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Encyclopedia > Mantua
Comune di {{{name}}}
Coat of arms of
Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Lombardy
Province Mantua (MN)
Mayor Fiorenza Brioni (since April 18, 2005)
Elevation 19 m (62 ft)
Area 63 km² (24 sq mi)
Population (as of December 31, 2004)
 - Total 46,372
 - Density 736/km² (1,906/sq mi)
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 45°10′N, 10°48′E
Gentilic Mantovani
Dialing code 0376
Postal code 46100
Frazioni Castelletto Borgo and Formigosa
Patron Anselm of Lucca, the Younger
 - Day March 18
Website: www.comune.mantova.it

Mantua (in Italian Màntova, in the local dialect of Lombard language Mantua) is an important city in Lombardy, Italy and capital of the province of the same name. Mantua is the English form of the name of the city in Italy whose Italian name is Mantova. ... Image File history File links Mantova-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Mantua (It. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... Saint Anselm of Lucca the Younger (Milan, 1036–March 18, 1086) was a prominent figure in the Investiture Controversy and in the fighting in Central Italy between the forces of Countess Matilda of Tuscany, the papal champion, and those of Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The term Lombard refers to a group of related varieties spoken mainly in Northern Italy (most of Lombardy and some areas of neighbouring regions) and Southern Switzerland (Ticino and Graubünden). ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... Mantua (It. ...


Mantua is surrounded on three sides by artificial lakes created during the 12th century.[1] These receive the waters from the Mincio, which descend from Lake Garda. The three lakes are called Lago Superiore, Lago di Mezzo, and Lago Inferiore ("Superior", "Middle," and "Inferior" Lakes).[2] A fourth lake, Lake Pajolo, which once completed a defensive water ring of the city, dried up at the end of the 18th century. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Mincio (IPA: ) is a river in the Lombardy region of northern Italy. ... Lake Garda (Italian Lago di Garda or Benaco) is the largest lake in Italy. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Mantua is mentioned in William Shakespeare's tragedy Romeo and Juliet. In this Romeo is sent into exile for killing Tybalt Capulet in a swordfight. Romeo subsequently leaves Mantua and returns to Verona when he hears his love, Juliet, has died. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ...

Contents

History

The city was founded, probably around 2000 BC, on the banks of the Mincio, on a sort of island which provided natural protection. In the 6th century BC it was an Etruscan village which, in Etruscan tradition, was re-founded by Ocno. (Redirected from 2000 BC) (21st century BC - 20th century BC - 19th century BC - other centuries) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 2064 - 1986 BC -- Twin Dynasty wars in Egypt 2000 BC -- Farmers and herders travel south from Ethiopia and settle in Kenya. ... Mincio (IPA: ) is a river in the Lombardy region of northern Italy. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 6th century BC started on January 1, 600 BC and ended on December 31, 501 BC. // Monument 1, an Olmec colossal head at La Venta The 5th and 6th centuries BC were a time of empires, but more importantly, a time... Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ...

Mantua.
Mantua.


Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2010x1113, 566 KB) Mantova vista dalla sponda del lago Inferiore. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2010x1113, 566 KB) Mantova vista dalla sponda del lago Inferiore. ...


The name derives from the Etruscan god Mantus, of Hades. After being conquered by the Cenomani, a Gallic tribe, the city was conquered by the Romans between the first and second Punic wars, confusing its name with Manto, a daughter of Tyresia (Tiresias). The new territory was populated by veteran soldiers of Augustus. Mantua's most famous ancient citizen is the poet Publius Virgilius Maro, Virgil (Mantua me genuit), who was born near the city in 70 BC. In Roman and Etruscan mythology, Mantus and his wife, Mania were gods of the underworld. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... The Cenomani (Greek: , Strabo, Ptol. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... The Punic Wars were a series of three wars fought between Rome and Carthage between 264 and 146 BC. They are known as the Punic Wars because the Latin term for Carthaginian was Punici (older Poenici, from their Phoenician ancestry). ... There are two figures in Greek mythology named Manto, one a daughter of Tiresias, the other a daughter of Heracles. ... Everes redirects here. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC - 70s BC - 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC Years: 75 BC 74 BC 74 BC 73 BC 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68...


