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Encyclopedia > March 2005

← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- →
← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Burning Man • Edinburgh Festival • European Constitution ratification • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May... Ongoing events • 2005 Kuomintang visits to Mainland • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Election of OAS Secretary General • Stanislav Gross scandal in Czech republic Upcoming events Deaths in May May 3: Jagjit Singh Aurora May 3: Don Canham May...

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Deaths in March

31Terri Schiavo
30Mitch Hedberg
29Johnnie Cochran
27Wilfred Bigelow
26Paul Hester
26James Callaghan
21Jeff Weise
21Bobby Short
19John De Lorean
18Gary Bertini
17George F. Kennan
17Andre Norton
17 – Czesław Słania
10Dave Allen (comedian)
9Chris LeDoux
8Aslan Maskhadov
6Hans Bethe
6Tommy Vance
4Yuri Kravchenko
3Rinus Michels
2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief • Cedar Revolution in Lebanon • Tulip Revolution in Kyrgyzstan • German Visa Affair 2005 • Expo 2005 in Nagoya, Japan • Terri Schiavo controversy • Pope John Paul II... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Todays featured article Tsunami. ... Deaths in March • 10 – Dave Allen • 6 – Tommy Vance • 5 – David Sheppard • 1 – Brian Luckhurst Other recent deaths Ongoing events • Justice For Robert McCartney Future events 2005: UK general election, 2005 Upcoming holidays April 1: April Fools Day May 1: May Day Upcoming sports events 17 April: 2005 Flora... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → This page deals with March 2005 events related to Hong Kong and Macao. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → This page deals with current events in the United States, its insular areas, and other American interests. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... Theresa Marie Terri Schiavo (December 3, 1963 – March 31, 2005) was a woman from St. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... Mitch Hedberg Mitch Hedberg (February 24, 1968 – March 30, 2005) was an American stand-up comedian known for his odd subject matter, subdued delivery and memorable routines that often consisted of a string of one-line non sequiturs. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in Leap years). ... Johnnie Cochran Johnnie L. Cochran, Jr. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in Leap years). ... Dr. Wilfred Gordon (Bill) Bigelow, OC , MD , LL.D , FRSC (June 18, 1913 – March 27, 2005) was a Canadian heart surgeon famous for his role in developing the artificial pacemaker. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... Paul Newell Hester (January 8, 1959 – March 26, 2005) was the drummer with Split Enz and Crowded House. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... The Right Honourable Sir Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... Jeff Weise around 9 years of age Jeffrey Weise (August 8, 1988 – March 21, 2005) was a high school student of Red Lake, Minnesota responsible for the Red Lake High School massacre, a school shooting in which he killed nine people and injured more than a dozen others before committing... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... Bobby Short (born September 15, 1924) is an American cabaret singer known for his interpretation of songs by early 20th century composers like Rodgers and Hart and Cole Porter. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... De Lorean with a prototype of his namesake car, the De Lorean DMC-12 John Zachary De Lorean (January 6, 1925 – March 19, 2005) was an American personality, engineer, and executive in the U.S. automobile industry, and founder of the De Lorean Motor Company. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... Gary Bertini (1928 - 18 March 2005) was an Israeli conductor and musician. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... George Frost Kennan (February 16, 1904 – March 17, 2005) was an American advisor, diplomat, political analyst, and historian, best known as the father of containment and as a key figure in the emergence of the Cold War. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... Science fiction and fantasy author Andre Alice Norton (February 17, 1912 – March 17, 2005) was born Alice Mary Norton in Cleveland, Ohio. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... CzesÅ‚aw SÅ‚ania (pronounced chess-wav swan-ya) (22 October 1921–17 March 2005) was an accomplished postage stamp and banknote engraver. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in Leap years). ... Dave Allen David Tynan OMahoney (July 6, 1936 – March 10, 2005), better known as Dave Allen, was an Irish comedian, popular in Britain in the 1970s. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... Chris LeDoux (1948-2005). ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... Aslan Aliyevich Maskhadov (Russian: Аслан Алиевич Масхадов) (September 21, 1951 – March 8, 2005) was a leader of the separatist movement in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... Hans Bethe Hans Albrecht Bethe (pronounced Bay-tuh; July 2, 1906 – March 6, 2005), was a German-American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1967 for his discovery of stellar nucleosynthesis. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... Tommy Vance, born Richard Anthony Crispian Francis Prew Hope-Weston (July 11, 1941 – March 6, 2005) was a British pop radio broadcaster, born in Eynsham, Oxfordshire. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... Yuriy Fedorovich Kravchenko (Ukrainian: Юрій Федорович Кравченко, March 5, 1951–March 4, 2005), was the Minister of Internal Affairs of Ukraine from 1995 until he was fired in March 2001. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... Marinus Jacobus Hendricus Rinus Michels (born February 9, 1928) is a Dutch football coach. ...

Election results

March 6: Moldovan parliamentary
March 12: Maltese Local Council Elections
March 13: Central African Rep. federal
March 13: Liechtenstein parliamentary
The following is a list of notable people who have died to date in 2005. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... Moldovan parliamentary elections, 6 march 2005 Turnout: 63. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in Leap years). ... The result Elections were held on March 12 in Malta in various localities across the islands. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... Presidential and parliamentary elections were held in the Central African Republic on March 13, 2005 (first round) and May 8, 2005 (second round), marking the end of the transitional process that began with the seizure of power by François Bozizé in a March 2003 coup. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... Politics of Liechtenstein Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Liechtenstein ...

March 31, 2005

March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda was the primary anti-Rwanda rebel group during the latter part of the Second Congo War. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... The skulls of victims show gashes and signs of violence The Rwandan genocide was the slaughter of roughly one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus during a timespan of 100 days in 1994. ... The Second Congo War was a conflict taking place largely in the territory of Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire) that began in 1998 and officially ended in 2002. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making his the third-longest reign in the history of the Papacy according to the... Blood pressure is the pressure exerted by the blood on the walls of the blood vessels. ... Hyperthermia: Characterized on the left. ... The Anointing of the Sick is one of the sacraments of Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Oriental Orthodoxy, and is also practiced in some Protestant churches. ... Theresa Marie Terri Schiavo (December 3, 1963 – March 31, 2005) was a woman from St. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush (R) Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band European networks National In much of Europe television broadcasting has historically been state dominated, rather than commercially organised, although commercial stations have grown in number recently. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Malnutrition is a symptom of a person who overeats, especailly foods that are designed not to nourish. ... The 2003 invasion of Iraq was the first military act of the Iraq War, and was launched by the United States and the United Kingdom on March 20, 2003, with support from some other governments, making up what was described as the coalition of the willing. After approximately three weeks... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... A conceptual outline for the program The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) is a research program that focuses on ecosystem changes over the course of decades, and projecting those changes into the future. ... Earth, also known as the Earth, Terra, and (mostly in the 19th century) Tellus, is the third-closest planet to the Sun. ... In ecology, an ecosystem is a naturally occurring assemblage of organisms (plant, animal and other living organisms—also referred to as a biotic community or biocoenosis) living together with their environment (or biotope), functioning as a loose unit. ... Biodiversity or biological diversity is the diversity of and in living nature. ... Timber Timber is a term used to describe wood throughout its processing from the time it is planned for use in industrial products to the time it is used as a structural material or in other industrial product, such as wood pulp for paper production. ... Water (from the Old English word wæter; c. ... Poster of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change accusing the ruling Zimbabwe African National Union - Patriotic Front of election fraud Parliamentary elections were held in Zimbabwe on March 31, 2005. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... The Zimbabwe African National Union - Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF) has been the ruling party in Zimbabwe since independence in 1980, led by Robert Mugabe, first as Prime Minister with the party simply known as ZANU, and then as President from 1988 after taking over ZAPU and renaming the party ZANU... Morgan Tsvangirai - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... The Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) was founded in 1999 as the official opposition party to the Zanu-PF party led by Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ... Events Births Deaths Categories: 127 ... ... State nickname: The Evergreen State Other U.S. States Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Governor Christine Gregoire (D) Official languages None Area 184,824 km² (18th)  - Land 172,587 km²  - Water 12,237 km² (6. ... In economics, dumping can refer to any kind of predatory pricing. ... Byrd Amendment is also known by the name Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act (CDSA) is a USA act that facilitate holding of dumping fines and distributing the fines annually to participating companies. ... WTO Logo The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international organization which oversees a large number of agreements defining the rules of trade between its member states (WTO, 2004a). ... Piece of paper Paper is a thin, flat material produced by the compression of fibres. ... A cigarette will burn to ash on one end. ... The name oyster is used for a number of different groups of molluscs which grow for the most part in marine or brackish water. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms The domestic pig is usually given the scientific name Sus scrofa, though some authors call it , reserving for the wild boar. ... City motto: Unity in Development Province Gauteng Mayor Amos Masondo Area  - % water 1,644 km² 0. ... The National Union of Mineworkers is a trade union for coal miners in the United Kingdom. ... Punjab, 1903 Punjab Province, 1909 The Punjab (Meaning: Land of five Rivers) (also Panjab, Gurmukhi: ਪੰਜਾਬ, Shahmukhi: پنجاب) is a region straddling the border between India and Pakistan. ... Yuriy Fedorovich Kravchenko (Ukrainian: Юрій Федорович Кравченко, March 5, 1951–March 4, 2005), was the Minister of Internal Affairs of Ukraine from 1995 until he was fired in March 2001. ...

March 30, 2005

March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 sq. ... Jean-Claude Juncker Jean-Claude Juncker (born December 9, 1954) is the Prime Minister and Finance Minister of Luxembourg, and until July 1, 2005, was president of the European Council, a position he also previously held in 1997. ... Olli Rehn Olli Rehn (born 31 March 1962) is a Finnish politician, currently serving as European Commissioner for Enlargement. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is an American academic and political figure. ... Logo of the World Bank The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, in Romance languages: BIRD), better known as the World Bank, is an international organization whose original mission was to finance the reconstruction of nations devastated by WWII. Now, its mission has expanded to fight poverty by means... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... The Death of Socrates by Jacques-Louis David, 1787 Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life; it is sometimes a noun for one who has committed or attempted the act. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as involvement in action to bring about change, be it social, political, environmental, or other change. ... Child custody and guardianship are the legal terms used to describe the legal and practical relationship between a parent and child, including e. ... Shanghai (Chinese: 上海; Pinyin: ; Shanghainese IPA: ), situated on the banks of the Yangtze River Delta, is Chinas largest city. ... Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Temple Mount (Hebrew: הַר הַבַּיִת, Har haBáyit) or Noble Sanctuary (Arabic: الحرم الشريف, al-Ḥaram aÅ¡-Å arÄ«f) is a hotly contested religious site in the Old City of Jerusalem. ... Passover, also known as Pesach or Pesah (פסח pesaḥ), is a Holy Day, observed by several religions, beginning on the evening of the 14th day of Nisan and lasting seven days (in Israel and among some liberal Diaspora Jews, and eight days among other Diaspora Jews) that commemorates the exodus and... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon was created by singer/songwriter Paul Jabara AIDS is an acronym for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and is defined as a collection of symptoms and infections... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... ... The Oil-for-Food Programme was established by the United Nations in 1996 to allow Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine and the like. ... Maharashtra (महाराष्ट्र) is Indias third largest state in terms of area and second largest in terms of population after Uttar Pradesh. ... Mumbai (Marathi: मुंबई ) (pronounced in Marathi, and in English), formerly known as Bombay (IPA: ), is the capital of the Indian state of Maharashtra and is the most populous Indian city with a 2005 estimated population of about 13 million. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services, such as oral sex or sexual intercourse, for money. ... Hosni Mubarak, President of Egypt Muhammad Hosni Said Mubarak (Arabic : محمد حسنى سيد مبارك ) (born May 4, 1928) commonly known as Hosni Mubarak (Arabic: حسنى مبارك ) has been the President of the Arab Republic of Egypt for twenty-four years, since 14 October 1981. ... The Civic Democratic Party (Czech: Občanská demokratická strana - abbreviation: ODS) is a eurosceptic, right-wing political party in the Czech Republic. ... The Christian and Democratic Union - Czechoslovak Peoples Party (in Czech: Křesťanská a demokratická unie - Československá strana lidová or KDU-ČSL, also known under short name lidovci) is the Christian democratic political party in the Czech Republic. ... For minority régime, see Apartheid. ... Stanislav Gross Stanislav Gross (born October 30, 1969 in Prague) is Czech politician, member of Czech Social Democratic Party (ČSSD) . He served as minister of the interior (2000 - 2004) and as prime minister of the Czech Republic (2004 - 2005). ... ... Gacaca courts are a new form of community justice that have been used in Rwanda in the wake of the Rwandan Genocide. ... The skulls of victims show gashes and signs of violence The Rwandan genocide was the slaughter of roughly one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus during a timespan of 100 days in 1994. ...

