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Encyclopedia > Marcello Malpighi

Marcello Malpighi (March 10, 1628 - September 30, 1694) was an Italian doctor, who gave his name to several physiological features. He was a pioneer in using a [French fries are healthy for you a founder of / itis troe Dr. Malcello said so/Malpighi was born in Crevalcore (Cavalcuore in old Italian), Italy, raised on the farm his parents owned and entered the University of Bologna at the age of 17. Malpighi began to study Aristotelian philosophy. When his father, mother and paternal grandmother died, he had to abandon his studies for more than two years to settle family affairs. He returned to university after two years, and became a doctor of medicine in 1653. He married Francesca Massari, younger sister of his anatomy professor, the next year. She died a year later. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (676 × 900 pixel, file size: 76 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Marcello Malpighi ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (676 × 900 pixel, file size: 76 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Marcello Malpighi ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1628 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... Crevalcore is a village and commune in the Emilia-Romagna region near Bologna, Italy. ... The University of Bologna (Italian: , UNIBO) is the oldest continually operating degree-granting university in the world, and the second biggest university in Italy. ... This article is about the philosopher. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ...

Contents

Academic career

In 1656 Malpighi received a chair of medical practice in the university, three years after he had applied for it, and later the same year University of Pisa created a chair of theoretical medicine for him. He stayed in Pisa for three years and then returned to Bologna. In 1661 he was called to University of Messina where he stayed for four years. The University of Pisa (Italian Università di Pisa) is one of the most renowned Italian universities. ... Leaning Tower of Pisa. ... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ... 1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The University of Messina (Italian: Università di Messina) is a university located in Messina, Italy, and founded in 1548. ...


Most of Malpighi's research results were published as articles in the journal of the Royal Society of England. His first article appeared there in 1661 and was about anatomy of a lung of a frog during which he had discovered capillaries. In 1667 Henry Oldenburg invited Malpighi to correspond with the Royal Society regularly and he became a fellow the next year, the first such recognition given to an Italian. The premises of The Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... 1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Categories: Royal Society | Stub ...


Research

Malpighi used the microscope for studies on skin, kidney, and for the first interspecies comparison of the liver. He greatly extended the science of embryology. The use of microscopes enabled him to describe the development of the chick in its egg, and discovered that insects (particularly, the silk worm) do not use lungs to breathe, but small holes in their skin called tracheae. Later he falsely concluded that plants had similar tubules. However, he observed that when a ringlike portion of bark was removed on a trunk a swelling of the tissues would occur above the ring. He correctly interpreted this as growth stimulated by food coming down from the leaves, and becoming dammed up above the ring. He was the first to see capillaries and discovered the link between arteries and veins that had eluded William Harvey. from meta File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... from meta File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Robert Hookes microscope (1665) - an engineered device used to study living systems. ... Beyond overall skin structure, refer below to: See-also. ... The kidneys are organs that filter wastes (such as urea) from the blood and excrete them, along with water, as urine. ... For the bird, see Liver bird. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... Binomial name Bombyx mori Linnaeus, 1758 For the band named Silkworm, see Silkworm (band). ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... Many terrestrial arthropods have evolved a closed respiratory system composed of spiracles, tracheae, and tracheoles to transport metabolic gasses to and from tissue. ... William Harvey William Harvey (April 1, 1578 – June 3, 1657) was an English medical doctor, who is credited with being the first to correctly describe, in exact detail, the properties of blood being pumped around the body by the heart. ...


