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Encyclopedia > Mark the Evangelist
Saint Mark the Evangelist

Coptic icon of Saint Mark
Gift of God
Died 25 April 68, Alexandria
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church, Orthodox Church, Eastern Catholic Churches, Anglican Church, Lutheran Church and some other Protestant Churches
Major shrine Venice, Italy
Cairo, Egypt
Feast April 25
Attributes Lion in the desert; lion; bishop on a throne decorated with lions; man helping Venetian sailors; man holding a book with pax tibi Marce written on it; man holding a palm and book; man with a book or scroll accompanied by a winged lion; man with a halter around his neck; man writing or holding his gospel; rescuing Christian slaves from Saracens; lion.
Patronage Barristers, Venice, and others; see [1]
Saints Portal

Mark the Evangelist (מרקוס, Greek: Μάρκος) (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark and a companion of Peter. He also accompanied Paul and Barnabas in Paul's first journey. After a sharp dispute, Barnabas separated from Paul, taking Mark to Cyprus (Acts 15:36-40). Later Paul calls upon the services of Mark, the kinsman of Barnabas, and Mark is named as Paul's fellow worker. He is also believed to be the first patriarch of Alexandria by both the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Coptic Orthodox Church, and thus the founder of Christianity in Africa. His evangelistic symbol is the lion. Image File history File links StMarkcoptic. ... Iconography has an organic link with Coptic theology indeed it is the other face and language in which its letters are being in harmony through colors and lines. ... Antiquity and modernity stand cheek-by-jowl in Egypts chief Mediterranean seaport For other uses, see Alexandria (disambiguation). ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Eastern Christianity. ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ... The Anglican Communion is a world-wide organisation of Anglican Churches. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... Venice (Venetian: Venezsia, Italian: Venezia, Latin: Venetia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... For the act of abandoning or withdrawing support from an entity, see desertion. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title... The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa is usually occupied by the Governor General and her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... A sailor is a member of the crew of a ship or boat. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... British barristers wearing traditional dress. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gospel of Mark (literally, according to Mark; Greek, Κατά Μαρκον, Kata Markon),(anonymous[1] but ascribed to Mark the Evangelist) is a Gospel of the New Testament. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Barnabas was an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament. ... For other senses, see Patriarch (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Christ - Coptic Art Coptic Orthodox Christianity is the indigenous form of Christianity that, according to tradition, the apostle Mark established in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century AD (approximately AD 60). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The symbols of the four Evangelists are here depicted in the Book of Kells The Four Evangelists are the four followers of Jesus to whom are ascribed the writings forming the four Gospels of the New Testament: the Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Biblical and traditional information

Traditionally the Pentapolis of North Africa is believed to be where Saint Mark was born and he returned to Pentapolis after preaching with Saint Paul in Colosse (Col 4:10) and Rome (Phil 24; 2 Tim 4:11) ; from Pentapolis he made his way to Alexandria.[1] The Roman Empire ca. ... Look up Paul in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Colossae or Colosse, a city of Phrygia, on the Lycus, which is a tributary of the Maeander. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa...


Though it is possible that some uses of the name "Mark" in the New Testament refer to different people, it is also possible that they are one and the same person. In this interpretation, the John Mark in Acts 12:12, 25, 15:37, mentioned simply as John in Acts 13:5, 13:13 and as Mark in Acts 15:39, is the same person as the Mark mentioned in Colossians 4:10, 2 Timothy 4:11, Philemon 1:24 and 1 Peter 5:13. Mark of the Pauline Epistles is specified as a cousin of Barnabas (Colossians 4:10); this would explain Barnabas' special attachment to the Mark of Acts over whom he disputed with Paul(Acts 15:37-40). Mark's mother was a prominent member of the earliest group of Christians in Jerusalem; it was to her house that Peter turned on his release from prison. The house was a meeting-place for the brethren, "many" of whom were praying there on the night Peter arrived from prison (Acts 12:12-17). Evidence for Mark's authorship of the Gospel that bears his name originates with Papias. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Acts of the Apostles is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... The Epistle to the Colossians is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... This article or section should be merged with First Epistle to Timothy The Second Epistle to Timothy is a book of the canonic New Testament, one of the three so-called pastoral epistles (1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and the Epistle to Titus). ... Philemon is the recipient of the Epistle to Philemon, which is a book of the Bible from the New Testament. ... (Redirected from 1 Peter) In Christianity, the First Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Papias (working in the 1st half of the 2nd century) was one of the early leaders of the Christian church, canonized as a saint. ...


