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Encyclopedia > Marching band
An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University)
An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University)

A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement – usually some type of marching and other movements  – with their musical performance. Instrumentation typically includes brass, woodwinds, and percussion instruments and the music usually incorporates a strong rhythmic component suitable for marching. All marching bands use some kind of uniform, often military-style uniforms with shakos, pith helmets, feather plumes, capes, gloves, and the school or organization's name or symbol. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Kansas State University Marching Band, known to fans as The Pride of Wildcat Land, is a 300 piece marching band consisting of woodwinds, brass, percussion, color guard, and dancers (Classy Cats). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... Brazen redirects here. ... A woodwind instrument is a musical instrument in which sound is produced by blowing through a mouthpiece against an edge or by a vibrating reed, and in which the pitch is varied by opening or closing holes in the body of the instrument. ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... Marching Naval Construction Battalion NMCB-1 (Seabees) 370th Infantry Regiment walking toward the mountains at north of Prato - April 1945 (Gothic Line) Marching refers to the organized, uniformed, steady and rhythmic walking forward, usually associated with military troops. ...


In addition to traditional parade performances, many bands also perform field shows at special events (such as football games) or at competitions. Marching bands are generally categorized by function and by the style of field show they perform. Increasingly, marching bands are performing indoor concerts, in addition to any "pep band" duties, that implement many of the songs, traditions, and flair from outside performances. United States Marines on parade. ... In music, a band is a company of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising a musical arrangement on different musical instruments. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...

Contents

Types of marching bands

Marching bands can be categorized based on primary function, instrumentation, and style, although many organizations may fill multiple roles.

Texas A&M's "ATM" formation during halftime
Texas A&M's "ATM" formation during halftime

Military Bands are historically the first of the various marching bands. Instrumentation varies, but generally contain brass, percussion, and woodwinds. Given their original purpose, military marching bands march forward only and in straight lines; they rarely make curves. Music is done at a constant tempo in order to provide a constant beat for other military units. Image File history File links Aggie_Band. ... Image File history File links Aggie_Band. ... Military Band marching A military band is a group of soldiers assigned to musical duties. ...


Active duty military marching bands often perform in parades with other military units and march in the same manner as other military personnel. Due to a lack of competition venues, military personnel, and interest, almost all military marching bands have disappeared from schools in the United States; two notable exceptions are the Fightin' Texas Aggie Band from Texas A&M and the Highty-Tighties of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets. There is also a pocket of about 80 high school military marching bands in East Texas. They have formed the National Association of Military Marching Bands in order to preserve the tradition of military marching. The Fightin Texas Aggie Band (also known as The Noble Men of Kyle or the Aggie Band) is the official marching band of Texas A&M University. ... Texas A&M University at College Station Texas A&M University, often Texas A&M, A&M or TAMU for short, is one of the flagship universities of Texas, and is the flagship institution of the Texas A&M University System. ... Highty-Tighty Logo The Virgia Tech Regimental Band, also known as the Highty Tighties, VPI Cadet Band, or Band Company, is a military marching band and unit in the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. ... A squad from the Corps of Cadets marches in formation to a football game The Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets (VTCC) is one of only two military organizations established as an integral part of a major United States civilian university; the other is Texas A&M University. ... NAMMB - National Association of Military Marching Band Recognizing the importance and rich heritage of the precision marching unit, THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MILITARY MARCHING BANDS hereby affirms to promote and preserve the military precision style of performance among marching bands in America, and to encourage the superior performance of traditional...


Bugle bands are a subset of military bands that use non valved instruments, typically B flat bugles. Some bugle bands, like Burgess Hill Marching Youth extend their range by using instruments such as the jaghorn. In the UK traditional youth bands compete on the TYMBA (Traditional Youth Marching Bands Association) circuit. TYMBA is an organization that was set up in the 1980s by a like minded group of people to cater specifically for youth bands executing military style drill and music. The Traditional Youth Marching Bands Association (TYMBA) is an organization related to marching bands in the UK. It was formed in 1983 by a few like-minded friends who felt there was a need for an organisation to cater specifically for youth bands, which project a traditional British image and... The Traditional Youth Marching Bands Association (TYMBA) is an organization related to marching bands in the UK. It was formed in 1983 by a few like-minded friends who felt there was a need for an organisation to cater specifically for youth bands, which project a traditional British image and...


Parade bands generally play marches. Instrumentation varies, and can contain anything from bagpipes or fifes and drums all the way to full wind and percussion sections. Many military and veterans' organizations have their own parade bands. A march, as a musical genre, is a piece of music with a strong regular rhythm which in origin was expressly written for marching to and most frequently performed by a military band. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... Fife from the American Civil War A fife is a small, high-pitched, transverse flute that is similar to the piccolo, but louder and shriller due to its narrower bore. ... For other uses, see Drum (disambiguation). ... A wind instrument is a musical instrument that contains some type of resonator (usually a tube), in which a column of air is set into vibration by the player blowing into (or over) a mouthpiece set at the end of the resonator. ... Percussion redirects here. ...


Show bands (field shows) have the main role of performing at sporting events, and competitions, such as American football games. They perform a field show before the game and at halftime (and sometimes after the game as well). Show bands typically march in time to the music, and may also participate in parades and competitions. Show bands contain brass and percussion instruments, but may or may not use woodwinds or a percussion pit. Typically, the show is not merely marching in lines. All show bands march as to create designs, curves, and moving illusions as their music progresses during the show. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... A woodwind instrument is a musical instrument in which sound is produced by blowing through a mouthpiece against an edge or by a vibrating reed, and in which the pitch is varied by opening or closing holes in the body of the instrument. ... In a marching band or drum corps, the front ensemble or pit is the stationary percussion ensemble typically placed in front of the football field. ...

