge Union, is one of the largest student societies at the University of Cambridge and one of the oldest in the world. ...

Notable universities

U.S. Institutions With the Greatest Number of Marshall Scholars Through 2005[citation needed]
Total #
Harvard 239
Princeton 112
Yale 101
Stanford 74
MIT 51
Brown 42
UC Berkeley 30
U.S. Military Academy 29
Cornell 27
Dartmouth 25
Columbia 24
Illinois 21

Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States of America. ... Yale redirects here. ... Stanford redirects here. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a private research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is organized into five schools and one college, containing 32 academic departments and 53 interdisciplinary laboratories, centers and programs. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as UC Berkeley, Berkeley, Cal, and by other names, see below) is the oldest and flagship campus of the ten-campus University of California system. ... The United States Military Academy, also known as West Point, or simply USMA (or Army, for NCAA purposes), is a United States Army fort and military academy. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Dartmouth College is a private academic institution in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... The University of Illinois is the set of three public universities in Illinois. ...

External links

  • Official Marshall Scholarship website
  • Profiles of recent Marshall Scholars

  Results from FactBites:
 
Marshall Scholarship (946 words)
Marshall Scholarships finance young Americans of high ability to study for a degree in the United Kingdom in a system of higher education recognized for its excellence.
Founded by a 1953 Act of Parliament, Marshall Scholarships are mainly funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and commemorate the humane ideals of the Marshall Plan conceived by General George C Marshall.
As a Marshall Scholarship is intended to give the holder an opportunity to see as much as possible of the United Kingdom, meet its people and observe its institutions, Scholars should be prepared to spend a reasonable proportion of their vacation time in the country.
Scholarship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (870 words)
Scholarship is the pursuit of academic research, whether in the arts and humanities or sciences, and in all such fields means deep mastery of a subject, often through study at institutions of higher education.
A scholarship is also an award of access to such an institution, or a financial aid award for an individual student scholar, for the purpose of furthering their education.
Scholarships are awarded based on a range of criteria which usually reflect the values and purposes of the donor or founder of the award.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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