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World Political/Physical raised-relief map
World Political/Physical raised-relief map

A map is a visual representation of an area—a symbolic depiction highlighting relationships between elements of that space such as objects, regions, and themes. Look up map in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In philosophy, an object is a thing, an entity, or a being. ... A region can be any area that has some unifying feature. ... In music, a theme is the initial or primary melody. ...


Many maps are static two-dimensional, geometrically accurate representations of three-dimensional space, while others are dynamic or interactive, even three-dimensional. Although most commonly used to depict geography, maps may represent any space, real or imagined, without regard to context or scale; e.g. Brain mapping, DNA mapping, and extraterrestrial mapping. Look up static in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A 2D geometric model is a geometric model of an object as two-dimensional figure, usually on the Euclidean or Cartesian plane. ... The space we live in is three-dimensional space. ... This article is about the idea of space. ... Look up Context in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A variable scale for measuring maps The scale of a map is the ratio of a single unit of distance on the map to the equivalent distance on the ground. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Neuroimaging. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ...

Contents

Geographic maps

A celestial map from the 17th century, by the Dutch cartographer Frederik de Wit.
A celestial map from the 17th century, by the Dutch cartographer Frederik de Wit.

Cartography, or map-making is the study and, often, practice, of crafting representations of the Earth upon a flat surface (see History of cartography), and one who makes maps is called a cartographer. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 548 pixelsFull resolution (1804 × 1236 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 548 pixelsFull resolution (1804 × 1236 pixel, file size: 3. ... Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) is the study and practice of making maps or globes. ... Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) has been an integral part of the human story for a long time (maybe 8,000 years - nobody knows exactly, but longer than written words). ... Cartography is the study of map making and cartographers are map makers. ...


Road maps are perhaps the most widely used maps today, and form a subset of navigational maps, which also include aeronautical and nautical charts, railroad network maps, and hiking and bicycling maps. In terms of quantity, the largest number of drawn map sheets is probably made up by local surveys, carried out by municipalities, utilities, tax assessors, emergency services providers, and other local agencies. Many national surveying projects have been carried out by the military, such as the British Ordnance Survey (now a civilian government agency internationally renowned for its comprehensively detailed work). A 1976 United States NOAA chart of part of Puerto Rico A nautical chart is a graphic representation of a maritime area and adjacent coastal regions. ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... Part of an Ordnance Survey map at 1 inch to the mile scale from 1945 Ordnance Survey (OS) is an executive agency of the United Kingdom government. ...


A map can also be any document giving information as to where or what something is.


Orientation of maps

The Hereford Mappa Mundi, about 1300, Hereford Cathedral, England. A classic "T-O" map with Jerusalem at centre, east toward the top, Europe the bottom left and Africa on the right.
The Hereford Mappa Mundi, about 1300, Hereford Cathedral, England. A classic "T-O" map with Jerusalem at centre, east toward the top, Europe the bottom left and Africa on the right.

The term orientation refers to the relationship between directions on a map and compass directions. The word orient is derived from oriens, meaning east. In the Middle Ages many maps, including the T and O maps, were drawn with east at the top. Today the most common, but far from universal, cartographic convention is that North is at the top of a map. Examples of maps not oriented to north are: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x678, 156 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x678, 156 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... The Hereford Mappa Mundi is a T and O map dating to ca. ... The current Hereford Cathedral, located at Hereford in England, United Kingdom, dates from 1079. ... Orientation mean direction of some vector or pseudo-vector. ... The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ... Look up North in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

