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Encyclopedia > Marcus Whitman
Marcus Whitman

Born September 4, 1802 in Federal Hollow, New York
Died November 29, 1847 in Waiilatpu, Oregon Country
Church Protestant
Education Fairfield Medical College
Congregations served Whitman Mission
Title Missionary
Spouse Narcissa Prentiss

Marcus Whitman (September 4, 1802November 29, 1847) was an American physician and missionary in the Oregon Country. Along with his wife Narcissa he started a mission in what is now southeastern Washington state in 1836, which would become a stop along the Oregon Trail. Whitman would later lead the first large party of wagon trains along the Oregon Trail, establishing it as a viable route for the thousands of emigrants who used the trail in the following decade. Image File history File links Marcus_Whitman. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... --69. ... Rushville is a village located in Ontario County, New York and in Yates County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 621. ... November 29 is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Whitman Mission National Historic Site is a United States National Historic Site located just west of Walla Walla, Washington, at the site of the massacre of the family of Dr. Marcus Whitman by the Cayuse on November 29, 1847. ... Narcissa Whitman (March 14, 1808 – November 29, 1847), born Narcissa Prentiss in Prattsburgh, New York in the Genesee Valley. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... --69. ... November 29 is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Jason Lee The Oregon missionaries were collectively the religious-minded pioneers who settled in the Oregon Country of North America starting in the 1830s with the intent of coverting local Native Americans to Christianity. ... Landscape in Oregon Country, by Charles Marion Russell Map of Oregon Country Oregon Country was a region of western North America that originally consisted of the land north of 42°N latitude, south of 54°40N latitude, and west of the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. ... Narcissa Whitman (March 14, 1808 – November 29, 1847), born Narcissa Prentiss in Prattsburgh, New York in the Genesee Valley. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... For the TV show, see Wagon Train. ...

Contents

Early life

On September 4, 1802 Marcus Whitman was born in Federal Hollow, New York to Beza Whitman and Alice Whitman.[1] The family's heritage dates to John Whitman who immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony before 1639 from England.[1] After his father's death, when Whitman was seven years old, he moved to Massachusetts to live with his uncle.[1] He dreamed of becoming a minister but did not have the money for such a time-consuming curriculum. Instead, apprenticing himself, he studied medicine for two years with an experienced physician and received his degree from Fairfield Medical College. is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... --69. ... Rushville is a village located in Ontario County, New York and in Yates County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 621. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ...


Missionary

In 1834 Whitman applied to the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. However the organization accepted only married couples. In 1835, he traveled with missionary Samuel Parker to present-day north-western Montana and northern Idaho, to minister to the Native American bands of the Flathead and Nez Percé people. During this journey, Whitman treated several fur trappers during an outbreak of cholera. At the end of their stay, he promised the Nez Percé that he would return with other missionaries and teachers to live with them. Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Proposed in 1810 by recent graduates of Williams College and officially chartered in 1812, the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) was the first American Christian foreign mission agency. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... Official language(s) English [1] Capital Boise Largest city Boise Area  Ranked 14th  - Total 83,642 sq mi (216,632 km²)  - Width 305 miles (491 km)  - Length 479 miles (771 km)  - % water 0. ... An independent origin and development of writing is counted among the many achievements and innovations of pre-Columbian American cultures. ... Bold text Flathead delegation in Washington, D.C. with interpreter, 1884 Flathead family The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation are the Bitterroot Salish, Kootenai and Pend dOreilles Tribes. ... Nez Percé warrior on horse, 1910 The Nez Percé or Nez Perce (pronounced as in French, or ) are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited the Pacific Northwest region of the United States at the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ... Cholera (or Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera) is a severe diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ...

After his return Whitman attended a speech by Parker, now representing the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, which called for missionaries. In 1836, Whitman married Narcissa Prentiss, a teacher of physics and chemistry. Narcissa had also been eager to travel west as a missionary, but she had been unable to do so as a single woman. Image File history File links Narcissa_Whitman. ... Image File history File links Narcissa_Whitman. ... Narcissa Whitman (March 14, 1808 – November 29, 1847), born Narcissa Prentiss in Prattsburgh, New York in the Genesee Valley. ... Narcissa Whitman (March 14, 1808 – November 29, 1847), born Narcissa Prentiss in Prattsburgh, New York in the Genesee Valley. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Chemistry - the study of interactions of chemical substances with one another and energy based on the structure of atoms, molecules and other kinds of aggregrates Chemistry (from Egyptian kēme (chem), meaning earth[1]) is the science concerned with the reactions, transformations and aggregations of matter, as well as accompanying...