A number of traditions have built up around Mark, though none can be verified from the New Testament. It is suggested that Mark was one of the servants at the Marriage at Cana who poured out the water that Jesus turned to wine (John 2:1-11). Mark is also said to have been one of the Seventy Apostles sent out by Christ (Luke 10); the servant who carried water to the house where the Last Supper took place (Mark 14:13)[2]; the young man who ran away naked when Jesus was arrested (Mark 14:51-52)[3]; and the one who hosted the disciples in his house after the death of Jesus, and into whose house the resurrected Jesus Christ came (John 20). These connections are considered by most to be mere conjecture. In the Christian New Testament, the Gospel of John refers a number of times to a town called Cana of Galilee. ... The Seventy of the Gospel of Luke 10:1 – 20, though not literally named apostles, were followers that Jesus appointed and sent away (the Greek verb form apostello, not the noun form apostolos). ... The Last Supper in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci. ...


In Egypt, Mark the Evangelist is said to have performed many miracles, and established a church there, appointing a bishop (Anianus of Alexandria), three priests, and seven deacons. Image:St Mark Baptises Anianus. ...

The martyrdom of Saint Mark
The martyrdom of Saint Mark

When Mark returned to Alexandria, the people there are said to have resented his efforts to turn them away from the worship of their traditional Egyptian gods. In AD 67 they killed him, and tried to burn his body. Afterwards, the Christians in Alexandria removed his unburned body from the ashes, wrapped it and then buried it in the north easterly part of the church they had built. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (929x1408, 284 KB) Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Folio 19v - The Martyrdom of Saint Mark the Musée Condé, Chantilly. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (929x1408, 284 KB) Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Folio 19v - The Martyrdom of Saint Mark the Musée Condé, Chantilly. ...


Fate of his remains

Statue of St. Mark in Venice
Statue of St. Mark in Venice

In 828, relics believed to be the body of St. Mark were stolen from Alexandria by Italian sailors and were taken to Venice, where the Byzantine St. Theodore had previously been the patron saint. A basilica was built there to house the relics. There is a mosaic on this Venetian basilica showing how the sailors covered the body relics with a layer of pork. Since Muslims are not allowed to touch pork, this action was done to prevent Muslim intervention in the relics removal. Image File history File links Venice21. ... Image File history File links Venice21. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Events Egbert became first King of England Alcamo was founded by the Muslim commander al-Kamuk. ... Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Saint Theodore of Amasea (Amasenus, now Amasya, Turkey) is one of the Greek military saints of the 4th century, the earlier patron saint of Venice, now outshone there by Saint Mark, but still represented atop one of the two Byzantine columns standing in the Piazzetta of the Piazza San Marco... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... St. ...


Copts believe that the head of the saint remained in Alexandria. Every year, on the 30th day of the month of Babah, the Coptic Orthodox Church celebrates the commemoration of the consecration of the church of St. Mark, and the appearance of the head of the saint in the city of Alexandria. This takes place inside St. Mark Coptic Orthodox Church in Alexandria, where the saint's head is preserved. The word Copt signifies the natives of Egypt as a nationality, and in popular common culture in Egypt it is used to specifically signify Christian Egyptians, although its use to mean Egyptian is not unwitnessed. ... Christ - Coptic Art Coptic Orthodox Christianity is the indigenous form of Christianity that, according to tradition, the apostle Mark established in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century AD (approximately AD 60). ...


In 1063, during the construction of a new basilica in Venice, St. Mark's relics could not be found. However, according to tradition, in 1094 the saint himself revealed the location of his remains by extending an arm from a pillar.[4] The newfound remains were placed in a sarcophagus in the basilica. [2] Events Anselm of Canterbury becomes prior at Le Bec Sancho I becomes ruler of Aragon Bishopric of Olomouc is founded Births Deaths April 30 - Emperor Renzong (b. ... For the Basilica di San Marco in Rome, see Basilica di San Marco (Rome). ... // May - El Cid completes his conquest of Valencia, Spain, and begins his rule of Valencia. ...