Derby Midshipmen Band - Derby, UK
Derby Midshipmen Band - Derby, UK

Carnival Bands are a UK variant of Show bands. Carnival bands typically march in time to the music, and may also participate in parades and competitions. Carnival Bands contain brass and percussion, but may or may not use woodwinds. The main competition body for carnival bands is The Carnival Band Secretaries League. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3456x2304, 3676 KB) Summary Derby Midshipmen Band Mark Atkins Personnel Archive 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3456x2304, 3676 KB) Summary Derby Midshipmen Band Mark Atkins Personnel Archive 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... Percussion may refer to: A family of musical instruments – see percussion instrument; A method of clinical examination – see percussion (medicine). ... A woodwind instrument is a musical instrument in which sound is produced by blowing through a mouthpiece against an edge or by a vibrating reed, and in which the pitch is varied by opening or closing holes in the body of the instrument. ... The CARNIVAL BAND SECRETARIES LEAGUE (CBSL) Main authoritative organisation in the Carnival Band movement. ...


Scramble bands are a variation on show bands. They generally do not march in time with the music, but, as their name implies, scramble from design to design and often incorporate comedic elements into their performances. Most of the bands in the Ivy league use this style. This does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...

Tennessee State University(HBCU) "The Aristocrat of Bands"

Historically Black College and Universities (HBCU) bands are another variation on traditional high-stepping bands. HBCU bands started as athletic support for football teams, and have grown to be featured in movies, various professional sporting and political events. They are known for their traditional high stepping style, musical repertoire ranging from Top 40 hits to classical literature from the common practice period, and choreography. There are over 100 known HBCU bands. Image File history File links 1tsuaob. ... Image File history File links 1tsuaob. ... Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ...


Drum and bugle corps is a genre of marching ensemble descended from military signaling units that is distinctly divided into classic and modern corps. Both groups have long, continuous histories and developments separate from marching bands. As the name implies, bugles and drums form the musical background of the corps, but modern competitive drum corps incorporate other brass instruments and orchestral percussion. Governing bodies of competitive drum and bugle corps include Drum Corps International (ages 13-22) in America, where about 8,000 students audition annualy, Drum Corps United Kingdom and Drum Corps Europe in Europe, and Drum Corps Japan in Japan. Drum and bugle corps is a name used to describe two forms of marching units. ... Classic drum and bugle corps are North American musical ensembles that descended from military bugle and drum units returning from World War I and succeeding wars. ... The Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps, a DCI Division I corps from Rosemont, Illinois. ... Military bugle in Bâ™­ The bugle is one of the simplest brass instruments; it is essentially a small natural horn with no valves. ... For other uses, see Drum (disambiguation). ... Drum Corps International (DCI), formed in 1972, is the non-profit governing body operating the North American drum and bugle corps circuit for junior corps, whose members are between the ages of 14 and 22. ... About Drum Corps United Kingdom (DCUK) Visit the Drum Corps United Kingdom website for further information. ... About Drum Corps Europe (DCE) Visit the Drum Corps Europe website for further information. ... Drum Corps Japan is the administrating organization for Drum and Bugle Corps activity in Japan. ...


History

The Marching Illini, the first band to perform a halftime show at a football game
The Marching Illini, the first band to perform a halftime show at a football game

Marching bands evolved out of military bands. As musicians became less and less important in directing the movement of troops on the battlefield, the bands moved into increasingly ceremonial roles. An intermediate stage which provided some of the instrumentation and music for marching bands was the modern brass band, which also evolved out of the military tradition. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Marching Illini (MI) is the marching band of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Military Band marching A military band is a group of soldiers assigned to musical duties. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ...


Many military traditions survive in modern marching band. Bands that march in formation will often be ordered to "dress" their "ranks" and "cover down" their "files". They may be called to "attention", and given orders like "about face" and "forward march". Uniforms of many marching bands still resemble military uniforms.


Outside of police and military organizations, modern marching band is most commonly associated with American football, and specifically the halftime show. Many U.S. universities had bands before the twentieth century. The first modern halftime show by a marching band at a football game was by the University of Illinois Marching Illini in 1907 at a game against the University of Chicago.[1] United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The Marching Illini (MI) is the marching band of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ...


Another innovation that appeared at roughly the same time as the field show and marching in formations was the fight song. University fight songs are often closely associated with the university’s band. Many of the more recognizable and popular fight songs are widely utilized by high schools across the country. Three university fight songs commonly used by high schools are The University of Michigan’s “The Victors”, Notre Dame’s “Victory March”, and the United States Naval Academy’s “Anchors Aweigh A fight song is primarily a sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... The Victors is the fight song of the University of Michigan (UM). ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... When you think of college fight songs, the Notre Dame Victory March is without a doubt the most recognizable collegiate fight song in the nation. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ... Original sheet music cover // Anchors Aweigh is the song of the United States Navy, composed in 1906 by Charles A. Zimmerman with lyrics by Alfred Hart Miles. ...


Other changes in marching band have been:

Bands of America Award Ceremony at the Superregional Competition in St. Louis, MO, October, 2005
Bands of America Award Ceremony at the Superregional Competition in St. Louis, MO, October, 2005

Since the inception of Drum Corps International in the 1970s, many marching bands that perform field shows have adopted changes to the activity that parallel developments with modern drum and bugle corps. These bands are said to be corps-style bands. Changes adopted from drum corps include: Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Look up Majorettes in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Clemson colorguard Color guard is a combination of military drill, also called marching, and the use of flags, sabres or rifles. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x613, 838 KB) Summary taken by William Wesen Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x613, 838 KB) Summary taken by William Wesen Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Bands of America (BOA) is a nonprofit organization that promotes high school music education in the United States. ... Drum Corps International (DCI), formed in 1972, is the non-profit governing body operating the North American drum and bugle corps circuit for junior corps, whose members are between the ages of 14 and 22. ... The Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps, a DCI Division I corps from Rosemont, Illinois. ...

  • marching style: instead of a traditional high step, drum corps tend to march with a fluid roll step to keep musicians' torsos completely still (see below)
  • the adaptation of the flag, rifle, and sabre units into "auxiliaries", who march with the band and provide visual flair by spinning and tossing flags or mock weapons and using dance in the performance
  • moving marching timpani and keyboard percussion into a stationary sideline percussion section (pit), which has since incorporated many different types of percussion instruments
  • marching band competitions are judged using criteria similar to the criteria used in drum corps competitions, with emphasis on individual aspects of the band (captions for music performance, visual performance, percussion, guard (auxiliary), and general effect are standard).

Ottoman military bands are thought to be the oldest variety of military marching band in the world. An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ... Clemson colorguard Color guard is a combination of military drill, also called marching, and the use of flags, sabres or rifles. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... French naval officers sabre of the 19th Century From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers sabre, and a carbine. ... In a marching band or drum corps, the front ensemble or pit is the stationary percussion ensemble typically placed in front of the football field. ...