After the fall of the Roman Empire, Mantua was invaded in turn by Byzantines, Longobards and Franks. In the 11th century it became a possession of Boniface of Canossa, marquis of Toscana. The last ruler of the family was the countess Matilde of Canossa (d. 1115), who, according to legend, ordered the construction of the precious "Rotonda di San Lorenzo" (1082). For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Boniface as protrayed in the chronicle of Donizo, Vita Mathildis. ... This article is about a title of nobility. ... Tuscany (Italian Toscana) is a region in central Italy, bordering on Latium to the south, Umbria to the east, Emilia-Romagna and Liguria to the north, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west. ... Matilda of Tuscany from (1115) Matilda, countess of Tuscany (1046 – July 24, 1115), called La Gran Contessa, was the principal Italian supporter of Pope Gregory VII during the investiture controversy, and is one of the few medieval women to be remembered for her military accomplishments. ... Events Clairvaux Abbey is founded by St. ... Events England - The Rochester Cathedral was completed Europe - The German Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor besieges Rome and gains entry, a synod is agreed upon by the Romans to rule on the dispute between Henry and Pope Gregory VII Styria - Ottokar II succeeds his brother Adalbero (died 1086 or 1087...


After the death of Matilde of Canossa, Mantua became a free commune, and strenuously defended itself from the Holy Roman Empire in the 12th and 13th centuries. In 1198 Alberto Pitentino optimised the course of the Mincio, creating what Mantuans call "the four lakes" to reinforce the city's natural protection. In the Holy Roman Empire, a free imperial city (in German: freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes (Fürsten) of... Defensive towers at San Gimignano, Tuscany, bear witness to the factional strife within communes. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Toba of Japan Emperor Tsuchimikado ascends to the throne of Japan January 8 - Pope Innocent III ascends Papal Throne Frederick II, infant son of German King Henry VI, crowned King of Sicily Births August 24 - Alexander II of Scotland (d. ...


During the struggle between the Guelphs and the Ghibellines, Pinamonte Bonacolsi took advantage of the chaotic situation to seize power in 1273. His family ruled Mantua for the next century, making it more prosperous and artistically beautiful. On August 16, 1328, the last Bonacolsi, Rinaldo, was overthrown in a revolt backed by the House of Gonzaga, a family of officials. Luigi Gonzaga, who had been podestà of the city in 1318, was elected "People's Captain". The Gonzaga built new walls with five gates and renovated the architecture of the city in the 14th century, but the political situation in the city did not settle until the third Gonzaga, Ludovico I of Gonzaga, eliminated his relatives, seizing power for himself. The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... The Gonzaga family ruled Mantua in Northern Italy from 1328 to 1708. ... The Palace of the Podestà in Florence, known as the Palazzo Vecchio or the Palazzo della Signoria Podestà is the name given to certain high officials in many Italian cities, since the later middle ages, mainly as Chief magistrate of a city state (like otherwise styled counterparts in other cities... Events 1 April: Berwick-upon-Tweed is captured by the Scottish from the English Emperor Go-Daigo ascends to the throne of Japan End of the reign of Emperor Hanazono, emperor of Japan Pope John XXII declares the doctrines of the Franciscans advocating ecclesiastical poverty erroneous Qalaun Mosque, Cairo... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...

Image:Mantova vicolo Bonacolsi.jpg
A sight in the Medieval quarter of the city.

Through a payment of 120,000 golden florins in 1433, Gianfrancesco I was appointed marquis of Mantua by Emperor Sigismund, whose daughter Barbara of Brandenburg he married. In 1459 Pope Pius II held a diet in Mantua to proclaim a crusade against the Turks. Under Francesco II the famous Renaissance painter Andrea Mantegna worked in Mantua as court painter, producing some of his most outstanding works. The back of an Italian florin coin The front of an Italian florin coin The florin was struck from 1252 to 1523 with no significant change in its design or metal content standard. ... Year 1433 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Portrait of Gianfrancesco I Gonzaga, Ambras castle collection, Innsbruck, Austria. ... Sigismund (February 14/15, 1368 - December 9, 1437) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1433 to 1437. ... For the similarly spelled Brandenberg, see Brandenberg (Austria) or Brandenburg (disambiguation) Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE4 Capital Potsdam Minister-President Matthias Platzeck (SPD) Governing parties SPD / CDU Votes in Bundesrat 4 (of 69) Basic statistics Area  29,479 km² (11,382... Events September 23 - Battle of Blore Heath. ... Pope Pius II, born Enea Silvio Piccolomini (Latin Aeneas Sylvius), (October 18, 1405 – August 14, 1464) was Pope from 1458 until his death. ... Francesco II of Gonzaga (1466 - 1519), Marquis of Mantua, ruled Mantua from 1484 to 1519. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... The Agony in the Garden (1455) is the pinnacle of Mantegnas early style. ...


