FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mario Lemieux
Position Centre
Shot Right
Nickname(s) Super Mario
Le Magnifique
(the magnificent one)
Height
Weight
6 ft 4.5 in (1.94 m)
235 lb (107 kg/16 st 11 lb)
Pro clubs Pittsburgh Penguins
Nationality Flag of Canada Canada
Born October 5, 1965 (1965-10-05) (age 42),
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
NHL Draft 1st overall, 1984
Pittsburgh Penguins
Pro career 1984/85 – 1993/94
1995/96 – 1996/97
2000/01 – 2005/06
Hall of Fame, 1997

Mario Lemieux (born October 5, 1965 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is a retired professional ice hockey centre who played 17 seasons for the Pittsburgh Penguins of the National Hockey League (NHL) between 1984 and 2005. He is also the Penguins' principal owner and chairman of the board, having bought the team out of bankruptcy in 1999. The position an ice hockey player plays can be divided into three basic categories: Forwards Centre Wingers Defenceman Goaltender ... Centre or center in ice hockey is a forward position of a player whose primary zone of play is the middle of the ice, away from the side boards. ... A shot in ice hockey is an attempt by a player to score a goal by striking the puck with his stick in the direction of the net. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... -1... Weight, in the context of human body weight measurements in the medical sciences and in sports is a measurement of mass, and is thus expressed in units of mass, such as kilograms (kg), or units of force such as pounds (lb). ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Kg redirects here. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Birthday (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... The NHL Entry Draft is a collective meeting in which the franchises of the National Hockey League systematically select the rights to available amateur players who meet the eligibility requirements to play professional hockey in the NHL. // The first NHL Amateur Draft was held on June 5, 1963 at the... jk;lkkkl;l [popiopi ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... The 1984-85 NHL season was the 68th season of the National Hockey League. ... The 1993-94 NHL season was the 77th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... The 1995-96 NHL season was the 79th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... The classic NHL shield logo The 1996-97 NHL season was the 80th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... The 2000-01 NHL season was the 84th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... The modernized NHL shield logo was introduced for the 2005-06 season. ... Hockey Hall of Fame logo The Hockey Hall of Fame, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is dedicated to the history of ice hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL trophies (including the Stanley Cup) along with interactive activities. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about people called professionals. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Centre or center in ice hockey is a forward position of a player whose primary zone of play is the middle of the ice, away from the side boards. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... NHL redirects here. ... The 1984-85 NHL season was the 68th season of the National Hockey League. ... The 2004-05 NHL season would have been the 88th regular season of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The phrase Chairman of the Board has several meanings: Chairman of the Board is the term used to denote the leader of a corporations board of directors. ...


Lemieux won three Hart Trophies as the most valuable player, six Art Ross Trophies as the leading scorer, and won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP during both Stanley Cup victories. At the time of his retirement, he was the seventh highest all-time scorer with 690 goals and 1,033 assists.[1] Lemieux led his teams to two Stanley Cups, an Olympic gold medal, and two World Cups of Hockey (one while it was still the Canada Cup). In 2004, he was inducted into Canada's Walk of Fame. Hart Memorial Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the ice hockey player who is most valuable to his team in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ... The Art Ross Trophy on display at the 2006 NHL Entry Draft. ... Conn Smythe Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Conn Smythe Memorial Trophy is awarded annually to the most valuable player during the National Hockey Leagues Stanley Cup playoffs. ... The Stanley Cup (French: ) is an ice hockey club championship trophy, awarded annually to the National Hockey League (NHL) playoffs champion. ... Ice hockey tournaments have been staged at the Olympic Games since the 1920 Summer Olympics. ... The World Cup of Hockey is the successor to the Canada Cup ice hockey tournament. ... Canadas Walk of Fame acknowledges the achievements and accomplishments of successful Canadians. ...


He achieved such accolades despite being marred by injuries— he played 915 out of a potential 1428 regular season games. His numerous ailments included spinal disc herniation, Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic tendinitis of a hip-flexor muscle, and chronic back pain so severe that he had other people tie his skates.[2] He has retired twice because of his health: first in 1997 after battling lymphoma (he returned in 2000), and for a second and final time after being diagnosed with an atrial fibrillation.[1] A spinal disc herniation, incorrectly called a slipped disc, is a medical condition affecting the spine, in which a tear in the outer, fibrous ring (annulus fibrosus) of an intervertebral disc allows the soft, central portion (nucleus pulposus) to bulge out. ... Hodgkins lymphoma, also known as Hodgkins disease, is a type of lymphoma first described by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. ... Tendonitis (also tenonitis or tendinitis) is an inflammation of a tendon. ... Back pain (also known dorsalgia) is pain felt in the back that may originate from the muscles, nerves, bones, joints or other structures in the spine. ... Atrial fibrillation (AF or afib) is a cardiac arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm) that involves the two upper chambers (atria) of the heart. ...


Lemieux was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame immediately after his first retirement, waiving the normal three-year waiting period; upon his return in 2000, he became the third Hall of Famer (after Gordie Howe and Guy Lafleur) to play after being inducted.[3] Lemieux's impact on the NHL has been significant: Andrew Conte of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review called him the "savior" of the Pittsburgh Penguins, and after Lemieux's retirement, Wayne Gretzky commented that "You don't replace players like Mario Lemieux [...] The game will miss him".[4] Bobby Orr called him "the most talented player I've ever seen"; Orr, along with Bryan Trottier, and numerous fans,[1] speculate that had Lemieux not suffered so many injuries, his on-ice achievements would have been much greater.[4] Hockey Hall of Fame logo The Hockey Hall of Fame, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is dedicated to the history of ice hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL trophies (including the Stanley Cup) along with interactive activities. ... Gordon Gordie Howe, OC (born March 31, 1928 in Floral, Saskatchewan) is a former professional ice hockey player from Canada who played for the Detroit Red Wings and Hartford Whalers of the National Hockey League, and the Houston Aeros and New England Whalers in the WHA. He is often referred... Guy Damien Lafleur, OC, CQ, (born September 20, 1951 in Thurso, Quebec), is one of the greatest and most popular players ever to play professional ice hockey. ... The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review is a newspaper in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. It was founded in 1992 as an offshoot of the Greensburg Tribune-Review following a press strike at the two previously dominant Pittsburgh dailies. ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... Robert Gordon Bobby Orr, OC (born March 20, 1948 in Parry Sound, Ontario) is a retired Canadian ice hockey defenseman, and is considered to be one of the greatest hockey players of all time. ... Bryan John Trottier (born July 17, 1956, in Val Marie, Saskatchewan, Canada) was a professional Ice Hockey Centre in the NHL, and is a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame. ...

