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Encyclopedia > Marburg
Marburg
Marburg: the castle, upper town, and St Elizabeth's church
Coat of arms Location
Coat of arms of Marburg
Administration
Country Germany
State Hesse
District Marburg-Biedenkopf
Lord Mayor Egon Vaupel (SPD)
Basic statistics
Area 124.5 km² (48 sq mi)
Elevation 173-412 m
Population 79,139  (31/12/2005)
 - Density 636 /km² (1,646 /sq mi)
Other information
Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Licence plate code MR
Postal codes 35001-35043
Area code 06421
Website Stadt Marburg
Location of the town of Marburg within Marburg-Biedenkopf district

Map Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2020x1203, 492 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Marburg Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File links Marburg-Wappen. ... Image File history File links Karte_Deutschland. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE7 Capital Wiesbaden Largest city Frankfurt Minister-President Roland Koch (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 5 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  21,100 km² (8,147 sq mi) Population 6,077,000 (08/2006)[1]  - Density... There are 439 German districts (Kreise), administrative units in Germany. ... Marburg-Biedenkopf is a Kreis (district) in the west of Hesse, Germany. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... SPD redirects here. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... German car number plates (Kfz-Kennzeichen) show the place where the car carrying them is registered. ... German Postleitzahl map of the first two digits Postal codes in Germany, Postleitzahl (plural Postleitzahlen, abbreviated to PLZ), consist of five digits, which indicate the wider area (first two digits), and the postal district (last three digits). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 551 pixelsFull resolution (1033 × 712 pixel, file size: 137 KB, MIME type: image/png) Date 01. ...

Coordinates: 50°48′36″N 8°46′15″E / 50.81, 8.77083 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Marburg is a city in Hesse, Germany, on the Lahn river. It is the main town of the Marburg-Biedenkopf district. Its population is 78,701, and its geographical position is 50°48′36″N, 8°46′15″E.
Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE7 Capital Wiesbaden Largest city Frankfurt Minister-President Roland Koch (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 5 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  21,100 km² (8,147 sq mi) Population 6,077,000 (08/2006)[1]  - Density... The river Lahn in Limburg The Lahn is a river in Germany. ... Marburg-Biedenkopf is a Kreis (district) in the west of Hesse, Germany. ...

Contents

Universitätsstadt Marburg

History

Founding and early history

Old Marburg
Old Marburg

Like many settlements, Marburg developed at the crossroads of two important early medieval highways: an east-west one (Cologne to Prague) and a north-south one (from the North Sea to the Alps and on to Italy), the former crossing the river Lahn here. The settlement was protected, and customs raised, by a small castle that was built in the 9th or 10th century by the dynasty of the Giso. Marburg has been a town since 1140, as proved by coins. From the Gisos, it fell around that time to the Landgraves of Thuringia, residing on the Wartburg above Eisenach. Marburg old engraving (copyright exp. ... Marburg old engraving (copyright exp. ... , For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: , Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The river Lahn in Limburg The Lahn is a river in Germany. ... Events Henry Jasomirgott was made count palatine of the Rhine. ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count (derived from the Latin Comes, with a history of its own) or a British earl (an Anglo-Saxon title derived from the Viking title Jarl). ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... Wartburg 311: in production between 1956 and 1965 Wartburg 312: in production in 1965. ... Eisenach is a city in Thuringia, Germany. ...


St Elizabeth

In 1228 the widowed princess-langravine (Landgräfin) of Thuringia, Elizabeth, chose Marburg as her dowager seat, as she did not get along well with her brother-in-law, the new Landgrave. The countess dedicated her life to the sick and would become after her early death in 1231, aged 24, one of the most eminent female saints, St Elisabeth of Hungary. She was canonized in 1235. Events The Sixth Crusade is launched by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, after delays due to sickness and an excommunication from Pope Gregory IX. Conrad IV of Germany becomes titular King of Jerusalem, with Frederick II as regent. ... // Events Ardengus becomes bishop of Florence. ... St. ... Events Anglo-Norman invasion of Connacht St. ...

St Elizabeth's church
St Elizabeth's church

Download high resolution version (560x752, 213 KB)Elisabeth-Kirche Marburg (copyright expired by age) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Download high resolution version (560x752, 213 KB)Elisabeth-Kirche Marburg (copyright expired by age) The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ...