March 29, 2005

March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... A typical spam advertisement Spam by e-mail is a type of spam that involves sending identical (or nearly identical) messages to thousands (or millions) of recipients. ... Scott Richter is a U.S.-based e-mail spammer. ... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... // A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT) is the worlds largest software company, with over 50,000 employees in various countries as of May 2004. ... Holding decision pending Court membership Case opinions Laws applied Copyright Act of 1976 MGM Studios, Inc. ... // A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... Official Lib Dem Portrait Jeremy John Durham Ashdown, Baron Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon, KBE, PC (born 27 February 1941), invariably known as Paddy Ashdown, is a British politician, who was leader of the Liberal Democrats from 1988 until 1999. ... The High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, with the Office of the High Representative (OHR) in Bosnia and Herzegovina, was created in 1995 immediately after the Dayton Peace Agreement to oversee the civilian implementation of this agreement. ... . Dragan Čović is a member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina, representing the nations Croat population. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). ... The Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Predsjedništvo Bosne i Hercegovine) is the head of state of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism, the gathering and dissemination of information about current events, trends, issues and people. ... A death toll is the number of dead as a result of war, violence, accident, natural disaster, extreme weather, or disease. ... The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ... UNICEF logo The United Nations International Childrens Emergency Fund (UNICEF) was established by the United Nations General Assembly on December 11, 1946. ... Motto: none Anthem: National Anthem of the Kyrgyz Republic Capital Bishkek 42°52′ N 74°36′ E Largest city Bishkek Official languages Kyrgyz, Russian Government President Prime Minister Republic Kurmanbek Bakiyev Feliks Kulov Independence  - Declared  - Recognized  - Formerly From the Soviet Union 31 August 1991 December 1991 Kyrgyz_SSR Area  â€¢ Total  â€¢ Water... The debating chamber or hemicycle of the European Parliament in Brussels. ... Kurmanbek Bakiyev, 7/2005 Kurmanbek Bakiyev, left, speaks to Ishenbai Kadyrbekov Kurmanbek Saliyevich Bakiyev (Курманбек Салиевич Бакиев) (born August 1, 1949 in Masadan, Jalal-Abad Province in Kyrgyzstan), is the president of the Kyrgyz Republic, whilst also holding the position of Prime Minister. ... The President of Kyrgyzstan is the head of state and the highest official of the Kyrgyz Republic. ... Askar Akayev Askar Akayevich Akayev (Аскар Акаевич Акаев) (born November 10, 1944 in Kyzyl-Bairak, Kirghiz SSR) served as President of Kyrgyzstan from 1990 to March 2005, when he was deposed by a popular uprising dubbed the Tulip Revolution. ... Paul Adolph Volcker (born September 5, 1927), economist, is best-known as the Chairman of the Federal Reserve under United States Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan (from August 1979 to August 1987). ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... The Oil-for-Food Programme was established by the United Nations in 1996 to allow Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine and the like. ... The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is an organization for boys between the ages of 7 and 18, and for both young men and women between the ages of 14 and 21, based in the United States of America, with some presence in other countries. ... The term child pornography (sometimes referred to as kiddie porn) generally refers to pornography featuring a child; however, the precise definition of pornography and child varies by region and country. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... A view of Kampala City center. ... The term polygamy (literally much marriage in late Greek) is used in related ways in social anthropology and sociobiology. ... Marriage is a relationship and bond between individuals (termed spouses -- a male spouse is a husband and a female spouse, a wife) that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... Scrivener Dam, Canberra Australia, was engineered to withstand a once-in-5000-years flood event A dam is a barrier across flowing water that obstructs, directs or retards the flow, often creating a reservoir, lake or impoundment. ... Minaret, July 2001 Ghazni is a city in central Afghanistan, situated on a plateau at 7280 feet above sea level. ... Bull attacking a matador Bullfighting or tauromachy (Spanish toreo, corrida de toros or tauromaquia; Portuguese tourada, corrida de touros or tauromaquia) is a blood sport that involves, most of the time, professional performers (matadores) who execute various formal moves with the goal of appearing graceful and confident, while masterful over... Ciudad Guayana is a city in Venezuela. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... The Oxford English Dictionary defines terrorism as a policy intended to strike with terror those against whom it is adopted; the employment of methods of intimidation; the fact of terrorizing or condition of being terrorized. ... Poverty is the state of being without, often associated with need, hardship and lack of resources across a wide range of circumstances. ... José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero (born August 4, 1960) is the Prime Minister of Spain. ... President Hugo Chávez in 2003 Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (born July 28, 1954) is the President of Venezuela. ... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga class cruiser. ... Mariano Rajoy Brey Mariano Rajoy Brey (born March 27, 1955), Spanish politician, is the leader of the opposition and of the conservative Peoples Party, (PP). ... ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... A diplomatic mission is a group of people from one nation state present in another nation state to represent the sending state in the receiving State. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ...

March 28, 2005

March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... The Kuomintang (KMT) or Nationalist Party of China (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang) is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... Chiang Pin-kung (Chinese: 江丙坤, pinyin: Jiāng Bǐngkūn) (born December 16, 1932) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... The Chinese Civil War was a conflict in China between the Kuomintang (The Nationalist Party; The Nationalists; KMT) and the Communist Party of China (CPC). ... Location within China Guangzhou (Simplified Chinese: 广州; Traditional Chinese: 廣州; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-chou; Jyutping: Gwong2zau1; Yale: GwóngjaÅ«) is the capital of the Guangdong Province in southern China. ... A province, in the context of China, is a translation of sheng (省 shÄ›ng), which is an administrative division of China. ... Guangdong (Simplified Chinese: 广东; Traditional Chinese: 廣東; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-tung; Postal System Pinyin: Kwangtung or Canton Province, Jyutping: gwong2 dung1), is a province on the south coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Epicentre map from NOAA USGS image depicting earthquake zones for the Sunda Trench - Damage zones for 1833 and 1861, then 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, and 28 March 2005 Sumatran earthquake. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The moment magnitude scale (a successor to the Richter Scale), was introduced in 1979 by Tom Hanks and Hiroo Kanamori and is used by seismologists to compare the energy released by earthquakes. ... Map of North Sumatra province within Indonesia North Sumatra (Indonesian: Sumatera Utara) is one of the provinces of Indonesia. ... Aftershocks are earthquakes in the same region of the mainshock (generally within a few rupture length) but of smaller magnitude and which occur with in a pattern that follows Omoris law. ... The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... Evacuation can have several meanings: In wilderness first aid, evacuation is the transport of a seriously injured person out of the wilderness to the nearest point an ambulance can reach to take them to the hospital, or to the nearest emergency room. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Knesset (כנסת, Hebrew for assembly) is the Parliament of Israel. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Gaza Disengagement Plan describes the move to withdraw all Jewish Israeli settlers from the Gaza Strip unilaterally as soon as possible, lead by Ariel Sharon. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The emblem of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad shows a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) superimposed on the images of the Dome of the Rock, two fists and two rifles. ... The Qassam rocket is a simple steel rocket filled with explosives, developed by the Palestinian armed group Hamas. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... February is the second month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Saint Basils Cathedral and Spasskaya Tower of Moscow Kremlin at Red Square. ... 1998 Russian Federation one rouble coin. ... As a unit of currency, the term pound originates from the value of a Troy pound weight (Latin libra), of high purity silver, and is the currency unit of a number of countries: Cyprus pound in Cyprus Egyptian pound in Egypt Lebanese pound in Lebanon Syrian pound in Syria British... Blasphemy is the defamation of the name of God or the gods, and by extension any display of gross irreverence towards any person or thing deemed worthy of exalted esteem. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... Pius Ncube Pius Ncube (1956 - ) is the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, widely known as a human rights advocate and an outspoken critic of President Robert Mugabe. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... In countries adopting the common law adversarial system or the civil law inquisitorial system, the prosecutor is the chief legal representative of the prosecution. ... Yukos logo Yukos Oil Company (ОАО НК ЮКОС) is a petroleum company in Russia which, until recently, was controlled by Russian billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky and a number of prominent Russian businessmen. ... A business magnate, sometimes referred to as a mogul or a tycoon, is a person who controls a large portion of a particular industry and whose wealth derives primarily from said control. ... Mikhail Khodorkovsky speaking at an Open Russia forum. ... A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or company (including a corporation), that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a joint stock company. ... Platon Lebedev (born 26 June 1963) is a Russian businessman and close associate of Mikhail Khodorkovsky. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... Underwater funeral in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A funeral is a ceremony marking a persons death. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... The Early Days Was born as: Ahmed Abdullrahman Zaki 18 November 1949 - 27 March 2005 in the Nile Delta city of Zagazig, about 50 miles north of Cairo, Egypt. ...

March 27, 2005

  • Christians around the world celebrate Easter Sunday. (AP via Yahoo! News)
  • In comments posted in a German newspaper Easter Sunday, Chancellor Gerhard Schröder expressed the hope that German-based companies will stop outsourcing, that they'll invest in employment opportunities within Germany. German companies have long complained of the stifling labor/regulatory/tax climate at home. (New York Times)

March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... Earth, also known as the Earth, Terra, and (mostly in the 19th century) Tellus, is the third-closest planet to the Sun. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... Gerhard Fritz Kurt Schröder [] (born April 7, 1944), a German politician, has been serving as Chancellor of Germany since 1998. ...

March 26, 2005

March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ... An epidemic is a disease that appears as new cases in the population in a period of time at a rate (the number of new cases in the population during a specified period of time is called the incidence rate) that substantially exceeds what is expected, based on recent experence. ... Species Ivory Coast ebolavirus Reston ebolavirus Sudan ebolavirus Zaire virus Ebola hemorrhagic fever (alternatively Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever, EHF, or just Ebola) is a very rare, but severe, usually fatal infectious disease occurring in humans and other primates, caused by the Ebola virus. ... Uige is a province of Angola. ... Map of Angola Luanda (formerly called Loanda) is the largest city and capital of Angola. ... Taiwan is mostly mountainous in the east but gradually transitions to gently sloping plains in the west. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... The Anti-Secession Law (Chinese: 反分裂国家法; pinyin: ; literally Against-Splitting-the-State Law) is a law passed by the third conference of the 10th National Peoples Congress of the Peoples Republic of China. ...

March 25, 2005

March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... An IMAX dome in Guayaquil, Ecuador IMAX (for Image Maximum) is a film projection system that has the capacity to display images of far greater size and resolution than conventional film display systems. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... Charles Darwin, father of the theory of evolution by natural selection. ... a tulip, the symbol of the revolution The Tulip Revolution refers to the overthrow of President Askar Akayev and his government in the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan after the parliamentary elections of February 27 and of March 13, 2005. ... The Leader of the Opposition is a title traditionally held by the leader of the largest party not in government in a Westminster System of parliamentary government. ... Kurmanbek Bakiyev, 7/2005 Kurmanbek Bakiyev, left, speaks to Ishenbai Kadyrbekov Kurmanbek Saliyevich Bakiyev (Курманбек Салиевич Бакиев) (born August 1, 1949 in Masadan, Jalal-Abad Province in Kyrgyzstan), is the president of the Kyrgyz Republic, whilst also holding the position of Prime Minister. ... The President of Kyrgyzstan is the head of state and the highest official of the Kyrgyz Republic. ... Askar Akayev Askar Akayevich Akayev (Аскар Акаевич Акаев) (born November 10, 1944 in Kyzyl-Bairak, Kirghiz SSR) served as President of Kyrgyzstan from 1990 to March 2005, when he was deposed by a popular uprising dubbed the Tulip Revolution. ... Looting is the default system of redistributing primarily water, food, as well as other goods and services in the absence of a formal system of distribution. ... [cityscape] [landscape towards the south] <<a href=b class=external free title=b>b>Bishkek</<a href=b class=external free title=b>b> (Бишкек, بىشكهك) (population in 2005 approx. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Rainier III ruled Monaco from 1949 to 2005. ... Congestive heart failure (CHF) (also called Congestive Cardiac Failure and heart failure) is the inability of the heart to pump a sufficient amount of blood throughout the body, or requiring elevated filling pressures in order to pump effectively. ... Renal failure - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A respirator is a breathing aid often used by intensive care units for the mechanical ventilation patients with respiratory failure. ... Good Friday is a holy day celebrated by Christians on the Friday before Easter or Pascha. ... Christ is the English representation of the Greek word Χριστός (transliterated as Khristós), which means anointed. ... The Stations of the Cross (or Way of the Cross; in Latin, Via Crucis or Via Dolorosa) refers to the depiction of the final hours (or Passion) of Jesus, and the Catholic and Anglican devotion commemorating the Passion. ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides...

March 24, 2005

March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... A paleontologist carefully chips rock from a column of dinosaur vertebrae. ... North Carolina State University is an institution of higher learning located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... The blood vessels are part of the circulatory system and function to transport blood throughout the body. ... Human red blood cells Red blood cells are the most common type of blood cell and are the vertebrate bodys principal means of delivering oxygen to body tissues via the blood. ... A fossil Ammonite Fossils are the mineralized remains of animals or plants or other traces such as footprints. ... Binomial name Tyrannosaurus rex Osborn, 1905 Tyrannosaurus rex (king of the tyrannical lizards), also known colloquially as The King of the Dinosaurs, was a giant carnivorous theropod dinosaur from the Upper Maastrichtian, the last stage of the Cretaceous period, 65 – 66 million years ago. ... ... Ghosting detainees is the practice of hiding the identities of people being held in a penal facility, generally by keeping them unregistered and therefore anonymous. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Riot control are the measures to control a riot or to break up an unwanted demonstration (usually of protestors). ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... [cityscape] [landscape towards the south] <<a href=b class=external free title=b>b>Bishkek</<a href=b class=external free title=b>b> (Бишкек, بىشكهك) (population in 2005 approx. ... Askar Akayev Askar Akayevich Akayev (Аскар Акаевич Акаев) (born November 10, 1944 in Kyzyl-Bairak, Kirghiz SSR) served as President of Kyrgyzstan from 1990 to March 2005, when he was deposed by a popular uprising dubbed the Tulip Revolution. ... The White House in the city of Bishkek is the presidential palace of the Kyrgyz Republic. ... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more large horizontal rotors (propellers). ... Bobby Fischer. ... Copenhagen (Danish: København) is the capital and largest city of Denmark. ... The WHO flag: similar to the flag of the United Nations, augmented with the symbolic staff and serpent of Asklepios, Greek god of medicine and healing. ... Tuberculous lungs show up on an X-ray image Tuberculosis is an infection with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which most commonly affects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can also affect the central nervous system (meningitis), lymphatic system, circulatory system (miliary TB), genitourinary system, bones and joints. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous after Asia. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ... A part of the Global Loop at Expo 2005 Expo 2005 is the Worlds Fair held in Aichi Prefecture, Japan, east of the city of Nagoya. ... Nagoya Castle in June of 2004. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Theresa Marie Terri Schiavo (December 3, 1963 – March 31, 2005) was a woman from St. ...

March 23, 2005

  • An explosion occurs at a BP oil refinery in Texas City, Texas. Over 100 are injured, and at least 15 are dead. (Fox News) (Globe and Mail) (BP)
  • Prince Rainier III of Monaco reportedly has gone into renal and heart failure and is on a respirator. (Yahoo! News)
  • Conflict in Iraq: Iraqi Army officials claim that they along with backing from US troops have killed at least 80 insurgents in a raid on a camp near Tikrit. (BBC)
  • Two people die following a bomb in a shopping centre in a Christian area of North Beirut, Lebanon. The two are believed to have been foreign workers. (BBC)
  • In Lebanon, Michel Abu Arraj, a judge investigating the murder of Rafik Hariri, asks to step down from the case prior to public announcement of the results of the United Nations investigation. (Reuters Alertnet) (BBC)
  • Israel announces that it will ban Palestinians from the West Bank and Gaza Strip from entering Israel during the upcoming Purim holiday. (People's Daily) (RTE)
  • In Brazil, the Brazilian Army receives permission to set up second emergency field hospital in the park of Rio De Janeiro to alleviate shortage of medical services. Mayor Cesar Maia opposes the move, blaming the situation on lack of government funding. (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Kyrgyzstan, riot police break up a protest in the capital Bishkek. (Reuters Alertnet) (BBC) President Askar Akayev sacks his interior minister and prosecutor general for "poor work" in dealing with the growing protests against his government. (Interfax) (Reuters) (RIA Novosti) (BBC) USA and UN appeal for calm and negotiations. (Bloomberg) (Bloomberg)
  • The College of Bishops of the Episcopal Church of Scotland declares that being a practicing homosexual does not constitute "a bar to the exercise of an ordained ministry". (BBC)
  • In the Central African Republic, the spokesman of André Kolingba, former military ruler, says that yesterday's shootout outside his house was an assassination attempt. Kolingba has called for an annulment of the results of the presidential elections. (BBC)
  • In Cambodia, 16 prisoners die during an jailbreak in the province of Kampong Cham; 30 others escape. (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Libya, Muammar Gaddafi states that he is not going to pardon five Bulgarian nurses that face a death penalty accused of injecting children with the HIV (Gulf Daily News) (Bulgarian News Network) (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In Russia, recent studies and statistics show that the name "Dmitry" is the most popular name in the Slavic regions of Eastern Europe. [1]

