FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Marquis de Lafayette

Marie-Joseph-Paul-Roch-Yves-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (September 6, 1757May 20, 1834), was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American Revolutionary War and early French Revolution. La Fayette is considered a national hero in both France and the United States and is one of only six people in history to become an Honorary U.S. Citizen. September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 20 May is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Aristocracy is a form of government in which rulership is in the hands of an upper class known as aristocrats. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen British colonies in North America. ... During the French Revolution (1789-1799) democracy and republicanism replaced the absolute monarchy in France, and the French sector of the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring. ... Sir Galahad, a hero of Arthurian legend In mythology and folklore, a hero (male) or heroine (female) is an eminent character who quintessentially embodies key traits valued by its originating culture. ... Public Law 88-6 (1963) granted honorary citizenship to Winston Churchill. ...


He was the father of Georges Washington Motier de La Fayette (17791849) and Oscar Thomas Gilbert Motier de La Fayette (18151881). 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Early life

The Marquis de La Fayette
The Marquis de La Fayette

La Fayette was born at the Château de Chavaniac, Haute-Loire, in the Auvergne area of France. The family of La Fayette, to the cadet branch of which he belonged, received its title ("La Fayette") from an estate in Aix that belonged to the Motier family in the thirteenth century. His father was killed at the Battle of Minden in 1759, and his mother and grandfather died in 1770, and thus at the age of 13 he was left an orphan with a princely fortune. He married at 16 to Marie-Adrienne-Françoise de Noailles, daughter of Jean-Paul-François, 5e duc de Noailles, from one of the most influential families in the kingdom. La Fayette chose to follow the career of his father, and entered the Guards. Download high resolution version (797x1107, 175 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (797x1107, 175 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Château de Chavaniac is a strong house of eighteen rooms furnished in the Louis XIII style located in Chavaniac-Lafayette, Haute-Loire, in Auvergne, France Château de Chavaniac Framed with two towers in black stones it was built in the 14th Century and is the birth place... Haute-Loire is a département in south-central France named after the Loire River. ... Auvergne coat of arms Auvergne (Occitan: Auvèrnha) was the name of an historically independent county in the center of France, as well as later a province of France. ... AIX or Aix may be: Aix, a genus of two species of dabbling ducks, the Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) and the Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) AIX operating system Athens Internet Exchange, (AIX) a European IXP a place name: Aix-la-Chapelle, or Aachen, a city in Germany in France: Aix... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... The Battle of Minden was a battle fought on August 1, 1759 during the Seven Years War. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Jean-Paul-François, 5th duc de Noailles (October 26, 1739–October 20, 1824), son of Louis, 4th duc de Noailles, was in the army, but his tastes were scientific, and for his eminence as a chemist he was elected a member of the Académie des sciences in 1777. ...