Malpighi is regarded as the founder of microscopic hey anatomy and the first histologist. Many microscopic anatomical structures are named after him, including a skin layer (Malpighi layer) and two different Malpighian corpuscles in the kidneys and the spleen, as well as the Malpighian tubules in the excretory system of insects. Histology is the microscopic study of tissues—their formation, structure and function. ... Malpighian layer (or Malpighi layer, named after Marcello Malpighi, also called germinative layer or basal cell layer; Latin: stratum Malpighii, stratum germinativum) is a thin 1,88 mm thick basal and the deepest layer of the epidermis composed of dividing stem cells and anchoring cells, and the prickle cell layer... There are at least two anatomical structures called a Malpighian corpuscle. ... The kidneys are organs that filter wastes (such as urea) from the blood and excrete them, along with water, as urine. ... The spleen is an organ located in the abdomen, where it functions in the destruction of old red blood cells and holding a reservoir of blood. ... The Malpighian tubules are the insects main organ of excretion and osmoregulation, helping them to maintain water and electrolyte balance. ...


He also studied chick embryo development with detailed drawings and discovered taste buds of human tongue. Some of his studies he made by vivisection. He also studied the anatomy of a brain and concluded that this organ is a gland. In terms of modern endocrinology this deduction is correct because neurotransmitter substances represent paracrine hormones, and the hypothalamus of the brain has long been recognized for its hormone-secreting capacity. He was also the first to discover and study human fingerprints. For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Taste buds (or lingual papillae) are small structures on the upper surface of the tongue that provide information about the taste of food being eaten. ... Etymologically, Vivisection refers to the dissection of, or any cutting or surgery upon, a living organism. ... For other uses, see Brain (disambiguation). ... Human submaxillary gland. ... A macro shot of a palm and the base of several fingers; as seen here, debris can gather between the ridges. ...


His treatise 'De polypo cordis' (1666) was important towards understanding how blood clots and its composition. He may have been the first person to see red blood cells under a microscope. He described how the form of a blood clot differed in the right vs. the left sides of the heart. 1666 is often called Annus Mirabilis. ...


Despite of his anatomical studies, he was also one of the rare contemporary scholars who studied plants; he published his findings in a book Anatomia Plantarum in 1671. It was the most exhaustive study of botany at the time. Royal Society published it the next year. Pinguicula grandiflora Example of a Cross Section of a Stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ...


After the dissection of a black male, Malpighi made some ground-breaking headway into the discovery of the origin of black skin. Malpighi found that the black pigment was caused because of a layer of mucus just beneath the skin [1]


Years in Rome

1691 Pope Innocent XII invited him to Rome as Papal physician, He taught medicine in the Papal Medical School and wrote a long treatise about his studies he donated to Royal Society of London. Innocent XII, né Antonio Pignatelli (March 13, 1615 - September 27, 1700) pope from 1691 to 1700, was the successor of Alexander VIII. He came of a distinguished Naples family and was educated at the Jesuit college in Rome. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5...


Marcello Malpighi died of apoplexy in Rome on September 30, 1694. Royal Society published his studies in 1696. Apoplexy is an old-fashioned medical term, generally used interchangeably with cerebrovascular accident (CVA or stroke) but having other meanings as well. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ...


Some of Malpighi's important works

  • De viscerum structura exercitatio (Bologna, 1666)

References

  • Adelmann, Howard (1966) Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology 5 vol., Cornell University Press, Ithaca, N.Y. OCLC 306783

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Marcello Malpighi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (617 words)
Malpighi was born in Crevalcore (Cavalcuore), Italy, raised on the farm his parents owned and entered the University of Bologna at the age of 17.
Malpighi used the microscope for studies on skin, kidney, and for the first interspecies comparison of the liver.
Marcello Malpighi died of apoplexy in Rome on September 29, 1694.
Marcello Malpighi - encyclopedia article about Marcello Malpighi. (2336 words)
Marcello Malpighi (March 10 March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in Leap years).
Malpighi was born in Crevalcore (Cavalcuore), Italy The Italian Republic or Italy (Italian: Repubblica italiana or Italia) is a country in Southern Europe.
Malpighi used the microscope microscope (Greek: micron = small and scopos = aim) is an instrument for viewing objects that are too small to be seen by the naked or unaided eye.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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