March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (83rd in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... BP (formerly British Petroleum and briefly known as BP Amoco) (NYSE: BP) is a petroleum company headquartered in London, and one of the top four oil companies in the world (along with Shell, ExxonMobil, and Total). ... View of the Tosco (ex Valero, originally Shell) Martinez oil refinery An oil refinery is an industrial process plant where crude oil is processed and refined into useful petroleum products. ... Texas City is a city located in Galveston County, Texas. ... Prior to 1821, Texas was part of the Spanish colony of New Spain. ... Rainier III ruled Monaco from 1949 to 2005. ... Renal failure - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A respirator is a breathing aid often used by intensive care units for the mechanical ventilation patients with respiratory failure. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Tikrit (تكريت, also transliterated as Takrit or Tekrit) is a town in Iraq, located 140 km northwest of Baghdad on the Tigris river (at 34. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus of Nazareth. ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut (Arabic: , transliterated BayrÅ«t - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... Former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri Rafik Bahaa Edine Hariri (1 November 1944 – 14 February 2005), was a Muslim Lebanese self-made billionaire and business tycoon, and was twice Prime Minister of Lebanon from 1992 to 1998 and again from 2000 to 2004. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Purim (פּוּרִים Lots, Standard Hebrew Purim, Tiberian Hebrew Pûrîm: plural of פּוּר pûr Lot, from Akkadian pūru) is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the deliverance of the Persian Jews from the plot of the evil Haman to exterminate them, as recorded in the biblical Book of Esther. ... Army (from French armée) can, in some countries, refer to any armed force (for example, the Peoples Liberation Army of China consists of ground force, navy and air force branches). ... Ipanema beach Cristo Redentor A NASA satellite image of Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro (meaning River of January in Portuguese) is the name of both a state and a city in southeastern Brazil. ... This is a list of mayors of Rio de Janeiro from the most recent See also: mayors in Brazil. ... Cesar Epitácio Maia (born July 18, 1945) is the current mayor of Rio de Janeiro and possibly will be candidate for the presidency of Brazil in 2006. ... Riot control are the measures to control a riot or to break up an unwanted demonstration (usually of protestors). ... [cityscape] [landscape towards the south] <<a href=b class=external free title=b>b>Bishkek</<a href=b class=external free title=b>b> (Бишкек, بىشكهك) (population in 2005 approx. ... The President of Kyrgyzstan is the head of state and the highest official of the Kyrgyz Republic. ... Askar Akayev Askar Akayevich Akayev (Аскар Акаевич Акаев) (born November 10, 1944 in Kyzyl-Bairak, Kirghiz SSR) served as President of Kyrgyzstan from 1990 to March 2005, when he was deposed by a popular uprising dubbed the Tulip Revolution. ... The Interior Minister is a member of a Cabinet in a Government. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... This article or section should be merged with Scottish Episcopal Church Episcopal Church of Scotland, a Scottish church in communion with, but historically distinct from, the Church of England, and composed of seven dioceses: Aberdeen and Orkney; Argyll and the Isles; Brechin; Edinburgh; Glasgow and Galloway; Moray, Ross and Caithness... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... André Diuedonne Kolingba (born August 12, 1935) was president of the Central African Republic from 1981 to 1993. ... Kampong Cham is a province in the east of Cambodia. ... Colonel Muammar al-Qaddafi Muammar Abu Minyar al-Qaddafi 1 (Arabic: معمر القذافي Mu`ammar al-Qadhdhāfī) (born 1942), leader of Libya since 1970 and a controversial Arab statesman. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a retrovirus that infects cells of the human immune system (mainly CD4+ T cells and macrophages, vital components of the hosts immune system), and destroys or impairs their function. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples currently living in Europe. ... World map showing location of Europe When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ...

March 22, 2005

March 22 is the 81st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (82nd in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The old World Hockey Association (WHA) merged into the National Hockey League (NHL) in 1979. ... Bobby Hull on the Chicago Blackhawks Robert Marvin Hull, born January 3, 1939 in Pointe Anne (near Belleville), Ontario, Canada, is regarded as one of the greatest ice hockey players and perhaps the greatest left winger to ever play the game. ... This article is about the month of May. ... Members of Parliament Libby Davies, Ujjal Dosanjh, David Emerson, Hedy Fry, Stephen Owen Members of the Legislative Assembly Gordon Campbell, David Chudnovsky, Adrian Dix, Colin Hansen, Jenny Kwan, Lorne Mayencourt, Wally Oppal, Gregor Robertson, Shane Simpson, Carole Taylor Mayor Larry Campbell Governing Body Vancouver City Council Latitude: Longitude: 49°16... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Splendour without diminishment) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Area 944,735 km² (5th) Land 925,186 km² Water 19,549 km² (2. ... Tulkarm or Tulkarem (Arabic طولكرم Ṭūlkarm; Standard Hebrew טולכרם) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Rainier III ruled Monaco from 1949 to 2005. ... The respiratory system is the biological system of any organism that engages in gas exchange. ... An infection is the detrimental colonization of a host organism by a foreign species. ... Intensive care medicine or critical care medicine is concerned with providing greater than ordinary medical care and observation to people in a critical or unstable condition. ... Paul Schäfer Paul Schäfer Schneider (born December 4, 1921) is the founder and former leader of a sect and agricultural commune of German immigrants called Colonia Dignidad (Dignity Colony)—later renamed Villa Baviera—located in central Chile, about 340 km south of Santiago. ... Colonia Dignidad (Dignity Colony, now known as Villa Baviera, Bavaria Village), is a settlement located in an isolated area in the Maule Region of southern Chile, near the village of Parral. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Juan Bosco Maino Canales (died 1976?) was a photographer, political activist, and opponent of Augusto Pinochets regime in Chile. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... The President of Kyrgyzstan is the head of state and the highest official of the Kyrgyz Republic. ... Askar Akayev Askar Akayevich Akayev (Аскар Акаевич Акаев) (born November 10, 1944 in Kyzyl-Bairak, Kirghiz SSR) served as President of Kyrgyzstan from 1990 to March 2005, when he was deposed by a popular uprising dubbed the Tulip Revolution. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... A coup détat (pronounced /ku de ta/), or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... Ituri is a region located in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... World Water Day or the World Day for Water occurs each year on March 22, as designated by United Nations General Assembly resolution. ... Water (from the Old English word wæter; c. ... The President of Nigeria is both head of government and head of state of Nigeria. ... Obasanjo met with U.S. President Bush in France on June 1, 2003. ... Lufthansa (Deutsche Lufthansa AG) is the largest German airline company, headquartered in Cologne. ... Alessandra Mussolini (born December 30, 1962) is an Italian (former?) actress, has a degree in Medicine and Surgery (1992), [1], and is currently a right wing politician. ... The essential function of a bank is to provide services related to the storing of deposits and the extending of credit. ... Diclofenac (marketed as Voltaren®, Voltarol® and Cataflam®) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) taken to reduce inflammation, such as in arthritis or acute injury. ... In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of taxons. ... A Nubian Vulture Vultures are scavenging birds, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals. ... Established in the Constitution of 1993, the President of the Republic is the Chief of the State and represents the republic in official international matters. ... Alberto Kenya Fujimori (アルベルト・ケンヤ・フジモリ Aruberuto Kenya Fujimori, born July 28, 1938), also known as Kenya Fujimori (藤森 謙也 Fujimori Kenya), was President of Peru from July 28, 1990 to November 17, 2000. ... Fuji-Cola is a soft drink created to promote Alberto Fujimori, a former President of Peru. ... The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ...

March 21, 2005

March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Althing (Modern Icelandic Alþingi; Old Norse Alþing) is the national parliament: literally, the all-thing (or General Assembly) of Iceland. ... This article is about someone fleeing from legal custody. ... ... Many countries claim to have invented the chess game in some incipient form. ... Bobby Fischer. ... Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city but now usually a state), and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen. ... Maale Adummim (מעלה אדומים; unofficially also spelled Maale Adumim) is an Israeli settlement in the West Bank east of Jerusalem, considered by some as a suburb of Jerusalem. ... An Israeli settlement refers to a housing development for Israeli Jewish settlers in areas which came under the control of Israel as a result of the 1967 Six-Day War beyond the boundaries defined by the 1949 Armistice Agreements. ... Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... The Palestinians are a mainly Arabic-speaking people with family origins in Palestine. ... Saeb Erakat (Sa’ib Muhammad Salih ‘Urayqat; born 1955) was the chief of the PLO Steering and Monitoring Committee, from which he negotiated with Israel regarding the Oslo Accords from 1995 until his resignation in protest from the Palestinian government, in May 2003. ... Aerial photograph taken during the aftermath of the school massacre. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... A school massacre is an incident of attempted mass murder, involving at least one actual death, that occurs at a school. ... Jeff Weise around 9 years of age Jeffrey Weise (August 8, 1988 – March 21, 2005) was a high school student of Red Lake, Minnesota responsible for the Red Lake High School massacre, a school shooting in which he killed nine people and injured more than a dozen others before committing... Red Lake High School is a public state-funded high school in Red Lake, in Beltrami County, northern Minnesota, USA. The high school is located on the Red Lake Indian Reservation on which members of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa (Ojibwe) Indians live, and has over 300 students [1... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty (R) Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... a tulip, the symbol of the revolution The Tulip Revolution refers to the overthrow of President Askar Akayev and his government in the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan after the parliamentary elections of February 27 and of March 13, 2005. ... Jalal-Abad (since 2003 also spelled Jalalabad) is the administrative centre of the Jalal-Abad Oblasty in southwestern Kyrgyzstan. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... The 2005 Kyrgyz parliamentary elections were held in February and March 2005. ... Narendra Damodardas Modi (born September 17, 1950, Gujarat, India) is the Chief Minister of the state of Gujarat in India since October 7, 2001. ... For an article on American Indians see Native Americans. ... Note: After losing a court case in 2002 on the use of the initials WWF, the organization previously known as the World Wrestling Federation has rebranded itself as World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. WWF - The Conservation Organization was formerly known as World Wildlife Fund and Worldwide Fund for Nature. ... Binomial name Lipotes vexillifer Miller, 1918 The Chinese River Dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer) is a freshwater dolphin found only in the Yangtze River in China. ... Pollution is the realest of harmful environmental contaminants, or the substances so released. ... Scrivener Dam, Canberra Australia, was engineered to withstand a once-in-5000-years flood event A dam is a barrier across flowing water that obstructs, directs or retards the flow, often creating a reservoir, lake or impoundment. ... A tornado over land. ... The Bangladesh Awami League (বাংলাদেশ আওয়ামী লীগ Bāŋlādeś Āowāmī Līg) or the Bangadesh Peoples League is the main opposition party in Bangladesh. ... Bangladesh Nationalist Party (বাংলাদেশ জাতীয়তাবাদী দল Bangladesh Jatiotabadi Dôl, BNP) is the most popular political party of Bangladesh. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Peacekeeping, as defined by the United Nations, is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ... President Sam Nujoma Samuel Daniel Shafiishuna Nujoma (born May 12, 1929) is the first President of Namibia. ... Hifikepunye Lucas Pohamba (born August 18, 1935) is a Namibian politician from the South-West Africa Peoples Organisation (SWAPO) ruling party who won the presidential election of November 15/16, 2004 with 76% of the vote, in what has been described as a landslide. [1] He was backed by... Palace of Culture and Science in Warsaw Warsaw (Polish: Warszawa, see also other names, in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto StoÅ‚eczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ... Chechen can mean: Chechen people, an ethnic group Chechen language Related to Chechnya This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Charles Taylor announces his resignation on Liberian TV, 2003 Charles Ghankay Taylor (born January 28, 1948) was the President of Liberia from 1997 to 2003. ... Juhan Parts (born 27 August 1966) is a former Prime Minister of Estonia, and Chairman of the Res Publica party. ... A Motion of No Confidence, also called Motion of Non Confidence is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... Ken-Marti Vaher (5 September 1974) is a leading member of the Estonian Res Publica party, and the former Estonian Minister of Justice. ...

March 20, 2005

March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Seal of the United States Secretary of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Condoleezza Condi Rice, (born November 14, 1954), is the second United States Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. ...   Beijing? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... The President of the Peoples Republic of China (Chinese: 中华人民共和国主席 pinyin: Zhōnghuá Rénmín Gònghéguó Zhǔxí) is the head of state of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Hú Jǐntāo (born December 21, 1942) became General Secretary of the Communist Party of China on November 15, 2002. ... The Premier ( Chinese: 总理 pinyin: zŏnglĭ), sometimes referred to as the Prime Minister, is the Chairman of the State Council of the Peoples Republic of China and head of Central Peoples Government. ... Wen Jiabao (Simplified Chinese: 温家宝; Traditional Chinese: 溫家寶; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Wen Chia-pao) (born September 1942) is the Premier of the State Council of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A nuclear missile is a type of: missile nuclear weapon It could also refer to a missile with some form of nuclear propulsion, such as the Project Pluto cruise missile. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... The 2005 Kyrgyz parliamentary elections were held in February and March 2005. ... Jalal-Abad (since 2003 also spelled Jalalabad) is the administrative centre of the Jalal-Abad Oblasty in southwestern Kyrgyzstan. ... Askar Akayev Askar Akayevich Akayev (Аскар Акаевич Акаев) (born November 10, 1944 in Kyzyl-Bairak, Kirghiz SSR) served as President of Kyrgyzstan from 1990 to March 2005, when he was deposed by a popular uprising dubbed the Tulip Revolution. ... The President of Kyrgyzstan is the head of state and the highest official of the Kyrgyz Republic. ... Look up Flood on Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more large horizontal rotors (propellers). ... Ilham Heydar oglu Aliyev (Azerbaijani: Ä°lham HeydÉ™r oÄŸlu Əliyev) (born December 24, 1961) is the president of Azerbaijan for the New Azerbaijan Party (since 2003). ... A pardon is the forgiveness of a crime and the penalty associated with it. ... Opposition may refer to a number of topics: astronomical opposition political opposition parliamentary opposition Opposition to a patent, see for instance Opposition procedure before the European Patent Office This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A political prisoner is anyone held in prison or otherwise detained, perhaps under house arrest, because their ideas or image either challenge or pose a real or potential threat to the state. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ... Look up Genocide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Most generally, Genocide is the deliberate destruction of a social identity. ... Identified Victims of Srebrenica Massacre The Srebrenica massacre was the July 1995 killing of a large number of Bosniak males, ranging in age from teenagers to the elderly, in the region of Srebrenica by a Serb Army of Republika Srpska under general Ratko Mladić including Serbian state special forces Scorpions... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

March 19, 2005

  • A 7.0 magnitude earthquake hits Japan's southernmost main island of Kyushu. Japan's Meteorological Agency emits warnings for tsunamis that could hit areas including the coast of Kyushu. (CNN)
  • One Briton killed and 12 people wounded by a car bomb in Doha, Qatar. (Al-Jazeera) (BBC)
  • Pakistan successfully test-fires a long-range nuclear-capable ballistic missile, Shaheen-II, the latest in a series of tests. Shaheen-II can travel upto 2,000 km and carry all kinds of warheads. (Pakistan Times) (Daily Times, Pakistan) (Times of India)
  • G20 group of the developing countries calls on rich nations to end their farming subsidies in five years (Reuters) (Business Week) (Bloomberg) (BBC)

March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... In science, magnitude refers to the numerical size of something: see orders of magnitude. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... Japan Meteorological Agency (気象庁) is a government agency, which is a central place responsible for gathering and reporting weather data and forecasts in Japan. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... ... Doha, Qatar Doha (Arabic: الدوحة;, Ad-Dawḥah) (population 370,000) is the capital of Qatar, located on the Persian Gulf. ... Polish missile wz. ... G20 has several possible meanings: G20 developing nations, a trade bloc of 20 countries. ... A developing country is a country with a low income average, a relatively backwards infrastructure and a poor human development index when compared to the global norm. ...