In 1836, the couple, and a group of other missionaries including Henry and Eliza Spalding, joined a caravan of fur traders and traveled west, establishing several missions as well as their own settlement, Waiilatpu (Why-ee-lat-poo, the 't' is half silent), which means "place of the rye grass" in the Cayuse language. Located in the Walla Walla Valley, just west of the northern end of the Blue Mountains, near the present day city of Walla Walla, Washington. The settlement was in the territory of both the Cayuse and the Nez Percé tribes of Native Americans. Marcus farmed and provided medical care, while Narcissa set up a school for the Native American children. In 1843, Whitman travelled east, and on his return he helped lead the first large group of wagon trains west from Fort Hall, in eastern Idaho. Known as the "Great Emigration", it established the viability of the Oregon Trail for later the homesteaders. Henry Harmon Spalding (1803 - 1874), and his wife Eliza Hart Spalding were prominent Presbyterian missionaries and educators working primarily with the Nez Perce in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. ... The fur trade was a huge part in the early economic development of North America. ... Whitman Mission National Historic Site is a United States National Historic Site located just west of Walla Walla, Washington, at the site of the massacre of the family of Dr. Marcus Whitman by the Cayuse on November 29, 1847. ... The Blue Mountains The Blue Mountains are a mountain range located largely in northeastern Oregon and stretching into southeastern Washington in the United States. ... Walla Walla is both the county seat of Walla Walla County, Washington, and the countys largest city. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... For other uses, see Cayuse (disambiguation). ... Nez Percé warrior on horse, 1910 The Nez Percé or Nez Perce (pronounced as in French, or ) are a tribe of Native Americans who inhabited the Pacific Northwest region of the United States at the time of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fort Hall Fort Hall in the United States was a 19th century outpost in the eastern Oregon Country. ...


Massacre

The influx of white settlers in the territory brought new diseases to the Indian tribes, including a severe epidemic of measles in 1847. The Native American's lack of immunity to new diseases and limited health practices led to a high mortality rate, with children dying in striking numbers. The zealous conversion attempts by the Whitmans, as well as the recovery of many white patients, fostered the belief among the Native Americans that Whitman was causing the death of his Indian patients. According to some contemporaries, including Rev. Henry H. Spalding, the situation was aggravated by ongoing animosity between the Protestant missionaries and local Catholic priests. The Indian tradition of holding medicine men personally responsible for the patient's recovery eventually resulted in violence. In what became known as the Whitman Massacre, Cayuse tribal members murdered the Whitmans in their home on November 29, 1847. Most of the buildings at Waiilatpu were destroyed. Twelve other white settlers in the community were also killed. For several weeks, 53 women and children were held captive before negotiations led to them being released. This event triggered an ongoing conflict between white settlers and local tribes, known as the Cayuse War. Crude death rate by country Mortality rate is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in some population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit time. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Marcus Whitman The Whitman massacre (also known as the Walla Walla massacre and the Whitman Incident) was the murder in the Oregon Country on November 29, 1847 of U.S. missionaries Dr. Marcus Whitman and his wife Narcissa Whitman, along with twelve others, by Cayuse and Umatilla Indians. ... November 29 is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Cayuse War was an armed conflict that took place in the northwestern United States between 1848 and 1855 between the Cayuse people of the region and the United States Government and local white settlers. ...


Commemoration

Marcus Whitman, National Statuary Hall Collection, NSHC
Marcus Whitman, National Statuary Hall Collection, NSHC

Whitman is commemorated by Marcus Whitman Junior High in Port Orchard, Washington, Marcus Whitman Central School in Rushville, New York, Whitman College, Whitman County, Washington, the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and the Marcus Whitman hotel in Walla Walla. In 1953, the state of Washington donated a statue of Whitman to the National Statuary Hall Collection. The Washington State Legislature has declared the fourth day of September as Marcus Whitman Day. statue of Marcus Whitman; http://www. ... statue of Marcus Whitman; http://www. ... Port Orchard is the county seat of Kitsap County, Washington. ... This article is about the college in Washington state. ... Whitman County is a county located in the state of Washington. ... The Wallow-Whitman National Forest is a United States National Forest located in U.S. state of Oregon. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Part of the National Statuary Hall Collection The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Brad Owen, D since January 13, 1997 Speaker of the House of Representatives Frank Chopp, D since January 14, 2001 Members 147 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Washington State Capitol, Olympia...


