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Encyclopedia > Mantis shrimp
Mantis shrimp

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Crustacea
Class: Malacostraca
Subclass: Hoplocarida
Calman, 1904
Order: Stomatopoda
Latreille, 1817
Suborders, superfamilies and families [1]

Suborder Archaestomatopodea Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (700x1170, 91 KB) Mantis shrimp Source:http://www. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Subphyla and Classes Subphylum Trilobitomorpha Trilobita - trilobites (extinct) Subphylum Chelicerata Arachnida - spiders,scorpions, etc. ... For the Dutch band, see Crustacean (band). ... // Subclasses Eumalacostraca Hoplocarida Phyllocarida See text for orders. ... William Thomas Calman (December 29, 1871 - September 29, 1952) was a Scottish zoologist, specialising in the Crustacea. ... Pierre André Latreille. ... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... In biology, a superfamily is a taxonomic grade intermediate between suborder and family. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ...

Tyrannophontidae†

Suborder Unipeltata

Bathysquilloidea
Bathysquillidae
Indosquillidae
Gonodactyloidea
Alainosquillidae
Hemisquillidae
Gonodactylidae
Odontodactylidae
Protosquillidae
Pseudosquillidae
Takuidae
Erythrosquilloidea
Erythrosquillidae
Lysiosquilloidea
Coronididae
Lysiosquillidae
Nannosquillidae
Tetrasquillidae
Squilloidea
Squillidae
Eurysquilloidea
Eurysquillidae
Parasquilloidea
Parasquillidae

Mantis shrimp or stomatopods are marine crustaceans belonging to the order Stomatopoda, one part of the class Malacostraca, the largest class of crustaceans. They are neither shrimp nor mantids, but receive their name purely from the physical resemblance to both the terrestrial praying mantis and the shrimp. They may reach 30 cm (12 in) in length, although exceptional cases of up to 38 cm have been recorded [2]. The carapace of mantis shrimp covers only the rear part of the head and the first three segments of the thorax. Mantis shrimp appear in a variety of colours, from shades of browns to bright neon colours. Gonodactylidae are one of the various families of mantis shrimp, or stomatopods. ... Genera Odontodactylus Odontodactylidae is a crustacean family of the order Stomatopoda. ... Species Erythrosquilla hamano Erythrosquilla megalops Erythrosquilla is a genus of mantis shrimp, placed in its own family (Erythrosquillidae) and superfamily (Erythrosquilloidea) comprising two species: Erythrosquilla hamano Ahyong, 2001 Erythrosquilla megalops Manning & Bruce, 1984 The family is distinguished from other stomatopod families by the presence of a ridge on the mid... Genera See text. ... Genera See text Squillidae is a family of mantis shrimp, the only family in the superfamily Squilloidea [1]. It contains the following genera [2]: ^ a b c J. W. Martin & G. E. Davis (2001). ... Genera See text Eurysquillidae is a family of mantis shrimp. ... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... A class is the rank in the scientific classification of organisms in biology below Phylum and above Order. ... // Subclasses Eumalacostraca Hoplocarida Phyllocarida See text for orders. ... Superfamilies Alpheoidea Atyoidea Bresilioidea Campylonotoidea Crangonoidea Galatheacaridoidea Nematocarcinoidea Oplophoroidea Palaemonoidea Pandaloidea Pasiphaeoidea Procaridoidea Processoidea Psalidopodoidea Stylodactyloidea True shrimp are swimming, decapod crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. ... A praying mantis, or praying mantid, is the common name for an insect of the order Mantodea. ... A praying mantis, or praying mantid, is the common name for an insect of the order Mantodea. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... The term carapace refers to a dorsal section of an exoskeleton or shell, in a number of animal groups. ... Diagram of a tsetse fly, showing the head, thorax and abdomen The thorax is a division of an animals body that lies between the head and the abdomen. ...