Personnel and instruments

The size and composition of a marching band can vary greatly. Some bands have fewer than ten members, and some have over 499. The Allen High School marching band, known as the Allen Eagle Escadrille, has more than 600 members.[2] Allen High School is a public, co-educational secondary school in Allen, Texas. ...


A marching band is typically led by one or more drum majors, who are called field commanders in some ensembles. They are also led by other student leaders that can include field lieutenants, and captains of other sections like brass, drumline, and woodwinds. The drum major often conducts the band, sometimes using a large baton or mace. In many school bands, the drum major is the student leader of the band, followed by students within the band that lead a section, squad, letter, row, etc. Bands may also be led by a more traditional conductor, especially during field shows, where a stationary conductor on a ladder or platform may be visible throughout the performance. Usually clapping or a whistle is used to issue commands. A high school drum major uses hand gestures to lead his band. ... A baton is a light metal rod that is used for keeping time, twirling, and juggling in marching band, cheerleading, and parade performances, usually by drum majors or majorettes (Drum majors typically use either the larger mace or the smaller military baton. ... This article needs cleanup. ...

The Ohio State University Marching Band, an all-brass and percussion marching band
The Ohio State University Marching Band, an all-brass and percussion marching band

American marching bands vary considerably in their exact instrumentation. Some bands omit some or all woodwinds, but it is not uncommon to see piccolos, flutes, clarinets, alto saxophones, and tenor saxophones. Bass clarinets, alto clarinets and baritone saxophones are more likely to be found in a high school marching band, while bassoons and oboes are very seldom to be found on a field. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1185 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1185 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The Ohio State University Marching Band (often called The Best Damn Band in the Land or TBDBITL by fans[1]) is one of the few all-brass and percussion bands in the country, the largest of its type in the world. ... A woodwind instrument is a musical instrument in which sound is produced by blowing through a mouthpiece against an edge or by a vibrating reed, and in which the pitch is varied by opening or closing holes in the body of the instrument. ... This article is about the instrument in the flute family. ... â™  This article is about the family of musical instruments. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left, with capped mouthpiece) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The tenor saxophone is a medium-sized member of the saxophone family, a group of instruments invented by Adolphe Sax. ... The bass clarinet is a musical instrument of the clarinet family. ... The alto clarinet is a wind instrument of the clarinet family. ... The baritone saxophone, often called bari sax (to avoid confusion with the baritone horn, which is often referred to simply as baritone), is one of the larger and lower pitched members of the saxophone family. ... Bassoon Playing range of a bassoon The bassoon is the tenor member of the woodwind family. ... Modern Oboe The Oboe is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ...


Brass sections usually include trumpets or cornets, mellophones (instead of French horns), B♭ tenor trombones, euphoniums or baritones, and sousaphones or tubas (often configured so that they can be carried over the shoulder with the bell facing forward-this is often referred to as a "Sousaphone," after John Phillip Sousa). A newer style of Tuba is the Contra. This is an instrument that is shaped like a Tuba, but the lead pipe is bent to allow the player to face the bell of the horn towards the box or crowd. This is also carried over the shoulder, but it doesn't wrap around the player as the original Sousaphone did. E♭ soprano cornets are sometimes used to supplement or replace the high woodwinds. Some especially large bands will use flugelhorns to cover the lower trumpet parts. Alto horns can also be used in place of the mellophone, although this is rare. Bass trombones are also sometimes used, especially in large bands. Trumpeter redirects here. ... The cornet is a brass instrument that closely resembles the trumpet. ... The mellophone is a brass instrument that is typically used in place of the French horn in marching bands or drum and bugle corps. ... For other uses, see Horn. ... There are many different types of trombones. ... The euphonium is a conical-bore, baritone-voiced brass instrument. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sousaphone player in Washington Square, New York City The sousaphone is a type of tuba often used in a marching band. ... For other uses, see Tuba (disambiguation). ... John Philip Sousa John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 - March 6, 1932), is probably the most famous marching band conductor (although his band rarely marched) and composer in history. ... Bâ™­ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument very similar to the trumpet, distinguished by its conical bore, compact shape, and mellower tone quality. ... A standard 3-valved Bb flugelhorn. ... Known in the U.S. as alto horn, in Germany as althorn, and in the UK as tenor horn, this brass instrument pitched in Eb has a conical bore (gradually widening), and normally uses a deep, cornet-like mouthpiece. ...


Marching percussion (often referred to as the drumline or back battery) typically includes snare drums, tenor drums, bass drums, and cymbals. All of these instruments have been adapted for mobile, outdoor use. Marching versions of the glockenspiel (orchestra bells), xylophone, and marimba are also used by some ensembles. Marching percussion instruments are specially designed to be played while moving. ... The snare drum or side drum is a tubular drum made of wood or metal with skins, or heads, stretched over the top and bottom openings, and with a set of snares (cords) stretched across the bottom head. ... A tenor drum is a cylindrical drum, much higher pitched than a bass drum. ... A bass drum is a large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch. ... It is also possible that you want to know about the Cymbalum instrument. ... Most orchestral glockenspiels are mounted in a case. ... Kulintang a Kayo, a Philippine xylophone The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ...


For bands that include a front ensemble (also known as the "pit"), stationary instrumentation may include orchestral percussion such as timpani, cowbells, wood blocks, marimbas, xylophones, bongos, vibraphones, chimes, as well as a multitude of auxiliary percussion equipment. Until the advent of the pit in the early 1980s, many of these instruments were actually carried on the field by marching percussionists. Some bands also include instruments such as synthesizers, electric guitars, and bass guitar. If double-reed or string instruments are used, they are usually placed here, but even this usage is very rare due to their relative fragility. In a marching band or drum corps, the front ensemble or pit is the stationary percussion ensemble typically placed in front of the football field. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... The cowbell is a percussion instrument. ... Wood block Tubular wood block A wood block is essentially a small slit drum made from a single piece of wood and used as a percussion instrument. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Xylophone in Bali 1937 The xylophone is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Bongos being played Bongos are a percussion instrument. ... A typical vibraphone. ... For the musical instrument, see tubular bell. ... For other uses, see Synthesizer (disambiguation). ... An electric guitar An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ...