March 18, 2005

March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... There is a current controversy on the circumstances in which women may act as imams - that is, lead a congregation in salat (prayer. ... Dr. Amina Wadud at prayer service Professor Amina Wadud was the subject of much debate and Muslim juristic discourse after leading a Friday prayer congregation of over 100 men and women in the Episcopal cathedral of St. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... Virginia Commonwealth University VCU logo Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (also known as the disengagement plan, תוכנית ההינתקות) is a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to remove all permanent Israeli presence in the Gaza Strip and northern Samaria (part of what is known as The West Bank to the Palestinians, the UN, and... Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... The Knesset (כנסת, Hebrew for assembly) is the Parliament of Israel. ... Ephraim (Efi, Effie) Eitam (Fein) אפי איתם is an Israeli religious Zionist politician. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Reuven Rivlin (in Hebrew ראובן ריבלין) (born September 9, 1939) is an Israeli lawyer, politician and the current Speaker of the Knesset. ... National motto: 널리 인간을 이롭게 하라 Translation: Bring benefit to all people Official language Korean Capital Seoul Largest city Seoul President Roh Moo-hyun Prime Minister Lee Hae-chan Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 107th 99,274 km² 0. ... Seoul (서울,   listen?) is the capital of South Korea and is one of the most populous cities in the world, located in the northwestern part of the country on the Han River. ... The Liancourt Rocks are islets in the Sea of Japan (Korean name: East Sea), claimed by both Korea and Japan but administered by South Korea since 1953. ... The Raduga Kh-55 Granat (NATO reporting name AS-15 Kent) is a Soviet/CIS subsonic long-range cruise missile capable of delivering a nuclear warhead. ... A Tomahawk cruise missile A cruise missile is a guided missile which uses a lifting wing and most often a jet propulsion system to allow sustained flight. ... Frans Cornelis Adrianus van Anraat (born August 9, 1942 in Den Helder) is a Dutch businessman who is accused of selling raw materials for the production of chemical weapons to Iraq during the reign of Saddam Hussein. ... Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, sometimes spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was the President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture by United States-led coalition forces during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Dressing the wounded during a gas attack by Austin O. Spare, 1918. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Look up Genocide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Most generally, Genocide is the deliberate destruction of a social identity. ... An entry visa valid in all Schengen treaty countries Visas for Laos, Thailand, and Sri Lanka A visa (short for the Latin carta visa, lit. ... Narendra Damodardas Modi (born September 17, 1950, Gujarat, India) is the Chief Minister of the state of Gujarat in India since October 7, 2001. ... Gujarat (ગુજરાત in Gujarati) is the most industrialized state in India after Maharashtra and is located in western India, bordered by Pakistan to the northwest and Rajasthan to the north. ... Harold Keke (born 1971??) is a Solomon Islands warlord. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Shuimu Tsinghua (Simplified Chinese: 水木清华; Pinyin: ; abbreviated SMTH) BBS is the first and most prestigious bulletin board system among Chinese universities. ... A newsgroup is a repository, usually within the Usenet system, for messages posted from many users at different locations. ... A bulletin board system or BBS is a computer system running software that allows users to dial into the system over a phone line and, using a terminal program, perform functions such as downloading software and data, uploading data, playing games, reading news, and exchanging messages with other users. ... In the technical terminology of political science the PRC was a communist state for much of the 20th century, and is still considered a communist state by many, though not all, political scientists. ... A private is a military soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grade OR-1). ... Johnson Beharry in front of a mural of the Victoria Cross Private Johnson Gideon Beharry, VC (born 26 July 1979, in Grenada), of the 1st Battalion, Princess of Waless Royal Regiment is a British soldier who, in March 2005, was awarded the Victoria Cross, the highest military decoration for... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Victoria Cross The Victoria Cross (official post-nominal letters VC) is the highest award for valour that can be awarded to members of the British and Commonwealth armed forces of any rank in any service and civilians under military command. ...

March 17, 2005

March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. ... One of the early particle accelerators responsible for development of the atomic bomb. ... Upton, New York is part of the Long Island town of Brookhaven. ... A physicist is a scientist trained in physics. ... Horaţiu Năstase is an Romanian Asst. ... A black hole is a concentration of mass great enough that the force of gravity prevents anything from escaping from it except through quantum tunneling behavior. ... Uyghurs (also called Uighurs, Uygurs, or Uigurs) (Chinese: 維吾爾 or 维吾尔 in pinyin: wéiwúěr) are a Turkic ethnic group of people living in northwestern China (mainly in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, where they are the dominant ethnic group together with Han people), Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan. ... Rebiya Kadeer (Uyghur: رابىيه قادىر; Simplified Chinese: 热比娅·卡德尔; Traditional Chinese: 熱比婭·卡德爾; pinyin: ) (1947 - ) is a prominent Uyghur businesswoman and political activist from the northwest region of Xinjiang. ... Medical parole is a form of parole which involves the release of a prisoner on the grounds that he is too ill to continue serving his prison sentence. ... Rob Portman speaks on March 17, 2005 at the White House ceremony at which President George W. Bush nominated him to be the next U.S. Trade Representative. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... The Office of the United States Trade Representative, or USTR, is an arm of the executive branch of the United States government. ... Robert B. Zoellick Robert Bruce Zoellick (born July 25, 1953) is the current United States Deputy Secretary of State. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Reuters Group plc (pronounced IPA: ) is a company supplying global financial markets and news media with a range of information products and transactional solutions, including real-time and historical market data, research and analytics, financial trading platforms, investment data and analytics plus news in text, video, graphics and photographs. ... Transparency International (TI) is an international organisation devoted to fighting corruption, including, but not limited to, political corruption. ... A non-governmental organization (NGO) is an organization that is not part of a government and was not founded by states. ... Geneva (French: Genève) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland located where Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman, but the Genevois are fond of calling it Lac de Genève) empties into the Rhône River. ... Water (from the Old English word wæter; c. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or, especially in India, disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership and/or transferring the management of a service or activity from the government to the private sector. ... TheBus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ... Jiangxi (Chinese: 江西; pinyin: Jiāngxī; Wade-Giles: Chiang-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Kiangsi) is a southern province of the Peoples Republic of China, spanning from the banks of the Chang Jiang (Yangtze) in the north into hillier areas in the south. ... Evo Morales Juan Evo Morales Ayma (born October 26, 1959) is the left-wing leader of the Bolivian cocalero movement, a loose federation of coca leaf-growing campesinos who are resisting the efforts of the Bolivian government to eradicate coca in the province of Chapare in southeastern Bolivia. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... A tax is a compulsory charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (SMBC, Mitsui Sumitomo Ginko) is a Japanese bank based in Tokyo, Japan. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... Dictator was the title of a magistrate in ancient Rome appointed by the Senate to rule the state in times of emergency. ... Francisco Franco Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde Salgado Pardo de Andrade (December 4, 1892 – November 20, 1975), abbreviated Francisco Franco Bahamonde and sometimes known as Generalísimo Francisco Franco, was President of the Government of Spain from 1939 until his death in 1975. ... Location within Italy Piazza della Scala Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed Italian region. ... La Scala The Teatro alla Scala (or La Scala for short), in Milan, Italy, is one of the worlds most famous opera houses. ... The foyer of Charles Garniers Opéra, Paris, opened 1875 Opera is an art form consisting of a dramatic stage performance set to music. ... A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... Riccardo Muti (born July 28, 1941) is an Italian conductor best known for being the music director of Milans La Scala opera house, a position he has held since 1986. ... Anatoly Chubais Anatoly Borisovich Chubais (Russian: Анато́лий Бори́сович Чуба́йс) was born on June 16, 1955 in the town of Barysau, Belarus. ... The Unified Energy System (UES) is Russias state electric power monopoly. ... An ambush is a long established military tactic in which an ambushing force uses concealment to attack an enemy that passes its position. ... Bhumibol Adulyadej, King Rama IX of Thailand His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej the Great (ภูมิพลอดุลยเดช, actually pronounced Phumiphon Adunyadet), King Rama IX of Thailand, born December 5, 1927, has been King of Thailand since 1946. ... Rain falling For other uses see Rain (disambiguation). ... A drought is an extended period where water availability falls below the statistical requirements for a region. ... Cloud seeding is the attempt to change the amount or type of precipitation that falls out of clouds or the structure of clouds by using certain chemicals dispersed by various means. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... The NCA is a Non-governmental organisation formed in 1997 as a grouping of individual Zimbabwean citizens and civic organisations including, labour movements, student and youth groups, women groups, churches, business groups and human rights organisations. ...

March 16, 2005

  • Israel formally hands Jericho to Palestinian Authority control, which is likely to strengthen Mahmoud Abbas. The PA will resume security control over the city and will have to make sure that wanted militants will remain in check. (Yahoo!)(BBC)
  • Anti-fascist protesters in the center of Riga, Latvia, end up in custody after trying to stop the annual march of Waffen-SS veterans and young radical nationalists. (BBC)
  • Russia announces that it will pay $10 m to the people who betrayed Chechen separatist leader Aslan Maskhadov, who was killed by Russian special forces. (The Guardian)
  • President of Bolivia Carlos Mesa has asked the country's congress to approve early elections in August to replace him to "prevent bloodbath". There are still widespread opposition protests against his economic policies. (Reuters) (Bloomberg) (BBC)
  • President of El Salvador, Tony Saca, criticises new inquiries of The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights into El Mozote massacre in 1981. (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • The United States Senate accuses seven US banks of complicity of allowing Augusto Pinochet to set up 100 bank accounts to hide money total to US$15 million. (Reuters) (CNN) (BBC)
  • Amnesty International states that fair elections are "impossible" in Zimbabwe. (Amnesty International) (Reuters AlertNet) (News24)
  • In the Supreme Court of British Columbia today, Ripudaman Singh Malik and Ajaib Singh Bagri were found not guilty in their trial for the bombing of Air India Flight 182. (The Globe and Mail) (Reuters) (Bloomberg)
  • European Union postpones negotiations for Croatia's possible membership. Delegates state that Zagreb has not cooperated with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in trying to arrest suspected war criminal Ante Golovina. (EUObserver) (Bloomberg) (Reuters) (World Peace Herald)
  • A plane crash in Russia kills 28, some of them employees of Lukoil oil company. (Mosnews) (RIA Novosti) (Bloomberg)
  • Zambian government files corruption charges against ex-president Frederick Chiluba in a British High Court. He is accused of defrauding the state of the equivalent of US$35 million. (Reuters SA) (BBC)
  • United Nations withdraws its foreign personnel from west of Darfur after threats from pro-government militias. (AllAfrica) (Reuters) (BBC)
  • Iran publicly executes serial killer Mohammad Bijeh, nicknamed the "Tehran Desert Vampire". (IranMania) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Japan, Hitachi unveils two examples of its wheeled robot Emiew. (Reuters) (Slashdot)
  • In China, smth, the biggest BBS in chinese campus, announced that IP outside the Tsinghua University would be blocked off.

(yahoo) March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Jericho (Arabic أريحا; ʼArīḥā; Hebrew יְרִיחוֹ; Standard Hebrew YÉ™riḥo; Tiberian Hebrew YÉ™rîḫô, YÉ™rîḥô) is a town in the West Bank, near the west bank of the Jordan River. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Riga (RÄ«ga in Latvian), the capital of Latvia, is situated on the Baltic Sea coast on the mouth of River Daugava, at 56°58′ N 24°8′ E. Riga is the largest city in the Baltic states and serves as a major cultural, educational, political, financial, commercial and industrial... Waffen-SS recruitment poster; Volunteer to the Waffen-SS The Waffen-SS was the armed wing of the Schutzstaffel. ... The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below), including the US dollar, the worlds most widely circulated currency (see list below). ... The Chechen Republic (Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn [Nokhchiyn] Respublika, Russian: Чеченская Республика), informal Chechnya (Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö/Nokhchiyno, Russian: Чечня), Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... Aslan Aliyevich Maskhadov (Russian: Аслан Алиевич Масхадов) (September 21, 1951 – March 8, 2005) was a leader of the separatist movement in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... Elías Antonio (Tony) Saca González (born 9 March 1965) is a Salvadoran politician. ... The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (the IACHR or, in Spanish, CIDH) is one of the two bodies that comprise the inter-American system for the promotion and protection of human rights. ... The El Mozote Massacre took place in the village of El Mozote, in Morazán department, El Salvador, on December 11, 1981, when Salvadoran armed forces slaughtered an estimated 900 civilians in an anti-guerrilla campaign. ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The essential function of a bank is to provide services related to the storing of deposits and the extending of credit. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization with the stated purpose of promoting all the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international standards. ... The Court system of Canada is made up of many courts differing in levels of legal superiority and separated by jurisdiction. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Splendour without diminishment) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Area 944,735 km² (5th) Land 925,186 km² Water 19,549 km² (2. ... In criminal law, an acquittal is the legal result of a verdict of not guilty, or some similar end of the proceeding that terminates it with prejudice without a verdict of guilty being entered against the accused. ... Air India Flight 182 was a flight that flew on a Montreal-Mirabel International Airport, Montreal, Quebec - London Heathrow Airport, London - Indira Gandhi International Airport, Delhi - Sahar International Airport (now Chatrapati Shivaji International Airport), Bombay (now Mumbai) route. ... Air India (Hindi: एअर इंडिया) is the national flag carrier airline of India with a network of passenger and cargo services worldwide. ... Air India Flight 182 was a Boeing 747 that exploded on June 23, 1985 while at an altitude of 31,000 feet (9500 m) above the Atlantic Ocean, south of Ireland; all 329 on board were killed, of whom 82 were children and 280 were Canadian citizens. ... Zagreb (pronounced ZAH-greb) is the capital city of Croatia. ... The International Criminal Tribunal for Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, more commonly referred to as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, acronym ICTY, is a body of the United Nations (UN) established... Citing the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, an aviation accident is defined as an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and all such persons have disembarked, and in which any person... Russias second largest oil company, LUKOIL (ЛУКОЙЛ) is the largest producer of oil in Russia. ... Frederick Jacob Titus Chiluba (born April 30, 1943) was the second President of Zambia (1991 - 2002). ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Hitachi (Japanese: 日立製作所) NYSE: HIT is a global company headquartered in Tokyo, Japan. ... A humanoid robot playing the trumpet In practical usage, a robot is a mechanical device which performs automated physical tasks, either according to direct human supervision, a pre-defined program, or a set of general guidelines using artificial intelligence techniques. ... Tsinghua University Tsinghua University or Qinghua University (Simplified Chinese: 清华大学; Traditional Chinese: 清華大學; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ching-hua Ta-hsüeh) is one of the most prestigious universities in China. ...


