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Encyclopedia > Maple leaf
A maple leaf with its distinctive shape.
A maple leaf with its distinctive shape.

The maple leaf is the characteristic leaf of the maple tree, and is an important national symbol of Canada. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 1. ... “Foliage” redirects here. ... See also Maple computer algebra system. ... National symbols are symbols of states, nations and countries in the world. ...


There is some evidence that the tree flags hoisted by New England Planters in the Northern Colonies of British North America had some influence in the adoption of the Maple leaf as an emblem.[1][2] This identity would have been accentuated by the United Empire Loyalists, searching for a traditionally common and regional symbol instead of the rebellious imagery employed by the American government. The New England Planters were settlers from the New England colonies who responded to requests by the lieutenant governor and, subsequently, governor of Nova Scotia, Charles Lawrence, to settle lands left vacant by the Acadian Expulsion of 1755. ... British North America was an informal term first used in 1783, but uncommon before the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), called the Durham Report. ... The name United Empire Loyalists is given to those American Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ...


Its use as a Canadian symbol dates back as far as the 1700s, when the English, Scottish, and Irish populations in Canada would all display their national plant at certain gatherings. Individuals with only a distant affiliation to their country of origin and wishing to be considered Canadians began wearing the maple leaf.[citation needed] Events and trends The Bonneville Slide blocks the Columbia River near the site of present-day Cascade Locks, Oregon with a land bridge 200 feet (60 m) high. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the United Kingdom anthem is God Save the Queen. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English (de facto) Recognised regional languages Gaelic, Scots1 Demonym Scot, Scots...


The maple leaf slowly caught on as a national symbol: in 1868, it was included in the coat of arms of both Ontario and Quebec, and was added to the Canadian coat of arms in 1921. In 1867, Alexander Muir composed the patriotic The Maple Leaf Forever, which became an unofficial anthem in English-speaking Canada. From 1876 until 1901, the leaf appeared on all Canadian coins, and remained on the penny after 1901. During the First World War, badges of the Canadian Expeditionary Force were often based on a maple leaf design. The use of the maple leaf as a regimental symbol extended back to the 1800s, and Canadian soldiers in the Second Boer War were distinguished by a maple leaf on their sun helmets. The maple leaf finally became the central national symbol with the introduction of the Canadian flag (designed by George F.G. Stanley) in 1965, which uses a highly-stylized eleven-pointed maple leaf, referring to no specific species of maple. The one chosen is a generic maple leaf representing the ten species of maple tree native to Canada - at least one of these species grows natively in every province[3]. Other shapes of maple leaf are sometimes used prominently in Canada, in particular a certain generic 35 point "vintage" or "heritage" leaf design representing past use. Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... , Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Alexander Muir Credit: Milton Adamson / Library and Archives Canada / PA-030217 Alexander Muir (5 April 1830 near Lanark – 26 June 1906) was a songwriter, poet and school headmaster. ... The Maple Leaf Forever was written by Alexander Muir (1830–1906) in 1867, the year of Canadas Confederation. ... An anthem is a composition to an English religious text sung in the context of an Anglican service. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... . This coin features a red-coloured poppy embedded in the centre of a maple leaf above a banner reading Remember - Souvenir. The mint claims that this is the first colour coin in circulation in the world. ... For the NBA basketball player with the nickname see Penny Hardaway A variety of low value coins, including an Irish 2p piece and many U.S. pennies. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... 26th Battalion of the Second Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915 The Canadian Expeditionary Force was the group of Canadian military units formed for service overseas in the First World War. ... A regimental symbol is a distinguishing emblem used by soldiers during times of war. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Flag Ratio: 1:2 (1965-Present) The National Flag of Canada (), popularly known as the Maple Leaf Flag (French: lUnifoli the one-leaved), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre, featuring a red stylized 11-pointed maple leaf. ... The Flag of Canada Col. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...

The flag of Canada, featuring a stylized maple leaf in the centre.
The flag of Canada, featuring a stylized maple leaf in the centre.

The designs of the uniforms of the National men's and women's hockey teams have used this specific shape with great success as a secondary logo since their double 2002 Olympic gold victories, and it has even shown up on national flag designs in place of the regular leaf shape[4]. The Toronto Maple Leafs NHL franchise similarly use a vintage 35 point leaf logo on their alternate uniforms in addition to the regular 11 point one[5]. The Coat of Arms of Canada first granted in 1921 frequently used 35 point leaves on its shield, which was used on the Canadian flag 1921-1965. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and lUnifolié (French for the one-leaved), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. ... The Toronto Maple Leafs are a professional ice hockey team based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Coat of Arms of Canada (since 1994) The Royal Coat of Arms of Canada (formally known as The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada) was proclaimed by King George V on November 21, 1921, as the Arms or Ensigns Armorial of the Dominion of Canada. ...



The U.S. city of Carthage, Missouri is nicknamed "America's Maple Leaf City."[6] Carthage is a city in Jasper County, Missouri, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...


Since 1979, the Royal Canadian Mint also produces gold, silver, platinum, and palladium bullion coins, which are officially known as Maple Leafs, as geometric Maple Leafs are stamped on them. Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Mint flag The Royal Canadian Mint (RCM, french Monnaie royale canadienne) produces all of Canadas circulation coins, and manufactures circulation coins on behalf of other nations. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Standard atomic weight 196. ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Standard atomic weight 107. ... General Name, Symbol, Number platinum, Pt, 78 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 6, d Appearance grayish white Standard atomic weight 195. ... General Name, Symbol, Number palladium, Pd, 46 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 5, d Appearance silvery white metallic Standard atomic weight 106. ... A precious metal is a rare metallic element of high, durable economic value. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Maple Leaf is a Canadian bullion gold coin minted by Royal Canadian Mint. ... Geometry (from the Greek words Ge = earth and metro = measure) is the branch of mathematics first introduced by Theaetetus dealing with spatial relationships. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Maple Leaf Forever (713 words)
The Maple Leaf, of course, also represents the forests of Canada -- a most important contributor to the nation's wealth.
These maple leaves also match the anthem The Maple Leaf Forever, whose stirring words make it the anthem of the real Canada.
Maple Cottage, the house at Memory Lane and Laing Street in which Muir lived and a huge maple tree, which legend tells us inspired his composition, still stand.
Maple leaf - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (308 words)
The maple leaf is the characteristic leaf of the maple tree, and is an important national symbol of Canada.
The maple leaf slowly caught on as a national symbol: in 1868, it was included in the coat of arms of both Ontario and Quebec, and was added to the Canadian coat of arms in 1921.
The use of the maple leaf as a regimental symbol extended back to the 1800s, and Canadian soldiers in the Second Boer War were distinguished by a maple leaf on their sun helmets.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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