Called "sea grasshoppers" by ancient Assyrians, "prawn killers" in Australia and now sometimes referred to as "thumb splitters" by modern divers — because of the relative ease the creature has in mutilating small appendages — mantis shrimp sport powerful claws that they use to attack and kill prey by spearing, stunning or dismemberment. Mantis shrimp can break through aquarium glass with a single strike from this weapon [3]. Language(s) Aramaic Religion(s) Syriac Christianity Related ethnic groups Other Semitic peoples, and other ethnic groups from the Fertile Crescent. ... Scuba diving is swimming underwater while using self-contained breathing equipment. ... “Aquaria” redirects here. ...

Contents

Ecology

These aggressive and typically solitary sea creatures spend most of their time hiding in rock formations or burrowing intricate passageways in the sea-bed. They either wait for prey to chance upon them or, unlike most crustaceans, actually hunt, chase and kill living prey. They rarely exit their homes except to feed and relocate, and can be diurnal, nocturnal or crepuscular, depending on the species. Most species live in tropical and subtropical seas (Indian and Pacific Oceans between eastern Africa and Hawaii), although some live in temperate seas. A diurnal animal (dī-ŭrnəl) is an animal that is active during the daytime and sleeps during the night. ... A bat illustrating nocturnal features. ... Adult Firefly or Lightning Bug – a Crepuscular Beetle Photuris lucicrescens Crepuscular is a term used to describe animals that are primarily active during the twilight. ...


Classification and the claw

Around 400 species of mantis shrimp have currently been described worldwide; all living species are in the suborder Unipeltata [4]. They are commonly separated into two distinct groups determined by the manner of claws they possess: For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Cat claw A claw is a curved pointed appendage, found at the end of a toe or finger or, in arthropods, of the tarsus. ...

Squilla mantis, showing the spearing appendages
Squilla mantis, showing the spearing appendages
  • Spearers are armed with spiny appendages topped with barbed tips, used to stab and snag prey and some have a blunt, calcified club on the elbow.
  • Smashers, on the other hand, possess a much more developed club and a more rudimentary spear (which is nevertheless quite sharp and still used in fights between their own kind); the club is used to bludgeon and smash their meals apart. The inner aspect of the dactyl (the terminal portion of the appendage) can also possess a sharp edge, with which the animal can cut prey while it swims.

Both types strike by rapidly unfolding and swinging their raptorial claws at the prey, and are capable of inflicting serious damage on victims significantly greater in size than themselves. In smashers, these two weapons are employed with blinding quickness, with an acceleration of 10,400 g and speeds of 23 m/s from a standing start  [5]. Because they strike so rapidly, they generate cavitation bubbles between the appendage and the striking surface  [5]. The collapse of these cavitation bubbles produce measurable forces on their prey in addition to the instantaneous forces of 1,500 N that are caused by the impact of the appendage against the striking surface, which means that the prey is hit twice by a single strike; first by the claw and then by the collapsing cavitation bubbles that immediately follows  [6]. Even if the initial strike misses the prey, the resulting shock wave can be enough to kill or stun the prey. Image File history File linksMetadata Squilla_mantis. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Squilla_mantis. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Squilla mantis is a species of mantis shrimp chiefly found and fished in the Mediterranean Sea. ... An appendage is, in general, an external body part that projects from the body, or a natural prolongation or projection from a part of any organism. ... The term g force or gee force refers to the symbol g, the force of acceleration due to gravity at the earths surface. ... Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds. ... Cavitating propeller model in a water tunnel experiment High speed jet of fluid impact on a fixed surface. ... For other uses, see Newton (disambiguation). ...