The first duke of Mantova was Federico II of Gonzaga, who acquired the title from Emperor Charles V in 1530. Federico commissioned Giulio Romano to build the famous Palazzo Te, on the periphery of the city, and profoundly improved the urbanistic asset of the city. About Mantua, the poet Torquato Tasso in 1586 wrote: Federico II of Gonzaga (1500 – 1540), Marquis of Mantua, succeeded his father Francesco as ruler of Mantua in 1519. ... Charles (February 24, 1500 – September 21, 1558) was Holy Roman Emperor (as Charles V) from 1519-1558; he was also King of Spain from 1516-1556, officially as Charles I of Spain, although often referred to as Charles V (Carlos Quinto or Carlos V) in Spain and Latin America. ... June 25 - Augsburg confession presented to Charles V of Holy Roman Empire. ... Fire in the Borgo, Vatican fresco Giulio Romano (ca 1499? – November 1, 1546) was an Italian painter, architect, and decorator. ... Palazzo del Te, Mantua (1524 - 1534). ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

This is a very beautiful city and one worth travelling a thousand miles to see.

In 1624 Francesco IV moved the ducal seat to a new residence, the Villa della Favorita, designed by the architect Nicolò Sebregondi. Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... Francesco IV Gonzaga (Mantua, May 7, 1586 – Mantua, December 22, 1612), was Duke of Mantua and (as Francesco II) Duke of Montferrat between February 9 and December 22, 1612. ...

Ludovico Gonzaga receiving the news of his son Francesco being elected cardinal, fresco by Andrea Mantegna in the Stanza degli Sposi of Palazzo Ducale.
Ludovico Gonzaga receiving the news of his son Francesco being elected cardinal, fresco by Andrea Mantegna in the Stanza degli Sposi of Palazzo Ducale.

In 1627, the direct line of the Gonzaga family came to an end with the vicious and weak Vincenzo II, and the town slowly declined under the new rulers, the Gonzaga-Nevers, a cadet French branch of the family. The War of the Mantuan Succession broke out, and in 1630 an Imperial army of 36,000 Landsknecht mercenaries besieged Mantua, bringing the plague with them. Mantua never recovered from this disaster. Ferdinand Carlo IV, an inept ruler whose only aim was to hold parties and theatrical representations, allied with France in the Spanish Succession War. After the latter's defeat, he took refuge in Venice, carrying with him a thousand pictures. At his death, in 1708, he was declared deposed and his family lost Mantua forever in favour of the Habsburgs of Austria. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1323, 261 KB) Description: Title: de: Freskenzyklus in der Camera degli Sposi im Palazzo Duccale in Mantua, Szene: Der Hof der Gonzaga, Detail: Der Herzog Ludovicio Gonzaga im Gespräch mit dem Sekretär Marsilio Andreasi Technique: de: Fresko Dimensions: Country... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1323, 261 KB) Description: Title: de: Freskenzyklus in der Camera degli Sposi im Palazzo Duccale in Mantua, Szene: Der Hof der Gonzaga, Detail: Der Herzog Ludovicio Gonzaga im Gespräch mit dem Sekretär Marsilio Andreasi Technique: de: Fresko Dimensions: Country... The Palazzo Ducale di Mantova (Ducal Palace) is a set edifices in the Italian city of Mantua (Lombardy), built between the 14th and the 17th century mainly by the noble family of Gonzaga as their royal residence in the capital of their Duchy. ... Events A Dutch ship makes the first recorded sighting of the coast of South Australia. ... Portrait of Vincenzo II Gonzaga as young man by Pieter Paul Rubens. ... Palais Ducal Nevers (Latin: Noviodunum, later Nevirnum and Nebirnum) is a commune of central France, the préfecture (capital) of the Nièvre département, in the former province of Nivernais. ... The War of the Mantuan Succession (1627-1631) came as a result of the extinction of the main male line of Gonzaga Dukes of Mantua in 1627. ... Events February 22 - Native American Quadequine introduces Popcorn to English colonists. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Landsknecht. ... Charles IV, Duke of Mantua (Revere, August 31, 1652 – Padua, July 5, 1708) was the only child of Duke Charles III of Mantua and Montferrat, and the last ruler of this Duchy. ... Charles II was the last Habsburg King of Spain. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ...


