FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Marie de France
Marie de France from an illuminated manuscript
French literature
By category
French literary history

Medieval
16th century - 17th century
18th century -19th century
20th century - Contemporary Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In the strictest definition of illuminated manuscript, only manuscripts decorated with gold or silver, like this miniature of Christ in Majesty from the Aberdeen Bestiary (folio 4v), would be considered illuminated. ... French literature is, generally speaking, literature written in the French language, particularly by citizens of France; it may also refer to literature written by people living in France who speak other traditional non-French languages. ... Medieval French literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in Oïl languages (including Old French and early Middle French) during the period from the eleventh century to the end of the fifteenth century. ... French Renaissance literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French (Middle French) from the French invasion of Italy in 1494 to 1600, or roughly the period from the reign of Charles VIII of France to the ascension of Henri IV of France to the throne. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) French literature of the 17th century spans the reigns of Henry IV of France, the Regency of Marie de Medici, Louis XIII of France, the Regency of Anne of Austria (and the civil war called the Fronde) and the... French literature of the 18th century spans the period from the death of Louis XIV of France, through the Régence (during the minority of Louis XV) and the reigns of Louis XV of France and Louis XVI of France to the start of the French Revolution. ... French literature of the nineteenth century is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French from (roughly) 1799 to 1900. ... French literature of the twentieth century is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French from (roughly) 1895 to 1990. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

French Writers

Chronological list
Writers by category
Novelists - Playwrights
Poets - Essayists
Short story writers Chronological list of French language authors (regardless of nationality), by date of birth. ...

France Portal
Literature Portal
This box: view  talk  edit

Marie de France ("Mary of France") was a poet evidently born in France and living in England during the late 12th century. Virtually nothing is known of her early life, though she wrote a form of continental French that was copied by Anglo-Norman scribes. Therefore, most of the manuscripts of her work bear Anglo-Norman traits. She also translated some Roman literature. The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The literature of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire written in the Latin language. ...


Although her actual name is now unknown, she is referred to as "Marie de France" after a line in one of her published works: "Marie ai nun, si sui de France," which translates as "My name is Marie, I am from France." Some of the most widely accepted candidates for the poet are Marie, Abbess of Shaftesbury and half-sister to Henry II, King of England; Marie, Abbess of Reading; Marie de Boulogne; Marie, Abbess of Barking;[1] and Marie de Meulan, wife of Hugh Talbot.[2][3][4] For other uses, see Shaftesbury (disambiguation) Shaftesbury is a town in North Dorset, England, situated on the A30 road near the Wiltshire border 20 miles west of Salisbury. ... Henry II of England 5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... Marie of Boulogne was the Countess of Boulogne from 1159 to 1170. ... Barking is the principal town in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. ...


Four works have been attributed to Marie de France: The Lais of Marie de France (a collection of short narrative poems not unlike shortened versions of romances), the "Ysopet" fables, a retelling of the Legend of the Purgatory of St. Patrick, and, most recently, a saint's life called La Vie seinte Audree or The Life of Saint Audrey. Scholars have dated Marie's works between about 1160 at the earliest, and about 1215 at the latest, though it is probable that they were written between about 1170 and 1205. One of her works, the Lais, is dedicated to a "noble king," another to a "Count William." It is thought that the king referred to is either Henry II of England or his eldest son, "Henry the Young King." The Count William in question is, most likely, either William of Mandeville or William Marshall. The Lais of Marie de France are a series of twelve short narrative poems in Anglo-Norman, generally focused on glorifying the concepts of courtly love through the adventures of their main characters. ... Ysopet or isopet (little Aesop) refers to a medieval collection of fables in French literature, specifically to versions of Aesops Fables. ... St. ... Æthelthryth (also Etheldreda, Ediltrudis, Audrey or Awdrey) (c. ... Events Eric IX of Sweden is succeeded by Karl Sverkersson. ... A certified copy of the Magna Carta March 4 - King John of England makes an oath to the Pope as a crusader to gain the support of Innocent III. June 15 - King John of England was forced to put his seal on the Magna Carta, outlining the rights of landowning... Lais was a legendary prostitute or courtesan of ancient Greece who was active in Corinth. ... Henry II of England 5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... Henry, the Young King Henry the Young King (February 28, 1155–June 11, 1183) was the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... William de Mandeville, 3rd Earl of Essex (d. ...


It has been suggested that Marie de France was a member of the court Henry II and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was a patron of troubadours and other artists. In 1816, the English poet Matilda Betham wrote a long poem about Marie de France in octosyllabic couplets, "The Lay of Marie." Eleanor of Aquitaine Eleanor of Aquitaine (or Aliénor), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1] – April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... A troubadour composing lyrics, Germany c. ... Matilda Betham-Edwards (born 1836 in Suffolk; died 1919 in Hastings) was a novelist, travel writer and francophile. ...


See also

  • Anglo-Norman literature

Anglo-Norman literature is literature composed in the Anglo-Norman language developed during the period 1066-1204 when the Duchy of Normandy and England were united in the Anglo-Norman realm. ...

External links

  • International Marie de France Society
  • Works by Marie de France at Project Gutenberg
    • French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France, available at Project Gutenberg.
  • Complete bibliography of her works, including secondary literature (Archives de littérature du Moyen Âge, Arlima)

Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

References

  1. ^ Rossi, Carla (2007). Marie, ki en sun tens pas ne s'oblie; Maria di Francia: la Storia oltre l'enigma. Rome: Bagatto Libri. 
  2. ^ Holmes, Urban T. (1932), "New thoughts on Marie de France", Studies in Philology 29: 1-10
  3. ^ Grillo, Peter R. (1988), "Was Marie de France the Daughter of Waleran II, Count of Meulan?", Medium Aevum 57: 269-273
  4. ^ Pontfarcy, Yolande de (1995), "Si Marie de France était Marie de Meulan", Cahiers de Civilisation Medievale (Xe-XIIe Siecles) 38: 353-61

  Results from FactBites:
 
Marie De France - LoveToKnow 1911 (1282 words)
France," generally interpreted to mean that Marie was a native of the Ile de France, she seems to have been of Norman origin, and certainly spent most of her life in England.
The manuscripts in which Marie's poems are preserved date from the late 13th or even the 14th century, but the language fixes the date of the poems in the second half of the 12th century.
Marie's Ysopet is translated from an English original which she erroneously attributed to Alfred the Great, who had, she said, translated it from the Latin.
Marie de France (423 words)
She has this trait in common with the other trouvères, that she had no biographer; at least no biography of her has come down to us, and it is mostly by inference that scholars have been able to gather the meagre information that we possess about her.
She was a native of Normandy and lived in the second half of the twelfth century, because she uses the pure Norman dialect of that time, and the two personages alluded to in her works were Henry II of England and his son William, Count of Salisbury.
Marie's contributions to French literature consist of lays, the "Ysopet", and a romance published by Roquefort under the title, "Legend of the Purgatory of Saint Patrick".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m