The snap can also produce sonoluminescence from the collapsing bubble. This will produce a very small amount of light and high temperatures in the range of several thousand Kelvin within the collapsing bubble, although both the light and high temperatures are too weak and short-lived to be detected without advanced scientific equipment. The light emission and temperature increase probably have no biological significance but are rather side-effects of the rapid snapping motion. Pistol shrimp produce this effect in a very similar manner. Long exposure image of multi-bubble sonoluminescence created by a high intensity ultrasonic horn immersed in a beaker of liquid. ... For other uses, see Kelvin (disambiguation). ... Genera Alpheopsis Alpheus Amphibetaeus Arete Aretopsis Athanas Athanopsis Automate Bannereus Batella Bermudacaris Betaeus Betaeopsis Coronalpheus Coutieralpheus Deioneus Fenneralpheus Hamalpheus Leptalpheus Leslibetaeus Metabetaeus Metalpheus Mohocaris Notalpheus Nennalpheus Orygmalpheus Parabetaeus Pomagnathus Potamalpheops Prionalpheus Pterocaris Racilius Salmoneus Stenalpheops Synalpheus Thuylamea Vexillipar Yagerocaris Alpheidae is a family of caridean snapping shrimp characterized by having...


Smashers use this ability to attack snails, crabs, molluscs and rock oysters; their blunt clubs enabling them to crack the shells of their prey into pieces. Spearers, on the other hand, prefer the meat of softer animals, like fish, which their barbed claws can more easily slice and snag. For other uses, see Snail (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crab (disambiguation). ... Classes Caudofoveata Aplacophora Polyplacophora - Chitons Monoplacophora Bivalvia - Bivalves Scaphopoda - Tusk shells Gastropoda - Snails and Slugs Cephalopoda - Squids, Octopuses, etc. ... For other uses, see Oyster (disambiguation). ...


The eyes

The front of Lysiosquilla maculata, showing the stalked eyes
The front of Lysiosquilla maculata, showing the stalked eyes

Mantis shrimp are the only animals with hyperspectral colour vision. Their eyes (both mounted on mobile stalks and constantly moving about independently of each other) are similarly variably coloured, and are considered to be the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom [7]. They permit both serial and parallel analysis of visual stimuli. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x700, 38 KB)Mantis shrimp (Lysiosquilla maculata) in the Haus des Meeres, Vienna. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x700, 38 KB)Mantis shrimp (Lysiosquilla maculata) in the Haus des Meeres, Vienna. ... The term hyperspectral is found in military and remote sensing jargon and denotes, a sensor system observing a target in very different spectral bands, by different types of sensors, e. ... Color vision is a psychophysical phenomenon that exists only in our minds. ... Compound eye of a dragonfly Compound eye of Antarctic krill as imaged by an electron microscope A compound eye is a visual organ found in certain arthropods such as insects and crustaceans. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... In biological taxonomy, a kingdom or regnum is a taxon in either (historically) the highest rank, or (in the new three-domain system) the rank below domain. ... In physiology, a stimulus is a detectable change in the internal or external environment. ...


Each compound eye is made up of up to 10,000 separate ommatidia of the apposition type. Each eye consists of two flattened hemispheres separated by six parallel rows of highly specialised ommatidia, collectively called the midband, which divides the eye into three regions. This is a design which makes it possible for mantis shrimp to see objects with three different parts of the same eye. In other words, each individual eye possesses trinocular vision and depth perception. The upper and lower hemispheres are used primarily for recognition of forms and motion, not colour vision, like the eyes of many other crustaceans. The compound eye of insects is composed of hundreds of units called ommatidia. ... Compound eye of a dragonfly Compound eye of Antarctic krill as imaged by an electron microscope A compound eye is a visual organ found in certain arthropods such as insects and crustaceans. ... For other uses, see Sphere (disambiguation). ... Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions. ...