Army life

La Fayette entered the French Army at the age of 14. At 19 he was captain of dragoons when the British colonies in America proclaimed their independence. He later wrote in his memoirs, "my heart was enrolled in it." The comte de Broglie, whom he consulted, discouraged his zeal for the cause of liberty. Finding his purpose unchangeable, however, he presented the young enthusiast to Johann Kalb, who was also seeking service in America, and through Silas Deane, an American agent in Paris, an arrangement was concluded, on December 7, 1776 by which La Fayette was to enter the American service as major general. At this moment the news arrived of grave disasters to the American arms. La Fayette's friends again advised him to abandon his purpose. Even the American envoys, Benjamin Franklin and Arthur Lee, who had superseded Deane, withheld further encouragement and the king himself forbade his leaving. At the insistence of the British ambassador at Versailles orders were issued to seize the ship La Fayette was fitting out at Bordeaux and La Fayette himself was arrested. La Fayette escaped from custody in disguise, and before a second lettre de cachet could reach him he was afloat with eleven chosen companions. Though two British ships had been sent in pursuit of him, he landed safely near Georgetown, South Carolina on June 13, 1777 after a tedious voyage of nearly two months, and hastened to Philadelphia, then the seat of government of the colonies. A light dragoon from the American Revolution Statue of a dragoon on the Triumph Arc of the Louvres in Paris A dragoon was traditionally a soldier trained to fight on foot, but transport himself on horseback. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is a document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... Charles-François de Broglie, marquis de Ruffec (20 August 1719–16 August 1781), second son of François-Marie, 1st duc de Broglie, was a French soldier and diplomat. ... Johann Henry Jules Alexandre von Robaii, Baron de Kalb (born Johann Kalb) (1721-1780) was a German soldier and a volunteer who served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. ... Silas Deane (December 24, 1737 - September 23, 1789), was a delegate to the American Continental Congress and later a diplomat. ... December 7 is the 341rd day (342th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 For the former mayor of Nepean, see Ben Franklin (politician) Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706–April 17, 1790) was one of the most prominent of Founders and early political figures and statesmen of the United States. ... Arthur Lee (1740-1792), was an American diplomat during the American Revolutionary War. ... Versailles in 1789. ... City motto: Lilia sola regunt lunam undas castra leonem. ... In French history, lettres de cachet were letters signed by the king of France, countersigned by one of his ministers, and closed with the royal seal, or cachet. ... Historic Front Street Georgetown is a city located in Georgetown County, South Carolina. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ...


American Revolution

When this lad of 19, with the little English he had been able to pick up on his voyage, presented himself to the Congress with Deane's authority to demand a commission of the highest rank after the commander-in-chief, his reception was chilly. Deane's contracts were so numerous, and for officers of such high rank, that it was impossible for Congress to ratify them without injustice to Americans who had become entitled by their service to promotion. La Fayette appreciated the situation as soon as it was explained to him, and immediately expressed his desire to serve in the American army upon two conditions—that he should receive no pay, and that he should act as a volunteer. The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ...

La Fayette and Washington at Mt. Vernon, 1784
La Fayette and Washington at Mt. Vernon, 1784

These terms were so different from those made by other foreigners, they had been attended with such substantial sacrifices, and they promised such important indirect advantages, that Congress passed a resolution, on July 31, 1777, "that his services be accepted, and that, in consideration of his zeal, illustrious family and connexions, he have the rank and commission of major-general of the United States." The next day La Fayette met George Washington, who became his lifelong friend. Congress intended his appointment as purely honorary, and the question of giving him a command was left entirely to Washington's discretion. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was an American planter, political figure, the highest ranking military leader in U.S. history and first President of the United States. ...


His first battle was Brandywine on September 11, 1777, where he showed courage and activity and received a wound. Shortly afterwards he secured what he most desired, the command of a division—the immediate result of a communication from Washington to Congress of November 1, 1777, in which he said: "The Marquis de La Fayette is extremely solicitous of having a command equal to his rank. I do not know in what light Congress will view the matter, but it appears to me, from a consideration of his illustrious and, important connexions, the attachment which he has manifested for our cause, and the consequences which his return in disgust might produce, that it will be advisable to gratify his wishes, and the more so as several gentlemen from France who came over under some assurances have gone back disappointed in their expectations. His conduct with respect to them stands in a favourable point of view—having interested himself to remove their uneasiness and urged the impropriety of their making any unfavourable representations upon their arrival at home. Besides, he is sensible, discreet in his manners, has made great proficiency in our language, and from the disposition he discovered at the battle of Brandywine possesses a large share of bravery and military ardour." The Battle of Brandywine was a battle of the American Revolutionary War fought on September 11, 1777 near Chadds Ford on Brandywine Creek in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Though the commander of a division, La Fayette never had many troops in his charge. Whatever military talents he possessed were not the kind which appeared as conspicuous advantage on the theatre to which his wealth and family influence rather than his soldierly gifts had called him. In the first months of 1778 he commanded troops detailed for the projected expedition against Canada. His retreat from Barren Hill (May 28, 1778) was commended as masterly, and he fought at the Battle of Monmouth (June 28) and received from Congress a formal recognition of his services in the Rhode Island expedition (August 1778). 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This entry has been merged with Lafayette Hill, Pennsylvania. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of Monmouth was an inconclusive battle of the American Revolutionary War fought on June 28, 1778. ... (Some entries on this page have been duplicated on August 1. ... State nickname: The Ocean State, Little Rhody Other U.S. States Capital Providence Largest city Providence Governor Donald Carcieri (R) Senators Jack Reed (D) Lincoln Chafee (R) Official language(s) None Area 4,005 km² (50th)  - Land 2,709 km²  - Water 1,296 km² (32. ...