March 15, 2005

  • U.S. Representative Henry Waxman sends a scathing letter to President George W. Bush, accusing the administration of having withheld until after the election a damaging audit regarding overcharges by Halliburton for services in Iraq (such as charging $27,000,000 for transporting $82,000 worth of fuel from Kuwait to Iraq). (Guardian) (Philadelphia Daily News)
  • OPEC announces that it's unable to control oil prices. (MSNBC)
  • The dedication of the new Yad Vashem Holocaust museum in Jerusalem, Israel: leaders from 40 states and the General Secretary of the UN Kofi Annan attend inauguration of Holocaust museum. President of Israel Moshe Katzav said that the new museum serves as "an important signpost to all of humankind, a signpost that warns how short the distance is between hatred and murder, between racism and genocide." (Haaretz)
  • In the Philippines, police storm the Camp Bagong Diwa prison. 26 die during the fighting, three of them Abu Sayyaf members. Six police officers are wounded. (Reuters) (Bloomberg) (Sun Star, Manila) (BBC)
  • Japanese immigration officials state that they are going to deport Bobby Fischer back to USA, instead of allowing him to move to Iceland. (Mainich Daily News) (MSNBC)
  • In Kosovo, an explosion hits the motorcade of president Ibrahim Rugova in the capital Pristina. (Reuters) (CNN) (BBC)
  • The International Criminal Court will hear its first case, the allegations of war crimes during a civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo. (Daily Times) (BBC)
  • The government of Italy announces that it will begin to withdraw its troops from Iraq in several months. (BBC)
  • In Niger, thousands of protesters demonstrate violently outside parliament against rising prices and high tax increases. Some of them call for resignation of the president Mamadou Tandja (AllAfrica) (Reuters SA) (BBC)
  • In Zimbabwe, new electoral court rules that jailed opposition politician Roy Bennett, member of the Movement for Democratic Change, can take part of parliamentary elections on March 31. (AllAfrica) (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Paris, France, French-Algerian Djamel Beghal is sentenced to 10 years in jail for plotting to bomb US embassy in 2001. Five others received shorter sentences. (Reuters) (IHT) (BBC)
  • In Lebanon, United Nations team that investigates murder of Rafik Hariri, completes its mission. They will present their findings to secretary general Kofi Annan in New York (Reuters AlertNet) (BBC)
  • In Italy, cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, Roman catholic archbishop of Genoa, speaks against what he describes as "lies" in the popular book "The Da Vinci Code"; the book effectively claims that, among other things, the church suppresses information about Jesus' marriage with Mary Magdalene (Catholic News Service) (Catholic World News) (Reuters) (BBC)

March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (75th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Henry Waxman Henry Arnold Waxman (born September 12, 1939) is an American politician. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Halliburton Energy Services (NYSE: HAL) is a multinational corporation based in Houston, Texas. ... Logo The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is made up of Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela; since 1965, its international headquarters have been in Vienna, Austria. ... Nodding donkey pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 Petroleum (from Latin petra – rock and oleum – oil), crude oil, sometimes colloquially called black gold, is a thick, dark brown or greenish liquid. ... Yad Vashem memorial sculpture Yad Vashem (יד ושם) is Israels official memorial to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust established in 1953 through the Memorial Law passed by the Knesset, Israels parliament. ... Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... The term General Secretary (alternatively First Secretary) denotes a leader of various unions, parties or associations. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ... President of the State of Israel is the head of state of Israel, but has a largely ceremonial, figurehead role with real power lying in the hands of the Prime Minister of Israel. ... Moshe Katsav (Courtesy: Israeli Knesset) Moshe Katsav (משה קצב mosheh qaṣṣāḇ, born December 5, 1945) is the current President of Israel (since 2000). ... The Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG), or simply Abu Sayyaf, also known as Al Harakat Al Islamiyya, is a separatist group of islamist terrorists based in and around the southern islands of the Philippines, primarily Jolo, Basilan, and Mindanao. ... Deportation is the expelling of someone from a country. ... Bobby Fischer. ... Kosovo (Albanian: Kosovë / Kosova, Serbian: Косово и Метохија / Kosovo i Metohija), in English most often called just Kosovo, is a province of Serbia. ... Ibrahim Rugova Ibrahim Rugova (b. ... Prishtinë/Prishtina (Albanian indefinite/definite form) or Priština (Приштина) (Serbian) is the capital city of Kosovo, a landlocked province of Serbia located at 42°65′ N 21°17′ E. It is estimated that the current population of Prishtina is as high as 500,000. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... A tax is a compulsory charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... Tandja Mamadou (born 1938) is a Niger politician and current President. ... Roy Bennett, Zimbabwean farmer and politician Roy Bennett MP is a member of the Zimbabwean National Parliament for the seat of Chimanimani and as a member of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC). ... The Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) was founded in 1999 as the official opposition party to the Zanu-PF party led by Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Djamel Beghal (also transliterated as Jamel Beghal and Djamel Begal) is a French Algerian and alleged Al-Qaida member. ... ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri Rafik Bahaa Edine Hariri (1 November 1944 – 14 February 2005), was a Muslim Lebanese self-made billionaire and business tycoon, and was twice Prime Minister of Lebanon from 1992 to 1998 and again from 2000 to 2004. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone is the Archbishop of Genoa and was considered papabile following the death of Pope John Paul II. His Eminence Tarcisio Cardinal Bertone (born 2 December 1934) is Archbishop of Genoa and a Cardinal Priest in the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... Location within Italy Flag of Genoa Christopher Columbus monument in Piazza Aquaverde Genoa (Italian Genova, Genoese Zena, French Gênes) is a city and a seaport in northern Italy, the capital of the Province of Genoa and of the region of Liguria. ... The Da Vinci Code book cover The Da Vinci Code is a novel written by American author Dan Brown and published in 2003 by Doubleday Fiction (ISBN 0385504209). ... // Jesus, or Jesus of Nazareth, also known as Jesus Christ, is Christianitys central figure, both as Messiah and, for most Christians, as God incarnate. ... Mary Magdalene is described, both in the canonical New Testament and in the New Testament apocrypha, as a devoted disciple of Jesus. ...

March 14, 2005

  • Massive protests take place in Beirut, Lebanon, against the Syrian presence there. With an estimated turnout of 800,000 to 1 million, it is the largest public demonstration on the issue yet. (ABC News)
  • Cyclone Ingrid is moving away from Darwin, Northern Territory and towards the Kimberley region of Western Australia as a Category 4 storm. (AustBC News), (Aust BOM)
  • The Anti-Secession Law of the People's Republic of China, a law aimed at resolving the issue of Taiwan, is passed and enters into force. (BBC News)
  • According to World Wildlife Fund, melting glaciers in the Himalayas could lead first to floods in China, India and Nepal and then long droughts. (Bloomberg) (Xinhua) (BBC)
  • In Italy, Alessandra Mussolini, granddaughter of Il Duce Benito Mussolini, is banned from regional elections for presenting fraudulent signatures. She threatens to go on a hunger strike. (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In the Philippines, inmates of a Camp Bagong Diwa maximum security prison in Manila took hostages during an attempted jailbreak and demand to talk with authorities. At least four guards and one prisoner have been killed. Prisoners claim to hold 100 hostages; police dispute this number. According the police, the attempt was led by imprisoned members of Abu Sayyaf. (Sun Star, Manila) (Reuters)
  • Bangladesh bans smoking in public places. (Reuters)
  • San Francisco Superior Court Judge Richard Kramer says that limiting marriage to between man and woman is unconstitutional (San Francisco Chronicle) (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In India, muslim charity Sunni Waqf Board claims ownership of the Taj Mahal. They have issues notice to Archeological Survey of India to show opposing evidence (Express Newsline) (New Kerala) (BBC) (Hindustan Times)
  • 500 protesters are arrested in Nepal (BBC)
  • In Macedonia Ljube Boskowski, former interior minister, is indicted for war crimes for an alleged role in clashes between ethnic albanians and security forces in 2001 (Reuters) (RFE) (BBC)
  • According to International Maritime Bureau, 35 pirates stormed gas tanker MT Tri Samudra in Malacca Strait last saturday and captured its captain and chief engineer for ransom. The ship has been released. In another attack, pirates capture three members of a japanese tugboat (Today Online) (Channel News Asia) (ABC) (BBC)
  • In Zambia, former president Frederick Chiluba protests when government anti-corruption investigators seize hundred of pieces of clothing from the warehouse he used to store them. Police suspect that the clothes were bought using government funds (AllAfrica) (BBC)
  • The United States government announces the arrests of 103 members of the violent street gang MS-13. (AP)

March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut (Arabic: , transliterated BayrÅ«t - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... Tropical Cyclone Ingrid as of March 8, 2005 Cyclone Ingrid is a tropical cyclone which developed in the Coral Sea on March 3, 2005. ... Darwin is the capital city of the Northern Territory, and is a city of 109,419 people (2001 Australian Census), on Australias far north-western coastline. ... Motto: None Nickname: ? Other Australian states and territories Capital Darwin Government Administrator Chief Minister Const. ... The Kimberley is one of the nine regions of Western Australia, consisting of the local government areas of Broome, Derby-West Kimberley, Halls Creek and Wyndham-East Kimberley. ... Category 4 redirect here. ... The Anti-Secession Law (Chinese: 反分裂国家法; pinyin: ; literally Against-Splitting-the-State Law) is a law passed by the third conference of the 10th National Peoples Congress of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Taiwan Strait Area The political status of Taiwan is a controversy over whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of Taiwan. ... Note: After losing a court case in 2002 on the use of the initials WWF, the organization previously known as the World Wrestling Federation has rebranded itself as World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. WWF - The Conservation Organization was formerly known as World Wildlife Fund and Worldwide Fund for Nature. ... Mouth of the glacier Schlatenkees near Innergschlöß, Austria. ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... Look up Flood on Wiktionary, the free dictionary A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... A drought is an extended period where water availability falls below the statistical requirements for a region. ... Alessandra Mussolini (born December 30, 1962) is an Italian (former?) actress, has a degree in Medicine and Surgery (1992), [1], and is currently a right wing politician. ... Duce is an Italian word meaning leader (derived from Latin dux of the same meaning). ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... A hunger strike is a method of non-violent resistance in which participants fast as an act of political protest or to achieve a goal such as a policy change. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES City of Manila Region: National Capital Region Province: — Dates: Founded—June 24, 1571 Cityhood—June 10, 1574 Population: 2000 census—1,581,082 Density—41,014 per km² Area: 38. ... A hostage is an entity which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act or refrain from acting in a particular way. ... The Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG), or simply Abu Sayyaf, also known as Al Harakat Al Islamiyya, is a separatist group of islamist terrorists based in and around the southern islands of the Philippines, primarily Jolo, Basilan, and Mindanao. ... For information about smoking tobacco, see tobacco smoking. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Honorable Richard A. Kramer was born in Brookline, Massachusetts on July 22, 1947 and graduated from the University of Southern California Law School in 1972 as a Doctor of Jurisprudence, following a Bachelor of Arts, magna cum laude degree in political science in 1969. ... Marriage is a relationship and bond between individuals (termed spouses -- a male spouse is a husband and a female spouse, a wife) that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... Constitutionality is the status of a law, procedure, or act being in accordance with the laws or guidelines contained in a constitution. ... The Taj Mahal. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The International Maritime Bureau is a specialised bureau of the International Chamber of Commerce. ... A pirate digging for treasure. ... The Straits of Malacca is a narrow stretch of water between Peninsular Malaysia (West Malaysia) and the Indonesian island of Sumatra. ... The term ransom refers to the practice of holding a prisoner to extort money or property extorted to secure their release, or to the sum of money involved. ... Frederick Jacob Titus Chiluba (born April 30, 1943) was the second President of Zambia (1991 - 2002). ... The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ... A gang is a group of individuals who share a common identity and, in current usage, engage in illegal activities. ... Mara Salvatrucha, MS-13, MS, In the early 1980s, a violent civil war began in El Salvador which would last more than 12 years. ...

March 13, 2005

March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... White Whale is the codename given by Interpol and EUROPOL for the international money laundering operation near Costa del Sol, Spain. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Catholic Church for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his death, making his the third-longest reign in the history of the Papacy according to the... The Gemelli Hospital, named after Agostino Gemelli, is a university hospital in Rome, Italy. ... Completed tracheotomy: 1 - Vocal cords 2 - Thyroid cartilage 3 - Cricoid cartilage 4 - Tracheal cartileges 5 - Balloon cuff A tracheotomy or tracheostomy is a surgical procedure performed on the neck to open a direct airway through an incision in the trachea (the windpipe). ... The Malta Labour Party (MLP, Maltese: Partit Laburista) is a Maltese political party. ... The Nationalist Party or Partit Nazzjonalista (PN) is a Maltese political party. ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon was created by singer/songwriter Paul Jabara AIDS is an acronym for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and is defined as a collection of symptoms and infections... A bottle and a syringe containing the influenza vaccine. ... Jean-Pierre Raffarin Jean-Pierre Raffarin   listen? (born August 3, 1948) is a French conservative politician. ... Gnassingbé Eyadéma - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Lomé, estimated population 700,000 (1998), is the capital of Togo. ... (City of Dakar, divided into 19 communes darrondissement) City proper (commune) Région Dakar Département Dakar Mayor Pape Diop (PDS) (since 2002) Area 82. ... Red blood cell infected with Malaria (Italian: bad air; formerly called ague or marsh fever in English) is an infectious disease which in humans causes about 350-500 million infections and approximately 1. ... A Mosquito net is a fine, see through mesh that stops many insects from disturbing the person using the net. ... Picture of artist (PHOTO BY GALILEA NIN) Youssou Ndour (born October 11, 1959) is a singer who was born in Dakar, Senegal. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... A fatwa (Arabic: ) plural fatāwa (فتاوى), is a legal pronouncement in Islam, issued by a religious law specialist on a specific issue. ... Heroin or diacetylmorphine (INN) is an alkaloid opioid. ...   Islam? (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... Baluchistan (or Balochistan), also known as Greater Baluchistan is an arid region of south Asia, presently split between Iran, Pakistan and Afghanistan. ... Fatih Sultan Mehmed Bridge over the Bosporus seen from over Rumelihisarı This article is about the strait; Bosphorus is also a Turkish Boğaziçi or İstanbul Boğazı) is a strait that separates the European part (Rumeli) of Turkey from its Asian part (Anadolu), connecting the Sea of Marmara (Marmara Denizi) with... Nodding donkey pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 Petroleum (from Latin petra – rock and oleum – oil), crude oil, sometimes colloquially called black gold, is a thick, dark brown or greenish liquid. ...