See also

Whitman Mission National Historic Site is a United States National Historic Site located just west of Walla Walla, Washington, at the site of the massacre of the family of Dr. Marcus Whitman by the Cayuse on November 29, 1847. ... This article is about the college in Washington state. ... Jason Lee (NSHC statue) Jason Lee (June 28, 1803 – March 12, 1845) an American missionary and pioneer, was born on a farm near Stanstead, Quebec. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c National Park Service: Biography of Marcus Whitman

External links

  • The Whitmans at Whitman Mission National Historic Site
  • Whitman at the Architect of the Capitol
  • PBS: The West: Marcus & Narcissa Whitman
Pioneer History of Oregon (1806–1890)
Topics

Oregon Country · Oregon Treaty · Oregon missionaries · Executive Committee · Oregon Trail · Oregon boundary dispute · Pacific Fur Company · Provisional Government · Ferries · Hudson's Bay Company Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Landscape in Oregon Country, by Charles Marion Russell Map of Oregon Country Oregon Country was a region of western North America that originally consisted of the land north of 42°N latitude, south of 54°40N latitude, and west of the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. ... Map of the lands in dispute The Treaty with Great Britain, in Regard to Limits Westward of the Rocky Mountains, also known as the Oregon Treaty or Treaty of Washington, is a bilateral treaty between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the United States that was signed... Jason Lee The Oregon missionaries were collectively the religious-minded pioneers who settled in the Oregon Country of North America starting in the 1830s with the intent of coverting local Native Americans to Christianity. ... An Executive Committee was the title of a three-person committee which served as the executive Branch of the Provisional Government of Oregon in the disputed Oregon Country. ... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... The Oregon Country/Columbia District Disputed Area is the main area of dispute, although the whole region was disputed The Oregon boundary dispute (often called the Oregon question) arose as a result of competing British and American claims to the Oregon Country, a region of northwestern North America known also... The Pacific Fur Company was founded June 23, 1810, in New York City. ... The Provisional Government of Oregon was a popularly elected government created in the Oregon Country that was in effect from May 2, 1843 until March 3, 1849. ... Historic ferries in Oregon are water transport ferries that operated in Oregon Country, Oregon Territory, and the state of Oregon, United States. ... The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC; Compagnie de la Baie dHudson in French) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ...

Events

Treaty of 1818 · Russo-American Treaty · Champoeg Meetings · Whitman massacre · Donation Land Claim Act The Convention respecting fisheries, boundary, and the restoration of slaves between the United States and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, also known as the London Convention, Anglo-American Convention of 1818, Convention of 1818, or simply the Treaty of 1818, was a treaty signed in 1818 between... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Champoeg Meetings in Oregon Country were the first attempts at governing in the Pacific Northwest by United States European-American pioneers. ... Marcus Whitman The Whitman massacre (also known as the Walla Walla massacre and the Whitman Incident) was the murder in the Oregon Country on November 29, 1847 of U.S. missionaries Dr. Marcus Whitman and his wife Narcissa Whitman, along with twelve others, by Cayuse and Umatilla Indians. ... The Donation Land Claim Act of 1850, sometimes known just as the Donation Land Act, was a historic law passed by the Congress of the United States intended to promote homestead settlement in the Oregon Territory in the Pacific Northwest (comprising the present-day states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho). ...

Places

Fort Astoria · Oregon Mission · Fort Vancouver · Champoeg, Oregon · Fort William · Barlow Road · Whitman Mission Fort Astoria was the Pacific Fur Companys primary fur trading post in the Northwest, and was the first permanent U.S. settlement on the Pacific coast. ... Oregon Mission (1831-1846) began as an effort by the Methodist Episcopal Church to convert the native Indians of the far west to Christianity. ... Fort Vancouver Fort Vancouver was a 19th century fur trading outpost along the Columbia River that served as the headquarters of the Hudsons Bay Company in the companys Columbia District (known to Americans as the Oregon Country). ... Champoeg, Oregon Champoeg, pronounced sham_POO_ee (SAMPA /ʃæm. ... Fort William was a fur trading outpost built by American Nathaniel Jarvis Wyeth in 1834. ... The Barlow Road was the last overland segment of the Oregon Trail before reaching the Willamette Valley. ... Whitman Mission National Historic Site is a United States National Historic Site located just west of Walla Walla, Washington, at the site of the massacre of the family of Dr. Marcus Whitman by the Cayuse on November 29, 1847. ...