Instrumentation varies widely from band to band, so no generalization is completely correct. There are bands where members play string instruments, or bang on brake drums, empty propane tanks, and trashcans with drumsticks. Large bands also require a number of support staff who can move equipment, repair instruments and uniforms, and manipulate props used in performances. In high school bands, these activities are usually performed by volunteers, typically parents of band members or the band members of the lower grades.


Auxiliary groups

Clemson University's Color guard performs during Pre-game ceremonies
Clemson University's Color guard performs during Pre-game ceremonies

Many bands have auxiliaries who add a visual component to the performance. For ceremonial bands, this could be a traditional color guard or honor guard. For drum & bugle corps and corps-style field bands, this could include dancers, majorettes, or some type of drill team. Auxiliary units may be collectively referred to as color guard or visual ensemble. Image File history File links cadet color guard from www. ... Image File history File links cadet color guard from www. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ... Clemson colorguard Modern color guard is a combination of military drill, also called marching, and the use of flags, sabers, mock rifles and other equipment, as well as dance and other interpretive movement. ... The Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps, a DCI Division I corps from Rosemont, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Look up Majorettes in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In the United States, a drill team is a marching unit that performs military style maneuvers in parades, at air shows, football half-time shows, and other ceremonies. ...


Auxiliaries may perform as independent groups. In the early 1970s, color guards began to hold their own competitions in the winter (after the American football season, and before the beginning of the summer drum & bugle corps season). There are also numerous dance competitions in the off-season. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Drum and bugle corps is a name used to describe two forms of marching units. ...


The color guard of a marching band or drum and bugle corps may contain sabers, mock rifles, and tall flags. In modern bands, other props are often used: flags of all sizes, horizontal banners, vertical banners, streamers, pom-poms, even tires and hula hoops or custom built props. While military color guards were typically male, band color guards tend to be primarily female, though it is becoming more common for males to join as well. A few independent units are all-male. Guards most often have a special uniform or costume that is distinctive from that of band, and may or may not match each other. Colorguard can compete without the band in such competitions as winter guard. The Saber (spanish/portuguese: knowledge) currency is an educational sectoral currency in Brazil that is handed out by the ministry of education. ... For other uses, see Rifle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... Winter Guard is an indoor color guard activity, derived from the outdoor summer activity that is commonly part of marching band or drum corps. ...


Color guard can be extremely competitive and taken very serious by those involved. Many color guards along with a written show of flag, saber, and rifle tossing the color guard sets formations as well as coordinates dance into their routine


Performance elements

The goal of each band's performance is different. Some bands aim for maximum uniformity and precision. Others – especially scramble bands – want to be as entertaining as possible. Many U.S. university marching bands aim for maximum sound "impact" on the audience. Some bands perform primarily for the enjoyment of their own members. However, there are some common elements in almost all band performances. This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Music

Some marching bands have their members hold music on lyres attached to the instrument.
Some marching bands have their members hold music on lyres attached to the instrument.

The traditional music of the marching band is the military march, but since show bands evolved from the concert and brass band traditions as well, music has always been varied. Often, music from other genres is adapted for the specific instrumentation of a marching band. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 524 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1047 pixel, file size: 799 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 524 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1047 pixel, file size: 799 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... “Lyres” redirects here. ... A march, as a musical genre, is a piece of music with a strong regular rhythm which in origin was expressly written for marching to and most frequently performed by a military band. ... A concert band, also called wind band, symphonic band, symphonic winds, wind orchestra, wind symphony, or wind ensemble, is a performing ensemble consisting of several members of the woodwind instrument family, brass instrument family and percussion instrument family. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ...


Commercial arrangements that are tailored for the "average" band instrumentation are also available. Military and university bands typically have a repertoire of "traditional" music associated with the organization they serve. Many competitive bands will choose to use an arrangement of popular music varied for marching band, as well as music from a movie or other such theme. In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ...


Music may be memorized, or it may be carried on flip folders that clip onto the instruments, called lyres. Having music memorized is usually considered an advantage for competitive bands in addition to preventing obstruction of vision caused by the folders. Marching bands with a skilled low brass section may perform music that has bass runs for the low brass section, which display the skill and technique of the performers. “Lyres” redirects here. ... A bass run is an instrumental break in which the main vocal or melody line rests (pauses, takes a break) and the bass instruments and line are given the forefront. ...


Marching styles

Some bands, primarily military bands, use a simple walking motion. This is done to conform with military regulations regarding marching and to conform with "what everyone else is doing" in order to appear more uniform.


Many bands use some variation of the glide step, also known as the roll step. This step involves bringing the heel gently to the ground with the toe pointed up, and then rolling forward onto the toes before lifting the foot. This style is a direct imitation of Drum & Bugle Corps. It gives the drill a fluid and smooth appearance, and allows for better control of the difficult formations and various styles of music played by those bands which roll step. Glide step is a form of walking used by marching bands to minimize upper body movement enabling musicians to play their instruments and march without air-stream interruptions. ... Glide step is a form of walking used by marching bands to minimize upper body movement enabling musicians to play their instruments and march without air-stream interruptions. ... Drum Corps International (DCI), formed in 1972, is the non-profit governing body operating the North American drum and bugle corps circuit for junior corps, whose members are between the ages of 14 and 22. ...


In addition, roll stepping allows for a much broader range of tempos to be performed well: The proper execution of a roll step will give a player marching at 40 beats per minute the same smooth tone as a player who is marching at 180. The proper form prevents the wind player from bouncing and moving around unnecessarily, thus producing an unstable tone. Marching percussionists generally use a roll step exclusively, as drum harnesses (especially in the case of marching snare and tenor drums) make a high step impossible.


Along with the roll or glide step, there is also a 'high step'. Many traditional style colleges and universities such as The Ohio State University Marching Band, the University of Southern California Spirit of Troy and The Pride of Oklahoma Marching Band execute this style as do most Historically Black Colleges or Universities. Some secondary schools that have deep tradition in their marching band also utilize a high step. The Ohio State University Marching Band (often called The Best Damn Band in the Land or TBDBITL by fans[1]) is one of the few all-brass and percussion bands in the country, the largest of its type in the world. ... The Spirit of Troy drumline at Navy Pier in Chicago October 14, 2005 The Spirit of Troy giving a traditional post-game concert, this time celebrating the defeat of the University of Arkansas in Razorback Stadium The Spirit of Troy take the field at Stanford Stadium The Spirit of Troy... The Pride of Oklahoma The Pride of Oklahoma Marching Band is the student marching band for the University of Oklahoma Sooners. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ...