March 12, 2005

March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The President of the Peoples Republic of China (Chinese: 中华人民共和国主席 pinyin: Zhōnghuá Rénmín Gònghéguó Zhǔxí) is the head of state of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Hú Jǐntāo (born December 21, 1942) became General Secretary of the Communist Party of China on November 15, 2002. ... The Central Military Commission (Chinese: 中央军事委员会 pinyin: Zhōngyāng JÅ«nshì WÄ›iyuánhuì ) refers to one of two bodies within the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest legislative body in the Peoples Republic of China. ... The State Council (国务院, pinyin: Guówùyuàn) of the Central Peoples Government is the chief civilian administrative body of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A resignation occurs when a person holding a position gained by election or appointment steps down. ... The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Chinese: 香港特別行政區行政長官 pinyin (forMandarin Chinese pronounciation): XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng Zhangguān) is the head of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China, and represents the Region. ... Tung Chee-hwa (Traditional Chinese: 董建華 Simplified Chinese: 董建华 Pinyin: Dǒng Jiànhuá) (born July 7, 1937, or the 29th day of the fifth month in the Chinese calendar) is the first Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... The Chinese Peoples Political Consultative Conference (中国人民政治协商会议 Pinyin: Zhongguo renmin zhengzhi xieshang huiyi), abbreviated CPPCC, is an advisory body in the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Malta Labour Party (MLP, Maltese: Partit Laburista) is a Maltese political party. ...

March 11, 2005

11 March is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Mourning is in the simplest sense synonymous with grief over the death of a friend or relative. ... The 11 March 2004 Madrid attacks (also known as 11/3, 3/11, M-11 and 11-M) were a series of coordinated terrorist bombings against the commuter train system of Madrid, Spain on the morning of 11 March 2004, which killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,800. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with King Don Juan Carlos de Borbón y Borbón. ... Her Majesty Queen Sofía (Sofía de Borbón, Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg), is the queen consort of King Juan Carlos I of Spain. ... Forest of the Departed - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... For the Italian political alliance see Olive Tree, and the color, olive (color). ... Cypress is the name applied to many plants in the conifer family Cupressaceae (cypress family). ... ... Map of Iraq highlighting Abu Ghraib The city of Abu Ghraib (أبو غريب in Arabic) in Iraq is located 20 km (12 miles) west of Baghdad just north of the Baghdad International Airport. ... Samuel Schmid (born January 8, 1947), is the President of Switzerland for the year 2005. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... The Oxford English Dictionary defines terrorism as a policy intended to strike with terror those against whom it is adopted; the employment of methods of intimidation; the fact of terrorizing or condition of being terrorized. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Many countries claim to have invented the chess game in some incipient form. ... Garry Kasparov Garry Kimovich Kasparov (, pronounced with stress falling on the second syllable: kas-PA-rov) (born April 13, 1963) is a chess grandmaster and one of the strongest chess players in history. ... Retirement is the status of a worker who has stopped working. ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (Dutch: Brussel, French: Bruxelles, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium and is considered by many to be the headquarters of the European Union, as two of its four main institutions have their headquarters in the... Monarchism is the advocacy of the establishment, preservation, or restoration of a monarchy. ... An airliner is a large fixed-wing aircraft (an aeroplane/airplane) initially designed for the transport of paying passengers, and usually operated by an airline company (which owns or leases the aircraft). ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Islamism refers to a set of political ideologies derived from conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism, which hold that Islam is not only a religion, but also a political system that governs the legal, economic and social imperatives of the state. ... The Malta Labour Party (MLP, Maltese: Partit Laburista) is a Maltese political party. ... The Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 is a British Act of Parliament intended to deal with the Law Lords ruling of 16 December 2004, that the detention without trial of nine foreigners at HM Prison Belmarsh under Part IV of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 was unlawful... The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, or the Sovereigns representative in Commonwealth Realms, completes the process of the enactment of legislation by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ...

March 10, 2005

March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Paul Schäfer Paul Schäfer Schneider (born December 4, 1921) is the founder and former leader of a sect and agricultural commune of German immigrants called Colonia Dignidad (Dignity Colony)—later renamed Villa Baviera—located in central Chile, about 340 km south of Santiago. ... Colonia Dignidad (Dignity Colony, now known as Villa Baviera, Bavaria Village), is a settlement located in an isolated area in the Maule Region of southern Chile, near the village of Parral. ... // Sexual abuse in general Sexual abuse is a form of abuse that is made by means of the sexual behavior between an victim(s) and offender(s). ... Vienna can refer to: Geography Vienna - the capital and a federal state of Austria The River Vienna- a small river meeting the Danube at Vienna. ... The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ... Death Row is a term used in some countries including the United States of America which refers to that section of prisons which house persons awaiting execution. ... Gacaca courts are a new form of community justice that have been used in Rwanda in the wake of the Rwandan Genocide. ... The skulls of victims show gashes and signs of violence The Rwandan genocide was the slaughter of roughly one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus during a timespan of 100 days in 1994. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... This article is about the political process. ... Categories: Stub | Djibouti ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... MosÅ«l (36°22′ N 43°07′ E Arabic: al-Mawsil), Kurdish: Mûsil, or Nineveh (Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ, Ninewa) is a city in northern Iraq/Central Assyria. ... ... Agent Orange is the code name for a powerful herbicide and defoliant used by the U.S. military in its Herbicidal Warfare program during the Vietnam War. ... The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the National Liberation Front (NLF, or Viet Cong) against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and their allies—notably the United States military in support of... This page lists presidents of Lebanon. ... Categories: People stubs | 1936 births | Lebanese politicians ... Omar Karami Omar Abdul Hamid Karami (last name also spelled Karamé) (born September 7, 1934) was the Prime Minister of Lebanon on two separate occasions. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... The emblem of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad shows a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip) superimposed on the images of the Dome of the Rock, two fists and two rifles. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... K-9 refers to a variety of entries, most related to dogs. ... *For other members of the canine family, see Canidae. ... The Caterpillar D9 is a large track-type tractor (commonly referred to as a bulldozer) with caterpillar tracks designed and manufactured by Caterpillar Inc. ... The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Chinese: 香港特別行政區行政長官 pinyin (forMandarin Chinese pronounciation): XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng Zhangguān) is the head of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China, and represents the Region. ... Tung Chee Hwa Tung Chee Hwa (Traditional Chinese: 董建華; Simplified Chinese: 董建华; Cantonese IPA: ; Jyutping: dung2 gin3 waa4; Mandarin Pinyin: DÇ’ng Jiànhuá) (born July 7, 1937, or the 29th day of the 5th month in the Chinese calendar in Shanghai, China) was the first elected Chief Executive (July 1, 1997... A resignation occurs when a person holding a position gained by election or appointment steps down. ... Shanxi (Chinese: 山西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shansi) is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... Flag Flying Half-Staff over the White House Half-mast, or half-staff, describes the act of flying a flag approximately halfway up a flagpole (though anywhere from one-third to two-thirds of the way up the flagpole is acceptable). ... Sculpture on the Discoveries Age and Portuguese Navigators in Lisbon, Portugal A memorial is an object served as a memory of something, usually a person (who has died) or an event. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Industry Integrity Progress City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada location. ... The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP or Mounties; French, Gendarmerie royale du Canada, GRC) is both the federal police force and the national police of Canada. ... The Rochfort Bridge massacre occurred on March 3, 2005 on the property of James Roszko in Rochfort Bridge, Alberta northwest of Edmonton. ... World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west...   Islam? (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, and the worlds second largest religion. ... A fatwa (Arabic: ) plural fatāwa (فتاوى), is a legal pronouncement in Islam, issued by a religious law specialist on a specific issue. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Apostasy (Greek απο, apo, away, apart, στασις, stasis, standing) is the formal renunciation of ones religion. ... The Quran (Arabic: al-qurān literally the recitation; also called Al Qurān Al KarÄ«m or The Noble Quran; or transliterated Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Look up terrorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Istihlal (Arabic: ) is a term used in Islamic jurisprudence, or fiqh, to refer to the act of regarding some action as permissible, or halaal; the implication is that such a regard is an erroneous and improper distortion of Islamic law. ...

March 9, 2005

  • Cyclone Ingrid diminishes to a category 3 storm, and is crossing the Cape York Peninsula in northern Queensland, Australia late on March 9, 2005 UTC. ABOM
  • In Australia, immigration minister Amanda Vanstone grants Cui Yu Hu permanent residency (News.com.au) (Australian) (BBC)
  • In Bolivia, Congress refuses to accept resignation of President Carlos Mesa and he withdraws it (Reuters) (BBC)
  • Akhmed Zakayev, envoy of the killed Chechen separatist leader Aslan Maskhadov, states that Maskhadov's death does not end resistance to Russian rule and that his successor would be chosen in a couple of days (Bloomberg) (BBC)
  • Colombia extradites captured FARC leader Omaira Rojas Cabrera, also known as Sonia, to USA to face drug trafficking charges (BBC)
  • Conflict in Iraq: Iraqi police discover the bullet-riddled and/or headless bodies of 41 people at two sites, one near the Syrian border, the other just south of Baghdad. (AP)
  • Israeli Defence Minister Shaul Mofaz and Palestinian head of the PNA Mahmoud Abbas have not agreed upon giving Jericho and Tulkarm to Palestinian security control, as early reports suggested, but talks continue. (Haaretz) (BBC)
  • In Israel, an official report has revealed that Israeli state bodies have been diverting funds from state projects to fund the establishment of illegal Israeli settlements in the West Bank. Former state prosecutor Talia Sasson has recommended that criminal investigations be launched. (BBC)
  • Ramush Haradinaj, the former prime minister of Kosovo, flies to International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague to answer for charges for his role as a former commander of Kosovo Liberation Army in 1998-1999. He goes there voluntarily. (OneWorld) /Reuters) (BBC)
  • In the Philippines, 29 children from San Jose Elementary School die from food poisoning after eating cassava balls. (Reuters)
  • Syria says its troops will leave Lebanon before parliamentary elections in May (BBC) (Reuters)
  • In Costa Rica, bank robbers take hostages in the western town of Santa Elena de Monteverde. Three robbers, five hostages and a security agent are killed during the siege. Last robber surrenders (Reuters AlertNet) (San Jose Mercury News) (BBC)
  • In South Africa, 5.3 Richter scale earthquake collapses Hartebeestfontein gold mine south of Johannesburg and traps 40 miners undersground. One miner is killed and 23 injured. Medics and volunteer miners rescue them in a 12-hour rescue operation (IOL) (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In Spain, Alfredo Galán, a serial killer who left playing cards on the bodies of some of his victims, is sentenced to jail for 142 years (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In Guinea, president Lansana Conté sacks three senior ministers, security minister Moussa Sampil, foreign affairs minister Mamadi Condé and mines minister Alpha Mady Soumah, to replace them with the members of his own Party of Unity and Progress. Journalists and students welcome sacking of Sampil because of his handling of an alleged assassination attempt against the president in January. (Reuters) (BBC)
  • World Health Organization issues a warning that cases of malaria have increased to 500 million- much more than they anticipated (Reuters) (Scientific American) (BBC)

March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Tropical Cyclone Ingrid as of March 8, 2005 Cyclone Ingrid is a tropical cyclone which developed in the Coral Sea on March 3, 2005. ... Category 4 redirect here. ... Cape York Peninsula, far north Queensland, Australia. ... Motto: Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Nickname: Sunshine State/Smart State Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Governor Premier Const. ... Hon Amanda Vanstone Amanda Eloise Vanstone (born 7th December 1952), Australian politician, has been a Liberal Party member of the Australian Senate since December 1984. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... Vanessa Redgrave and Akhmed Zakayev Akhmed Zakayev (Ахмед Закаев) is a Chechen envoy, former separatist guerrilla leader and the Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Aslan Maskhadov, appointed by President Maskhadov shortly after the 1997 election. ... Chechen can mean: Chechen people, an ethnic group Chechen language Related to Chechnya This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Aslan Aliyevich Maskhadov (Russian: Аслан Алиевич Масхадов) (September 21, 1951 – March 8, 2005) was a leader of the separatist movement in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya. ... Extradition is a formal process by which a criminal suspect held by one government is handed over to another government for trial or, if the suspect has already been tried and found guilty, to serve his or her sentence. ... The FARC-EPs flag The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) is a militant and revolutionary guerrilla group established in 1964-1966 as the military wing of the Colombian Communist Party, and is Colombias... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi Police are the organic civil police force of the Republic of Iraq. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Israeli Minister of Defense Shaul Mofaz Shaul Mofaz (b. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Jericho (Arabic أريحا; ʼArīḥā; Hebrew יְרִיחוֹ; Standard Hebrew YÉ™riḥo; Tiberian Hebrew YÉ™rîḫô, YÉ™rîḥô) is a town in the West Bank, near the west bank of the Jordan River. ... Tulkarm or Tulkarem (Arabic طولكرم Ṭūlkarm; Standard Hebrew טולכרם) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank. ... An Israeli settlement refers to a housing development for Israeli Jewish settlers in areas which came under the control of Israel as a result of the 1967 Six-Day War beyond the boundaries defined by the 1949 Armistice Agreements. ... Kosovo (Albanian: Kosovë / Kosova, Serbian: Косово и Метохија / Kosovo i Metohija), in English most often called just Kosovo, is a province of Serbia. ... The International Criminal Tribunal for Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, more commonly referred to as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, acronym ICTY, is a body of the United Nations (UN) established... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ... The KLA insignia The Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA or UÇK; Albanian: Ushtria Çlirimtare e Kosovës) was an Albanian terrorist group which operated in Kosovo during the late 1990s. ... Foodborne illness or food poisoning is caused by consuming food contaminated with pathogenic bacteria, toxins, viruses, prions or parasites. ... Binomial name Manihot esculenta Crantz The cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta; also yuca in Spanish, mandioca, aipim, or macaxeira in Portuguese, and mandio in Guaraní) is a woody perennial shrub of the spurge family, that is extensively cultivated as an annual crop for its edible starchy tuberous root. ... A hostage is an entity which is held by a captor in order to compel another party to act or refrain from acting in a particular way. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Atomic mass 196. ... City motto: Unity in Development Province Gauteng Mayor Amos Masondo Area  - % water 1,644 km² 0. ... The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually (but not always) from an ore body, vein, or (coal) seam. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Some typical modern playing cards. ... Lansana Conté Lansana Conté (born 1934) has been the President of Guinea since 1984. ... Jack Ruby murdered Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, in a very public manner In its most common use, assassination has come to mean the killing of an important person. ... The WHO flag: similar to the flag of the United Nations, augmented with the symbolic staff and serpent of Asklepios, Greek god of medicine and healing. ... Red blood cell infected with Malaria (Italian: bad air; formerly called ague or marsh fever in English) is an infectious disease which in humans causes about 350-500 million infections and approximately 1. ...