Contents

Early years

Mario Lemieux was born in Montreal to Pierrette, a stay-at-home mom, and Jean-Guy Lemieux, a construction worker. He and his older brothers Alain and Richard grew up in a working class family in the Ville-Émard district. Mario began practicing hockey at age 3 in his basement; before using real equipment, he and his brothers used wooden kitchen spoons as hockey sticks and bottle caps as pucks.[5] His father created a rink on the front lawn so that the boys could practice regularly,[6] and according to family legend, the family sometimes packed snow onto the living room carpet so the brothers could practice indoors when it was dark.[7] Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Alain Lemieux (born May 24, 1962 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada ) is a retired ice hockey player. ... Ville-Émard is a district of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...



Lemieux started his career with the Laval Voisins of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL). When he was drafted at age 15, he declared that he would break league records;[7] in the 1983-84 QMJHL season, Lemieux broke the league record for points in a season with 282 (133 goals, 149 assists) in 70 games.[8] In his last game of the regular season, Lemieux needed three goals to tie Guy Lafleur's record of 130 goals— he scored six goals and added six assists in a 16-4 victory.[3] The Acadie-Bathurst Titan are a junior ice hockey team in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. ... The Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (French: la Ligue de hockey junior majeur du Québec, abbreviated QMJHL in English, LHJMQ in French) is one of the three Major Junior A Tier I hockey leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ... Guy Damien Lafleur, OC, CQ, (born September 20, 1951 in Thurso, Quebec), is one of the greatest and most popular players ever to play professional ice hockey. ...


Although he played in the 1983 World Junior Hockey Championships, Lemieux refused to play for the Canadian Juniors in 1984 because he disliked how coach Dave King treated him in the previous tournament.[9] He also did not want to break up his junior season.[10] He finished his QMJHL career with 562 points (247 goals, 315 assists) in three seasons.


Before the 1984 NHL Entry Draft, Lemieux announced he wanted to play for whomever drafted him.[11] He and his agent were deadlocked with the Penguins and could not negotiate a contract. Because of this, when the Penguins called his name as the first overall draft pick, he did not shake general manager Eddie Johnston's hand or don the Penguins jersey, as is NHL tradition. He claimed he was upset about the contract negotiation, and said that "Pittsburgh doesn't want [him] bad enough."[12] Even though the draft was held in Montreal, over 3,000 fans viewed a broadcast in Pittsburgh's Civic Arena — a typical Penguins game drew less than 7,000 fans at the time.[13] Lemieux's actions upset many fans and led to accusations of arrogance and aloofness.[7] After the draft, Johnston signed Lemieux to a two-year contract for $600,000, plus a $150,000 bonus for signing.[14] jk;lkkkl;l [popiopi ... The term general manager is a descriptive term for certain executives in a business operation. ... Edward Joseph Eddie Johnston (born November 23, 1935 in Montreal, Quebec) is a former player and coach in the National Hockey League. ... The Mellon Arena (known as Pittsburgh Civic Arena from 1961–1999[1] and informally known as The Igloo) is an indoor arena in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ...


NHL career

At the start of Lemieux's career, the Penguins were in financial turmoil and there were rumours of relocation. The team declared bankruptcy after the 1974-75 season, and by 1983, they were averaging fewer than 7,000 fans per game — less than half of their arena's capacity.[15] The classic NHL shield logo The 1974-75 NHL season was the 58th season of the National Hockey League. ...


Lemieux debuted on October 11, 1984 against the Boston Bruins and scored a goal with his very first NHL shot, on his first shift against Pete Peeters.[16] Later that season, Lemieux played in the NHL All-Star Game and became the first rookie to be named the All-Star Game's Most Valuable Player. Despite missing seven games during the season, Lemieux scored 100 points and won the Calder Memorial Trophy as the rookie of the year. is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Peter H. Peeters (born 1 August 1957 in Edmonton, Alberta) is a retired professional ice hockey goaltender who was one of the NHLs most colourful characters in the 1980s. ... The National Hockey League All-Star Game (French: Match des Étoiles de la Ligue Nationale de Hockey) is an exhibition hockey game that marks the midway point of the National Hockey Leagues regular season, with many of the leagues star players playing against each other. ... In sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ... Calder Memorial Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Calder Memorial Trophy is awarded annually to the best rookie in the National Hockey League. ...


The next season, Lemieux finished second in league scoring with 141 points, behind Wayne Gretzky's NHL-record 215 points. He won the Lester B. Pearson Award as the NHL's best regular-season player as voted by his peers. Lemieux missed 17 games of the 1986-87 NHL season — his point production slipped, and the Penguins once again failed to make the playoffs. However, he played in the Canada Cup during the summer of 1987 and set a tournament record 11 goals in 9 games; his last goal, which clinched the Canadian victory, came against the Soviet team with 1:26 remaining in the third period. Lemieux cited his Canada Cup experience as the reason for his elevated play later on, stating, "Remember, I was only 21 years old at the time. To be around guys like Wayne [Gretzky] and Mark Messier and Paul Coffey [...] was a tremendous learning experience".[17] The 1985-86 NHL season was the 69th regular season of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... Lester B. Pearson Award on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Lester B. Pearson Award is awarded annually to the National Hockey Leagues outstanding player in the regular season, as judged by members of the NHL Players Association (NHLPA). ... The 1986-87 NHL season was the 70th season of the National Hockey League. ... Following the exciting 1972 Summit Series between Canada and the Soviet Union, interest in a world professional ice hockey championship increased substantially. ...


By the 1987-88 season, Wayne Gretzky had won seven consecutive Art Ross Trophies for leading the league in points. That season, fueled by his Canada Cup experience,[17] Lemieux scored 168 points and won his first NHL scoring title. He also won his first Hart Memorial Trophy as the league's Most Valuable Player to his team, and the All-Star Game MVP award after a record-setting six-point game. Despite Lemieux's success, the Penguins did not qualify for the playoffs. The 1987-88 NHL season was the 71st season of the National Hockey League. ... The Art Ross Trophy on display at the 2006 NHL Entry Draft. ... Hart Memorial Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the ice hockey player who is most valuable to his team in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ...


