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Encyclopedia > Margaret Chase Smith
Margaret Chase Smith

Member of the United States Senate from Maine Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ...


In office
1949 - 1973
Preceded by Wallace H. White, Jr.
Succeeded by William Hathaway

Born December 14, 1897
Skowhegan, Maine
Died May 29, 1995
Skowhegan, Maine
Political party Republican
Spouse Clyde H. Smith
Member of the U. S. House of Representatives from Maine's 2nd district
In office
1940 - 1949
Preceded by Clyde H. Smith
Succeeded by Charles Pembroke Nelson

Born December 14, 1897
Skowhegan, Maine
Died May 29, 1995
Skowhegan, Maine
Political party Republican

Margaret Chase Smith (December 14, 1897May 29, 1995) was a Republican Senator from Maine, and one of the most successful politicians in Maine history. She was the first woman to be elected to both the U.S. House and the Senate, and the first woman from Maine to serve in either. She was also the first woman to have her name placed in nomination for the U.S. Presidency at a major party's convention (1964 Republican Convention, won by Barry Goldwater). She was a moderate Republican and might be termed a Rockefeller Republican. Margaret Chase Smith, from US Senate webpage http://www. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Wallace Humphrey White, Jr. ... Categories: Stub | 1924 births | United States Senators ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Skowhegan can refer to a town or CDP in Maine. ... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Skowhegan can refer to a town or CDP in Maine. ... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Clyde Harold Smith (June 9, 1876 - April 8, 1940) was a United States Representative from Maine. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Maine congressional districts since 2003 Maines second congressional district is the larger of Maines two congressional districts, covering most of the state. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... Clyde Harold Smith (June 9, 1876 - April 8, 1940) was a United States Representative from Maine. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Skowhegan can refer to a town or CDP in Maine. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Skowhegan can refer to a town or CDP in Maine. ... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Official language(s) None Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... In the United States, the term Rockefeller Republican refers to those members of the Republican party who hold moderate views similar to those of the late Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York from 1959 to 1973 and vice president of the United States under President Gerald Ford in the mid...


Margaret Chase was born in Skowhegan, Maine, on December 14, 1897, the daughter of Carrie Murray and George Emery Chase. As a young woman she taught school at a one-room schoolhouse, worked as a telephone operator, managed circulation for the Skowhegan Independent Reporter, and served as an executive with a local textile mill. She became involved with local women's organizations and helped found the Skowhegan Business and Professional Women's Club. She attended Colby College where she was a member of Sigma Kappa. In 1930, she married Clyde Smith, a respected political leader in central Maine. Skowhegan can refer to a town or CDP in Maine. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is one of the United States of Americas oldest independent liberal arts colleges. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Clyde Harold Smith (June 9, 1876 - April 8, 1940) was a United States Representative from Maine. ...


She first won a seat to the U.S. House of Representatives on June 3, 1940 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of her husband. She served on the House Naval Affairs committee during World War II. As co-chair of a subcommittee that investigated problems encountered by the War Department in rapidly establishing bases across the nation, she was instrumental in resolving conflicts between states, local jurisdictions and the military. June 3 is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ...

Chase Smith in 1943
Chase Smith in 1943

She was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1948. She served in the Senate from 1949 to 1973. In her bid for a third term in 1960, the Democratic Party put up Lucia Cormier, the Democratic floor leader of the Maine House of Representatives, making it the first time two women ran against each other for a Senate seat. By the end of her fourth term, the charm she had had for so many years seemed to evaporate. She was defeated for reelection in 1972 by Democrat Bill Hathaway, the only election she ever lost in the state of Maine. In her last election Smith had been plagued by rumors of poor health (she had been using a motor scooter around the Senate). A Republican primary challenger taunted her for being out of touch; she did not have a state office operating in Maine. Also, she alienated liberals with her support for the Vietnam War while turning off conservatives with her votes against Nixon Supreme Court nominees Clement Haynsworth and G. Harrold Carswell. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 476 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (508 × 640 pixel, file size: 17 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date 1943 Author unknown Permission No known restrictions on publication. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 476 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (508 × 640 pixel, file size: 17 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date 1943 Author unknown Permission No known restrictions on publication. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The debating chamber of the Maine House of Representatives inside the State House The Maine House of Representatives is the lower house of the Maine Legislature. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Stub | 1924 births | United States Senators ... American liberalism—that is, liberalism in the United States of America—is a broad political and philosophical mindset, favoring individual liberty, and opposing restrictions on liberty, whether they come from established religion, from government regulation, from the existing class structure, or from multi-national corporations. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Clement Furman Haynsworth, Jr. ... George Harrold Harold Carswell (December 22, 1919 - July 13, 1992) was a Federal Judge and an unsuccessful nominee to the United States Supreme Court. ...