Capital of Hesse

In 1264, St Elizabeth's daughter Sophie of Brabant, succeeded in winning the Landgraviate of Hesse, hitherto connected to Thuringia, for her son Henry. Marburg (alongside Kassel) was one of the capitals of Hesse from that time until about 1540. Following the first division of the landgraviate, it was the capital of Hesse-Marburg from 1485 to 1500 and again between 1567 and 1605. Hesse was one of the more powerful second-tier principalities in Germany. Its "eternal enemy" was the Archbishop of Mainz, one of the Prince-electors, who competed with Hesse in many wars and conflicts, stretching over several centuries, for territory. A contemporary monument to the Battle of Lewes, a crucial 1264 battle in the Second Barons War in England. ... Landgrave (Dutch landgraaf, German Landgraf; French landgrave; Latin comes magnus, comes patriae, comes provinciae, comes terrae, comes principalis, lantgravius) was a title (mostly) used in the Holy Roman Empire and later on by its former territories, comparable to a count, who had feudal duty directly to the Holy Roman Emperor. ... Capital Kassel, Marburg Government Monarchy Landgrave  - 1264 – 1308 Henry I the Child  - 1509 – 1567 Philip I the Magnanimous Historical era Middle Ages, Reformation  - Established 1264  - Disestablished 1567 The Landgraviate of Hesse (German: ) was a Landgraviate of the Holy Roman Empire from 1264 to 1567 when it was divided between the... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... Henry I of Hesse (German: Heinrich I das Kind (the child) (24 June 1244–21 December 1308, Marburg) ,Landgrave of Hesse. ... This article is about the city of Kassel in Hessen, Germany. ... Year 1540 was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // Events August 5-7 - First outbreak of sweating sickness in England begins August 22 - Battle of Bosworth Field is fought between the armies of King Richard III of England and rival claimant to the throne of England Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. ... 1500 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Duke of Alva arrives in the Netherlands with Spanish forces to suppress unrest there. ... 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Between 780/82 AD and 1802 AD the Archbishop of Mainz, was an influential ecclesiastic and secular prince of the middle ages. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ...


After 1605, Marburg became just another provincial town, known mostly for the university. It became a virtual backwater for two centuries after the Thirty Years' War, 1618-1648, when it was fought over by Hesse-Darmstadt and Hesse-Kassel. The Hessian territory around Marburg lost more than two thirds of its population, more than in all later wars (including World War I and World War II) combined. Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For a bill proposed in USA in 1998, see Bill 1618. ... 1648 (MDCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Capital Darmstadt Government Monarchy Landgrave  - 1567 - 1596 George I  - 1790 - 1806 Louis X History  - Established 1567  - Disestablished 1806 The Landgraviate of Hesse-Darmstadt (German: ) was a member state of the Holy Roman Empire. ... Hesse-Kassel (Hessen-Kassel in German) was a German principality that came into existence when the Landgraviate of Hesse was divided in 1568 upon the death of Landgrave Philip I of Hesse. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Reformation

Marburg is the seat of the oldest Protestant university in the world, the University of Marburg, or Philipps-Universität, founded in 1527. It is one of the five classical "university villages" in Germany, the other four being Freiburg, Göttingen, Heidelberg, and Tübingen. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... University of Marburg - Department of Social Sciences and University library The old university The University of Marburg (German: Philipps-Universität Marburg Philips University, Marburg), was founded in 1527 by Landgrave Philipp I of Hesse (usually called the Magnanimous, although the updated meaning haughty is sometimes given) as the... January 5 - Felix Manz, co-founder of the Swiss Anabaptists, was drowned in the Limmat in Zürich by the Zürich Reformed state church. ... This article refers to the city in Baden-Württemberg. ... Göttingen marketplace with old city hall, Gänseliesel fountain and pedestrian zone Göttingen ( ) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Heidelberg is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Tübingen, Neckar front Tübingen, a traditional university town of Baden-Württemberg, Germany, is situated 20 miles southwest of Stuttgart, on a ridge between the River Neckar and the Ammer. ...