1988–1992: 199 Points

In the 1988-89 season, Lemieux led the league with 114 assists (tied with Gretzky) and 85 goals for 199 points; he is the only player to approach Gretzky's mammoth 200+ point seasons.[18] Lemieux finished the season a close second to Gretzky in voting for the Hart Trophy, and set several milestones and records in the process, becoming the second player to score 70+ goals in two seasons, the fourth player to score 50 goals in 50 games, and the only player to score 13 shorthanded goals in one season.[19] The 1988-89 NHL season was the 72nd season of the National Hockey League. ... Mike Bossy, left, equalled the Rockets scoring mark. ...


Perhaps the defining moment of Lemieux's season was on December 31, 1988, in a game against the New Jersey Devils.[18] In that game, Lemieux scored eight points and became the only player in NHL history to score a goal in all five possible game situations in the same game: even-strength, power-play, shorthanded, penalty shot, and empty-net. Lemieux had another five-goal, eight-point performance in a 10-7 victory during the postseason against the Philadelphia Flyers on April 25, 1989. He tied the NHL record for most goals and points in a postseason game, most goals in a postseason period (four in the first), and most assists in a postseason period (three in the second).[20] However, the Penguins lost the series four games to three. is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... The Philadelphia Flyers are a professional ice hockey team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...


During the 1989-90 NHL season, Lemieux scored at least one point in 46 consecutive games. The streak's length was second only to Gretzky's 51-game streak.[21] Lemieux won his third All-Star Game MVP with a four-goal performance. Although he missed 21 games, he finished fourth in the league in scoring with 123 points (45 goals, 78 assists).[19] The Penguins did not qualify for the playoffs. The 1989-90 NHL season was the 73rd regular season of the National Hockey League. ...


Lemieux's back injury developed into a herniated disc, which subsequently developed an infection. On July 11, 1990, Lemieux underwent back surgery to fix the disk, and he missed 50 games in the 1990-91 NHL season. In his absence, the Penguins acquired players Larry Murphy, Ron Francis, and Ulf Samuelsson in hopes of becoming serious contenders for the Stanley Cup. Despite significant back pain, Lemieux scored 16 goals and 28 assists for the playoff lead, and led the Penguins over the Minnesota North Stars for their first Stanley Cup.[19] Lemieux won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the most valuable player in the playoffs. His 44 playoff points rank second only to Wayne Gretzky's 47 in 84-85. A spinal disc herniation, incorrectly called a slipped disc, is a medical condition affecting the spine, in which a tear in the outer, fibrous ring (annulus fibrosus) of an intervertebral disc allows the soft, central portion (nucleus pulposus) to bulge out. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The 1990-91 NHL season was the 74th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... Lawrence Thomas Murphy (born March 8, 1961 in Scarborough, Ontario) is a former Canadian professional ice hockey player. ... Ronald Ron Francis (born March 1, 1963 in Sault Ste. ... Ulf Samuelsson Ulf Samuelsson (Born March 26, 1964, in Fagersta, Västmanlands län, Sweden), is a Swedish-American retired professional ice hockey player. ... The Stanley Cup (French: ) is an ice hockey club championship trophy, awarded annually to the National Hockey League (NHL) playoffs champion. ... The Minnesota North Stars were a professional ice hockey team in the National Hockey League (NHL) from 1967 to 1993. ... Conn Smythe Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Conn Smythe Memorial Trophy is awarded annually to the most valuable player during the National Hockey Leagues Stanley Cup playoffs. ...


The 1991-92 season saw another injury-plagued campaign, although Lemieux managed to play 64 games. Despite missing several games, he won his third Art Ross Trophy with 131 points. During the second game of the Patrick Division finals, the New York Rangers' Adam Graves slashed and broke Lemieux's left hand; Lemieux missed five games, but still led the playoffs with 16 goals and 18 assists.[19] The Penguins swept the Chicago Blackhawks in the Stanley Cup Final, and Lemieux won his second Conn Smythe Trophy. The 1991-92 NHL season was the 75th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... The NHLs Patrick Division was formed in 1974 as part of the Clarence Campbell Conference. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... Adam Graves, playing for the New York Rangers. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Chicago, Illinois. ...


1992–1997: Cancer, return, and retirement

The Penguins started the 1992-93 season well, and Lemieux set a franchise record with at least one goal in twelve consecutive games, from October 6 to November 1.[22] He was on pace to challenge Gretzky's records of 92 goals in one season (1981-82) and 215 points in one season (1985-86),[23] until January 12, 1993, when he made the shocking announcement that he had been diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma. He was forced to undergo energy-draining radiation treatments, leaving his career and possibly his survival in doubt. He missed two months of play, and without him, the Penguins struggled. When he returned, he was 12 points behind Buffalo's Pat LaFontaine in the scoring race.[23] The 1992-93 NHL season was the 76th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Hodgkins lymphoma, also known as Hodgkins disease, is a type of lymphoma first described by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. ... {{NHL Team | team_name = Buffalo Sabres | bg_color = #002D62 | text_color = #FDBB30 | logo_image = Sabres. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...

"Notwithstanding Gretzky's abiding majesty, posterity will never forget that no athlete — not even the sainted Lou Gehrig — has ever before Lemieux been struck down by a deadly disease at the very moment when he was the best of his sport at the best he ever would be. And since: Lemieux has achieved miraculously in remission, struggling, on the side, with a back injury so grievous that it has benched him after he merely laced up a skate. That is the stuff that answers people these days when they wonder where all our sports heroes have gone."
—Frank Deford, Newsweek[24]

On the day of his last radiation treatment, Lemieux flew to Philadelphia to play against the Flyers, where he scored a goal and an assist in a 5-4 loss. After the game Lemieux earned a standing ovation from Philadelphia fans — a rare occurrence for a visiting player.[23] With Lemieux back, Pittsburgh won an NHL record 17 consecutive games to finish first overall for the first time in franchise history;[23] their 119 points are still a franchise record. Lemieux scored at an incredible pace, notching an average 2.67 points per game — the third highest points-per-game for a season, behind only Wayne Gretzky's 1983-84 and 1985-86 averages of 2.77 and 2.69, respectively.[23] Lemieux won his second straight and fourth overall scoring title, finishing with 160 points (69 goals, 91 assists) in 60 games, beating out LaFontaine by 12 points.[19] The Philadelphia Flyers are a professional ice hockey team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


The Penguins dispatched the New Jersey Devils in the first round in five games, but were upset by the New York Islanders in seven. After the season, Lemieux was awarded his second Pearson Trophy, and his first Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy, given to the player who best exemplifies perseverance, sportsmanship, and dedication to hockey.[19] The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... The New York Islanders are a professional ice hockey team based in Uniondale, a hamlet located on Long Island in Town of Hempstead, Nassau County, New York, United States. ... Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy is awarded annually to the National Hockey League player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship, and dedication to ice hockey. ...