Variations of the high step

  • In one high step, the band member rolls his or her foot out to the toe, bending the knee. The knee then locks, and the leg is lifted out in front of the marcher before it is put down in the new position.
  • Another high step involves bringing the foot up to the inside of the leg to the knee before coming down and forward. Some bands may refer to this as "tucking" and others as "ankle-knee". This is also the style for many HBCU bands.
  • An older high step involves the lifting of the knee with legs directly in front, thighs parallel to the ground, and toes pointed downward. When the leg is elevated, there should be a 90-degree angle with the body and the thigh, and a 90-degree angle with the thigh and the shin. The leg is then lowered, and this is repeated with the other leg. This is informally referred to as the "chair step".
  • Another, very physically demanding, style of high step marching is extended high step. This version requires the thigh to be parallel to the ground (perpendicular to the body) with the lower leg extended outward at a 45-degree angle from the body (135-degrees from the thigh), toes pointed downward. The leg is then driven quickly back to the ground while the other leg repeats in this fashion. At the same time, the upper body swaggers 22.5-degrees left or right of center with each step.

The most important part of this style of marching is known as "stop action," which means all movement ceases momentarily at the apex of each step. This requires a band to have a great deal of stamina, but is effective visually. This style is common among most marching bands of the Big Ten Conference (e.g. Wisconsin, Ohio State, and Michigan). The ankle knee step is a type of high step used by marching bands. ... University of Wisconsin Marching Band executing a chair step. ...


Marking time

When a band is not moving, the members may mark time, or march in place. The step used usually resembles the step that is used for marching forward, though mixing a high step mark time with a roll step march (or vice versa) produces an interesting visual effect. For a typical mark time, the foot is raised to the ankle bone of the opposite leg. The toe should not come off the ground and the knee shouldn't come out much past the still-straight leg.


Some bands mark time by bringing their feet all the way up to their knee, this is also known as high-mark time. Some bands practice marking time during concert arch with the toes coming off of the ground in order to give the marcher a greater sense of marching while actually standing still. The heel should hit the ground on the beat. Some bands forgo marking time and instead come to a complete halt when not marching. Traditionally, the drumline would put their feet in a V-shape and lift their feet fully off the ground a few inches. This is to avoid hitting the drums.


Changing direction

When band members are marching in one direction but want to focus their sound in another, they may rotate their bodies at the waist, so that only the upper portion of the body faces in the direction of play. This is known as "shifting" or "sliding". Percussion players, whose large drum harnesses often prevent them from twisting their torsos, and sometimes tuba and sousaphone players, will instead use a crab step when moving sideways. During a crab step, the musician crosses one leg over the other, either marching on the toes or rolling the foot sideways. Percussionists may also substitute roll step when their instruments would interfere with performing the high step.


When certain band members need to change the direction in which they are marching (sometimes called the "line of march") while facing the new direction, a "flank" is used. Flanks have their history in military maneuvers and are executed so that the entire body will face the new direction. This provides a definite sense of change rather than the more fluid slides.


Backward marching

A back march may be used when the band wishes to move in the opposite direction from where it is projecting its sound. There are several ways to back march, one of which is to walk backwards, putting each foot down and rolling from the toe to the heel (the exact reverse of the roll step). Another variation involves marching on the toes, dragging the toe of the moving foot on the ground or simply walking backwards on your toes. Some people feel dragging the toes gives better balance, while others feel lifting the toes gives better balance. With either method, the heel of the foot never touches the ground. Using peripheral vision to align oneself to formations or field markings is even more important during backward marching.


Staying in step

Even when marking time, it is often considered good form for all band members to stay in step – that is, step with the same foot at the same time. A large majority of bands step off with, or start marching on, the left foot, the Cadets drum and bugle corps being one exception. Staying in step is generally easier when the band is playing music or when the drums are playing a marching cadence.


When the band and percussion are not playing, rhythm may be maintained in a variety of ways: a drummer may play clicks or rim shots, the drum major may clap or use a wood block, a drum major or band member may vocalize a sharp syllable like "hit", "hut", or "dhut" (the last is usually characteristic of the drum line, and often said before playing in the rhythm; dhut, dhut, dhut dhut dhut dhut [one, three, one two three four] ), or band members may chant the military call of "Left, left, left right left". Band members may count the steps of the move out loud so as to keep the entire band together. Typically most moves consist of a number of steps that are a multiple of four. This is because most marching band music is in the time signature 4/4. The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each measure and what note value constitutes one beat. ...


Parade marching

For parades, bands usually line up in a marching block composed of ranks (rows) and files (columns). Typically, each member tries to stay within his or her given rank and file, and to maintain even spacing with neighboring musicians. It is usually the responsibility of the people at the end of each rank and the front of each file to be in the correct location; this allows other band members to guide to them.


Band members also try to keep a constant pace or step size while marching in parade. This usually varies between 22 and 30 inches (56–76 cm) per stride. A step size of 22.5 inches is called 8-to-5 because the marcher covers five yards (about 4.6 m) in eight steps. A step size of 30 inches is called 6-to-5 because five yards are covered in six steps. Because yard lines on an American football field are five yards apart, exact 8-to-5 and 6-to-5 steps are most useful for field shows. An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ...


A drum cadence (sometimes called a walkbeat or street beat) is usually played when the band is marching, sometimes alternating with a song. This is how the band keeps time. Alternately, a drum click or rim shot may be given on the odd beats to keep the band in step. Between songs and cadences, a roll is usually given to indicate what beat in the measure the band is at. Cadence tempo varies from group to group, but is generally between 112 and 144 beats per minute. For other uses, see Tempo (disambiguation). ... Beats per minute (bpm) is a unit typically used as either a measure of tempo in music, or a measure of ones heart rate. ...


Increasingly and especially in the northern midwest, bands will perform their parades with elements of a field show, sometimes referred to as a street show. This is typical for bands who operate during the summer months and do not perform field shows.