Monument to Lafayette erected in Paris by the schoolchildren of the USA
Enlarge
Monument to Lafayette erected in Paris by the schoolchildren of the USA

The treaties of commerce and defensive alliance, signed by the insurgents and France on February 6, 1778, were promptly followed by a declaration of war by Great Britain against the latter, and La Fayette asked leave to revisit France and to consult his king as to the further direction of his services. This leave was readily granted; it was not difficult for Washington to replace the major-general, but it was impossible to find another equally competent, influential and devoted champion of the American cause near the court of Louis XVI. In fact, he went on a mission rather than a visit. He embarked on January 11, 1779, was received with enthusiasm, and was made a colonel in the French cavalry. On March 4, 1779, Franklin wrote to the president of Congress: "The marquis de La Fayette is infinitely esteemed and beloved here, and I am persuaded will do everything in his power to merit a continuance of the same affection from America." He won the confidence of Vergennes. Image:Lafayette-p1000411. ... Image:Lafayette-p1000411. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Louis XVI Louis XVI (August 23, 1754 - January 21, 1793), was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French in 1791-1792. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


La Fayette was absent from America about six months, and his return was the occasion of a complimentary resolution of Congress. From April until October 1781 he was charged with the defence of Virginia, in which Washington gave him the credit of doing all that was possible with the forces at his disposal; and he showed his zeal by borrowing money on his own account to provide his soldiers with necessaries. The Battle of Yorktown, in which La Fayette bore an honourable if not a distinguished part, was the last of the war, and terminated his military career in the United States. He immediately obtained leave to return to France, where it was supposed he might be useful in negotiations for a general peace. He was also occupied in the preparations for a combined French and Spanish expedition against some of the British West India Islands, of which he had been appointed chief of staff, and a formidable fleet assembled at Cádiz, but the armistice signed on January 20, 1783 between the belligerents put a stop to the expedition. He had been promoted (1781) to the rank of maréchal de camp (brigadier general) in the French army, and he received every token of regard from his sovereign and his countrymen. He visited the United States again in 1784, and remained some five months as a guest of the nation. State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Official language(s) English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... The Battle of Yorktown (1781) was a victory by a combined American and French force led by General George Washington, Marquis De Lafeyette, and the Comte de Rochambeau over a British army commanded by General Lord Charles Cornwallis. ... The British West Indies are those islands in the Caribbean that are or were British colonies. ... City nickname: Tacita de plata (little silver cup) Location Location within Spain Government Province Cádiz Mayor Teófila Martínez Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 12. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Washington and Lafayette were both slaveowners who had come to view slavery with repugnance. Lafayette urged Washington to free his slaves as an example to others— Washington was held in such high regard after the revolution that there was reason to hope that if he freed his slaves, others would follow his example. Lafayette purchased an estate in French Guiana and settled his own slaves there, and he offered a place for Washington's slaves, writing "I would never have drawn my sword in the cause of America if I could have conceived thereby that I was founding a land of slavery." Nevertheless, Washington did not free his own slaves in his lifetime.