In 1529, Philipp I of Hesse arranged the Marburg Colloquy, to propitiate Martin Luther and Huldrych Zwingli. Philip I of Hesse Philip I of HESSE, (13 November 1504 - 31 March 1567), was a leading champion of the Reformation and one of the most important German rulers of the Renaissance. ... The Marburg Colloquy was a meeting which attempted to mediate between the different opinions of the Lutherans and Zwinglians over the Lords Supper, and issues relating to transubstantiation. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Huldrych (or Ulrich) Zwingli or Ulricus Zuinglius (January 1, 1484 – October 11, 1531) was the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland, and founder of the Swiss Reformed Churches. ...


Romanticism

Owing to its neglect during the entire 18th century Marburg – like Rye or Chartres – survived as a relatively intact Gothic town, simply because there was no money spent on any new architecture or expansion. When Romanticism became the dominant cultural and artistic paradigm in Germany, Marburg became interesting once again, and many of the leaders of the movement lived, taught, or studied in Marburg. They formed a circle of friends that was of great importance, especially in literature, philology, folklore, and law. The group included Friedrich Karl von Savigny, the most important jurist of his day and father of the Roman Law adaptation in Germany; the poets, writers, and social activists Achim von Arnim, Clemens Brentano, and especially the latter's sister and former's later wife, Bettina von Arnim. Most famous internationally, however, were the Brothers Grimm, who collected many of their fairy tales here – Rapunzel's Tower stands in Marburg, and across the Lahn hills, in the area called Schwalm, little girls' costumes included a red hood. , Rye is a small hill top town and civil parish in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. ... Chartres is a town and commune of France, préfecture (capital) of the Eure-et-Loir département. ... The Western (Royal) Portal at Chartres Cathedral ( 1145). ... This article is about building architecture. ... Wanderer above the sea of fog by Caspar David Friedrich Romanticism is an artistic, literary, and intellectual movement that originated in 18th century Western Europe, during the Industrial Revolution. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... Philology, etymologically, is the love of words. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Friedrich Karl von Savigny Friedrich Karl von Savigny (February 21, 1779 - 25 October 1861) was a German jurist. ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... Using the term Roman law in a broader sense, one may say that Roman law is not only the legal system of ancient Rome but the law that was applied throughout most of Europe until the end of the 18th century. ... Ludwig Achim (or Joachim) von Arnim (January 26, 1781 – January 21, 1831), German poet and novelist, was born at Berlin. ... Clemens Brentano, or Klemens Brentano (September 8, 1778 – July 28, 1842) was a German poet and novelist. ... Bettina von Arnim (the Countess of Arnim) (4 April 1785, Frankfurt am Main – 20 January 1859, Berlin), born as Elisabeth Catharina Ludovica Magdalena Brentano, was a German writer and novelist. ... For information about the other uses of the name, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Illustration by Johnny Gruelle Rapunzel is a German fairy tale in the collection assembled by the Brothers Grimm, and first published in 1812 as part of Childrens and Household Tales. ...


It has to be said, however, that this circle had disappeared from Marburg by the 1820s, and for another 45 years, Marburg became a Hessian backwater again.


Prussian town

In the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, the reactionary Prince-elector of Hesse had backed Austria; Prussia won, and invaded (without any bloodshed) and annexed Hesse-Kassel (as well as Hanover, the City of Frankfurt, and other territories) north of the Main river, while likewise pro-Austrian Hesse-Darmstadt remained independent. For Marburg, this turn of events was very positive, because Prussia decided to make Marburg its main administrative center in this part of her new province and to turn the university in the regional academic center. Thus, Marburg's rise as an administrative and university city began; since the Prussian university system would become the indubitably best in the world, Marburg would now attract very famous scholars. There was, on the other hand, hardly any industry to speak of, so that students, professors, and civil servants – who generally had enough but not much money and paid very little in taxes – dominated the town, which tended to be very conservative. Combatants Austria, Saxony, Bavaria, Baden, Württemberg, Hanover and some minor German States (formerly as the German Confederation) Prussia, Italy, and some minor German States Strength 600,000 Austrians and German allies 500,000 Prussians and German allies 300,000 Italians Casualties 20,000 dead or wounded 37,000 dead... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Hesse-Kassel (Hessen-Kassel in German) was a German principality that came into existence when the Landgraviate of Hesse was divided in 1568 upon the death of Landgrave Philip I of Hesse. ... , Hanover(i) (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... Map showing the position of the Main in Germany The Main (pronounced in German like the English word mine) is a river in Germany, 524 km long (including White Main 574 km), and one of the more significant tributaries of the Rhine river. ... The Landgraviate of Hesse-Darmstadt came into existence in 1568, as the portion of George, youngest of the four sons of Landgrave Philip I of Hesse. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ...


