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Encyclopedia > Market Street Subway

The Market Street Subway is a subway tunnel in San Francisco, California, United States. It runs under the length of Market Street and is used by both Muni Metro and BART. BART does not run through the entire subway; it turns to the south in its own tunnel before reaching Van Ness Avenue. In the section that BART does run in, there are tunnels on two levels for most of the length of the tunnel. The upper level is used by Muni Metro lines and the lower level is used by BART lines. The western end of the tunnel is connected to the Twin Peaks Tunnel and the eastern end on the BART level is connected to the Transbay Tube. Originally, all Muni Metro lines ended at the Embarcadero Station, but in 1998 a new exit to the tunnel past the station was opened. Only the N Judah line continues through this exit, with all other lines still terminate at the Embarcadero Station. This article describes subways as mass transit lines. ... San Francisco skyline. ... Market Street is a street in San Francisco, California that runs from the Ferry Building on San Francisco Bay at the north eastern edge of the city going southwest and terminating as a major throughfare at Castro Street. ... Muni Metro Map Muni Metro is a mass transit system operated in the city of San Francisco by the San Francisco Municipal Railway. ... BART (in full, San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District) is a rapid transit electric train service that serves parts of the San Francisco Bay Area, including the cities of San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Fremont, and Walnut Creek. ... The Twin Peaks Tunnel is a 2-mile long subway tunnel in San Francisco, California, United States running under Twin Peaks. ... The Transbay Tube is a tunnel used by BART that runs under the San Francisco Bay in California and is the longest underwater tunnel for rapid transit in the world. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... The N Judah is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco, California operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway. ...


The K Ingleside, L Taraval, and M Oceanview Muni Metro lines run through the entire tunnel and into the Twin Peaks Tunnel. The J Church and N Judah lines leave the tunnel through an exit that connects to Church Street. The K Ingleside is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco. ... The L Taraval is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco, California operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway. ... The San Francisco State University Station at the intersection of 19th Avenue and Holloway The M Oceanview is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco. ... Looking south along the private right-of-way near 20th Street The J Church is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco, California. ... The N Judah is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco, California operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway. ...


Stations on the Market Street Subway

There are a total of seven stations in the tunnel. Four are used by BART, five by all of the Muni Metro lines, and two by only three Metro lines:


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