On July 23, 1993, Lemieux underwent his second back surgery, this time to repair a herniated muscle. He missed the first ten games of the season to recover from surgery, and missed 48 more games from back problems.[19] After the season, he announced that he would take a leave of absence because of fatigue brought on by his radiation treatment.[19] Lemieux returned for the 1995-96 season, and on October 29, 1995, he scored his 500th career goal in his 605th game, played against the New York Islanders. Lemieux was second only to Gretzky, who scored 500 goals in 575 games.[19] Lemieux finished the season with 69 goals and 92 assists to lead the league; he became the seventh player to win three Hart Trophies, and the fourth player to win five Art Ross Trophies.[19] Despite his return, the Penguins fell to the Florida Panthers in the Eastern Conference Final in seven games. is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1995-96 NHL season was the 79th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The New York Islanders are a professional ice hockey team based in Uniondale, a hamlet located on Long Island in Town of Hempstead, Nassau County, New York, United States. ... For the animal species by this name, see Florida Panther. ... Eastern Conference is one of two conferences in both the National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League. ...


The next season, Lemieux, playing against the Vancouver Canucks, scored his 600th career goal in his 719th game, and then won his sixth Art Ross Trophy with 122 points (50 goals, 72 assists) and earned his tenth career 100-point season. Once again, Lemieux finished second only to Wayne Gretzky, who finished with 15 100-point seasons, and scored 600 goals in 718 games.[19] In his last game against his hometown Montreal, Lemieux tied an NHL record for most goals in a period, with four goals in the third.[25] The Penguins qualified for the playoffs again, but lost to the Eric Lindros-led Philadelphia Flyers in five games in the first round. Lemieux scored one goal and earned an assist in his final game, played in Philadelphia.[19] After the game, he skated around the ice and received a standing ovation from the Philadelphia crowd. On November 17, 1997, Lemieux was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, becoming the ninth player in history to have the mandatory three-year waiting period waived. The classic NHL shield logo The 1996-97 NHL season was the 80th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... The Vancouver Canucks are a professional ice hockey team based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Eric Bryan Lindros (born February 28, 1973 in London, Ontario, Canada) is a professional ice hockey player in the National Hockey League. ... The Philadelphia Flyers are a professional ice hockey team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Hockey Hall of Fame logo The Hockey Hall of Fame, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is dedicated to the history of ice hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL trophies (including the Stanley Cup) along with interactive activities. ...


1997—2000: Post-retirement

Through most of the 1990s, the Penguins' owners badly mismanaged the team. As a consequence of the team's free-spending ways earlier in the decade, the Penguins asked many of its big-name players to defer their salaries; the players, including Lemieux, obliged in order to stay in Pittsburgh. This forced General Manager Craig Patrick to make many personnel moves that were widely criticized by fans. It only later came out that the owners' poor financial management was the real culprit in November 1998, when the team went into bankruptcy for the second time in franchise history. For much of the 1998-99 season, it was almost a foregone conclusion that the Penguins would either leave town or fold. Craig Patrick (born May 20, 1946 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American hockey player, coach and general manager, the son of Hall of Famer Lynn Patrick and the grandson of Lester Patrick. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ...


At this point, Lemieux stepped in with an unusual proposal. Years of deferred salaries, adding up to millions of dollars, had made him one of the Penguins' largest creditors. He sought to recover this money by converting it into equity and buying the team. He also promised to keep the team in Pittsburgh. On September 3, 1999, a U.S. Bankruptcy Court approved Lemieux's reorganization plan to save the Penguins. This made the then-retired star the first former NHL player to become majority owner of his former team. is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... In the United States, Federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases. ...


Part of the reason the court had accepted Lemieux's plan was because it was designed to pay everyone the organization owed, a feat that would be rare if it happened. In August 2005, the Post-Gazette reported that the Penguins had indeed fully paid the principal it owed to each of its creditors, both secured and unsecured.[26] Lemieux was given much of the credit, according to the article, for his insistence that everyone owed be paid. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, also known simply as the PG, is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. // The paper began publication on July 29, 1786, with the encouragement of Hugh Henry Brackenridge as a four-page weekly, initially called The Gazette. ...


Lemieux became president, chairman of the board and CEO of the Penguins. He has since relinquished the president's and CEO's posts to Ken Sawyer, but remains the team's principal owner. In January 2006, Lemieux confirmed the team was for sale, but would consider offers only from those who will keep the team in Pittsburgh.


Player/owner status

Lemieux's unique status as player and owner placed him in a potential conflict of interest with respect to NHL labor negotiations. Because he was also an owner, Lemieux was no longer a member of the National Hockey League Players Association, although he still paid union dues to maintain his pension. A conflict of interest is a situation in which someone in a position of trust, such as a lawyer, a politician, or an executive or director of a corporation, has competing professional or personal interests. ... The 2004-05 NHL Lockout resulted in the cancellation of what would have been the 88th season of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The National Hockey League Players Association or NHLPA is a labour union that represents the interests of the hockey players in the National Hockey League. ... Members of most trade unions pay a portion of their wages to their local to support the unions internal government, pay for any legal representation, and contribute to a strike fund. ... For the lodging, see Pension (lodging). ...


By agreement with the NHLPA, Lemieux was paid the average league salary of about $1.4 million and it was from this amount that his union dues are calculated and deducted. He did not vote in owners' meetings, delegating this role to a Penguins vice-president. The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


He appeared to have sided with the league on key collective bargaining agreement issues and suggested that the NHL adopt a salary structure similar to the National Football League, which has a hard salary cap. Lemieux and fellow team owner Gretzky brought the parties together in a last-ditch effort to save what remained of the season, but the meeting failed. The Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) is the contract between the NHL and the NHLPA that defines the structure of procedural, financial, and disciplinary relationships between the NHL, its teams, and its players. ... NFL redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


As a player, Lemieux was represented by agent Steve Reich of Pittsburgh, who handled all of Lemieux's marketing through his agency, Reich Publishing and Marketing. The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ...


Out of retirement

Lemieux in 2001
Lemieux in 2001

Late in 2000, there were rumours that Lemieux was attempting a comeback and on December 27 of that year he returned to the NHL against the Toronto Maple Leafs. The game was nationally broadcast on ESPN in the U.S. and on Hockey Night in Canada. Image File history File links Mario_Lemieux_2001. ... Image File history File links Mario_Lemieux_2001. ... The 2000-01 NHL season was the 84th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... For other uses, see Toronto Maple Leafs (disambiguation). ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Hockey Night in Canada (HNIC) is a popular television broadcast of National Hockey League games in Canada, produced by the CBC. Hockey Night consistently remains one of the highest-rated Canadian programs on television. ...