20th century

Marburg Speech
Main article: Marburg speech
The Wettergasse in the Marburg Upper Town
The Wettergasse in the Marburg Upper Town

Franz von Papen, vice-chancellor of Germany in 1934, delivered an anti-Nazi speech at the University of Marburg on June 17. This contributed to several of von Papen's staff being murdered by the Nazis. The Marburg speech (die Marburger Rede in German) was an address given by German vice chancellor Franz von Papen at the University of Marburg on June 17, 1934. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 2398 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Marburg Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 2398 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Marburg Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Franz Joseph Hermann Michael Maria von Papen (29 October 1879 – 2 May 1969) was a German nobleman Catholic politician, General Staff officer, and diplomat, who served as Chancellor of Germany in 1932. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...


In 1945, Marburg became President and Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg's final resting place. His grave is in the Elisabethkirche. He is an honorary citizen of the town. Paul Ludwig Hans Anton von Beneckendorff und von Hindenburg, known universally as Paul von Hindenburg (2 October 1847 – 2 August 1934) was a German field marshal and statesman. ... An old painting showing the Elisabeth Church The Elisabeth Church in Marburg was built by the Order of the Teutonic Knights in honor of Elisabeth of Hungary. ...


Marburg is also now home to one of the most progressive schools for the blind in the world. Street crossings are equipped with "walk" and "don't walk" signs that also emit sounds enabling the blind to know what the signs are "saying."


Architecture

Marburg is famous for its medieval churches, especially the Elisabethkirche, one of the two or three first purely Gothic churches North of the Alps outside of France and thus an incunable of Gothic architecture in Germany, as well as for the castle. An old painting showing the Elisabeth Church The Elisabeth Church in Marburg was built by the Order of the Teutonic Knights in honor of Elisabeth of Hungary. ...


More important, however, is Marburg's city as such, an unspoilt, spire-dominated, castle-crowned Gothic/Renaissance city on a hill, intact because Marburg was an extreme backwater between 1600 and 1850. Unlike, for example, Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Marburg regained some of its importance in later centuries, so it is not a "museum village" or EuroDisney, no tourist trap but rather a student-dominated university town. Town Hall Square of Rothenburg A famous street in Rothenburg at Koboldzellersteig and Spittalgasse Town wall of Rothenburg Rothenburg ob der Tauber is a town in the district of Ansbach of Mittelfranken (Middle Franconia), the Franconia region of Bavaria, Germany, well known for its well-preserved medieval old town. ... Disneyland Resort Crymych is a holiday and recreation resort in Marne-la-Vallée, a new town in the eastern suburbs of Paris, France. ... Billboards are used to advertise the attractions Tourist trap is a phrase for any establishment or set of establishments that have been created to attract travelers or tourists and provide products for the tourist to purchase. ...


Much of the physical attractiveness of Marburg today is the legacy of the legendary Lord Mayor Dr. Hanno Drechsler (in office 1970-1992), who promoted urban renewal and the restoration, for the first time, by object and not by area, i.e. areas were not pulled down but rather buildings restored. Thus, at a time when other cities were still pulling down medieval quarters, Marburg already protected its unique heritage. Marburg also had one of the first pedestrian zones in Germany. Marburg's Altstadtsanierung (since 1972) received many awards and prizes. Categories: Stub | 1931 births | 2003 deaths ...


Politics

As a larger mid-sized city, Marburg, like six other such cities in Hesse, has a special status as compared to the other municipalities in the district. This means that the city takes on tasks more usually performed by the district so that in many ways it is comparable to an urban district (kreisfreie Stadt). In the British Isles an urban district was a type of local government district which covered an urbanised area. ...