  • Reversed maps, also known as Upside-Down maps or South-Up maps, which generally show Australia and New Zealand at the top of the map instead of the bottom.
  • Polar maps of the Arctic or Antarctic regions are conventionally centred on the pole, in which case the direction north would be towards or away from the centre of the map, respectively.
  • Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion maps are based on a projection of the Earth's sphere onto an icosahedron. The resulting triangular pieces may be arranged in any order or orientation.
  • Maps from non-Western traditions are oriented a variety of ways. Old maps of Edo show the Japanese imperial palace as the "top", but also at the centre, of the map. Labels on the map are oriented in such a way that you cannot read them properly unless you put the imperial palace above your head.
  • Medieval European T and O maps such as the Hereford Mappa Mundi were centred on Jerusalem with east at the top. Indeed, prior to the reintroduction of Ptolemy's Geography to Europe around 1400, there was no single convention in the West. Portolan charts, for example, are oriented to the shores they describe.
  • Route and channel maps have traditionally been oriented to the road or waterway they describe.
  • Many maps used in the Society for Creative Anachronism show the west at the top, in honour of the Society starting in California.[citation needed]

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ... Richard Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller (July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American visionary, designer, architect, poet, author, and inventor. ... Unfolded Dymaxion map with nearly-contiguous land masses. ... [Etymology: 16th century: from Greek eikosaedron, from eikosi twenty + -edron -hedron], icosahedral adjective An icosahedron noun (plural: -drons, -dra ) is any polyhedron having 20 faces, but usually a regular icosahedron is implied, which has equilateral triangles as faces. ... This article is about the history of the city now known as Tokyo. ... Panorama of the Imperial Palace in Tokyo Map of the Imperial Palace and surrounding Gardens Nijubashi Bridge at the Imperial Palace. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Earliest printed example of a classical T and O map (by Guntherus Ziner, Augsburg, 1472), illustrating the first page of chapter XIV of the Etymologiae. ... The Hereford Mappa Mundi is a T and O map dating to ca. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... A Japanese portolan chart of the Indian Ocean, early 17th century A portolan (derived from the Latin word portus, port) is an early modern European navigation chart, dating from the thirteenth century or later, in manuscript, usually with rhumb lines, shorelines and place names. ... Arms of the Society for Creative Anachronism. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Scale and accuracy

Many but not all maps are drawn to a scale, expressed as a ratio such as 1:10,000, meaning that 1 of any unit of measurement on the map corresponds to 10,000 of that same unit in reality. This allows the reader to estimate the sizes of, and distances between, depicted objects. A larger scale (i.e. the second number of the ratio is smaller) shows more detail and supports more accurate estimates, thus requiring a larger map to show the same area. Highly detailed maps covering areas ranging upward in size from small cities or counties to entire countries or continents are now often published as books, or computer software (with numerous tools to aid the user, including user-adjustable scale and customized search engines), for convenient handling. Printed versions may include a comprehensive index, tables of distances between cities, and possibly even a cross reference of important destinations. Computer software based maps provide numerous tools to aid the user, including user-adjustable scale (a.k.a "zoom") and customized search engines to locate street addresses. A variable scale for measuring maps The scale of a map is the ratio of a single unit of distance on the map to the equivalent distance on the ground. ... This article is about the mathematical concept. ... Measurement is the estimation of the magnitude of some attribute of an object, such as its length or weight, relative to a unit of measurement. ... For other uses, see Reality (disambiguation). ... “Accuracy” redirects here. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... For other uses, see Publishing (disambiguation). ... An address is a code and abstract concept expressing the fixed location of a home, business or other building on the earths surface. ...


Historically, large maps were presented (but not necessarily published, due to prohibitive labor costs) as scrolls, a famous example of which is the recently rediscovered hand-made copy of the Tabula Peutingeriana[1]. A wage is a compensation which workers receive in exchange for their labor. ... For other uses, see Scroll (disambiguation). ... The Tabula Peutingeriana (Peutinger table) is an itinerarium showing the cursus publicus, the road network in the Roman Empire. ...


For modern examples, published maps designed for the hiker (e.g. USGS Topographic maps, a.k.a. "Topos") are often scaled at the ratio of approximately 1:25,000[citation needed], while maps designed for the motorist to display major highways might be scaled at 1:250,000 or 1:1,000,000[citation needed]. In any case, a properly made map will either state its scale, or declare that it is not scaled and can not be reliably used to deduce distances. Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... // Topographic maps are a variety of maps characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines in modern mapping, but historically using a variety of methods. ... For other uses, see Driving (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ...