Under Austrian rule, Mantua enjoyed a revival, and during this period the Royal Academy of Sciences, Letters and Arts, the Scientific Theatre, and numerous Palaces were built.


On June 4, 1796, during the Napoleonic Wars, Mantua was besieged by Napoleon as a move against Austria, who joined the First Coalition. Austrian and Russian attempts to break the siege failed, but spread the French thin enough to abandon the siege on 31 July to fight other battles. The siege resumed on August 24. In early February the city surrendered and the region came under French administration. In the year 1810 by Porta Giulia, a gate of the town at Borgo di Porto (Cittadella), Andreas Hofer was shot; he had led the insurrection of the Tyrol against Napoleon. is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... The name First Coalition (1793–1797) designates the first major concerted effort of multiple European powers to contain Revolutionary France. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Andreas Hofer on an Austrian stamp. ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Tyrol Austria-Hungary in 1914, showing Tirol–Vorarlberg as the left-most province, coloured cream Capital Meran (Merano), until 1848 Government Principality Historical era Middle Ages  - Created County 1140  - Bequeathed to Habsburgs 1363 or 1369  - Joined Council of Princes 1582  - Trent, Tyrol and...


After the brief French rule, Mantua returned to Austria in 1814, becoming one of the Quadrilatero fortress cities in northern Italy. Agitation against Austria culminated in a revolt which lasted from 1851 to 1855, and was finally suppressed by the Austrian army. One of the most famous episodes of Italian Risorgimento took place in the small valley of Belfiore, when a group of rebels was hanged by the Austrians. Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Quadrilatero (English: ) is the traditional name of a defensive system of the Austrian Empire in the Lombardy-Venetia, which connected the fortresses of Peschiera, Mantua, Legnago and Verona between the Mincio, the Po and Adige Rivers. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy...


In 1866, Mantua was incorporated in united Italy by the king of Sardinia. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Italian unification (called in Italian the Risorgimento, or Resurgence) was the political and social process that unified different states of the Italian peninsula into the single nation of Italy. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont with Savoy, Nice, and Sardinia in the inset. ...


See also:

The Duchy of Mantua was an Italian state that was ruled by the Gonzaga family from 1328 to 1708. ...

Main sights

Piazza Sordello in Mantua.
Piazza Sordello in Mantua.
Houses on a canal in Mantua.
Houses on a canal in Mantua.


The Gonzaga protected art and culture, and hosted several important artists like Leone Battista Alberti, Andrea Mantegna, Giulio Romano, Donatello, Luca Fancelli and Nicolò Sebregondi. Though many of the masterworks have been dispersed, the cultural value of Mantua is nonetheless outstanding. Many monuments furnish examples of unique patrimony in patrician buildings and Italian architecture. Image File history File links Mantua1_BMK.jpg Summary Mantova, Lombardia, Italia /*from de. ... Image File history File links Mantua1_BMK.jpg Summary Mantova, Lombardia, Italia /*from de. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,608 × 1,952 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,608 × 1,952 pixels, file size: 2. ... Late statue of Leon Battista Alberti. ... The Agony in the Garden (1455) is the pinnacle of Mantegnas early style. ... Fire in the Borgo, Vatican fresco Giulio Romano (ca 1499? – November 1, 1546) was an Italian painter, architect, and decorator. ... Statue of Habacuc (popularly known as Zuccone) for the Giottos Bell Tower. ... Luca Fancelli ( circa 1430 - after 1494) was an Italian architect and sculptor. ...