Senator Smith had a professional and personal relationship with staff assistant William Lewis, a lawyer from Oklahoma with a Harvard MBA. He had been assigned to work with the House Naval Affairs committee while with the Naval Reserve. His political and legal savvy combined with his knowledge of military matters augmented her own experience. He remained her political advisor and personal partner until his death in 1982. Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a masters degree in business administration, which attracts people from a wide range of academic disciplines. ... The United States Navy Reserve is the reserve component of the United States Navy. ... -1...


She received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President George H. W. Bush in 1989 in addition to the U.S. Air Force's top award, the American Spirit Award, in recognition of her contributions as a "great American patriot". She was also presented with a Doctor of Laws honorary degree from Rutgers University in addition to 93 other honorary degrees. The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other major civilian award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, which... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ...


Senator Smith is prominent not only for her many firsts as a woman, but also for her early principled opposition to the tactics of Senator Joseph McCarthy. On June 1, 1950, she gave her Declaration of Conscience [1] speech on the floor of the Senate, earning McCarthy's permanent ire and the nickname "Moscow Maggie" from his staff. In 1954, when McCarthy attempted to challenge her seat by sponsoring a primary challenger, the Maine voters rejected the effort. She was the first (and as yet only) woman chair of the Senate Republican Conference, 1967–1972. Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Declaration of Conscience was a speech made by Senator Margaret Chase Smith on June 1, 1950, the height of the McCarthy Era. ... The Republican conference of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairperson. ... The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 51 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. ...


Janis Benson portrayed Senator Smith in the 1998 miniseries From the Earth to the Moon. From the Earth to the Moon is a twelve-part HBO television miniseries (1998) co-produced by Ron Howard, Brian Grazer, Tom Hanks, and Michael Bostick detailing the landmark Apollo expeditions to the Moon during the 1960s and early 1970s. ...


Patricia Neal dramatized Senator Smith's Declaration of Conscience speech in the 1978 television movie Tail Gunner Joe. Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... Tail Gunner Joe was a 1977 television movie dramatizing the life of Senator Joseph McCarthy. ...


References

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Margaret Chase Smith
Preceded by
Clyde H. Smith
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maine's 2nd congressional district

1940–1949
Succeeded by
Charles Pembroke Nelson
Preceded by
Wallace H. White, Jr.
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Maine
1949–1973
Succeeded by
William Hathaway
Preceded by
Milward L. Simpson
Oldest living U.S. Senator
June 10, 1993 - April 29, 1997
Succeeded by
Jennings Randolph

  Results from FactBites:
 
Margaret Chase Smith - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (511 words)
Margaret Chase Smith (December 14, 1897–May 29, 1995) was a Republican Senator from Maine, and one of the most successful politicians in Maine history.
Margaret Chase attended Colby College in Waterville, Maine and was inducted into the Alpha chapter of Sigma Kappa Sorority.
Senator Smith is historically prominent not only for her many firsts as a woman, but also for her early principled opposition to the tactics of Senator Joseph McCarthy.
Margaret Chase Smith (430 words)
Former Senator Margaret Chase Smith, Maine's First Lady, is perhaps best known for her contribution to the well being of the United States and its people with her consistent stand for the condemnation of bigotry and injustice wherever she found it.
Senator Smith put her name at the forefront of women's achievements that have significantly improved the lives of women when, at the Republican Convention in 1964, her name was placed in nomination for the President of the United States.
Senator Smith is the first woman elected to a leadership post in the United States Senate, serving as the leader of the Conference of all Republican Senators from 1967 until her retirement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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