Maps which use some quality other than physical area to determine relative size are called cartograms. Area cartogram of the United States, with each county rescaled in proportion to its population. ...


A famous (non-cartogram) example of a map without scale is the London Underground map, which best fulfills its purpose by being less physically accurate and more visually communicative to the hurried glance of the commuter. This is not a cartogram (since there is no consistent measure of distance) but a topological map that also depicts approximate bearings. The simple maps shown on some directional road signs are further examples of this kind. The tube map is the schematic diagram that represents the lines, stations, and zones of Londons rapid transit rail system, the London Underground. ... Commuters on the New York City Subway during rush hour Rush hour at Shinjuku Station, Yamanote Line Traffic jam Commuting is the process of travelling between a place of residence and a place of work. ... A Möbius strip, an object with only one surface and one edge; such shapes are an object of study in topology. ... In navigation, a bearing is the clockwise angle between a reference direction (or a datum line) and the direction to an object. ... Unused traffic signs in Austria Most countries post signage, known as traffic signs or road signs, at the side of roads to impart information to road users. ...


In fact, most commercial navigational maps, such as road maps and town plans, sacrifice an amount of accuracy in scale to deliver a greater visual usefulness to its user, for example by exaggerating the width of roads. With the end-user similarly in mind, cartographers will censor the content of the space depicted by a map in order to provide a useful tool for that user. For example, a road map may or may not show railroads, smaller waterways or other prominent non-road objects, and if it does, it may show them less clearly (e.g. dashed or dotted lines/outlines of various colors) than highways. Known as decluttering, the practice makes the subject matter the user is interested in easier to read, usually without sacrificing measurement accuracy. Software-based maps often allow the user to toggle decluttering between ON, OFF and AUTO as needed. In AUTO the degree of decluttering is adjusted as the user changes the scale being displayed. This article is about determination of position and direction on or above the surface of the earth. ... Economics and commerce define an end-user as the person who uses a product. ... railroads redirects here. ... For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ...


Topographic maps, show elevation above (or depression below) sea level as contour lines, a specific type of Isoline. Isolines on any map or chart indicate the constant labeled value, such as elevation, temperature, or rainfall, for that particular line. Depending on the type of a map, alternative representations of elevation (or depression) exist as well. Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... Contour and Contour map redirect here. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... This article is about precipitation. ...


World maps and projections

Main article: World map
Map of large underwater features. (1995, NOAA)

Maps of the world or large areas are often either 'political' or 'physical'. The most important purpose of the political map is to show territorial borders; the purpose of the physical is to show features of geography such as mountains, soil type or land use. Geological maps show not only the physical surface, but characteristics of the underlying rock, fault lines, and subsurface structures. Physical world map (2004) with country borders and capitals A world map is a map of the surface of the Earth, which may be made using any of a number of different map projections. ... Download high resolution version (1010x597, 466 KB)Ocean basins mapped with satellite altimetry. ... Download high resolution version (1010x597, 466 KB)Ocean basins mapped with satellite altimetry. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... Geologic faults, fault lines or simply faults are planar rock fractures, which show evidence of relative movement. ...


Maps that depict the surface of the Earth also use a projection, a way of translating the three-dimensional real surface of the geoid to a two-dimensional picture. Perhaps the best-known world-map projection is the Mercator Projection, originally designed as a form of nautical chart. The Mercator projection shows courses of constant bearing as straight lines. ... The GOCE project will measure high-accuracy gravity gradients and provide an accurate geoid model based on the Earths gravity field. ... Mercator world map Nova et Aucta Orbis Terrae Descriptio ad Usum Navigatium Emendate (1569) The Mercator projection is a cylindrical map projection presented by the Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator, in 1569. ... A 1976 United States NOAA chart of part of Puerto Rico A nautical chart is a graphic representation of a maritime area and adjacent coastal regions. ...


Airplane pilots use aeronautical charts based on a Lambert conformal conic projection, in which a cone is laid over the section of the earth to be mapped. The cone intersects the sphere (the earth) at one or two parallels which are chosen as standard lines. This allows the pilots to plot a great-circle route approximation on a flat, two-dimensional chart. A Lambert conformal conic projection (LCC) is a conic map projection, which is often used for aeronautical charts. ...