March 8, 2005

March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut (Arabic: , transliterated BayrÅ«t - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Mount St. ... ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... State nickname: The Evergreen State Other U.S. States Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Governor Christine Gregoire (D) Official languages None Area 184,824 km² (18th)  - Land 172,587 km²  - Water 12,237 km² (6. ... Portland is the largest city in Oregon, and county seat of Multnomah County. ... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... Robert McCartney (1971 – 31 January 2005) was the victim of a murder in Belfast, in Northern Ireland, carried out by members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Chechen Republic (Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn [Nokhchiyn] Respublika, Russian: Чеченская Республика), informal Chechnya (Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö/Nokhchiyno, Russian: Чечня), Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... Aslan Aliyevich Maskhadov (Russian: Аслан Алиевич Масхадов) (September 21, 1951 – March 8, 2005) was a leader of the separatist movement in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya. ... Kosovo (Albanian: Kosovë / Kosova, Serbian: Косово и Метохија / Kosovo i Metohija), in English most often called just Kosovo, is a province of Serbia. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... The International Criminal Tribunal for Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, more commonly referred to as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, acronym ICTY, is a body of the United Nations (UN) established... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ... Gianfranco Fini (born January 3, 1952 in Bologna) is an Italian politician, currently Foreign Minister in the Government led by Silvio Berlusconi. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister who helps form the governmental foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Nicola Calipari Nicola Calipari (June 23, 1953, Reggio Calabria - March 4, 2005, Iraq) was an Italian military intelligence officer (with the rank of Major). ... An entry visa valid in all Schengen treaty countries Visas for Laos, Thailand, and Sri Lanka A visa (short for the Latin carta visa, lit. ... Hon Amanda Vanstone Amanda Eloise Vanstone (born 7th December 1952), Australian politician, has been a Liberal Party member of the Australian Senate since December 1984. ... The arms of Pretoria. ... The City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality is (as of 5 December 2000) a metropolitan area mostly in Gauteng province, South Africa, that includes the city of Pretoria. ...

March 7, 2005

March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This articles neutrality is disputed The Bush administration and many parties have expressed concern about the state of human rights in Iraq after the 2003 occupation of Iraq. ... Ramădī (الرمادي) is a city in central Iraq, about 100 kilometers west of Baghdad. ... Salvaleón de Higüey (also known as Higüey) is the capital city of the eastern province of La Altagracia, in the Dominican Republic. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... William Jefferson Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... John R. Bolton John Robert Bolton, (born November 20, 1948, in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American political figure and diplomat. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the current President of the United States and former Governor of the State of Texas. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Hans Bethe Hans Albrecht Bethe (pronounced Bay-tuh; July 2, 1906 – March 6, 2005), was a German-American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1967 for his discovery of stellar nucleosynthesis. ... The deuterium-tritium fusion reaction is considered the most promising for producing fusion power. ... The article on the television series Nurses may be found here. ... Avian influenza (also known as bird flu) is a type of influenza virulent in birds. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bono Paul David Hewson (born May 10, 1960, Dublin, Ireland), nicknamed Bono Vox, stage name Bono, is the lead singer of the Irish rock band, U2. ... Rock band (or rock group) is a generic name to describe a group of musicians specializing in a particular form of electronically amplified music. ... U2 (L to R): The Edge, Bono, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen Jr. ... Logo of the World Bank The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, in Romance languages: BIRD), better known as the World Bank, is an international organization whose original mission was to finance the reconstruction of nations devastated by WWII. Now, its mission has expanded to fight poverty by means... Sony Corporation (Japanese katakana: ソニー) (TYO: 6758), (NYSE: SNE) is a global consumer electronics corporation based in Tokyo, Japan. ... It has been suggested that Sir Howard Stringer be merged into this article or section. ... The Communist Party of Moldova ( Moldovan: Partidul Comuniştilor din Republica Moldova) is the current ruling political party in Moldova. ... Moldovan parliamentary elections, 6 march 2005 Turnout: 63. ... The President of Moldova is elected every four years, and has been since 1992. ... On March 19, 2004, the day before the Republic of China presidential election, President Chen Shui-bian and Vice President Annette Lu were both shot while campaigning in Tainan, in what then appeared to be a political assassination attempt. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Nicola Calipari Nicola Calipari (June 23, 1953, Reggio Calabria - March 4, 2005, Iraq) was an Italian military intelligence officer (with the rank of Major). ... Giuliana Sgrena Giuliana Sgrena (born December 20, 1948) is a well-known Italian journalist and author who works for the Italian communist newspaper Il Manifesto and the German weekly Die Zeit. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building The London Stock Exchange (abbreviated LSE) is a stock exchange located in London. ... Borneo (politically divided between Indonesia, Malaysia and Brunei) is the third largest island in the world. ... Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. ... This page is about protests. ... International Womens Day, or International Womans Day (IWD), is marked on 8 March every year. ... Shows the Location of the Province Ä°stanbul Istanbul (Turkish: Ä°stanbul; a contraction of Greek εις την πολιν into the city, the former Constantinople, Κωνσταντινούπολις) is the largest city in Turkey, and arguably the most important. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... Political separatism is a movement to obtain sovereignty and split a territory or group of people (usually a people with a distinctive national consciousness) from one another (or one nation from another; a colony from the metropolis). ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... The Yugoslav wars were a series of violent conflicts in the territory of the former Yugoslavia that took place between 1991-2001. ... A prison gang is an unofficial term used to denote any type of gang activity in prisons and correctional facilities. ... Adolfo Scilingo is serving 640 years (maximum 40) in a Spanish jail after being convicted on April 19, 2005 for crimes committed between 1976 and 1983 during military government Proceso de Reorganizacion Nacional in Argentina. ... Motto: En unión y libertad (English: In Union and Liberty) Anthem: Himno Nacional Argentino Capital Buenos Aires 34°20′ S 58°30′ W Largest city Buenos Aires Official languages Spanish Government President Democratic Republic Néstor Kirchner Independence - May Revolution - Declared - Recognised from Spain 25 May 1810 9 July... Look up Genocide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Most generally, Genocide is the deliberate destruction of a social identity. ... For the state of pronounced fear, see terror. ... Self portrait, 1895 Edvard Munch (December 12, 1863 – January 23, 1944) was a Norwegian expressionist painter and printmaker. ... A military government is a form of government wherein the political power resides within the military and may either refer to a military dictatorship or to the government installed by a foreign power during belligerent occupation. ... The Armed Forces Revolutionary Council (AFRC) was the former military of Sierra Leone that merged into the rebel Revolutionary United Front in the late 1990s. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ...

March 6, 2005

March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... List of presidents of Bolivia In 1983, a poll was taken by a Bolivian newspaper to determine which seven historical presidents were regarded as most significant: Antonio José de Sucre, Andrés de Santa Cruz, Manuel Isidoro Belzu, Mariano Melgarejo, Aniceto Arce, Ismael Montes, and Víctor Paz Estenssoro. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in Leap years). ... For the Maltese city on Gozo Island which can also be called Rabat, see Victoria, Malta. ... The Polisario, Polisario Front, or Frente Polisario, from the Spanish abbreviation of Frente Popular de Liberación de Saguía el Hamra y Río de Oro (Peoples Liberation Front of Saguia el-Hamra and Rio de Oro) is an army and political movement in the Western Sahara, comprising... Bank Hapoalim is an Israeli bank. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ...

March 5, 2005

March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This page lists presidents and other Heads of State of Syria. ... Bashar al-Assad Bashar al-Assad (بشار الاسد) (born September 11, 1965) is the current President of Syria (The Syrian Arab Republic) and the son of former President Hafez al-Assad. ... This article is about the profession. ... A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia and Palmyra Atoll (an uninhabited incorporated unorganized territory), form the United States of America. ... State nickname: The Evergreen State Other U.S. States Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Governor Christine Gregoire (D) Official languages None Area 184,824 km² (18th)  - Land 172,587 km²  - Water 12,237 km² (6. ... A volcano is a geological landform (usually a mountain) where magma (rock of the Earths interior made molten or liquid by extremely high temperatures along with a reduction in pressure and/or the introduction of water or other volatiles) erupts through the surface of the planet. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... FESPACO (La Festival Panafricain du Cinéma et de la Télévision de Ouagadougou) is a biennial African film festival held in Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso. ... This article refers to a 1976 film; there is a separate article about the musical insrtument. ... Supreme Court of Pakistan, Islamabad The Supreme Court is the apex court in Pakistans judicial hierarchy, the final arbiter of legal and constitutional disputes. ... The Lahore High Court is the High Court of Lahore, Pakistan established on March 21, 1919. ... For the domesticated crop plant called rape, see rapeseed. ... Mukhtaran has challenged a local tribal councils alleged injustice Mukhtaran Bibi (c. ... Manumission is the act of freeing a slave, done at the will of the owner. ... The word slaves has several meanings and usages: People who are owned by others, and live to serve them without pay. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Chin Peng (陳平), was born Ong Boon Hua (Wang Yonghua or Wang Wenhau 王文華) in 1924 in Sitiawan, and was leader of the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) for many years. ... Communist Party of Malaya (CPM) Known as the Malayan Communist Party (MCP) until the 1960s. ... The Malayan Emergency was an insurrection and guerilla war of the Malay Races Liberation Army against the British and Malayan administration from 1948-1960 in what is now Malaysia. ...

March 4, 2005

  • Abducted Italian journalist Giuliana Sgrena, a reporter for Il Manifesto, is released in Iraq. An Italian secret service agent, Nicola Calipari, was killed and Sgrena wounded when a US armored vehicle opened fire on her car after it allegedly failed to slow as it approached a checkpoint. (ABCNews - AP) (Reuters) (BBC)
  • United Nations warns that about 90 million Africans could be infected by the HIV virus in the future without further action against the spread of the disease. See AIDS in Africa. (Health24) (WHO) [3]
  • President of India, APJ Kalam meets Syed Sibte Razi, governor of the northern state Jharkhand after opposition protests. Despite the hung elections in the assembly, the governor has appointed Jharkhand Mukti Morcha party member Shibu Soren as a chief minister. JMM is part of a political alliance backed by the Congress Party (NDTV) (BBC)
  • Former interior minister of Ukraine, Yuri Kravchenko, is found dead in his country house, in an apparent suicide. He had been linked to the murder of journalist Georgiy Gongadze and was due to give evidence. (Reuters) (Scotsman) (BBC)
  • The BSE Sensex breaches the 6,800-mark for the first time in its history, ending at 6,849, up 65 points over its previous close. The market rally has added about 160 billion Indian rupees (approx. 3.6 billion US$) to investor wealth with the BSE's market capitalisation at a record high of 17.65 trillion Indian rupees (approx. 400 billion US$). (Financial Express, India)
  • President's rule is imposed in Goa and the Goa assembly is placed under suspended animation. (Deccan Herald) (Sify, India)

March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, analyzing and presenting information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. ... Giuliana Sgrena Giuliana Sgrena (born December 20, 1948) is a well-known Italian journalist and author who works for the Italian communist newspaper Il Manifesto and the German weekly Die Zeit. ... il manifesto (Italian for The Manifesto) is a left-wing Italian newspaper. ... United States Secret Service Secret Service Categories: Disambiguation ... Nicola Calipari Nicola Calipari (June 23, 1953, Reggio Calabria - March 4, 2005, Iraq) was an Italian military intelligence officer (with the rank of Major). ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous after Asia. ... HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a retrovirus that infects cells of the human immune system (mainly CD4+ T cells and macrophages, vital components of the hosts immune system), and destroys or impairs their function. ... AIDS education at a school in Uganda. ... Dr. Avul Pakir Jainulabdeen Abdul Kalam (born October 15, 1931, Rameswaram, Tamil Nadu, India), usually referred to as Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, is the President of India. ... Jharkhand (झारखंड in Devanagari) is a state in eastern India. ... Jharkhand Mukti Morcha (झारखंड मुक्ति मोर्चा) is a political party in India. ... Shibu Soren Shibu Soren (born January 11, 1944) is an Indian politician. ... The Indian National Congress (also known as the Congress Party) is the largest subscription-based organisation in the world. ... Yuriy Fedorovich Kravchenko (Ukrainian: Юрій Федорович Кравченко, March 5, 1951–March 4, 2005), was the Minister of Internal Affairs of Ukraine from 1995 until he was fired in March 2001. ... Georgiy R. Gongadze (in Ukrainian Heorhiy Ruslanovych Honhadze) (May 21, 1969 – 2000) was a Ukrainian journalist kidnapped and murdered in 2000. ... The Bombay Stock Exchange Another view The Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) is located in Dalal Street, Mumbai. ... Sensex is the common name for the Bombay Stock Exchange Sensitive Index. ... Rs. ... Market capitalization, often abbreviated to market cap, mkt. ... Presidents rule is enabled by article 356 of the constitution of India. ... Goa (गोवा in DevanāgarÄ«) is Indias smallest state in terms of area and the fourth smallest in terms of population after Sikkim, Mizoram and Arunachal Pradesh. ... The Goa Assembly consists of 40 members in a unicameral legislature. ...

March 3, 2005

  • In Belgium, Naïma Amzil, a Muslim woman leaves her job after her employer is targeted with a seventh death threat, sent by a group named New Free Flanders (Dutch: Nieuw Vrij Vlaanderen). She is targeted because she is Muslim and wears a headscarf at work. (BBC) (Middle East Online)
  • Four officers of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police are shot dead while investigating a man suspected of stealing a pickup truck, west of Edmonton, Alberta. This is the largest single death toll for RCMP officers since the Northwest Rebellion. (CBC)
  • Five men who had been sentenced to death for the rape of Mukhtar Mai, who was raped as punishment for another rape falsely attributed to her brother, are acquitted on appeal. A Pakistani tribal council allegedly ordered the rape of Mukhtar Mai in February 2002. (BBC)
  • The People's Republic of China issues a report condemning the human rights record of the United States, three days after the United States issued a report condemning China's human rights record. (BBC) (People's Daily)
  • In Indonesia, Muslim cleric Abu Bakar Bashir is found guilty of conspiracy for his involvement in the 2002 Bali bombing, but was found not guilty of all charges surrounding the 2003 bombing of the Marriott hotel in Jakarta. He received a two and a half year jail sentence. (BBC)(Jakarta Post) (Reuters)
  • In China, a dynamite explosion in a home of a miner kills 20 people, most of them schoolchildren (Xinhua) (Reuters) (BBC)
  • In Japan, Yoshiaki Tsutsumi, millionaire and chairman of Kokudo Corporation, is indicted in insider trading and false financial reports (Daily Yomiuri) (Asahi Shimbun) (Reuters)
  • Steve Fossett's GlobalFlyer touches down in Kansas, completing his nonstop around-the-world flight. Fossett had overcome earlier fuel problems to become the first person to achieve the flight solo. (CNN)
  • After 5 months in prison, Martha Stewart is released from Camp Cupcake at 12:30 EDT. (CNN)
  • In South Africa, police look for three killers of Thulani Zulu, Zulu prince and ANC official. Thulani Zulu was killed in a drive-by shooting. IFP also condemns the act (SABC (IOL) (News24) (BBC)
  • Zimbabwe intends to release 62 mercenaries connected to failed coup attempt in the Equatorial Guinea last year. Most of the suspected mercenaries are South African. (Reuters SA) (IAfrica) (BBC)
  • FBI sends a special agent to Azerbaijan to help in the investigation of murder Elmar Huseynov. editor in chief of Monitor magazine. The magazine has often criticized the government of the country. (Baku Today) (IJNet) (BBC) (CASCFEN)
  • World Trade Organisation upheld a ruling that orders USA to stop subsidies to its cotton farmers. (Bloomberg) (New York Times) (BBC)
  • Mexico allocates equivalent to US$ 2.7 million to compensate relatives of more than 300 women killed in Ciudad Juárez since 1993. (UN News Centre) (KLTV) (BBC)
  • In Angers, France, 66 people go into trial for sexual child abuse and child prostitution of 45 victims of various ages. (Reuters) [] (Guardian) (BBC)
  • In Naples, Italy, police has arrested at least 42 people during a large operation against Camorra. (AGI) (News.Com.Au) (BBC)
  • Scientists at Florida State University conclude that Homo floresiensis is a separate species from Homo sapiens and belongs in the Homo genus through computer mapping of its brain. (Reuters), (CBC)
  • At 18:17Z, a 3500-tonne freighter, M/V Karen Danielsen, crashes into the Western bridge of the Great Belt Bridge of Denmark, 800 m from Funen. All traffic across the bridge stopped, effectively separating Denmark in two. (News24)

