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Encyclopedia > Maria Anne Fitzherbert
Maria Anne Fitzherbert, 'wife' of King George IV
Maria Anne Fitzherbert, 'wife' of King George IV
Plaque at Maria Fitzherbert's burial place in Brighton
Plaque at Maria Fitzherbert's burial place in Brighton

Maria Anne Fitzherbert, née Smythe (26 July 175627 March 1837), was the first woman with whom the future King George IV of the United Kingdom undertook a wedding ceremony, and his companion for a large part of his adult life. However the marriage was invalid under English civil laws concerning royal marriages and she never became queen or acquired any other title. source: http://www. ... source: http://www. ... Plaque at tomb of Maria Fitzherbert in Kemp Town, Brighton: photograph taken 9 July 2004. ... Plaque at tomb of Maria Fitzherbert in Kemp Town, Brighton: photograph taken 9 July 2004. ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in leap years). ... | Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ...

Contents


Early life

Maria Anne was the eldest child of Walter Smythe of Brambridge, Hampshire, and Mary Ann Errington. Her paternal grandparents were Sir John Smythe, 3rd Baronet Smythe and Constantia Blount. Her maternal grandparents were John Errington of Beaufront, Northumberland, and Maria Levery. Maria was also mother to Charles William Molyneux, 1st Earl of Sefton by her third marriage. She was educated in Paris. Hampshire (abbr. ... A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt), is the holder of an hereditary title awarded by the British Crown, known as a baronetcy. ... Northumberland is a traditional, ceremonial and administrative county in northern England. ... Charles William Molyneux, 1st Earl of Sefton (September 3, 1748-January 31, 1794). ... The Eiffel Tower, the international symbol of the city For other uses, see Paris (disambiguation). ...


Marriages

She was married to Edward Weld, 16 years her senior, of Lulworth Castle in July, 1775. Maria Anne soon became a widow, as Weld died just three months later. Lulworth Castle, in East Lulworth, Dorset, situated south of Wool, is a Castle. ... A widow is a woman whose spouse has died. ...


She was secondly married, three years later, to Thomas Fitzherbert of Swynnerton, Staffordshire. She was ten years younger than him. They had a son who died young. She became a widow for a second time on 7 May 1781, inheriting a residence in Mayfair and an annual income of £2,500. Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Mayfair is an area in the City of Westminster London, named after the fortnight-long May Fair that took place there from 1686 until it was banned in that location in 1764. ...


The young widow soon entered London high society. In spring, 1784, Maria was introduced to a youthful admirer: George, Prince of Wales. She became the most notable royal mistress to the future George IV of the United Kingdom by marrying him on December 15, 1785, at Red Rice House, Red Rice. London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... A royal mistress is historical position of a mistress who has considerable power. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Red Rice is a small village located just southwest of Andover, Hampshire. ...


The marriage was considered invalid under the Royal Marriages Act 1772 because it had not been approved by George III of the United Kingdom and the Privy Council. Had permission been asked, it would probably not have been granted, as Mrs. Fitzherbert was a Roman Catholic. The Royal Marriages Act of 1772 made it illegal for any member of the British royal family (defined as all descendants of King George II, excluding descendants of princesses who marry foreigners) under the age of 25 to marry without the consent of the ruling monarch. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ...


Relationship with Prince of Wales/George IV after his marriage

Maria and the Prince continued to see one another romantically even after the Prince's marriage to Caroline of Brunswick, and the prince returned to live with Maria in about 1800, but their relationship had ended permanently by 1811. During this time he was also romantically involved with royal courtesan Frances Villiers, Countess of Jersey, but this affair apparantly had no adverse effect on Maria's affair with him. [1] Caroline of Brunswick Duchess Caroline of Brunswick (17 May 1768 – 7 August 1821) as Queen Caroline was the Queen Consort of King George IV of the United Kingdom from 29 January 1820 to her death. ... A courtesan is a person paid and/or supported for the giving of social companionship and intimate liaisons to one or more partners. ... Frances Villiers, Countess of Jersey (February 25, 1753 – July 23, 1821, Cheltenham) was the most notorious of the many mistresses of King George IV of the United Kingdom. ...


Following the death of George on 26 June 1830, it was discovered that he had kept all her letters, and steps were taken to destroy them. The new king, William IV, offered to make her a royal duchess, a recompense for the difficulties she had suffered on his brother's behalf. Mrs Fitzherbert replied that ‘she had borne through life the name of Mrs Fitzherbert; that she had never disgraced it, and did not wish to change it’. [2] June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... William IV (William Henry) (21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ...


She is buried in St John the Baptist's Church, Kemp Town, Brighton. Kemp Town is a residential estate in the east of Brighton in England. ... Brighton is a town on the south coast of England, which together with its immediate neighbour Hove forms the city of Brighton & Hove. ...


References

  • Charles Langdale: The Memoirs of Mrs Fitzherbert : with an account of her marriage with H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, afterwards King George IV.. – London : Richard Bentley, 1856
  • WH Wilkins: Mrs Fitzherbert and George IV. – London, New York und Bombay : Longmans, Green, & Co., 1905
  • Sir Shane Leslie: Mrs. Fitzherbert : A Life. Chiefly from Unpublished Sources. 2 Bände. – London : Burns Oates, 1939–40
  • Anita Leslie: Mrs. Fitzherbert. – London : Hutchinson & Co. Ltd., 1960
  • Geraldine Simpson: Mrs Fitzherbert : The Uncrowned Queen. – 1971
  • Valerie Irvine: The King's Wife : George IV and Mrs Fitzherbert. – London : Hambledon & London, 2005. – ISBN 185285443X

  Results from FactBites:
 
Maria Anne Fitzherbert - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (557 words)
Maria Anne Fitzherbert, née Smythe (26 July 1756 27 March 1837), was the first woman with whom the future King George IV of the United Kingdom undertook a wedding ceremony, and his companion for a large part of his adult life.
Maria Anne was the eldest child of Walter Smythe of Brambridge, Hampshire, and Mary Ann Errington.
Maria and the Prince continued to see one another romantically even after the Prince's marriage to Caroline of Brunswick, and the prince returned to live with Maria in about 1800, but their relationship had ended permanently by 1811.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Maria Anne Fitzherbert (503 words)
Fitzherbert turned a deaf ear to the prince's solicitations, to get rid of which she withdrew to the Continent.
Fitzherbert off, at the same time continuing the pension of £3000 a year, which he had allowed her ever since their marriage.
Fitzherbert survived him seven years, dying at the age of eighty, at Brighton, where she was buried in the Catholic church of St. John the Baptist, to the erection of which she had largely contributed, and wherein a mural monument to her memory is still to be seen.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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