  • Richard Edes Harrison produced a striking series of maps during and after World War II for Fortune magazine. These used "bird's eye" projections to emphasize globally strategic "fronts" in the air age, pointing out proximities and barriers not apparent on a conventional rectangular projection of the world.

The Mercator projection shows courses of constant bearing as straight lines. ... Gnomonic projections are used in seismic work because seismic waves tend to travel along great circles. ... The Mercator projection shows courses of constant bearing as straight lines. ... For the Brisbane bus routes known collectively as the Great Circle Line (598 & 599), see the following list of Brisbane Transport routes A great circle on a sphere A great circle is a circle on the surface of a sphere that has the same diameter as the sphere, dividing the... Richard Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller (July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American visionary, designer, architect, poet, author, and inventor. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Unfolded Dymaxion map with nearly-contiguous land masses. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Categories: Magazines stubs | Time Warner subsidiaries | Business magazines ...

Electronic maps

From the last quarter of the 20th century, the indispensable tool of the cartographer has been the computer. Much of cartography, especially at the data-gathering survey level, has been subsumed by Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The functionality of maps has been greatly advanced by technology simplifying the superimposition of spatially located variables onto existing geographical maps. Having local information such as rainfall level, distribution of wildlife, or demographic data integrated within the map allows more efficient analysis and better decision making. In the pre-electronic age such superimposition of data led Dr. John Snow to discover the cause of cholera. Today, it is used by agencies as diverse as wildlife conservationists and militaries around the world. Description: Example of a topographic map with contour intervals Source: Sample taken from the public domain USGS Digital Raster Graphic file o44072d6. ... Description: Example of a topographic map with contour intervals Source: Sample taken from the public domain USGS Digital Raster Graphic file o44072d6. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Categories: Stub | Cartography ... GIS redirects here. ... Dr. John Snow John Snow (16 March 1813 – 16 June 1858) was a British physician and a leader in the adoption of anaesthesia and medical hygiene. ... Distribution of cholera Cholera, sometimes known as Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera, is an infectious gastroenteritis caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ...


Even when GIS is not involved, most cartographers now use a variety of computer graphics programs to generate new maps.


Interactive, computerised maps are commercially available, allowing users to zoom in or zoom out (respectively meaning to increase or decrease the scale), sometimes by replacing one map with another of different scale, centred where possible on the same point. In-car satellite navigation systems are computerised maps with route-planning and advice facilities which monitor the user's position with the help of satellites. From the computer scientist's point of view, zooming in entails one or a combination of: Satellite navigation systems use radio time signals transmitted by satellites to enable mobile receivers on the ground to determine their exact location. ...

  1. replacing the map by a more detailed one
  2. enlarging the same map without enlarging the pixels, hence showing more detail by removing less information compared to the less detailed version
  3. enlarging the same map with the pixels enlarged (replaced by rectangles of pixels); no additional detail is shown, but, depending on the quality of one's vision, possibly more detail can be seen; if a computer display does not show adjacent pixels really separate, but overlapping instead (this does not apply for an LCD, but may apply for a cathode ray tube), then replacing a pixel by a rectangle of pixels does show more detail. A variation of this method is interpolation.

For example: This article is about the picture element. ... LCD redirects here. ... Cathode ray tube employing electromagnetic focus and deflection Cutaway rendering of a color CRT: 1. ... For other uses, see Interpolation (disambiguation). ...

  • Typically (2) applies to a Portable Document Format (PDF) file or other format based on vector graphics. The increase in detail is, of course, limited to the information contained in the file: enlargement of a curve may eventually result in a series of standard geometric figures such as straight lines, arcs of circles or splines.
  • (2) may apply to text and (3) to the outline of a map feature such as a forest or building.
  • (1) may apply to the text (displaying labels for more features), while (2) applies to the rest of the image. Text is not necessarily enlarged when zooming in. Similarly, a road represented by a double line may or may not become wider when one zooms in.
  • The map may also have layers which are partly raster graphics and partly vector graphics. For a single raster graphics image (2) applies until the pixels in the image file correspond to the pixels of the display, thereafter (3) applies.