French Revolution

La Fayette did not appear again prominently in public life until 1787, though he did good service to the French Protestants, and became actively interested in plans to abolish slavery. In 1787 he took his seat in the Assembly of Notables. He demanded, and he alone signed the demand, that the king convoke the Estates-General, thus becoming a leader in the French Revolution. He showed liberal tendencies both in that assembly and after its dispersal, and in 1788 was deprived, in consequence, of his active command. In 1789 La Fayette was elected to the Estates-General, and took a prominent part in its proceedings. He was chosen vice-president of the National Assembly, and on 11 July 1789 proposed a declaration of rights, modelled on Jefferson's Declaration of Independence in 1776. 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... The word States-General, or Estates-General, refers in English to : the Etats-Généraux of France before the French Revolution the Staten-Generaal of the Netherlands. ... During the French Revolution (1789-1799) democracy and republicanism replaced the absolute monarchy in France, and the French sector of the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... The Palais Bourbon, front The French National Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale) is one of the two houses of the bicameral Parliament of France under the Fifth Republic. ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


On July 15, the second day of the new regime, La Fayette was chosen by acclamation colonel-general of the new National Guard of Paris. He also proposed the combination of the colours of Paris, red and blue, and the royal white, into the famous tricolour cockade of modern France (July 17). For the succeeding three years, until the end of the constitutional monarchy in 1792, his history is largely the history of France. His life was beset with great responsibility and perils, for he was ever the minister of humanity and order in a time of great chaos. He rescued the queen from the hands of the populace in October 1789, saved many humbler victims who had been condemned to death, and he risked his life in many unsuccessful attempts to rescue others. Before this, disgusted with enormities which he was powerless to prevent, he had resigned his commission; but so impossible was it to replace him that he was induced to resume it. July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... Flag Ratio: 2:3 The national flag of France (Vexillological symbol: , known in French as le drapeau tricolore, le drapeau bleu-blanc-rouge, le drapeau de la France, rarely, le tricolore and, colloquially, les couleurs) is a tricolour featuring three vertical bands coloured blue (hoist side), white, and red. ... July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ...

La Fayette orders his soldiers to fire on members of the Cordeliers Club, Sept. 3, 1791
La Fayette orders his soldiers to fire on members of the Cordeliers Club, Sept. 3, 1791

In the Constituent Assembly he pleaded for the abolition of arbitrary imprisonment, for religious tolerance, for popular representation, for the establishment of trial by jury, for the gradual emancipation of slaves, for the freedom of the press, for the abolition of titles of nobility, and the suppression of privileged orders. Pursuing these goals he drafted the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen which was adopted by the Assembly. In February 1790 he refused the supreme command of the National Guard of the kingdom. In May he founded the "Society of 1789" which afterwards became the Feuillants Club. He took a prominent part in the celebration of July 14, 1790, the first anniversary of the storming of the Bastille. After suppressing a riot in April 1791 he again resigned his commission, and was again compelled to retain it. He was the friend of liberty as well as of order, and when Louis XVI fled to Varennes he issued orders to stop him. Shortly afterwards he was made lieutenant-general in the army. He commanded the troops in the suppression of another riot, on the occasion of the proclamation of the constitution (September 18, 1791), after which, feeling that his task was done, he retired into private life. This did not prevent his friends from proposing him for the mayoralty of Paris in opposition to Jérôme Pétion de Villeneuve. Download high resolution version (994x640, 131 KB)from http://memory. ... Download high resolution version (994x640, 131 KB)from http://memory. ... The Cordeliers, also known as the Club of the Cordeliers and formally as the Society of the Friends of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen comprised a populist society during the French Revolution. ... A constituent assembly is a body elected with the purpose of drafting, and in some cases, adopting a constitution. ... Freedom of religion is the individuals right or freedom to hold whatever religious beliefs he or she wishes, or none at all. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public speech for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ... Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen: Revolutionary patriotism borrows familiar iconography of the Ten Commandments The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (French: La Déclaration des droits de lHomme et du citoyen) is one of the fundamental documents of the... Feuillant, a French word derived from the Latin for leaf, has been used as a tag by two different groups. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The storming of the Bastille on July 14, 1789 was an important development in, and later a symbol of, the French Revolution. ... The Flight to Varennes (June 20-21, 1791) forms a dramatic, romantic and symbolic event in the history of the French Revolution. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... 1791 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jérôme Pétion de Villeneuve Jérôme Pétion de Villeneuve (1756 - 1794) was a French writer and politician. ...