Rows 1-4 of the midband are specialised for colour vision, from ultra-violet to infra-red. The optical elements in these rows have eight different classes of visual pigments and the rhabdom is divided into three different pigmented layers (tiers), each adapted for different wavelengths. The three tiers in rows 2 and 3 are separated by colour filters (intrarhabdomal filters) that can be divided into four distinct classes, two classes in each row. It is organised like a sandwich; a tier, a colour filter of one class, a tier again, a colour filter of another class, and then a last tier. Rows 5-6 are segregated into different tiers too, but have only one class of visual pigment (a ninth class) and are specialised for polarisation vision. They can detect different planes of polarised light. A tenth class of visual pigment is found in the dorsal and ventral hemispheres of the eye. For other uses, see Ultraviolet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Infrared (disambiguation). ... Rhabdoms are transparent rods, found in the center of each ommatidium in the compound eye of arthropods. ... The retinal pigment epithelium is the pigmented cell layer just outside the neurosensory retina that nourishes retinal visual cells, and is firmly attached to the underlying choroid and overlying retinal visual cells. ... For other uses, see Wavelength (disambiguation). ... In electrodynamics, polarization (also spelled polarisation) is the property of electromagnetic waves, such as light, that describes the direction of their transverse electric field. ...


The midband only covers a small area of about 5°-10° of the visual field at any given instant, but like in most crustaceans, the eyes are mounted on stalks. In mantis shrimps the movement of the stalked eye is unusually free, and can be driven in all possible axes, up to at least 70°, of movement by eight individual eyecup muscles divided into six functional groups. By using these muscles to scan the surroundings with the midband, they can add information about forms, shapes and landscape which cannot be detected by the upper and lower hemisphere of the eye. They can also track moving objects using large, rapid eye movements where the two eyes move independently. By combining different techniques, including saccadic movements, the midband can cover a very wide range of the visual field. This article describes the unit of angle. ... A saccade is a fast movement of an eye, head or other part of an animals body or device. ...


Some species have at least 16 different photoreceptor types, which are divided into four classes (their spectral sensitivity is further tuned by colour filters in the retinas), 12 of them for colour analysis in the different wavelengths (including four which are sensitive to ultraviolet light) and four of them for analysing polarised light. By comparison, humans have only four visual pigments. The visual information leaving the retina seems to be processed into numerous parallel data streams leading into the central nervous system, greatly reducing the analytical requirements at higher levels. For other uses, see Ultraviolet (disambiguation). ... Human eye cross-sectional view. ... Look up Data stream in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A diagram showing the CNS: 1. ...


Reasons given for powerful eyesight

The eyes of mantis shrimp may make them able to recognise different types of coral, prey species (which are often transparent or semi-transparent), or predators, such as barracuda, which have shimmering scales. Alternatively, the manner in which mantis shrimp hunt (very rapid movements of the claws) may require very accurate ranging information, which would require accurate depth perception. For other uses, see Barracuda (disambiguation). ...


The fact that those with the most advanced vision also are the species with the most colourful bodies, suggests the colour vision has taken the same direction as the peacock's tail. Peacock re-directs here; for alternate uses see Peacock (disambiguation). ...


During mating rituals, mantis shrimp actively fluoresce, and the wavelength of this fluorescence was shown to match the wavelengths detected by their eye pigments [2]. Females are only fertile during certain phases of the tidal cycle; the ability to perceive the phase of the moon may therefore help prevent wasted mating efforts. It may also give mantis shrimp information about the size of the tide, which is important for species living in shallow water near the shore. Fluorescence induced by exposure to ultraviolet light in vials containing various sized cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots. ... The tide is the cyclic rising and falling of Earths ocean surface caused by the tidal forces of the Moon and the Sun acting on the Earth. ... Lunar phase refers to the appearance of the illuminated portion of the Moon as seen by an observer, usually on Earth. ...


Another theory is that the invertebrate brain is unequipped to analyse all the incoming data in real time and so the processing is performed physically by the eye. Invertebrate is an English word that describes any animal without a spinal column. ... The human brain In animals, the brain (enkephalos) (Greek for in the skull), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for behavior. ... It has been suggested that Real-time computing be merged into this article or section. ...