Lemieux proved that his scoring touch had not disappeared by scoring a goal and three points, including an assist 33 seconds into the first shift of his return. He was named captain of the North American All-Stars during the midseason All-Star game in Denver, Colorado. Despite playing in only 43 games in 2000-2001, Lemieux scored 76 points to finish 26th in scoring, finishing the season with the highest points-per-game average that season among NHL players.


Lemieux was one of the three finalists for the Hart Memorial Trophy and Lester B. Pearson NHLPA awards and earned a selection on the postseason NHL All-Star Second Team. Hart Memorial Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the ice hockey player who is most valuable to his team in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ...


Lemieux led the Penguins in the postseason and led in playoff scoring for much of it. His team surprised many by going to the Eastern Conference finals, knocking off the higher-seeded Washington Capitals and Buffalo Sabres along the way in six and seven games, respectively. The Penguins lost in five games to the top-seeded New Jersey Devils. The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ...


Lemieux was limited due to injuries during his last four regular seasons, playing in only 24 games in 2001-02 and ten games during the 2003-04 season. In 2002-03, at age 37, Lemieux led the National Hockey League in scoring for most of the season but missed most of the games towards the end of the schedule and finished eighth in scoring with 92 points in only 67 games. However, Pittsburgh plummeted to the bottom of the NHL and missed the playoffs in each of those three seasons. Lemieux skipped some Penguins games in order to play in what would be the first chance at the Olympics in his career. The 2001-02 NHL season was the 85th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... The 2003-04 NHL season was the 87th regular season of the National Hockey League. ... NHL redirects here. ...


Notably, on December 23, 2002, during his afternoon radio show in Pittsburgh, host Mark Madden said he would donate $6,600 to the Mario Lemieux Foundation if the hockey great ever scored off a faceoff. That very night, the Penguins played the Buffalo Sabres in Pittsburgh and Lemieux, who was aware of the challenge, made good on it when he scored the game-winning goal right off a faceoff during the third period. Mark Madden (born December 29, 1960) is a radio sports talk-show host in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and also a former World Championship Wrestling color commentator in 2000. ... A closeup of an official about to drop the puck A typical faceoff at centre ice A faceoff is the method used to begin play in ice hockey. ... {{NHL Team | team_name = Buffalo Sabres | bg_color = #002D62 | text_color = #FDBB30 | logo_image = Sabres. ...


Second retirement

After the lockout concluded, Lemieux returned to the ice for the 2005-06 season. Hopes for the Penguins were high due to the salary cap and revenue sharing, which enabled the team to compete in the market for several star players. Another reason for optimism was the Penguins winning the lottery for the first draft pick, enabling them to select Sidney Crosby. Lemieux opened up his home to Crosby to help the rookie settle in Pittsburgh and Lemieux also served as Crosby's mentor. Sidney Patrick Crosby (born August 7, 1987) is a Canadian professional ice hockey player and captain of the NHLs Pittsburgh Penguins. ...


On January 24, 2006, Mario Lemieux announced his second and permanent retirement from professional hockey at the age of 40. This followed a half-season in which he struggled not only with the increased speed of the "new NHL" but also with yet another threatening physical ailment, a heart condition called atrial fibrillation that caused him to experience irregular heartbeats. is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Atrial fibrillation (AF or afib) is a cardiac arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm) that involves the two upper chambers (atria) of the heart. ...


Although he had put up points at a pace that most NHL forwards would be perfectly content with (22 points in 26 games) in his last season, Lemieux still remarked that "I can no longer play at a level I was accustomed to in the past".


In October 2006, Lemieux's ownership group announced that it had reached an agreement to sell the Penguins to Research in Motion Chairman and Co-CEO Jim Balsillie. However, Balsillie unexpectedly rescinded his agreement two months later after an apparent dispute with the NHL Board of Governors over purchasing conditions[27], leaving ownership of the Penguins still in the Lemieux group's hands. Research In Motion Limited (RIM) (TSX: RIM, NASDAQ: RIMM) is a Canadian wireless device company. ... James L. (Jim) Balsillie, B.Comm, MBA, LL.D, FCA was born on February 3, 1961 in Seaforth, Ontario, but raised in Peterborough, Ontario where his family relocated in 1966. ...


On March 13, 2007, Lemieux's ownership group announced a final agreement for a new multi-purpose arena to be built across the street from the current Mellon Arena. The deal will keep the Penguins in Pittsburgh for at least 30 years. Lemieux was instrumental in negotiating this deal, despite efforts to move the team to Kansas City.


International play

Olympic medal record
Men's ice hockey
Olympic Games
Gold 2002 Salt Lake City Ice hockey
World Championships
Silver 1985 Czechoslovakia Ice hockey
World Junior Championships
Bronze 1983 Soviet Union Ice hockey

Lemieux played for Canada in the 1983 World Junior Championships (bronze medal), 1985 World Championships (silver medal), 1987 Canada Cup (championship), 2002 Winter Olympics (captain, gold medal) and the 2004 World Cup of Hockey (captain, championship). The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... 2002 Winter Olympic Games Ice hockey games were held at the E Center and Peaks Ice Arena in Salt Lake City and Provo, Utah. ... The Canadian national mens hockey team is overseen by Hockey Canada. ... The IIHF World U-20 Hockey Championship (colloquially called the World Junior Ice Hockey Championship, WJHC) is an annual event organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation for national under-20 ice hockey teams from around the world. ... The Ice Hockey World Championship is an annual event organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation. ... Tournament MVP Wayne Gretzky celebrates Canadas victory The 1987 Canada Cup was a Professional ice hockey world championships series in 1987. ... 2002 Winter Olympic Games Ice hockey games were held at the E Center and Peaks Ice Arena in Salt Lake City and Provo, Utah. ... The 2004 World Cup of Hockey is the second World Cup of Hockey (WCH), an international ice hockey tournament. ...


At the 2002 Winter Olympics, Lemieux led the Canadian men's team into Salt Lake City, United States as captain. The team had failed to win a gold medal at the Olympics in fifty years but were still considered favorites to win. The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The Canadian national ice hockey team is the national mens ice hockey team of Canada. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ...