Memorial plaque of La Fayette in Olomouc (Czech Republic), where he was held as a prisoner.
Memorial plaque of La Fayette in Olomouc (Czech Republic), where he was held as a prisoner.

When, in December 1791, three armies were formed on the western frontier to attack Austria, La Fayette was placed in command of one of them. But events moved faster than La Fayette's moderate and humane republicanism, and seeing that the lives of the king and queen were each day more and more in danger, he definitely opposed himself to the further advance of the Jacobin party, intending eventually to use his army for the restoration of a limited monarchy. On August 19, 1792, the Assembly declared him a traitor. He was compelled to take refuge in the neutral territory of Liège, whence as one of the prime movers in the Revolution he was taken and held as a prisoner of state for five years, first in Prussian and afterwards in Austrian prisons (1794-1797 in Olomouc), in spite of the intercession of America and the pleadings of his wife. Napoleon, however, though he had a low opinion of his capacities, stipulated in the Treaty of Campo Formio (1797) for La Fayette's release. He was not allowed to return to France by the Directory. He returned in 1799; in 1802 he voted against the life consulate of Napoleon, and in 1804 he voted against the imperial title. Image:LaFayette memorial. ... Image:LaFayette memorial. ... town hall with astronomical clock Olomouc (German Olmütz) is a city in Moravia, in the east of the Czech Republic. ... In the context of the French Revolution, a Jacobin originally meant a member of the Jacobin Club (1789-1794). ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Bishopric of Liège or Prince-Bishopric of Liège was a state of the Holy Roman Empire in present Belgium. ... The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (German: Preußen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: PrÅ«sai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad exclave of Russia and... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1797 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... town hall with astronomical clock Olomouc (German Olmütz) is a city in Moravia, in the east of the Czech Republic. ... Napoleon I of France, by Jacques-Louis David Napoleon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, and the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from 11 November 1799 to 18 May 1804, then as Emperor of... The Treaty of Campo Formio was signed on October 17, 1797 (26 Vendémiaire, Year VI of the French Republic) by Napoleon Bonaparte and Count Ludwig von Cobenzl as representatives of France and Austria. ... 1797 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... --69. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


He lived in retirement during the First Empire, but returned to public affairs under the First Restoration and took some part in the political events of the Hundred Days. From 1818 to 1824 he was deputy for the Sarthe, speaking and voting always on the Liberal side, and even becoming a carbonaro. He then revisited America (July 1824–September 1825, attending the inaugural banquet of the University of Virginia, at Jefferson's invitation) where his role in the Revolution placed him above the strong partisan divisions of the time. As a living symbol of a revolution that was then approaching its fiftieth anniversary, he was overwhelmed with popular applause and voted the sum of $200,000 and a township of land. From 1825 to his death he sat in the Chamber of Deputies for Meaux. During the revolution of 1830 he again took command of the National Guard and pursued the same line of conduct, with equal want of success, as in the first revolution. In 1834 he made his last speech—on behalf of Polish political refugees. He died at Paris on May 20, 1834 and was buried in the Cimetière de Picpus. In 1876 in the city of New York a monument was erected to him, and in 1883 another was erected at Le Puy. The Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) or the Waterloo Campaign commonly names the period between 20 March 1815, the date on which Napoleon Bonaparte arrived in Paris after his return from Elba, and 28 June 1815, the date of the restoration of King Louis XVIII. The phrase Cent jours was... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Sarthe is a French département, named after the Sarthe River. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Website Virginia. ... The term township generally means the district or area associated with a town. ... Meaux is a town in the Seine-et-Marne département of France, near the Marne River. ... 20 May is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Cimetière de Picpus (Picpus cemetery) is one of the smaller cemeteries in the city of Paris, France. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... State nickname: The Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² or 54,556 square miles (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water... 1883 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Le Puy-en-Velay or Le Puy is a commune of south-central France, pr fecture (capital) of the Haute-Loire d partement. ...