Field marching

A Brigade combat team forming a logo on a field during a farewell ceremony
A Brigade combat team forming a logo on a field during a farewell ceremony

While playing music during a field show, the band makes a series of formations on the field, which may be pictures, geometric shapes, curvilinear designs, or blocks of players, although sometimes it may be pure abstract designs using no specific form. These maneuvers are collectively called drill. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1584x1089, 591 KB) Subject: Brigade combat team Description: Slightly cropped version from Image:Brigade Combat Team. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1584x1089, 591 KB) Subject: Brigade combat team Description: Slightly cropped version from Image:Brigade Combat Team. ... The Brigade Combat Team (BCT) is the basic deployable unit of maneuver in the US Army. ...


Typically, each band member has an assigned position in each formation. There are as many ways of getting from one formation to the next as there are bands:

  • each member can move independently – this is called scattering or "scatter drill"
  • all the members can move together without deforming the picture – this is called floating
  • the members can stay in their lines and arcs, but slowly deform the picture – this is sometimes called rotating or expanding
  • the members can break into ranks or squads, each of which performs a maneuver (such as a follow-the-leader) which may or may not be scripted – an unscripted move is sometimes called a rank option
  • each member may have a specifically scripted move to perform – in these cases, the desired visual effect is often the move itself and not the ending formation

Many bands use a combination of the above techniques, sometimes adding dance choreography that is done in place or while marching. Players may point the bells of their instruments in the direction they are moving, or slide (also called traverse) with all the bells facing in the same direction. Bands that march in time with the music typically also synchronize the direction of individuals' turns, and try to maintain even spacing between individuals in formations (called intervals). Sometimes bands will specifically have wind players turn their instruments away from the audience in order to emphasize the dynamics of the music. Follow the Leader may have the folloing meanings. ... Look up Choreography in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Auxiliaries can also add to the visual effect. Backdrops and props ("scrims") may be used on the field that fit the theme of the show or the music being performed. In comedic shows, particularly for university bands, an announcer may read jokes or a funny script between songs; formations that are words or pictures (or the songs themselves) may serve as punch lines.


Phasing

In addition to staying in step and marching uniformly, one of the challenges with playing in large outdoor arenas is phasing. This is when part of the band gets behind or ahead of another part of the band, and such an occurrence is sometimes called an ensemble tear.


Phasing is a subjective effect, due to the finite speed of sound; some areas may not hear any phasing problems while other areas may hear a half second variation in timing. Even if all members of a band are playing at once, the sound from their instruments may reach listeners at different times.


For example, if two musicians, one standing on the front sideline of the football field and one on the back sideline, begin playing exactly when they see the beat of the conductor's baton, the sound produced by the musician on the front sideline will reach listeners in the stand before the sound played by the back musician. This is because the speed of sound is significantly slower than the speed of light. Sound may also echo off parts of the stadium or nearby buildings.


Phasing can be reduced in several ways, including:

  • keeping formations compact
  • having players listen to the drums in addition to watching the drum major, to get a uniform idea of tempo (this only works if the drill is not spread across the entire field)
  • having musicians make constant adjustments and keep watching or listening to sources of tempo so as to try and make their sound reach the audience at the same time as other musicians
  • having players located near the back of the field watch the drum major, and all other players "listen back", playing along with those watching the drum major.
  • having players keep track of time and rhythm on their own (called internalizing the tempo)
  • knowing to not only watch the drum major for the tempo but listen to the percussion. Having the percussion call out counts, or do rimshots (sometimes called "cheaters") when they are not playing might help the bands phasing problem also.
  • simply ignoring the phasing heard on the field and realize that the end product is essentially in sync. This most often occurs when the band is spread out, but in groups (i.e. the four corners of the football field in 4 groups). In this case, the sound will reach the center of the stadium and the center of the stands at the same moment provided the band members are not listening to each other.

Uniforms

Members of Texas Tech's band wear gaucho hats similar to the one worn by the school's mascot.

Nearly all marching bands use some kind of uniform. Military-style uniforms are most common, but there are bands that use everything from matching T-shirts and shorts to formal wear. Capes, rank cords, and other embellishments are common. Sometimes uniforms have substantially different colors on the front and back, so if band members turn suddenly (flank) the audience will see a striking change of color. Many Ivy League band members wear a jacket and tie while performing. The Southern Methodist University band will wear a different combination of jackets, vests, ties, shirts, and pants for each half of each game, (changing before halftime) such that no combination is repeated all year. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 484 pixelsFull resolution (928 × 561 pixel, file size: 155 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Goin Band from Raiderland performs during halftime at the 2006 Texas Tech Red Raiders vs. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 484 pixelsFull resolution (928 × 561 pixel, file size: 155 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Goin Band from Raiderland performs during halftime at the 2006 Texas Tech Red Raiders vs. ... The Goin Band from Raiderland is the 450-member-plus marching band of Texas Tech University. ... The Masked Rider gives the finger-gun salute. ... For other uses, see Uniform (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Dallas Hall at Dedman College at SMU The Laura Lee Blanton Hall during a rare snow storm Southern Methodist University (commonly SMU) is a nationally recognized, private, coeducational university in University Park, Texas (an enclave of Dallas). ...


The University of Oregon band wears outfits that are designed to look like their football team's uniforms. Rather than a traditional helmet, the USC Spirit of Troy Marching Band and Troy University's Sound of the South Marching Band wear traditional Trojan helmets. The Alma College Kiltie Marching Band is famous for wearing formal Scottish outfits including the official Alma College tartan. Drum Majors often wear more formal outfits or costumes that match the theme of the music, or their own design of uniform, based on personal preferences, which is at the discretion of the director. Many use an all-white version of the regular band uniform, with some (especially at the college level) still employing the tall wool-lined shako (often derisively referred to as a "Q-Tip hat"). The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The Spirit of Troy drumline at Navy Pier in Chicago October 14, 2005 The Spirit of Troy giving a traditional post-game concert, this time celebrating the defeat of the University of Arkansas in Razorback Stadium The Spirit of Troy take the field at Stanford Stadium The Spirit of Troy... Troy Worldwide Logo Troy University (formerly Troy State University) is a public university located in Troy, Alabama and founded in 1887. ... An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ... Alma College is a selective, private, liberal arts college located in the small city of Alma in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... For the artificial athletic track surface, see tartan track. ...