Lemieux was second in team scoring with six points in five games, and led the team to gold by defeating the United States 5-2 in the final game. The gold medal secured Lemieux's legacy and helped endear himself to the hockey community with such a selfless performance. His hip injury required several painkilling injections to keep him on the ice during the Olympics.


Personal life

Lemieux was raised by his stay-at-home mother, and his father, who was a construction worker. Lemieux married Nathalie Asselin on June 26, 1993. They have four children: Lauren, Stephanie, Austin, and Alexa. Austin was born prematurely, weighing just 2 pounds, but he is perfectly healthy today. The family lives in the affluent Pittsburgh suburb of Sewickley. is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sewickley during Autumn Sewickley is a borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 12 miles west northwest of Pittsburgh along the Ohio River. ...


Popular nicknames for Lemieux include "Le Magnifique," "Super Mario" in reference to the video game character Mario, and "The Magnificent." Mario Lemieux is the youngest of three sons of Jean-Guy Lemieux and Pierrette Lemieux. He was born on the same day as Patrick Roy, in the same Canadian province, just 120 miles apart. Mario ) is a video game character created by Japanese game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and the official mascot of Nintendo. ... Patrick Jacques Roy (pronounced ), (born October 5, 1965, in Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada) is a retired ice hockey goaltender. ...


He has a tradition of opening his home to young Penguins stars such as Marc-Andre Fleury and Sidney Crosby until they settle into the Pittsburgh area, as he did with Jaromir Jagr following the 1990 NHL Draft when he lived in Mt. Lebanon. Marc-André Fleury (born November 28, 1984 in Sorel, Quebec, Canada) is a Canadian professional ice hockey player. ... Sidney Patrick Crosby (born August 7, 1987) is a Canadian professional ice hockey player and captain of the NHLs Pittsburgh Penguins. ... Jaromír Jágr (IPA: , born February 15, 1972 in Kladno, Czechoslovakia, now the Czech Republic) is an National Hockey League player and the current captain for the New York Rangers. ...


On March 30, 2007, Lemieux contributed $2,300 to Democratic U.S. Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign fund. In the past, he has also made contributions to the reelections fund of former Republican U.S. Senator Rick Santorum.[28] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... GOP redirects here. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... “Santorum” redirects here. ...


Mario Lemieux Foundation

He created the Mario Lemieux Foundation during the same year he was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma (1993). The purpose of the Foundation is to fund medical research projects being conducted by scientists. Hodgkins lymphoma, also known as Hodgkins disease, is a type of lymphoma first described by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. ...


Additionally, the Lemieux Foundation supports other organizations such as the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the Leukemia Society, the Lupus Foundation and the Children's Home of Pittsburgh.


In 2007, Mario Lemieux along with Andre Agassi, Muhammad Ali, Lance Armstrong, Warrick Dunn, Mia Hamm, Jeff Gordon, Tony Hawk, Andrea Jaeger, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Alonzo Mourning and Cal Ripken Jr. founded Athletes for Hope, a charitable organization, which helps professional athletes get involved in charitable causes and inspires millions of non-athletes to volunteer and support the community. Andre Kirk Agassi (born April 29, 1970) is a former World No. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Lance Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist. ... Warrick DeMon Dunn (born January 5, 1975 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American football player who currently plays running back for the Atlanta Falcons of the NFL. // At Catholic High in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Dunn played quarterback, cornerback, and running back. ... Mia Hamm (born Mariel Margaret Hamm on March 17, 1972 in Selma, Alabama) is a former American soccer player. ... Jeffery Michael Gordon (born August 4, 1971) is a professional American race car driver. ... This article is about the American skateboarder. ... Andrea Jaeger (born June 4, 1965, in Chicago, Illinois) is a former professional tennis player from the United States. ... Jackie Joyner-Kersee (born March 3, 1962) is a retired American athlete, ranked amongst the all-time greatest heptathletes. ... Alonzo Harding Mourning, Jr. ... Cal Ripken, Jr. ...


Legacy

Mario Lemieux has a considerable number of records, and stands in comparison along with Wayne Gretzky as one of the best NHL players of all time. Two records, points in a season and assists in a season have their first 10 listings as either Gretzky or Mario. Mario was most famous for his style of play, where he could carry other defencemen on his back and still score. Lemieux's career was cut short by Hodgkin's lymphoma, which has led many to speculate that his career totals would have been far higher if he were healthy throughout his career.


Records

  • NHL single-season record for shorthanded goals (13 in 1988-89)
  • NHL record for most goals in one period (4, 26 January 1997, shares record)
  • NHL record only player in history who scored over 30 Power-Play-Goals in two different seasons
  • NHL record only player in history who scored over 10 Short-Handed-Goals in two different seasons
  • NHL record Involved in 57.3% of team's goals in 1988-1989, the highest percentage in NHL history
  • NHL All-Star Game record for career goals (13, shares record)
  • NHL All-Star Game record for goals in a single-game (4 in 1990, shares record)
  • NHL All-Star Game record for points in a single-game (6 in 1988)
  • NHL All-Star Game record for most MVP-Awards (3, shares record)
  • NHL playoff record for goals in a single period (4, shares record)
  • NHL playoff record for goals in a single game (5, shares record)
  • NHL playoff record for points in a single period (4, shares record)
  • NHL playoff record for points in a single game (8, shares record)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins team record for career games played (915)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins team record for career goals (690)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins team record for career assists (1033)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins team record for career points (1723)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins record for longest goal-scoring streak (12 games)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins single-season record for goals (85 in 1988-89)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins single-season record for assists (114 in 1988-89)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins single-season record for points (199 in 1988-89)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins single-game record for goals (5, four occasions including playoffs)
  • Shares Pittsburgh Penguins single-game record for assists (6, three occasions)
  • Pittsburgh Penguins single-game record for points (8, three occasions including playoffs)
  • Only player in NHL history to record three eight point games in three consecutive games
  • Only player in NHL history to score a goal in each of the five different ways possible in one game (even-strength, power-play, shorthanded, penalty shot, and empty-net) (December 31, 1988 against the New Jersey Devils)

is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ...

