FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Market town" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Market town

In medieval law, a market town is a settlement that has the right to hold markets (distinguishing it from a village, usually smaller) but which is not also a city (usually larger, and with additional rights). A town may be correctly described as a market town even if it no longer holds a market, provided the right to do so still exists. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Weighing scales represent the way law balances peoples interests For other senses of this word, see Law (disambiguation). ... A market is, as defined in economics, a social arrangement that allows buyers and sellers to discover information and carry out a voluntary exchange. ... Chicago from the air. ...


A market town may or may not have rights concerning self-government, which is the usual meaning of "town". In England, towns with such rights may be are usually distinguished with the additional status of Borough). A borough is an administrative division used in various countries. ...

Contents

England

In England, even up to the 19th century, the majority of people lived off the land, and relatively few in towns. Market towns were an important feature of rural life, as some place names remind us: Market Drayton, Market Harborough, Chipping Norton and Chipping Sodburychipping being derived from a Saxon word, meaning to buy. Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map sources for Market Drayton at grid reference SJ6734 Market Drayton is a market town in north Shropshire, England, on the River Tern, between Shrewsbury and Stoke-on-Trent. ... The stilted Grammar School Market Harborough Parish church of St Dionysius Market Harborough is a market town in Leicestershire, England, upon the River Welland. ... Chipping Norton Town Hall Chipping Norton is a town in Oxfordshire, England. ... Chipping Sodbury School ROOLZ Chipping Sodbury is a market town in South Gloucestershire, England, founded in the 12th century by William Crassus. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ...


Market towns often grew up close to fortified places, such as castles, in order to enjoy their protection, for example Framlingham in Suffolk. They tended to be located where transport was easiest: for example, at a crossroads or close to a river ford. Map sources for Framlingham at grid reference TM2863 Framlingham is a market town in East Suffolk, England. ...


The most obvious feature of the traditional market town is a very wide main street or market place, with room for stalls and booths to be set up on market days. A market cross often stood in the centre of the town, as a way of obtaining God's blessing on the trade. The best remaining examples of market crosses in England are at Chichester and Malmesbury. There would often be a market hall, with administrative quarters at first floor level, above the covered market. A market cross is a structure used to mark a market square in market towns. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Chichester is a small city in the south of England, in the county of West Sussex, with a population of about 25,000. ... Malmesbury is an old-established south Cotswold town in south west England in the county of Wiltshire. ...


Colchester claims to be England's oldest recorded market town. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... There are various towns which lay rival claims to be the oldest town in Britain: Abingdon in Oxfordshire Colchester in Essex Marazion in Cornwall Contents // (See talk. ...


German language area

The right to hold markets is similarly recollected in the names of many towns in Germany and Austria which have the prefix Markt, for example Markt Berolzheim and Marktl am Inn. Other terms used for market towns were Flecken or Marktflecken. Marktl am Inn Marktl am Inn (Little Market on the Inn River), or simply Marktl, is a village and historic market municipality in the state of Bavaria, Germany, near the Austrian border, in the Altötting district of Upper Bavaria. ...


The status of market towns (Marktgemeinde) still has some legal significance in Bavaria, Austria, and South Tyrol. The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... South Tyrol-Alto Adige (Italian: Alto Adige, German and Ladin: Südtirol; official in Italian: Provincia Autonoma di Bolzano - Alto Adige, official in German: Autonome Provinz Bozen - Südtirol, official in Ladin: Provinzia Autonòma de Balsan - Südtirol) is an autonomous province of Italy that belongs to the region...


Norway

In Norway the medieval market town (Norwegian kjøpstad from the old Norse kaupstaðr) is a Norwegian town which had been granted commerce privileges by the king or other authorities. The citizens in the town had a monopoly over the purchase and sale of wares and operation of other businesses, both in the town and in the surrounding district. Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... In economics, a monopoly (from the Latin word monopolium - Greek language monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a product or service. ...


Market towns were first created in Norway in the 12th century to encourage businesses to be concentrated around specific towns. Import and export was to be conducted only through market towns to allow oversight on commerce and to simplify imposition of excise taxes and customs duties. It served to encourage growth in areas which had strategic significance, providing a local economic base for construction of fortifications and population for defense of the area. It also served to restrict Hanseatic League merchants from trading in areas other than those designated. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A customs duty is a tariff or tax on the import or export of goods. ... Norwegian Fortresses A Historical Context for Norwegian Fortresses Most Norwegian fortresses were constructed in the period of intense competition among the Baltic powers (Denmark-Norway, Sweden, Russia, Poland and the German states) for northern supremacy. ... Carta marina of the Baltic Sea region (1539). ...


Norway included a subordinate category to the market town, the small seaport (Norwegian lossested or ladested), which was a port or harbor with a monopoly to import and export goods and materials in both the port and for a surrounding outlying district. Typically these were locations for exporting timber and importing grain and goods. Local farm goods and timber sales were all required to pass through merchants at either a small seaport or a market town prior to export. This incentivized local merchants to assure trading went through them, which was so effective in limiting unsupervised sales (smuggling) that customs revenues increased from <30% of the total tax revenues in 1600 to >50% of the total taxes by 1700. A skirmish with smugglers from Finland at the Russian border, 1853, by Vasily Hudiakov. ...


Norwegian “market towns” died out and were replaced by free markets in the 1800s. After 1952 both the “small seaport” and the “market town” have simple town status. 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Equivalents in other areas

A târg was a medieval Romanian market town. ... Köping, cognate to the Saxon word chipping, is a Swedish term similar to market town. In medieval times it was the designation of an official for town or market place. ...

Reference

A Revolution from Above; The Power State of 16th and 17th Century Scandinavia; Editor: Leon Jesperson; Odense University Press; Denmark; 2000


  Results from FactBites:
 
Market Harborough - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (280 words)
Market Harborough is a market town in Leicestershire, England, upon the River Welland.
Market Harborough is located in a rural part of south Leicestershire right next to the Northamptonshire border, and is roughly 15 miles (24 km) south of Leicester.
Market Harborough was founded in the 12th century as a market town to provide a market to boost the economy of the surrounding area.
Market town - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (324 words)
Market towns are opposed to villages, which are typically smaller and do not have this right, and to cities, which are typically larger and often have additional rights.
Market towns were an important feature of rural life, as some place names remind us: Market Drayton, Market Harborough, Chipping Norton and Chipping Sodbury - "chipping" being derived from an Saxon word, meaning "to buy".
The Swedish equivalent to a market town was köping; the Finnish is kauppala.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m