People

George Abernethy · Sam Barlow · Tabitha Brown · Abigail Scott Duniway · Philip Foster · Peter French · Joseph Gale · William Gilpin · David Hill · Jason Lee · Asa Lovejoy · John McLoughlin · Joseph Meek · Ezra Meeker · John Minto · Joel Palmer · Sager orphans · Henry H. Spalding · Marcus Whitman · Narcissa Whitman · Ewing Young George Abernethy (1807 - 1877) was a U.S. businessman. ... Samuel Kimbrough Barlow (b. ... Tabitha Moffatt Brown (May 1, 1780 – May 4, 1858) was a pioneer emigrant that traveled the Oregon Trail, and assisted in the founding of Tualatin Academy that would grow to become Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. ... Abigail Scott Duniway (October 22, 1834 _ October 11, 1915) was born Abigail Jane Scott near Groveland, Illinois, to John Tucker Scott and Anne Roelofson. ... Philip Foster (January 29, 1805–March 17, 1884) was one of the first settlers in Oregon, United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Joseph Gale (1807-1881) was an American pioneer, trapper, and politican who contributed to the early settlment of the Oregon Country. ... William Gilpin William Gilpin (October 4, 1813–1894) was a 19th century U.S. explorer, politician, land speculator, and futurist writer about the American West. ... David Hill (1809 – May 9, 1850), was a pioneer and settler of what became Hillsboro, Oregon, United States. ... Jason Lee (NSHC statue) Jason Lee (June 28, 1803 – March 12, 1845) an American missionary and pioneer, was born on a farm near Stanstead, Quebec. ... Asa Lawrence Lovejoy (born 1808 in Massachusetts, died 1882) was an Oregon pioneer and one of the founders of the city of Portland, Oregon. ... John McLoughlin (NSHC statue) Dr. John McLoughlin (pronounced mc-lock-lin, October 19, 1784 – September 3, 1857), the Father of Oregon, was a fur trader and early settler in the Oregon Country in the Pacific Northwest. ... Joseph Lafayette Meek (1810–1875) was born in Washington County, Virginia, near the Cumberland Gap. ... Meeker in Kearney, Nebraska, ca. ... John Minto IV (October 10, 1822 - February 25, 1915) was an American pioneer born in Wylam, England. ... General Joel Palmer, October 4, 1810 (Ontario, Canada) – June 9, 1881 (Dayton, Oregon), was an Oregon pioneer, author of a popular immigrant guidebook, co-founder of Dayton, Oregon, a controversial Indian Affairs administrator, and a popular Oregon politician. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Henry Harmon Spalding (1803 - 1874), and his wife Eliza Hart Spalding were prominent Presbyterian missionaries and educators working primarily with the Nez Perce in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. ... Narcissa Whitman (March 14, 1808 – November 29, 1847), born Narcissa Prentiss in Prattsburgh, New York in the Genesee Valley. ... Ewing Young expeditions to American West Ewing Young (1799 - February 9, 1841) was an American trapper from Tennessee who traveled the western United States before settling in Oregon Country. ...

Oregon History

Native Peoples History · History to 1806 · Pioneer History · Modern History Official language(s) None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Oregon Pioneer History (1806 to 1890) is the time in the European History of Oregon when pioneers and mountain men traveled west to explore and settle the lands west of the Rocky Mountains and north of California. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
AllRefer.com - Marcus Whitman (U.S. History, Biography) - Encyclopedia (291 words)
Marcus Whitman 1802–47, American pioneer and missionary in the Oregon country, b.
Disagreement among the missionaries and a board order (1842) to curtail their work led Whitman to ride back across the continent on horseback during the winter of 1842–43 to settle the various disputes.
Later, there was argument as to whether Whitman made his ride of 1842–43 in order to "save" Oregon from the British, the boundary still being in dispute.
Marcus Whitman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (569 words)
Marcus Whitman (September 4, 1802–November 29, 1847) was an American physician and missionary in the Oregon Country.
In 1843, Whitman travelled east, and on his return he helped lead the first large group of wagon trains west from Fort Hall, in eastern Idaho.
Whitman is commorated by Whitman College and Whitman County, Washington.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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