Career statistics

Playing career

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1980–81 Montreal-Concordia QAAA 47 62 62 124 127 3 2 5 7 8
1981–82 Laval Voisins QMJHL 64 30 66 96 22
1982–83 Laval Voisins QMJHL 66 84 100 184 76 12 14 18 32 18
1983–84 Laval Voisins QMJHL 70 133 149 282 92 14 29 23 52 29
1984–85 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 73 43 57 100 54
1985–86 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 79 48 93 141 43
1986–87 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 63 54 53 107 57
1987–88 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 77 70 98 168 92
1988–89 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 76 85 114 199 100 11 12 7 19 16
1989–90 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 59 45 78 123 78
1990–91 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 26 19 26 45 30 23 16 28 44 16
1991–92 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 64 44 87 131 94 15 16 18 34 2
1992–93 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 60 69 91 160 38 11 8 10 18 10
1993–94 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 22 17 20 37 32 6 4 3 7 2
1995–96 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 70 69 92 161 54 18 11 16 27 33
1996–97 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 76 50 72 122 65 5 3 3 6 4
2000–01 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 43 35 41 76 18 18 6 11 17 4
2001–02 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 24 6 25 31 14
2002–03 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 67 28 63 91 43
2003–04 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 10 1 8 9 6
2005–06 Pittsburgh Penguins NHL 26 7 15 22 16
QMJHL Totals 200 247 315 562 190 26 43 41 84 47
NHL Totals 915 690 1033 1723 834 107 76 96 172 87

The Acadie-Bathurst Titan are a junior ice hockey team in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. ... The Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (French: la Ligue de hockey junior majeur du Québec, abbreviated QMJHL in English, LHJMQ in French) is one of the three Major Junior A Tier I hockey leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ...

International

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
1983 Canada WJC 7 5 5 10 12
1985 Canada WC 9 4 6 10 2
1987 Canada CC 9 11 7 18 8
2002 Canada Oly 5 2 4 6 0
2004 Canada WCH 6 1 4 5 2
Senior int'l totals 29 18 21 39 12

The Ice Hockey World Championship is an annual event organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation. ... Following the exciting 1972 Summit Series between Canada and the Soviet Union, interest in a world professional ice hockey championship increased substantially. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The World Cup of Hockey is the successor to the Canada Cup ice hockey tournament. ...

All Star Games

Year Location   G A P
1985 Calgary 2 1 3
1986 Hartford 0 0 0
1988 St. Louis 3 3 6
1989 Edmonton 0 1 1
1990 Pittsburgh 4 0 4
1992 Philadelphia 0 1 1
1996 Boston 1 1 2
1997 San Jose 2 1 3
2001 Denver 1 1 2
2002 Los Angeles 1 0 1
All-Star Totals 14 9 23

The Calgary Flames are a professional ice hockey team based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada and play out of the Pengrowth Saddledome. ... The Hartford Whalers were an American professional ice hockey team based in Hartford, Connecticut. ... The 40th National Hockey League All-Star Game was held in the Northlands Coliseum in Edmonton, Alberta, home to the Edmonton Oilers, on February 7, 1989. ... The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... The 41st National Hockey League All-Star Game was held in Civic Arena in Pittsburgh, home to the Pittsburgh Penguins, on January 21, 1990. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... The 43rd NHL All-Star Game was played at the Spectrum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on January 18, 1992. ... The Philadelphia Flyers are a professional ice hockey team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The 46th Annual NHL All-Star Game took place at the FleetCenter in Boston, Massachusetts on January 20, 1996. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The 47th National Hockey League All-Star Game took place on January 18, 1997 at the San Jose Arena. ... The San Jose Sharks are a professional ice hockey team based in San Jose, California, United States. ... The 51st National Hockey League All-Star Game took place on February 4, 2001 at the Pepsi Center in Denver, Colorado. ... The Colorado Avalanche are a professional ice hockey team based in Denver, Colorado, United States. ... The 51st National Hockey League All-Star Game took place on February 2, 2002 at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, California. ... The Los Angeles Kings are a professional ice hockey team based in Los Angeles, California. ...

Awards

Hockey Hall of Fame logo The Hockey Hall of Fame, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is dedicated to the history of ice hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL trophies (including the Stanley Cup) along with interactive activities. ... Hart Memorial Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the ice hockey player who is most valuable to his team in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ... The Art Ross Trophy on display at the 2006 NHL Entry Draft. ... Conn Smythe Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Conn Smythe Memorial Trophy is awarded annually to the most valuable player during the National Hockey Leagues Stanley Cup playoffs. ... Lester B. Pearson Award on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Lester B. Pearson Award is awarded annually to the National Hockey Leagues outstanding player in the regular season, as judged by members of the NHL Players Association (NHLPA). ... The NHL Plus-Minus Award is awarded annually to the player in the National Hockey League that leads the league in plus/minus. ... Calder Memorial Trophy on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Calder Memorial Trophy is awarded annually to the best rookie in the National Hockey League. ... The Lester Patrick Trophy has been has presented by the National Hockey League since 1966 to honour a recipients contribution to hockey in the United States. ... The Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy is awarded annually to the National Hockey League player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship, and dedication to hockey. ... The NHL All-Rookie Team is chosen by the Professional Hockey Writers Association from the best rookies in the National Hockey League at each position for the season just concluded based on their performance in that year. ... The Lou Marsh Trophy is awarded annually by a panel of journalists in recognition of Canadas top athlete. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Hockey News is a North American hockey newspaper. ... Canadiens redirects here. ...