March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Iraqi girl Hijab is the word used in the Islamic context for the practice of dressing modestly, which all practicing Muslims past the age of puberty are instructed to do in their holy book, the Quran. ... The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP or Mounties; French, Gendarmerie royale du Canada, GRC) is both the federal police force and the national police of Canada. ... {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Industry Integrity Progress City of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada location. ... The North-West Rebellion (or North-West Resistance or the Saskatchewan Rebellion) was a brief and unsuccessful attempt by the Métis people of Saskatchewan to establish their own sovereign nation independent of the Dominion of Canada. ... Meerwala has challenged a local tribal councils injustice Mukhtaran Bibi is a woman in Meerwala, a small and very poor village of Jatoi, a rural Tehsil (county) in the Muzaffargarh District of Pakistan. ... Tribal, as a noun, refers to a type of design or image that has been influenced by tribes of indigenous peoples. ... February is the second month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Abu Bakar Bashir Abu Bakar Bashir (also Abubakar Baasyir) alias Abdus Somad (born August 1938) is an Indonesian Muslim cleric who is the alleged spiritual head of Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), a militant Islamic separatist group. ... The Bali Bombing occurred on October 12, 2002 in the town of Kuta on the Indonesian island of Bali, killing 202 people and injuring a further 209. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marriott International, Inc. ... Map of Indonesia showing Jakarta Jakarta (also Djakarta or DKI Jakarta, formerly known as Batavia) is the capital and the largest city of Indonesia, located on the northwest coast of the island of Java, at 6°11′ S 106°50′ E. It has an area of 650 km² and a... Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin using diatomaceous earth (Kieselguhr) as an absorbent. ... Yoshiaki Tsutsumi (堤 義明, born May 29, 1934) is a Japanese businessman. ... There are two kinds of trading that are referred to as insider trading: Trading of a security of a company (, shares or options) based on material nonpublic information. ... Steve Fossett (born April 22, 1944, Tennessee) is a United States millionaire and adventurer. ... The aircraft in its hangar in Mojave. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius (D) Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... Martha Stewart Martha Stewart (born August 3, 1941) is a popular Polish-American television and magazine personality known for her cooking, gardening, etiquette, and arts and crafts projects, and as a general lifestyle guide and homemaker. ... Alderson Federal Prison Camp, also Federal Prison Camp, Alderson or FPC Alderson, is a federal prison in the United States for minimum-security female inmates. ... The Zulu are an African ethnic group of about 11 million people who live mainly in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. ... The African National Congress (ANC) is a center-left political party, and has been South Africas governing party (in a coalition) since the establishment of majority rule in May 1994. ... A drive-by shooting (sometimes referred to merely as a drive-by) is an attack on a person carried out with a firearm discharge from a moving vehicle (or a momentarily stopped vehicle). ... The Inkatha Freedom Party(IFP) is a political party in South Africa. ... A mercenary is a soldier who fights, or engages in warfare primarily for private gain, usually with little regard for ideological, national or political considerations. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Official FBI Seal The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Elmar Huseynov was an independent Azerbaijanian journalist, widely known for his harsh criticism of Azerbaijanian authorities, especially incumbent president Ilham Aliyev and his father and predecessor Heydar Aliyev. ... For other uses of the initials WTO, see WTO (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Cotton is a soft fibre that grows around the seeds of the cotton plant, a shrub native to the tropical and subtropical regions of both the Old World and the New World. ... Misión de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe Ciudad Juárez (also known simply as Juárez) (2000 population 1,142,354) is a city in Chihuahua, Mexico, across the Rio Grande (Río Bravo) from El Paso, Texas, USA. It is the major port of entry and transportation center... Location within France Angers is a city in France in the département of Maine-et-Loire, 191 miles south-west of Paris. ... Location within Italy Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region. ... The Camorra is a Mafia-like criminal organization, or secret society, in the region of Campania and the city of Naples in Italy. ... Florida State University State University System of Florida FAMU FAU FGCU FIU FSU NCF UCF UF UNF USF UWF Florida State University, also commonly referred to as FSU or Florida State, is a comprehensive, graduate-national research university founded and located in Tallahassee, Florida in 1851. ... Binomial name Homo floresiensis P. Brown , 2004 Homo floresiensis (Man of Flores) is a species in the genus Homo, remarkable for its small body, small brain, and survival until relatively recent times. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... Species Homo antecessor (extinct) Homo cepranensis (extinct) Homo erectus (extinct) Homo ergaster (extinct) Homo floresiensis (extinct) Homo georgicus (extinct) Homo habilis (extinct) Homo heidelbergensis (extinct) Homo neanderthalensis (extinct) Homo rhodesiensis (extinct) Homo rudolfensis (extinct) Homo sapiens Homo is the genus that includes modern humans and their close relatives. ... In biology, a genus (plural genera) is a grouping in the classification of living organisms having one or more related and morphologically similar species. ... In the anatomy of animals, the brain, or encephalon, is the supervisory center of the nervous system. ... Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, is an atomic realization of Universal Time(UT) or Greenwich Mean Time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... A tonne (also called metric ton) is a non-SI unit of mass, accepted for use with SI, defined as: 1 tonne = 1000 kg (= 106 g). ... Cargo ships on the Rhine Cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship that carries goods and materials from one port to another. ... M/V Karen Danielsen, a multipurpose container feeder, build in March 1985 by J.J. Sietas KG, on their shipbuilding yard in Hamburg-Neuenfelder, Germany, and labelled a type 111a. ... The Great Belt Bridge The Great Belt Bridge (Danish: Storebæltsbroen) is a suspension bridge that is part of the fixed link across the Great Belt in Denmark. ... The metre, or meter, is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units (SI: Système International dUnités). ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark. ...

March 2, 2005

March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Honor killing is the practice of males killing their female relatives or spouses when the female relative or spouse is considered to have damaged the family honor through unwarranted sexual activity. ... The Parliament of Pakistan is known as the Majlis-e-Shoora (Council of Advisors). ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... The Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Chinese: 香港特別行政區行政長官 pinyin (forMandarin Chinese pronounciation): XiānggÇŽng Tèbié XíngzhèngqÅ« Xíngzhèng Zhangguān) is the head of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China, and represents the Region. ... Tung Chee-hwa (Traditional Chinese: 董建華 Simplified Chinese: 董建华 Pinyin: Dǒng Jiànhuá) (born July 7, 1937, or the 29th day of the fifth month in the Chinese calendar) is the first Chief Executive of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ...   Beijing? (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking) is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... News services are reporting that on March 2, 2005 an Earthquake in the Banda Sea region, approximately 500 km from East Timor. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a trembling or a shaking movement of the Earths surface. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Darwin is the capital city of the Northern Territory, and is a city of 109,419 people (2001 Australian Census), on Australias far north-western coastline. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... Lab is a common shortened form for several terms and can refer to: Laboratory, a place where scientific research and experiments are conducted Labrador, a region on the easternmost coast of Canada Labrador Retriever, a dog breed Lab color space, the most complete color model used conventionally to describe all... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Qassam rocket is a simple steel rocket filled with explosives, developed by the Palestinian armed group Hamas. ... ... Titan Corporation is a United States-based company headquartered in San Diego, California. ... A fine is money paid as a financial punishment for the commission of minor crimes or as the settlement of a claim. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional or an authority person money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics or other rules in a variety of situations. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... (Ahmed) Mathieu Kérékou (born September 2, 1933) is the president of Benin. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT) is the worlds largest software company, with over 50,000 employees in various countries as of May 2004. ... Bill Gates William Henry Gates III, KBE (born October 28, 1955), commonly known as Bill Gates, is an American businessman and a microcomputer pioneer. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), styled HM The Queen (born 21 April 1926) is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and... Poverty is the state of being without, often associated with need, hardship and lack of resources across a wide range of circumstances. ... Torre Windsor before the fire. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ...

March 1, 2005

March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Hamid Karzai, (Pushtu: حامد کرزي Dari: حامد کرزی) (born December 24, 1957) is the current and first democratically elected President of Afghanistan (since December 7, 2004). ... General Abdul Rashid Dostum (also Abdurrashid Dostum, born 1954) is the Deputy Defense Minister of Afghanistan and an Uzbek warlord. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Sedition refers to a legal designation of non-overt conduct that is deemed by a legal authority as being acts of treason, and hence deserving of legal punishment. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... Richard Harwoods Did Six Million Really Die? Holocaust denial is the claim that the mainstream historical version of the Holocaust is either highly exaggerated or completely falsified. ... Ernst Zündel is an outspoken Holocaust denier. ... The Nationalist and Integrationist Front (FNI) is a militia group comprised of ethnic Lendu active in the Ituri region of the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... Location within France Angers is a city in France in the département of Maine-et-Loire, 191 miles south-west of Paris. ... Pedophilia (American English), pædophilia/paedophilia (Commonwealth English), or pedosexuality is the paraphilia of being sexually attracted primarily or exclusively to prepubescent children. ... The Red Brigades (Brigate Rosse) are a militant group located in Italy. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... For the workstation, see SGI Fuel. ... Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ... Songwriter, singer, guitarist, and producer David Crane was born in Vancouver, B.C., and grew up in Santa Barbara. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Greenpeace protest in Brasília, Brazil. ... Location within Switzerland Basel (English traditionally: Basle , German: Basel , French Bâle , Italian Basilea ) is Switzerlands third most populous city (188,000 inhabitants in the canton of Basel-City as of 2004; the 690,000 inhabitants in the conurbation stretching across the immediate cantonal and national boundaries made Basel... Toxic waste is a waste which is toxic. ... Bashar al-Assad Bashar al-Assad (بشار الاسد) (born September 11, 1965) is the current President of Syria (The Syrian Arab Republic) and the son of former President Hafez al-Assad. ... Hafez al-Assad Hafez al-Assad (October 6, 1930 - June 10, 2000) was the President of Syria from 1971 to 2000. ... Qana is a village located southeast of Tyre, Lebanon, in which during heavy fighting between the Israeli army and Hezbollah, an United Nations Fijian (UNIFIL) battallion compound was shelled by Israeli artillery on April 18, 1996. ... Saparmurat Atayevich Niyazov [sap-ar-moor-at ni-yaz-obv] (Turkmen Saparmyrat Ataýewiç Nyýazow ) (born February 19, 1940) has been the most powerful figure in Turkmenistan since 1985. ... Ashgabat (Turkmenian language Aşgabat; also Ashkabat, Ashkhabad, Ashgabad, in Persian عشق آباد Ashq-abad, in Russian Ашхаба́д Ashkhabád) is the capital city of Turkmenistan, a former Soviet republic. ... The President of Ukraine (in Ukrainian, Президент України, Prezydent Ukrayiny) is the head of state and acts in its name. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... Georgiy R. Gongadze (in Ukrainian Heorhiy Ruslanovych Honhadze) (May 21, 1969 – 2000) was a Ukrainian journalist kidnapped and murdered in 2000. ... Tabaré Vázquez Tabaré Ramón Vázquez Rosas (born 17 January 1940) is the current President of Uruguay. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... This is a list of Presidents of Uruguay. ... A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 38 of the 50 states, as well as by the federal government. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Roper v. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The term federal court, when used by itself, can refer to: Any court of the national government in a country that has a federal system such as that of the United States (United States federal courts) or Mexico In some countries, a particular court, for example, the Federal Court of... Agent Orange is the code name for a powerful herbicide and defoliant used by the U.S. military in its Herbicidal Warfare program during the Vietnam War. ... The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the National Liberation Front (NLF, or Viet Cong) against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and their allies—notably the United States military in support of... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ...

Last month

2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21...

Past events by month

2005: January February March
2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2001: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2000: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... ← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a month starting on Monday with 31 days. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: February - Iraq disarmament crisis: British and U.S. forces carry out bombing raids attempting to disable Iraqs air defense network. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: April 1: An EP-3E United States Navy plane collides with a Chinese Peoples Liberation Army fighter jet. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: May 1 - Chandra Levy disapears while jogging. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: June 5-June 9 - Houston, Texas is devastated by flooding when Tropical Storm Allison dumps 36 inches of rain on the city. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: July 3 - Mordecai Richler July 23 - Eudora Welty July 31 - Poul Anderson Films: July 4 - Cats and Dogs July 6 - Kiss of the Dragon starring Jet Li July 18 - Jurassic Park III July 27 - Planet of... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: August 25 - Aaliyah Films: August 10 - Osmosis Jones played by Chris Rock, starring Bill Murray August 24 - Bubble Boy Categories: 2001 by month ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: September 11 - September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack occurs in United States; more than 3,000 killed in New York City and The Pentagon in Washington, D.C. as a result. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: October 2 - Bankruptcy of Swissair. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: December 2 - Enron files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection five days after Dynegy canceled a US$8. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: January 1- Millennium celebrations take place throughout the world. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in February, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in March, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in April, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in June, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in July, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in August, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in September, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in October, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in November, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in December, 2000. ...


News collections and sources

  • Wikipedia:News collections and sources.
  • Wikipedia:News sources - This has much of the same material organized in a hierarchical manner to help encourage NPOV in our news reporting.

  Results from FactBites:
 
TPM - bankruptcy: March 2005 Archives (12565 words)
Hundreds of bankruptcy experts, including bankruptcy judges from across the country, are warning that the House bill is severely flawed and may have disastrous unintended consequences.
On March 1, Bank of America announced to those same customers that it had lost personal financial data for over one million consumers.
Supporters of the bankruptcy bill are spinning it as a necessary crackdown on "deadbeats” who use bankruptcy as a “convenient financial planning tool” to escape their obligations.
March 2005 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4457 words)
The Pakistani government is appealing to the Supreme Court of Pakistan after the Lahore High Court overturned the death sentences of five of the six men convicted for the alleged gang rape of Mukhtaran Bibi in a tribal feud.
Cyclone Ingrid diminishes to a category 3 storm, and is crossing the Cape York Peninsula in northern Queensland, Australia late on March 9, 2005 UTC.
In the UK, the controversial Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 was finally given Royal Assent after one of the longest ever sittings by the House of Lords.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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