Behaviour

Mantis shrimp appear to be highly intelligent, are long-lived and exhibit complex behaviour, such as ritualised fighting. Scientists have discovered that some species use fluorescent patterns on their bodies for signaling with their own and maybe even other species, expanding their range of behavioural signals. They can learn and remember well, and are able to recognise individual neighbours with whom they frequently interact. They can recognise them by visual signs and even by individual smell. Many have developed a complex social behaviour to defend their space from rivals. Fluorescence induced by exposure to ultraviolet light in vials containing various sized Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots. ...


In a lifetime, they can have as many as 20 or 30 breeding episodes. Depending on the species, the eggs can be laid and kept in a burrow, or carried around under the female's tail until they hatch. Also depending on the species, male and female come together only to mate or bond in monogamous long-term relationships. In monogamy (Greek: monos = single/only and gamos = marriage) a person has only one spouse at a time (as opposed to polygamy). ... See: relational model personal relationship mathematical relationship, including: inverse relationship direct relationship relation (mathematics). ...


In the monogamous species, the mantis shrimp remain with the same partner for up to 20 years. They share the same burrow, and there are reasons to suspect that these pairs can coordinate their activities. Both sexes often take care of the eggs (biparental care). In Pullosquilla and some species in Nannosquilla, the female will lay two clutches of eggs, one that the male tends and one that the female tends. In other species, the female will look after the eggs while the male hunts for both of them. Once the eggs hatch the offspring may spend up to three months as plankton. For the SpongeBob SquarePants character, see Sheldon J. Plankton. ...


Most stomatopods display the standard locomotion types as seen in true shrimp and lobsters. One species, Nannosquilla decemspinosa, has been observed flipping itself into a crude wheel. The species lives in shallow, sandy areas. At low tides, N. decemspinosa is often stranded by its short rear legs, which are sufficient when the body is supported by water. The mantis shrimp then performs a forward flip, in attempts to roll towards the next tidepool. Caldwell once observed an N. decemspinosa roll repeatedly for a total of six feet. In a general sense, locomotion simply means active movement or travel, applying not just to biological individuals. ... Superfamilies Alpheoidea Atyoidea Bresilioidea Campylonotoidea Crangonoidea Galatheacaridoidea Nematocarcinoidea Oplophoroidea Palaemonoidea Pandaloidea Pasiphaeoidea Procaridoidea Processoidea Psalidopodoidea Stylodactyloidea True shrimp are swimming, decapod crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. ... Clawed lobsters comprise a family (Nephropidae) of large marine crustaceans. ...


Cookery

In Japanese cuisine, the mantis shrimp is eaten boiled as sashimi and as a sushi topping, and is called shako (蝦蛄). It is commonly served in Japan, but is not often found on the menu at sushi restaurants in the United States [citation needed]. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 299 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (445 × 891 pixels, file size: 60 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 299 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (445 × 891 pixels, file size: 60 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... There are many views as to what defines Japanese cuisine, as the everyday food of the Japanese people has diversified immensely over the past century or so. ... Assorted sashimi Sashimi (Japanese: ) is a Japanese delicacy primarily consisting of very fresh raw seafoods, thinly sliced into pieces about 2. ... This article is about Japanese cuisine. ...


In Cantonese cuisine, the mantis shrimp is a popular dish known as "pissing shrimp" (攋尿蝦, Mandarin pinyin: lài niào xiā, modern Cantonese: laaih niuh hā) due to its tendency to urinate when cooked [citation needed]. Because of this, mantis shrimp are speared to induce them to evacuate their bowels prior to being introduced into the cookpot [citation needed]. After cooking, their flesh is closer to that of lobsters than that of shrimp, and like lobsters, their shells are quite hard and require some pressure to crack. Yue cuisine Chinese: Cantonese (Yue) cuisine originates from Guangdong Province in Southern China, or more precisely, the area around Guangzhou (Canton). ... This article is on all of the Northern and Southwestern Chinese dialects. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ... Subfamilies and Genera Neophoberinae Acanthacaris Thymopinae Nephropsis Nephropides Thymops Thymopsis Nephropinae Homarus Nephrops Homarinus Metanephrops Eunephrops Thymopides Clawed lobsters comprise a family (Nephropidae, sometimes also Homaridae) of large marine crustaceans. ... Superfamilies Alpheoidea Atyoidea Bresilioidea Campylonotoidea Crangonoidea Galatheacaridoidea Nematocarcinoidea Oplophoroidea Palaemonoidea Pandaloidea Pasiphaeoidea Procaridoidea Processoidea Psalidopodoidea Stylodactyloidea True shrimp are swimming, decapod crustaceans classified in the infraorder Caridea, found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water. ...