See also

Mike Bossy, left, equalled the Rockets scoring mark. ... National Hockey League The list of National Hockey League (NHL) players is divided into the following lists: By specific groups Current players List of every NHL player List of members of the Hockey Hall of Fame List of members of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame List of NHL... In ice hockey, scoring 500 regular-season goals is considered a highly significant achievement for National Hockey League players. ... The following is a list of ice hockey players who have scored 1000 points in the National Hockey League. ... A list of National Hockey League seasons since inception of the league: 1917-18 | 1918-19 | 1919-20 | 1920-21 | 1921-22 | 1922-23 | 1923-24 | 1924-25 | 1925-26 | 1926-27 | 1927-28 | 1928-29 | 1929-30 | 1930-31 | 1931-32 | 1932-33 | 1933-34 | 1934-35 | 1935-36... This is a list of NHL Statistical leaders. ... // Brothers Andersson: Mikael, Niklas Arbour: Ernest Ty, Jack Babych: Dave, Wayne Benning: Brian, Jim Bentley: Doug, Max, Reg Biron: Martin, Mathieu Boucher: Frank, George, Billy, Bobby Bordeleau: JP, Chris Broderick: Ken, Len Broten: Aaron, Neal, Paul Bure: Pavel, Valeri Cain: Herb, Francis Callander: Drew, Jock Carlson: Jack, Steve Cavallini: Gino...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c "Lemieux leaves with a heavy heart", CBC Sports, 2006-01-24. Retrieved on 2007-09-19. 
  2. ^ Miller, Saul. Hockey Tough. Human Kinetics, 94. ISBN 0736051236. Retrieved on 2007-09-23. 
  3. ^ a b Mario Lemieux. Legends of Hockey. Retrieved on 2007-09-21.
  4. ^ a b "What people are saying [about Lemieux]", CBC Sports, 2006-01-25. Retrieved on 2007-09-19. 
  5. ^ Christopher, Matt [2002]. On the Ice With... Mario Lemieux. Little, Brown and Company, 3. ISBN 0-316-13799-5. Retrieved on 2007-09-21. 
  6. ^ Mario Lemieux. Ask Men. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  7. ^ a b c Deacon, James (1996-04-08). "Lemieux, Mario (profile)". Maclean's Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-09-19. 
  8. ^ 1997 Hockey Hall of Fame Inductees. Legends of Hockey. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  9. ^ Mario Lemieux. Hockey Draft Central. Retrieved on 2007-09-19.
  10. ^ Christopher, 3.
  11. ^ Christopher, 21.
  12. ^ Christopher, 23.
  13. ^ Christopher, 21.
  14. ^ Christopher, 23.
  15. ^ Christopher, 21.
  16. ^ Mario Lemieux Retires. TSN. Retrieved on 2007-09-21.
  17. ^ a b One on One with Mario Lemieux. Legends of Hockey (2002-02-04). Retrieved on 2007-09-21.
  18. ^ a b Honoured Player — Lemieux, Mario. Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Mario Lemieux — Career Timeline", Associated Press, 2006-01-24. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  20. ^ This Date In Flyers History...April 25. Philadelphia Flyers (2005-04-25). Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  21. ^ Rossi, Rob. ""He's still Mario Lemieux": the Penguins superstar has a renewed sense of purpose as he aims to win another scoring title, save hockey in Pittsburgh, and perhaps catch Gretzky - again", Hockey Digest, January 2003. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  22. ^ Mario Lemieux. hockeydraftcentral.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  23. ^ a b c d e Bonanno, Rocky. "Lemieux took on all opponents, even cancer, and won", NHL.com, 2007-10-23. Retrieved on 2007-10-23. 
  24. ^ Schwartz, Larry. Mario was super despite obstacles. ESPN. Retrieved on 2007-12-23.
  25. ^ "N.H.L.: ROUNDUP; Lemieux's Hat Trick Difference In Victory", Associated Press, 2001-01-25. Retrieved on 2007-11-16. 
  26. ^ http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/05232/557229.stm
  27. ^ http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/sports/penguins/s_484544.html
  28. ^ http://www.newsmeat.com/sports_political_donations/Mario_Lemieux.php

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Little, Brown and Company is a publishing house established by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Macleans is Canadas leading weekly news magazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Official website
  • Official NHL Mario Lemieux website
  • Mario Lemieux's biography at Legends of Hockey
  • Mario Lemieux's career stats at The Internet Hockey Database
  • Mario Lemieux's NHL player profile
  • Pittsburgh Penguins profile
  • The Mario Lemieux Foundation
  • Athletes for Hope
  • CBC Digital Archives – Becoming magnificent Interview with a young Mario Lemieux

{{Navboxes|title=Quick links to related articles|list1=

Awards
Preceded by
Pat LaFontaine
CHL Player of the Year
1984
Succeeded by
Dan Hodgson
Preceded by
Brian Lawton
NHL First Overall Draft Pick
1984
Succeeded by
Wendel Clark
Preceded by
Tom Barrasso
Winner of the Calder Trophy
1985
Succeeded by
Gary Suter
Preceded by
Wayne Gretzky
Winner of the Hart Trophy
1988
Succeeded by
Mark Messier
Preceded by
Wayne Gretzky
Winner of the Art Ross Trophy
1988, 1989
Succeeded by
Wayne Gretzky
Preceded by
Bill Ranford
Winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy
1991, 1992
Succeeded by
Patrick Roy
Preceded by
Wayne Gretzky
Winner of the Art Ross Trophy
1992, 1993
Succeeded by
Wayne Gretzky
Preceded by
Mark Messier
Winner of the Hart Trophy
1993
Succeeded by
Sergei Fedorov
Preceded by
Mark Fitzpatrick
Bill Masterton Trophy Winner
1993
Succeeded by
Cam Neely
Preceded by
Paul Ysebaert
Winner of the NHL Plus/Minus Award
1993
Succeeded by
Scott Stevens
Preceded by
Mark Tewksbury
Lou Marsh Trophy winner
1993
Succeeded by
Myriam Bédard
Preceded by
Eric Lindros
Winner of the Hart Trophy
1996
Succeeded by
Dominik Hašek
Preceded by
Jaromír Jágr
Winner of the Art Ross Trophy
1996, 1997
Succeeded by
Jaromír Jágr
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Dan Frawley
Pittsburgh Penguins captains
1987 - 1994
Succeeded by
Ron Francis
Preceded by
Ron Francis
Pittsburgh Penguins captains
1995 - 1997
Succeeded by
Ron Francis
Preceded by
Jaromír Jágr
Pittsburgh Penguins captains
2001 - 2006
Succeeded by
Sidney Crosby
Preceded by
Owen Nolan
EA Sports NHL Cover Athlete
NHL 2002
Succeeded by
Jarome Iginla
Persondata
NAME Lemieux, Mario
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Canadian ice hockey centre
DATE OF BIRTH October 5, 1965
PLACE OF BIRTH Montreal, Quebec, Canada
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mario Lemieux - MSN Encarta (597 words)
Mario Lemieux (born October 5, 1965) is a retired professional ice hockey centre who played 17 seasons for the Pittsburgh Penguins of the National Hockey League (NHL) between...
Mario Lemieux, born in 1965, Canadian professional ice hockey player, who had a brilliant Hall of Fame career in the National Hockey League (NHL) despite dealing with numerous injuries and health problems.
Lemieux’s illness caused him to miss the entire 1994-95 season, but he returned to the Penguins the following year and won his third MVP trophy and fifth scoring title, compiling 69 goals and 92 assists.
Mario Lemieux@Everything2.com (1499 words)
Mario Lemieux, born October 5th 1965 in Montreal, Quebec, is perhaps, and in my opinion, the greatest, but at minimum one of the greatest hockey players ever.
Mario Lemieux was born in Montreal, Quebec on October 5, 1965.
Mario was greeted with a standing ovation from the crowd and players on April 26, 1997 in Philadelphia in what was to be his final game as the Penguins were eliminated from the playoffs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m