Statue of St. Mark by Donatello
Statue of St. Mark by Donatello

In June 1968, Pope Cyril VI of Alexandria sent an official delegation to Rome to receive a relic of St. Mark from Pope Paul VI. The delegation consisted of ten metropolitans and bishops, seven of whom were Coptic and three Ethiopian, and three prominent Coptic lay leaders. The relic was said to be a small piece of bone that had been given to the Roman pope by Giovanni Cardinal Urbani, Patriarch of Venice. Pope Paul, in an address to the delegation, said that the rest of the relics of the saint remained in Venice. The delegation received the relic on June 22, 1968. The next day, the delegation celebrated a pontifical liturgy in the church of St. Athanasius the Apostolic in Rome. The metropolitans, bishops, and priests of the delegation all served in the liturgy. Members of the Roman papal delegation, Copts who lived in Rome, newspaper and news agency reporters, and many foreign dignitaries attended the liturgy. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (340x920, 163 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: St. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (340x920, 163 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: St. ... Statue of Habacuc (popularly known as Zuccone) for the Giottos Bell Tower. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... St Kyrillos VI, 116th Pope of Alexandria: A man of prayer, who held daily masses and had his door open to everyone His Holiness Pope Cyril (Kyrillos) VI of Alexandria, born Azer Ioseph Atta (August 8, 1902 – March 9, 1971), was Coptic Orthodox Pope from 1959 to 1971. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop (then more precisely called Metropolitan archbishop) of a metropolis; that is, the chief city of an old Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital. ... Giovanni Cardinal Urbani (26 March 1900 - 17 September 1969) was an Italian Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and the Patriarch of Venice from 1958 until his death. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Athanasius of Alexandria (also spelled Athanasios) was a Christian bishop of Alexandria in the fourth century. ...


In the book "The Lost Tomb of Alexander", historian Andrew Chugg argues that the relics of St. Mark in Venice are actually those of Alexander the Great. Few historians, however, accept this claim. For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ...


See also

The Gospel of Mark (literally, according to Mark; Greek, Κατά Μαρκον, Kata Markon),(anonymous[1] but ascribed to Mark the Evangelist) is a Gospel of the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Names of John. ... Luke the Evangelist (לוקא, Greek: Loukas) is said by tradition to be the author of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, the third and fifth books of the New Testament. ... Matthew the Evangelist (מתי, Gift of the LORD, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew: Mattay; Septuagint Greek: Ματθαίος, Matthaios), most often called Saint Matthew, is an important Christian figure, and one of Jesus Twelve Apostles. ...

References

  1. ^ Suscopts
  2. ^ University of Navarre (1999), The Navarre Bible: Saint Mark’s Gospel (2nd ed.), Dublin: Four Court’s Press, pp. 172, ISBN 1-85182-092-2
  3. ^ University of Navarre (1999), The Navarre Bible: Saint Mark’s Gospel (2nd ed.), Dublin: Four Court’s Press, pp. 179, ISBN 1-85182-092-2
  4. ^ Okey, Thomas (1904). Venice and Its Story. London: J. M. Dent & Co.. 

The University of Navarra is a private university based at the southeast border of Pamplona, Spain. ... The University of Navarra is a private university based at the southeast border of Pamplona, Spain. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Preceded by
Pope of Alexandria
4368
Succeeded by
Anianus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mark the Evangelist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (801 words)
Mark the Evangelist (Greek: Markos) (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark, drawing much of his material from Peter.
So the John Mark in Acts (12:12, 25, 15:37) mentioned simply as John in 13:5 and 13:13 and as Mark in 15:39 is the same person as the Mark mentioned by Paul in (Colossians 4:10; 2 Timothy, 4:11; Philemon, 24) and by the author of 1 Peter 5:13.
Mark's mother was a prominent member of the earliest group of Christians in Jerusalem; it was to her house that Peter turned on his release from prison.
St. Mark the Evangelist - definition of St. Mark the Evangelist in Encyclopedia (842 words)
Mark the Evangelist (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark, drawing much of his material from Peter.
The John Mark in Acts (xii, 12, 25; xv, 37) mentioned as John (xiii, 5, 13) and as Mark (xv, 39) is surely the Mark mentioned by Paul (Colossians., iv, 10; II Tim., iv, 11; Philem., 24) and by Peter in I Peter, v, 13.
Mark is considered by this writer to have founded the School of Alexandria, a school that encouraged studies in science, philosophy, music, math and language embraced by the early Copts, who believe such disciplines are not contrary to religion, but lead believers to a true spiritual life.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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