In the Mediterranean countries the Squilla mantis mantis shrimp is a common seafood, especially on the Adriatic coasts. The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Squilla mantis is a species of mantis shrimp chiefly found and fished in the Mediterranean Sea. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ...


The usual concerns associated with consuming seafood are an issue with mantis shrimp, as they may dwell in contaminated waters. This is especially true in Hawaii where some have grown unnaturally large [2]. This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Aquariums

Saltwater aquarists are currently caring for stomatopods across the world. These aquarists may play a major role in understanding the many mysteries involving the mantis shrimp. However, mantis shrimp are considered by many domestic marine aquarists as pests. They can often sneak into a tank hidden in rocks, and once there, they can feed on fish, corals, and smaller crustaceans. They are notoriously difficult to catch once established in a well stocked tank [8] and have been known to crack aquariums[9].


References

  1. ^ J. W. Martin & G. E. Davis (2001). An Updated Classification of the Recent Crustacea (PDF), Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 132 pp. 
  2. ^ a b c James Gonser. "Large shrimp thriving in Ala Wai Canal muck", Honolulu Advertiser, 2003-02-14. 
  3. ^ April Holladay. "Shrimp spring into shattering action", USA Today, 2006-09-01. 
  4. ^ Stomatopoda. Tree of Life Web Project (2002-01-01).
  5. ^ a b S. N. Patek, W. L. Korff, and R. L. Caldwell (2004). Deadly strike mechanism of a mantis shrimp. Nature 428: 819-820. doi:10.1038/428819a. 
  6. ^ S. N. Patek and R. L. Caldwell (2005). Extreme impact and cavitation forces of a biological hammer: strike forces of the peacock mantis shrimp. Journal of Experimental Biology 208: 3655-3664. doi:10.1242/jeb.01831. 
  7. ^ "Mantis shrimp have the world's most complex colour vision system." - Justin Marshall, University of Queensland
  8. ^ Nick Dakin (2004). The Marine Aquarium. London: Andromeda. ISBN 1-902389-67-0. 
  9. ^ http://www.blueboard.com/mantis/sighting/report1.htm

“PDF” redirects here. ... The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County opened in Exposition Park in 1913 as the Museum of History, Science, and Art. ... The Honolulu Advertiser is the largest newspaper in the U.S. state of Hawai‘i and has a morning circulation of 143,983 and a Sunday edition of 165,481 copies. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tree of Life Web Project is an ongoing Internet project and providing information about the diversity and phylogeny of life on Earth. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nature is a prominent scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chesapeake Bay Program - Mantis Shrimp (490 words)
The mantis shrimp is properly neither a shrimp nor a terrestrial "mantis," but bears characteristics common to both.
The common mantis shrimp usually inhabits the middle- to high-salinity waters of the lower Bay, and grows to a length of 8 to 10 inches.
Often called the "shrimp snapper" by watermen and respected for the swift slashing of its claws, which can slice a shrimp or fish in two (and lacerate a hand), the mantis shrimp is also edible and has a reputation for being very tasty.
Mantis shrimp - colourful and aggressive (384 words)
Mantis shrimps support large fisheries in many parts of the world but they are susceptible to overfishing and habitat loss.
Mantis shrimps can live in burrows and crevices on coral reefs, or on the seabed down to a depth of 1500 metres.
Mantis shrimps are also sensitive to environmental pollutants and are good bioindicators of pollution on coral reefs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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