Main monuments include:

  • The Palazzo Te (1525-1535), a creation of Giulio Romano (who lived in Mantua in his final years) in the style of mature Renaissance and with some hints of a certain post-Raphaelian mannerism. It was the summer residential villa of Frederick II of Gonzaga. It hosts the Museo Civico (with the donations of Arnoldo Mondadori, one of the most important Italian publishers, and Ugo Sissa, a Mantuan architect who worked in Iraq from where he brought back important Mesopotamian artworks)
  • The Palazzo Ducale, famous residence of the Gonzaga family, made up by a number of buildings, courtyards and gardens gathered around the Palazzo del Capitano, the Magna Domus, and the Castle of St. George.
  • The Basilica of Sant'Andrea
  • The Duomo
  • The Rotonda di San Lorenzo
  • The Bibiena Theater
  • The church of San Sebastiano
  • The Palazzo Vescovile ("Bishops Palace")
  • The Palazzo degli Uberti
  • The Torre della Gabbia ("Cage Tower")
  • The Palazzo del Podestà that hosts the museum of Tazio Nuvolari
  • The Palazzo della Ragione with the Tower of the Clock
  • The Palazzo Bonacolsi

Palazzo del Te, Mantua (1524 - 1534). ... Events January 21 - The Swiss Anabaptist Movement was born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptized each other in the home of Manzs mother on Neustadt-Gasse, Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union. ... pie is nice Year 1535 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Fire in the Borgo, Vatican fresco Giulio Romano (ca 1499? – November 1, 1546) was an Italian painter, architect, and decorator. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... This page is about the artist. ... In Parmigianinos Madonna with the Long Neck (1534-40), Mannerism makes itself known by elongated proportions, affected poses, and unclear perspective. ... Federico II of Gonzaga (1500 – 1540), Marquis of Mantua, succeeded his father Francesco as ruler of Mantua in 1519. ... Arnoldo Mondadori (Poggio Rusco Mantua, November 2, 1889 - Milan, June 8, 1971) was a noted Italian publisher. ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... The Palazzo Ducale di Mantova (Ducal Palace) is a set edifices in the Italian city of Mantua (Lombardy), built between the 14th and the 17th century mainly by the noble family of Gonzaga as their royal residence in the capital of their Duchy. ... The Basilica di SantAndrea is a Renaissance church in Mantua, Lombardy (Italy). ... Façade. ... The Rotonda of San Lorenzo. ... Nuvolaris statue in front of PalaLottomatica in Rome. ...

Gallery

Transportation

Mantua lies across the Milan-Codogno-Cremona-Mantova. By car, it can be reached through the A4 (Milan-Venice) Highway to Verona, and from there Highway A22 (Brennero-Modena). Otherwise, through the State road 415 (Milan-Cremona) to Cremona, and from there State road 10 (Cremona-Mantova). Codogno is a town in the province of Lodi, Lombardy, Italy. ... Cremona is a city in northern Italy, situated in Lombardy, on the left shore of the Po river in the middle of the Pianura padana (Po valley). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Brenner Pass (Italian: Passo del Brennero; German: Brennerpass; Latin: Brennus Mons) is a mountain pass through the Alps along the border between Italy and Austria, and is one of the principal passes of the Alps. ...


The closest airport is Verona-Villafranca. Verona Airport (IATA: VRN, ICAO: LIPX), also known as Valerio Catullo Villafranca International Airport or simply Verona-Villafranca is an airport serving Verona, Italy. ...