See also Webpage (Graphics), PDF (Layers), Mapquest, Google Maps, Google Earth or Yahoo! Maps. “PDF” redirects here. ... Imagine the smiley face in the top left corner as an RGB bitmap image. ... Example showing effect of vector graphics versus raster graphics. ... A webpage or web page is a page of the World Wide Web, usually in HTML/XHTML format (the file extensions are typically htm or html) and with hypertext links to enable navigation from one page or section to another. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Screenshot from MapQuest MapQuest is a map publisher and free online Web Map Service, owned by AOL. The company was founded in 1967 as Cartographic Services , a division of R.R. Donnelley & Sons in Chicago, Illinois. ... Google Maps (for a time named Google Local) is a free web mapping service application and technology provided by Google that powers many map-based services including the Google Maps website, Google Ride Finder and embedded maps on third-party websites via the Google Maps API. It offers street maps... Google Earth is a virtual globe program that was originally called Earth Viewer and was created by Keyhole, Inc. ... Yahoo! Maps web site Yahoo! Maps is a free online mapping portal provided by the Yahoo! network, based out of Sunnyvale, California. ...


Labeling

To communicate spatial information effectively, features such as rivers, lakes, and cities need to be labeled. Over centuries cartographers have developed the art of placing names on even the densest of maps. Text placement or name placement can get mathematically very complex as the number of labels and map density increases. Therefore, text placement is time-consuming and labor-intensive, so cartographers and GIS users have developed automatic label placement to ease this process.[2][3] Automatic label placement (sometimes called text placement or name placement) refers to the computer methods of placing labels automatically on a map or chart. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ BBC NEWS | Europe | Ancient Roman road map unveiled
  2. ^ Imhof, E., “Die Anordnung der Namen in der Karte,” Annuaire International de Cartographie II, Orell-Füssli Verlag, Zürich, 93-129, 1962.
  3. ^ Freeman, H.,, Map data processing and the annotation problem, Proc. 3rd Scandinavian Conf. on Image Analysis, Chartwell-Bratt Ltd. Copenhagen, 1983.

References

  • David Buisseret, ed., Monarchs, Ministers and Maps: The Emergence of Cartography as a Tool of Government in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992, ISBN 0-226-07987-2
  • Freeman, Herbert, Automated Cartographic Text Placement. White paper.
  • Ahn, J. and Freeman, H., “A program for automatic name placement,” Proc. AUTO-CARTO 6, Ottawa, 1983. 444-455.
  • Freeman, H., “Computer Name Placement,” ch. 29, in Geographical Information Systems, 1, D.J. Maguire, M.F. Goodchild, and D.W. Rhind, John Wiley, New York, 1991, 449-460.
  • Mark Monmonier, How to Lie with Maps, ISBN 0-226-53421-9
  • O'Connor, J.J. and E.F. Robertson, The History of Cartography. Scotland : St. Andrews University, 2002.
  • Denis E. Cosgrove (ed.) Mappings. Reaktion Books, 1999 ISBN 1-86189-021-4