Common design elements include hats (typically shakos, pith helmets, combination hats or other styles of helmets) with feather plumes, capes, gloves, and the school or organization's name or symbol. Sousaphone players often wear a military-style beret, as other hats may be in the way of the bell. It is also common for band uniforms to have a stripe down the leg and light-colored shoes (or spats over dark shoes) to emphasize the movement of the legs while marching. However, competitive bands may opt for matching pants and shoes (usually white or black) to hide the visual effect of members who are out of step as seen from a distance. A Shako of a French Navy uniform of the 19th century. ... Pith helmet of Harry S. Truman The Pith Helmet (also known as Sun helmet, Topee, or Topi) is a lightweight helmet made of cork or pith typically from the sola or a similar plant [1], with a cloth cover, designed to shade the wearers head from the sun. ... Gen. ... Spats are a type of shoe accessory worn in the late 19th and early 20th Century. ...


Some auxiliary groups use uniforms that resemble gymnastics outfits: Often, these uniforms are themed, drawing inspiration from the music. Many groups change the outfits they use from season to season based on the needs of the band, although many that do also have a "base" uniform for occasions such as parades or other ceremonies.


Occasionally, a band will forgo traditional uniforms in favor of costumes that fit the theme of its field show. The costumes may or may not be uniform throughout the band. This kind of specialized uniform change is usually confined to competitive marching bands.


More rarely, but with stunning visual effects, a marching band may wear traditional dress of a Native American nation, such as elaborate headdresses. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


Rehearsals

Some bands will perform the same field show at all of their appearances during a single season. Others will avoid repeating a performance in front of the same crowd. In either case, the amount of rehearsal required varies greatly depending on the number and complexity of the formations, and the difficulty of the music. Some bands do a new field show every week, but only practice drill for two or three hours immediately before the performance. Other bands can practice a single show upwards of 20 hours per week (or more, for some competitive drum and bugle corps, who have been known to practice as much as 16 hours a day) for an entire season. Drum and bugle corps is a name used to describe two forms of marching units. ...


In some states within the United States, such as Texas, there are actually laws that prohibit high school bands from practicing too much, in order to avoid injuring or overworking students. Texas has an 'Eight Hour Rule' which states that no competitive part of a marching band can spend more than 8 hours per week, including full band rehearsals, sectionals, and time before competitions, rehearsing. The things that do not count towards the 8 hours are competitions, parades, football games, and rehearsals during the scheduled school day.


Music for parade and show bands is typically learned separately, in a concert band setting. It may even be memorized before any of the marching steps are learned. When rehearsing drill, positions and maneuvers are usually learned without playing the music simultaneously – a common technique for learning drill is to have members sing their parts or march to a recording produced during a music rehearsal. Many bands learn drill one picture or form at a time, and later combine these and add music. A concert band, also called wind band, symphonic band, symphonic winds, wind orchestra, wind symphony, or wind ensemble, is a performing ensemble consisting of several members of the woodwind instrument family, brass instrument family and percussion instrument family. ...


Rehearsals may also include physical warm-up (stretching, jumping jacks, etc.), music warm-up (generally consisting of breathing exercises, scales, technical exercises, chorales, and tuning), basics (simple marching in a block to practice proper technique), and sectionals (in which either staff or band members designated section leaders rehearse individual sections). In music, a scale is a set of musical notes that provides material for part or all of a musical work. ... A chorale is a hymn of the Lutheran church sung by the entire congregation. ... In music, there are two common meanings for tuning: Tuning practice, the act of tuning an instrument or voice. ...


When learning positions for drill, an American football field may be divided into a 5-yard grid, with the yard lines serving as one set of guides. The locations where the perpendicular grid lines cross the yard lines, sometimes called zero points, may be marked on a practice field. Alternately, band members may only use field markings – yard lines, the center line, hash marks, and yard numbers – as guides (but note that different leagues put these markings in different places). United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


In order for members to learn their positions more quickly, they may be given drill charts, which map their locations relative to the grid or field markings for each formation. In other groups, spray chalk or colored markers are used to mark the location of each person after each set of drill, with a different color and, sometimes, shape for each move.


Some bands use small notebooks, also known as a dot book, which they hang about their necks, and within contain 'drill charts' taped in, which list coordinates that band members use to find 'pages' or 'sets' on the field, which are normally set off the front sideline and front and back hashes, along with the number of '8-5 steps off of the yardline listed on each page. Some bands are even using small plastic pouches that hang about their neck on an adjustable strap, which has a zipper pocket for holding drill, flags to mark sets, and a pencil. There is also a clear plastic window in front to display the current part of drill being worked on at that point in time. An example of a complex dot book. ...


Members may also group into squads, ranks, sections, or (especially with scramble bands that primarily form words) letters. Instead of each member having an individual move, moves are then learned on a squad-by-squad (rank-by-rank, etc.) basis. This does not cite its references or sources. ...


March steps and traditional music and drill that are unique to an organization are often taught at a band camp, a time set aside for intense rehearsal before the performance season begins. Many U.S. university bands meet for a week of band camp prior to the beginning of the autumn semester. Other band camps exist for individual band members, drum majors, and auxiliaries to practice their skills and learn generic techniques in the off-season. For many bands, band camp is actually camp: the groups board at a campground for a period of time. Other groups simply hold band camp at their typical rehearsal facilities. Many bands have an initiation night at the end of the camp to help build a greater bond between the musicians.


Competitions

In competitions, bands are usually judged on criteria such as musicality, uniformity, visual impact, artistic interpretation, and the difficulty of the music and drill. Competition exists at all levels, but is most common in the U.S. among secondary school bands and drum and bugle corps. Performances designed for a competition setting usually include more esoteric music (including but not limited to adaptations of modern orchestral pieces).


National and regional competitions

Fall Marching Band


In the United States, Bands of America holds the Grand National Championships for high school marching bands every November at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis. They also hold Regional Championships throughout the United States each fall and also the BOA Super Regional Regionals in San Antonio, TX (Alamodome), Atlanta, GA (Georgia Dome) & St. Louis, MO (Edward Jones Dome). Bands are divided into three classes (A, AA & AAA) based on school size. Bands of America (BOA) is a nonprofit organization that promotes high school music education in the United States. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... The RCA Dome is a domed stadium located in Indianapolis, Indiana which is the home of the Indianapolis Colts NFL franchise. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ...