The mayor (Oberbürgermeister) Egon Vaupel, directly elected in January 2005 and in office since 1 July 2005, is from the Social Democratic Party of Germany. His deputy, the head of the building and youth departments Dr. Franz Kahle is supplied by the Greens. The majority in the 59-seat city parliament is held by a coalition of SPD (20 seats) and Green (10 seats) members. Also represented are the factions of the CDU (17 seats), the PDS (4 seats), the Freie Wähler (Free Voters) BfM (Bürger für Marburg- 3 seats), the FDP (3 seats) and a CDU splinter group MBL (Marburger Bürgerliste- 2 seats). Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... SPD redirects here. ... Greens are people who support some or all of goals of a Green Party without necessarily working with or voting for that or any party. ... The Christian Democratic Union of Germany (CDU — Christlich Demokratische Union Deutschlands) is the second largest political party in Germany. ... The Left Party (Vänsterpartiet) is a political party in Sweden. ... Free Democratic Party (FDP) may be: in Germany, Freie Demokratische Partei (the Free Democratic Party) in Switzerland, Freisinnig-Demokratische Partei (the Free Democratic Party of Switzerland) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Outside the parliament, there are in Marburg, like otherwise only in big cities, a full range of groupings. Among the leftwing groups are ATTAC, the Worldshop movement, an autonomist-anarchist scene, but also groups engaged in ecological or human-rights concerns. Association for the Taxation of Financial Transactions for the Aid of Citizens (ATTAC - Association pour la Taxation des Transactions pour lAide aux Citoyens) is an activist organization for the establishment of a tax on exchange transactions. ... Worldshops, world shops or Fair Trade Shops are retail outlets that practice the principles of fair trade. ... Raised fist, stenciled protest symbol of Autonome at the Ernst-Kirchweger-Haus in Vienna, Austria Autonomism refers to a set of left-wing political and social movements and theories close to the socialist movement. ... Anarchist redirects here. ...


The city of Marburg, similar to the cities of Heidelberg, Tuebingen, Goettingen etc. has a rich history of student corporations or "Verbindungen" i.e. associations or faternities including Corps, Landsmannachaften, Burschenschaften, Turnerschaften etc.


City partnerships

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a small city located in west central France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Area: 147. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tunisia. ... Sfax, Looking across the Place de la Republique towards the Town Hall. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Eisenach is a city in Thuringia, Germany. ... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in central England on the River Nene, and the county town of Northamptonshire, in the English East Midlands region. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... County Status County capital Mayor Klaus Johannis, from the Democratic Forum of Germans of Romania, since 2000 Area 121. ...

Coat of arms

Marburg's coat of arms shows a Hessian Landgrave riding a white horse with a flag and a shield on a red background. The shield shows the red-and-white-striped Hessian lion, also to be seen on Hesse's state arms, and the flag shows a stylized M, blue on gold (or yellow). The arms are also the source of the city flag's colours. This is three horizontal stripes coloured, from top to bottom, red (from the background), white (from the horse) and blue (from the shield).


The arms, which were designed in the late nineteenth century, are based on a landgrave's seal on a municipal document, which is an example of a very prevalent practice of replacing forgotten coats of arms, or ones deemed not to be representative enough, with motifs taken from seals. Under municipal codes in force in Germany today, the use of city or municipal arms in service seals is often mandatory. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Marburg virus

Main article: Marburg (virus)

The city's name is also connected to a filovirus, the Marburg virus, which was first noticed and described during an outbreak in the city due to workers being accidentally exposed to infected grivet monkey tissue at the city's main industrial plant (1967), the Behring-Werke, then part of Hoechst and today of CSL Behring, founded by Marburg citizen and first Nobel Prize in Medicine winner, Emil von Behring. During the outbreak, 31 people became infected and seven of them died. While this may seem a small number of people, during a cholera epidemic in the modern world only 1 in 20 people die. The Marburg virus is named after the town as it is customary to name viruses of such ferocity after the town or area in which they originate. The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ... The Marburg virus is the causative agent of Marburg hemorrhagic fever. ... Binomial name Chlorocebus aethiops Linnaeus, 1758 The grivet is an Old World monkey with long white tufts of hair along the sides of the face. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... Emil Adolf von Behring (March 15, 1854 - March 31, 1917) was born at Hansdorf, Germany. ... Cholera (or Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera) is a severe diarrheal disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ...


External links

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Marburg

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