See also

Atlas Portal
General
Map design and types
Modern maps
Map history
Related Topics

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 23 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A political and physical map of the world For other uses, see Atlas (disambiguation). ... Automatic label placement (sometimes called text placement or name placement) refers to the computer methods of placing labels automatically on a map or chart. ... Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) is the study and practice of making maps or globes. ... This article is about a spherical model of the Earth, or similar. ... Area cartogram of the United States, with each county rescaled in proportion to its population. ... A common compass rose as is found on a nautical chart showing both true and magnetic north with magnetic declination A compass rose is a figure displaying the orientation of the cardinal directions, north, south, east and west on a map or nautical chart. ... Contour and Contour map redirect here. ... Unfolded Dymaxion map with nearly-contiguous land masses. ... Floor plan (floorplan, floor-plan) in its original meaning is an architecture term, a diagram of a room, a building, or a level (floor) of a building as if seen from the above (i. ... A geologic map is a special-purpose map made for the purpose of showing subsurface geological features. ... Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) is the study and practice of making maps or globes. ... A 1976 United States NOAA chart of part of Puerto Rico A nautical chart is a graphic representation of a maritime area and adjacent coastal regions. ... // section of Geopictorial map Pictorial maps are a category of maps that also loosely includes illustrated maps, panoramic maps, bird’s-eye view maps and Geopictorial maps. ... A planform or plan view is a vertical orthographic projection of an object on a horizontal plane, like a map. ... A contemporary plat map showing the location of a property for sale. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Similar in concept to an atlas but focussing in more detail on roads and road systems, usually in a more specific locale. ... A street map is a map showing roads and other travelways. ... A thematic map (also called a statistical or special purpose map) displays the spatial pattern of a theme or series of attributes. ... // Topographic maps are a variety of maps characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines in modern mapping, but historically using a variety of methods. ... Physical world map (2004) with country borders and capitals A world map is a map of the surface of the Earth, which may be made using any of a number of different map projections. ... Google Maps (for a time named Google Local) is a free web mapping service application and technology provided by Google that powers many map-based services including the Google Maps website, Google Ride Finder and embedded maps on third-party websites via the Google Maps API. It offers street maps... This is a list of symbols appearing on Japanese maps. ... Screenshot from MapQuest MapQuest is a map publisher and free online Web Map Service, owned by AOL. The company was founded in 1967 as Cartographic Services , a division of R.R. Donnelley & Sons in Chicago, Illinois. ... Maps of the UK and Ireland are available in various media. ... United States of America This is a gallery of maps with a short explanation of each map. ... Animation showing atmosphere and shading effects in v1. ... Ancient world maps cover depictions of the world from Classical times to the Age of Discovery and the emergence of modern Geography. ... George Bradshaw (July 29, 1801 - August, 1853) was an English cartographer, printer and publisher and the originator of the railway timetable. ... Cartography or mapmaking (in Greek chartis = map and graphein = write) has been an integral part of the human story for a long time (maybe 8,000 years - nobody knows exactly, but longer than written words). ... Part of an Ordnance Survey map at 1 inch to the mile scale from 1945 Ordnance Survey (OS) is an executive agency of the United Kingdom government. ... A sample Sanborn Map from 1867 Sanborn Maps were originally created for assessing fire insurance liability in urbanized areas in the United States. ... An example of artistic depiction of an aerial landscape: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52x48. (This article concerns painting and other non-photographic media. ... The Georgian terrace of Royal Crescent (Bath, England) from a hot air balloon Intersection of E42 and E451 from an aircraft soon after takeoff from Frankfurt International Airport Moreton Island in Queensland, Australia Aerial photography is the taking of photographs of the ground while not supported by a ground-based... Automatic label placement (sometimes called text placement or name placement) refers to the computer methods of placing labels automatically on a map or chart. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... The Geography Cup is an online, international competition taking place between 12 November and 31 December 2006. ... Map database management stems from navigation units becoming more common in automotive vehicles (see Automotive navigation system). ... An orthophoto or orthophotograph is an aerial photograph that has been geometrically corrected (orthorectified) such that the scale of the photograph is uniform, meaning that the photo can be considered equivalent to a map. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Map (Java 2 Platform SE 5.0) (1778 words)
The behavior of a map is not specified if the value of an object is changed in a manner that affects equals comparisons while the object is a key in the map.
method on an unmodifiable map may, but is not required to, throw the exception if the map whose mappings are to be "superimposed" is empty.
Removes all mappings from this map (optional operation).
Map (Java 2 Platform SE v1.4.2) (1654 words)
The order of a map is defined as the order in which the iterators on the map's collection views return their elements.
A special case of this prohibition is that it is not permissible for a map to contain itself as a key.
While it is permissible for a map to contain itself as a value, extreme caution is advised: the equals and hashCode methods are no longer well defined on a such a map.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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