Bands in most non-state sponsored competitions are classified by the number of wind players. States usually, but not always, classify bands based on the student population and compete accordingly. Sometimes, bands are permitted to "petition" up a class to challenge themselves but usually may not move down. An example classification used in some U.S. competitions is as follows:

  • A – Up to 36 wind players
  • AA – 37–54 wind players
  • AAA – 55–77 wind players
  • AAAA – 78–100 wind players
  • Open (or AAAAA in some cases)  – 101 or more wind players

Summer Marching Band


There are also some circuits in the United States which continue to hold field show competitions during the summer months. Much like drum corps, these bands rehearse and tour full time for about a month from mid-June to mid-August. One such circuit is the Mid-America Competing Band Directors Association, or MACBDA.


MACBDA is currently host to more than 20 actively competing, summer-only field show bands from the US (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan) and Canada (Saskatchewan and Alberta). The circuit sponsors fourteen field show competitions each summer and the circuit championships move on a three-year-rotation from Calgary, AB, Canada, to Traverse City, MI, to the Southern Wisconsin / Northern Illinois area.


Summer parade marching is popular in the northern midwest, where temperatures are moderate enough for students to march distances in heavy uniforms. Performance styles range from traditional block marching to elaborate productions with evolving drill patterns. The Vikingland Band Festival parade marching championship in Alexandria, Minnesota is held annually on the last Sunday of June. The event was founded in 1985 and has drawn parade bands from seven states, two Canadian provinces and Norway.


The Honda Battle of the Bands is an annual marching band exhibition which features performances by HBCU bands. Seemingly contradictory to the name, Honda's "battle" is not a competition in the traditional sense; that is, no winner is crowned during the event. Rather, the bands compete for the favor of the audience, each other, and the greater community. The Honda Battle of the Bands (sometimes abbreviated Honda or HBOB) is an annual marching band exhibition which features performances by HBCU bands. ...


Local competitions

In addition to the Bands of America competitions, many states also hold local championships in the fall for high school marching bands. In these competitions, school size is usually the determining factor in which class bands compete in, rather than the amount of wind players. Examples of these local circuits include:

The New York State Field Band Conference or NYSFBC is a local circuit for marching band competitions, based in New York. ... The Musical Arts Conference or MAC is a local circuit for marching band competitions, based in Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. ... The Eastern Marching Band Association or EMBA is a local circuit for marching band competitions, based in Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. ... The Southern California School Band and Orchestra Associaion (SCSBOA) provides a number of services for elementary through college level music groups in Southern California, including providing clinics for educators and students and hosting festivals for soloists and ensembles, including marching band competitions. ... The Indiana State School Music Association (ISSMA) is the governing body of the Indiana State Marching Band competition. ... The University Interscholastic League or UIL is an organization which creates rules for and sometimes administers almost all athletic, music, and academic contests for public elementary and secondary schools in the American state of Texas. ... The Tournament of Bands, abbreviated TOB, is one of the largest competitive band organizations in the country and is one of the two major circuits in the mid-Atlantic states (the other being the Cavalcade of Bands). ... Western Band Association (WBA) is a nonprofit organization that promotes high school music education in California, Arizona and Nevada. ... The Northwest Marching Band Circuit, or NWMBC, is a collective of Pacific Northwest high school marching bands founded in 1997[1]. // The NWMBC draws from high schools from various states across the Pacific Northwest. ... The Michigan Competing Band Association (MCBA) is a sanctioning body for marching band field contests in the state of Michigan, established in 1974. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... The Kentucky State Marching Band Championships are an annual contest held by the Kentucky Music Educators Association that takes place each fall over the course of several weeks to determine the Kentucky high school marching band champion in five respective classes. ...

The Sudler Trophy and Sudler Shield

Main article: Sudler Trophy

The Sudler Trophy and Sudler Shields are awards bestowed each year by the John Philip Sousa Foundation on one university marching band and one high school marching band, respectively. The awards do not represent the winner of any championship, but rather a band surrounded by great tradition that has become respected nationally. No school may be honored with either award twice. The Wisconsin Band, known for its unique stop at the top high step, performs at the HHH Metrodome during a football game against arch-rival Minnesota. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Bands of America (BOA) is a nonprofit organization that promotes high school music education in the United States. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ... United States Federal Protective Service color guard. ... Classic drum and bugle corps are North American musical ensembles that descended from military bugle and drum units returning from World War I and succeeding wars. ... The Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps, a DCI Division I corps from Rosemont, Illinois. ... Drum Corps International (DCI), formed in 1972, is the non-profit governing body operating the North American drum and bugle corps circuit for junior corps, whose members are between the ages of 14 and 22. ... Drum Corps Associates (DCA) is the governing body for modern senior or all-age drum and bugle corps in North America. ... A high school drum major uses hand gestures to lead his band. ... Marching percussion instruments are specially designed to be played while moving. ... Martial music, also known as military pop and martial industrial, is a music genre originating in late 20th century Europe. ... Military Band marching A military band is a group of soldiers assigned to musical duties. ... A Pep Band is an ensemble of instrumentalists who play at functions or events with the purpose of entertaining, or pepping up a crowd. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ Marching Illini Firsts. Retrieved on 2006-12-15.
  2. ^ Allen Eagle Escadrille. Retrieved on 2007-07-26.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Marching Band Sheet Music, Marching Band Music - ActiveMusician (543 words)
Cultivate the love of music in your students with lively marching band stand tunes with sheet music from ActiveMusician.
From jazz to movie themes, we carry marching band music favorites that everyone is sure to love.
If you have any questions about marching band sheet music or any of our other products, don't hesitate to call us toll-free day or night at 800-923-8166.
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Whether marching before the home crowd or away, the Auburn Band has attained a position of national distinction and a reputation for excellence second to none.
Band members are chosen by audition, and represent virtually every school and curriculum on the Auburn campus.
The Auburn University Marching Band was named the 2004 recipient of the Sudler Intercollegiate Marching Band Trophy, the nation's highest and most coveted award for college and university marching bands.
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