A handbill from La Fayette's funeral.

Few men have owed more of their success and usefulness to their family rank than La Fayette, and still fewer have abused it less. He never achieved distinction in the field, and his political career proved him to be incapable of ruling a great national movement, but he had strong convictions which always impelled him to study the interests of humanity, and a pertinacity in maintaining them, which, in all the strange vicissitudes of his eventful life, secured him a very unusual measure of public respect. No citizen of a foreign country has ever had so many and such warm admirers in America, nor does any statesman in France appear to have ever possessed uninterruptedly for so many years so large a measure of popular influence and respect. He had what Jefferson called a "canine appetite" for popularity and fame, but in him the appetite only seemed to make him more anxious to merit the fame which he enjoyed. He was brave to rashness, and he never shrank from danger or responsibility if he saw the way open to spare life or suffering, to protect the defenseless, to sustain the law and preserve order. Download high resolution version (600x823, 321 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (600x823, 321 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...


The admiration Americans feel for him is reflected in the many places named Lafayette, Fayette, and Fayetteville. Despite considerable anti-French sentiment in the United States at the time, President George W. Bush granted him honorary citizenship on August 6, 2002. Throughout World War II the U.S. Flag was draped on his grave even though it was in Nazi-occupied territory. Lafayette or La Fayette is the name of several places in the United States of America, generally named for the French hero of the American Revolution, the Marquis de Lafayette (sometimes referred to as the Marquis de la Fayette), as are most places named Fayette, or Fayetteville: La Fayette, Alabama... Fayette is the name of a number of places in the United States of America. ... Fayetteville is the name of several places in the United States of America. ... Anti-French sentiment in the United States is characterized by disapproval of many or all things French. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Public Law 88-6 (1963) granted honorary citizenship to Winston Churchill. ... August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ... 2002 (MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrination, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atom bomb. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Nazism. ...


World War I

General Pershing is said to have declared upon his arrival in France during the First World War, "Lafayette, we are here!", suggesting that the United States was repaying its debt for his assistance during the Revolutionary War. However, this attribution is apocryphal, and was actually said by Lieutenant Colonel Charles E. Stanton at the tomb of La Fayette, in the cemetery Picpus in Paris, July 4, 1917. Photo portrait from May 1917 New York Times John Joseph Black Jack Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was a soldier in the United States Army. ... World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machine guns, and poison gas World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations and... Charles E. Stanton was an important soldier during World War One from the United States of America. ... Picpus cemetery is one of the smaller cemeteries in the city of Paris. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ...


External links

  • Public Law 107-209 Conferring honorary citizenship of the United States posthumously on the Marquis de La Fayette 08/06/02 Signed by President George W. Bush
  • Association of the Order of La Fayette: Franco-American friendship association.


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
American Revolution - The Marquis de Lafayette rewarded for Revolutionary assist (814 words)
Lafayette, who came from a long line of solders, studied at the Military Academy in Versailles and became a captain in the French cavalry at age 16.
Lafayette joined the ranks as a major general and was assigned to the staff of George Washington.
Lafayette was the first foreign dignitary to address Congress, in 1824, and upon his death both the House and Senate draped their chambers in fl.
Marquis De Lafayette (5250 words)
Lafayette now proceeded secretly and at his own expense to fit out a vessel at Bordeaux, but his preparations were somewhat delayed by the necessity of making a journey to London in company with the Prince de Poix.
Lafayette was presently re-enforced by Steuben, so that he outnumbered Cornwallis, who accordingly, 20 June, continued his retreat, crossing the Chickahominy near White Oak Swamp, and marching down to the peninsula to Williamsburg.
Lafayette left a journal of the principal events in which he took part, which was published by his son, and completed with some supplementary documents, letters of Washington and other statesmen, under the title "Memoires, manuscrits et correspondance du General de Lafayette " (6 vols., Paris, 1837-'8).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m