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Encyclopedia > Manuel Chrysoloras
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Manuel (or Emmanuel) Chrysoloras (c. 1355April 15, 1415), one of the pioneers in introducing Greek literature to western Europe. Events January 7 - Portuguese king Afonso IV sends three men to kill Ines de Castro, beloved of his son prince Pedro - Pedro revolts and incites a civil war April - Philip of Anjou marries Mary of Naples, daughter of Charles of Valois, duke of Calabria, and Mary of Valois Scots defeat... Jump to: navigation, search April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... Events Friedrich I Hohenzollern (b. ... World map showing Europe (geographically) When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ...


He was born at Constantinople of a distinguished family, and was a pupil of Gemistus Pletho. In 1390 he led an embassy sent to Venice by the emperor Manuel II Palaeologus to implore the aid of the Christian princes against the Turks. Roberto Rossi of Florence met him there, and in 1395 Rossi's acquaintance Jacopo Angeli da Scarperia set off for Constantinople to study Greek with Chrysoloras. In 1396 Coluccio Salutati, the chancellor of the University of Florence, invited him to come and teach Greek grammar and literature, quoting Cicero: Jump to: navigation, search Map of Constantinople. ... Georgius Gemistos Plethon (or Pletho), (c. ... Events Births December 27 - Anne de Mortimer, claimant to the English throne (died 1411) Domenico da Piacenza, Italian dancemaster (died 1470) John Dunstable, English composer (died 1453) Engelbrekt Engelbrektsson, Swedish statesman and rebel leader (died 1436) Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (died 1447) John VIII Palaeologus Byzantine Emperor (died 1448) Deaths... The Byzantine Empire around year 1400. ... Coluccio Salutati (1331-1406) was one of the most important political and cultural leaders of Renaissance Florence. ... Grammar is the discovery, enunciation, and study of rules governing the use of language. ... Marcus Tullius Cicero (January 3, 106 BC – December 7, 43 BC) was an orator and statesman of Ancient Rome, and is generally considered the greatest Latin prose stylist. ...

'The verdict of our own Cicero confirms that we Romans either made wiser innovations than theirs by ourselves or improved on what we took from them, but of course, as he himself says elsewhere with reference to his own day: "Italy is invincible in war, Greece in culture." For our part, and we mean no offence, we firmly believe that both Greeks and Latins have always taken learning to a higher level by extending it to each other's literature."

Chrysoloras arrived in the winter of 1397, an event remembered by his most famous pupil, the humanist scholar Leonardo Bruni, as a great new opportunity: there were many teachers of law, but no one had studied Greek in Italy for 700 years. Chrysoloras remained only a few years in Florence, from 1397 to 1400, teaching Greek, starting with the rudiments. He moved on to teach in Bologna and later in Venice and Rome. Though he taught widely, a handful of his chosen students remained a close-knit group, among the first humanists of the Renaissance. Among his pupils were numbered some of the foremost figures of the revival of Greek studies in Renaissance Italy. Aside from Bruni, they included Guarino da Verona and Pallas Strozzi. Leonardo Bruni Leonardo Bruni (1374 - 1444) was a leading humanist, historian and a chancellor of Florence. ... Jump to: navigation, search By region Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance French Renaissance German Renaissance English Renaissance The Renaissance, also known as Il Rinascimento (in Italian), was an influential cultural movement which brought about a period of scientific revolution and artistic transformation, at the dawn of modern European history. ... Jump to: navigation, search Guarino da Verona (1370 - December 14, 1460) was an early figure in the Italian Renaissance. ...


Having visited Milan and Pavia, and resided for several years at Venice, he went to Rome on the invitation of Bruni, who was then secretary to Pope Gregory XII. In 1408 he was sent to Paris on an important mission from the emperor Manuel Palaeologus. In 1413 he went to Germany on an embassy to the emperor Sigismund, the object of which was to fix a place for the church council that later assembled at Constance. Chrysoloras was on his way there, having been chosen to represent the Greek Church, when he died suddenly. Jump to: navigation, search Location within Italy Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed region in Italy. ... Church San Michele in Pavia Pavia (the ancient Ticinum) (population 71,000) is a town and comune of south-western Lombardy, northern Italy, 35 km south of Milan on the lower Ticino river near its confluence with the Po. ... Jump to: navigation, search Location within Italy Venice (Italian: Venezia), the city of canals, is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice, 45°26′ N 12°19′ E, population 271,663 (census estimate 2004-01-01). ... Jump to: navigation, search City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost... Gregory XII, né Angelo Correr or Corraro (died October 18, 1417), pope from 1406 to 1415, succeeded Innocent VII on November 30, 1406, having been chosen at Rome by a conclave consisting of only fifteen cardinals, under the express condition that, should Benedict XIII, the rival pope at Avignon, renounce... Sigismund (February 14/15, 1368 - December 9, 1437) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1433 to 1437. ...


Though Chrysoloras became famous as a translator of Homer and Plato (The Republic), his works circulated in manuscript in his lifetime; two were eventually printed, his Erotemata (Questions). first published at Venice in 1484, and then widely reprinted, which was the first basic Greek grammar in use in Western Europe, and Epistolae III de comparatione veteris et novae Romae (Three Letters Comparing Ancient and Modern Rome). Many of his treatises on morals and ethics and other philosophical subjects came into print in the 17th and 18th centuries, because of their antiquarian interest. Jump to: navigation, search Bust of Homer in the British Museum For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Jump to: navigation, search Statue of a philosopher, presumably Plato, in Delphi. ...


The international fraternity Kappa Sigma, founded at the University of Virginia in 1869 traditionally claims that Manuel Chrysoloras was the founder of its brotherhood. Jump to: navigation, search nickname: Kappa Sig Founded December 10, 1869 International Headquarters Charlottesville, VA Official Colors scarlet, white, and emerald green Official Flower lily of the valley Official Jewel pearl Official Badge Official Crest ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is a fraternity with over 220 chapters and colonies in North America. ... Jump to: navigation, search Website Virginia. ...


Literature

  • Émile Legrand: Notice biographique sur Manuel Chrysoloras, Paris 1894.
  • Manuelis Chrysolarae epistolae : (Graece et Latine ; ed. J.-P. Migne), Paris 1866.

External links

  • Michael D. Reeve, "On the role of Greek in Renaissance scholarship.'
  • Jonathan Harris, 'Byzantines in Renaissance Italy'.
  • Kappa Sigma Fraternity.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Station Information - Manuel Chrysoloras (435 words)
Chrysoloras arrived in the winter of 1397, an event remembered by his most famous pupil, the humanist scholar Leonardo Bruni, as a great new opportunity: there were many teachers of law, but no one had studied Greek in Italy for 700 years.
Chrysoloras was on his way there, having been chosen to represent the Greek Church, when he died suddenly.
Though Chrysoloras became famous as a translator of Homer and Plato (The Republic), his works circulated in manuscript in his lifetime; two were eventually printed, his Erotemata (Questions).
Manuel Chrysoloras - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (486 words)
In 1390 he led an embassy sent to Venice by the emperor Manuel II Palaeologus to implore the aid of the Christian princes against the Turks.
In 1413 he went to Germany on an embassy to the emperor Sigismund, the object of which was to fix a place for the church council that later assembled at Constance.
The international fraternity Kappa Sigma, founded at the University of Virginia in 1869 traditionally claims that Manuel Chrysoloras was the founder of its brotherhood.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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