Trivia

  • An annual survey of Legambiente (an ecologist movement of Italy) in 2005 declared Mantua the most liveable city of the country. The study was based on levels of pollution, quality of life, traffic of cars, and public transportation, among other criteria. [1]
  • In William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet, Romeo spends his period of exile - his punishment for killing Tybalt - in Mantua. Also, in his play Taming of the Shrew, the schoolmaster who pretends to be Lucentio’s father, Vincentio, is from this city.
  • Giuseppe Verdi's opera Rigoletto (Based on Victor Hugo's play Le roi s'amuse) is set in Mantua. Austro-Hungarian authorities in Venice forced him to move the action from France to Mantua.
  • Since 1997 Mantua has hosted the Festivaletteratura, one of the most renowned literary events in Europe.
  • In 2007 the remains of two people were discovered during the construction of a factory. The remains are thought to be between 5000 and 6000 years old. It is speculated that the remains are of two young lovers because the two skeletons appear to be embracing. [2]
  • The story of Tinto Brass' Monamour 2005 is set to take place in Mantua.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Shakespeare (National Portrait Gallery), in the famous Chandos portrait, artist and authenticity unconfirmed. ... Romeo and Juliet in the famous balcony scene by Ford Madox Brown For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... Tybalt in the 1968 film as portrayed by Michael York. ... The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... Taming of the Shrew by Augustus Egg The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... “Verdi” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Rigoletto is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (IPA: (26 February 1802 — 22 May 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Le roi samuse is a play written by Victor Hugo in 1832. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... A literay fair, held in Mantua, Italy, since 1996. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Giovanni Brass (born March 26, 1933), better known as Tinto Brass, is one of the most well-known and controversial Italian filmmakers. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Twin cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Azuchi (安土町; -cho) is a town located in Gamo District, Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Charleville-Mézières is a town and commune in northeastern France, préfecture (capital) of the Ardennes département which is itself part of the Champagne-Ardenne région. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Palais Ducal Nevers (Latin: Noviodunum, later Nevirnum and Nebirnum) is a commune of central France, the préfecture (capital) of the Nièvre département, in the former province of Nivernais. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Weingarten (German for vine garden, vinyard) is the name of several places Weingarten (Württemberg) Weingarten (Baden) Weingarten Abbey in Weingarten Last names Gene Weingarten (born 1951), a humor writer and journalist Hermann Weingarten 1834–1892, protestant theologian Johnny Wayne (born Louis Weingarten) (1918-1990), a Canadian comedian and comedy... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... , For other uses, see Hyderabad. ...

Famous citizens

Eurobeat artist and producer Dave Rodgers and neo-aristotelian philosopher Alberto Jori were born in this city. SUPER EUROBEAT Vol. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Image:DaveRodgers. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Alberto Jori (1965, Mantova/Italy) is an Italian Neo-Aristotelian philosopher. ...


Giuseppe Sarto, appointed Bishop in 1884 before he became Pope Saint Pius X in 1903. He is credited with reviving the diocese. Pope Pius X (1903-1914), pictured in 1904, wearing the 1834 Triple Tiara of Pope Gregory XVI Saint Pius X, né Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto, (2 June 1835 - 20 August 1914) was Pope from 1903 to 1914, succeeding Pope Leo XIII. He was the first pope since the Counter-Reformation Pope... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Pope Saint Pius X, born Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto (2 June 1835 – 20 August 1914), was Pope from 1903 to 1914, succeeding Pope Leo XIII. He was the first pope since the Counter-Reformation Pope St. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


External links

  • Official site
  • ItalianVisits.com
  • Palazzo Te (in Italian)
  • A Mantova To know and to see Mantua
  • Prehistoric lovers found locked in eternal embrace
  • Bibiena's Theatre (IT) description by Arthur Rubinstein Association Italy

References

  1. ^ Mantua and the Gonzaga domains. UNESCO World Heritage Centre (2006-06-01). Retrieved on 2006-09-18.
  2. ^ Parco del Mincio. Comune di Mantova. Retrieved on 2006-09-18.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mantua (391 words)
Mantua was invaded (after the decay of Roman Empire) by Goths, Byzantines[?], Longobards and Franks, then it became a possession of Canossa[?], whose latest ruler was the famous countess Matilde of Canossa[?] (d.
In the Middle Ages, Mantua was ruled by several families which became extremely important in the history and in the culture of Italy, among which the Bonacolsi[?] and the Corradi di Gonzaga (or, briefly, Gonzaga - 1328-1708).
Austria conquered Mantua after the chute of Gonzaga (of this period are the Royal Academy of Sciences, Letters and Arts and the Scientific Theatre), then the town passed under Napoleon's domain and was later unified in Italy by the king of Sardinia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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