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Encyclopedia > Manticore
Manticore illustration from The History of Four-footed Beasts (1607)
Manticore illustration from The History of Four-footed Beasts (1607)

The manticore is a legendary creature similar to the Egyptian Sphinx. It has the body of a red lion, a human head with three rows of sharp teeth, and a trumpet-like voice. Other aspects of the creature vary from story to story. It may be horned or not. The tail is either of a dragon or a scorpion, and it may shoot poisonous spines to either paralyze or kill its victims. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... An image of Papilio machaon, from Topsells History Edward Topsell (c. ... A manticore is a mythical creature similar to a Chimera. ... A legendary creature is a mythological or folkloric creature (often known as fabulous creatures in historical literature). ... For other uses, see Sphinx (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dragon. ...

Contents

Origin

The manticore was of Persian origin, where its name was "man-eater" (from early Middle Persian martya "man" (as in human) and xwar- "to eat"). The English term "manticore" was borrowed from Latin mantichora, itself borrowed from Greek mantikhoras—an erroneous pronunciation of the original Persian name. It passed into European folklore first through a remark by Ctesias, a Greek physician at the Persian court of King Artaxerxes II in the fourth century BC, in his notes on India ("Indika"), which circulated among Greek writers on natural history, but have not survived. The Romanised Greek Pausanias, in his Description of Greece, recalled strange animals he had seen at Rome and commented, The beliefs and practices of the culturally and linguistically related group of ancient peoples who inhabited the Iranian Plateau and its borderlands, as well as areas of Central Asia from the Black Sea to Khotan (modern Ho-tien, China), form Persian mythology. ... Farsi redirects here. ... Ctesias of Cnidus (in Caria) (Greek ), was a Greek physician and historian, who flourished in the 5th century BC. In early life he was physician to Artaxerxes Mnemon, whom he accompanied in 401 BC on his expedition against his brother Cyrus the Younger. ... Artaxerxes II (c. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ...

The beast described by Ctesias in his Indian history, which he says is called martichoras by the Indians and "man-eater" by the Greeks, I am inclined to think is the tiger. But that it has three rows of teeth along each jaw and spikes at the tip of its tail with which it defends itself at close quarters, while it hurls them like an archer's arrows at more distant enemies; all this is, I think, a false story that the Indians pass on from one to another owing to their excessive dread of the beast. (Description, xxi, 5)

Pliny the Elder did not share Pausanias' skepticism. He followed Aristotle's natural history by including the martichoras—mistranscribed as manticorus in his copy of Aristotle and thus passing into European languages—among his descriptions of animals in Naturalis Historia, c. 77 AD. Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Naturalis Historia Pliny the Elders Natural History is an encyclopedia written by Pliny the Elder. ... For other uses, see number 77. ...


Pliny's book was widely enjoyed and uncritically believed through the European Middle Ages, during which the manticore was sometimes illustrated in bestiaries. The manticore made a late appearance in heraldry, during the 16th century, and it influenced some Mannerist representations, as in Bronzino's allegory The Exposure of Luxury, (National Gallery, London)[1]— but more often in the decorative schemes called "grotteschi"— of the sin of Fraud, conceived as a monstrous chimera with a beautiful woman's face, and in this way it passed by means of Cesare Ripa's Iconologia into the seventeenth and eighteenth century French conception of a sphinx. In Parmigianinos Madonna with the Long Neck (1534-40), Mannerism makes itself known by elongated proportions, affected poses, and unclear perspective. ... Andrea Doria as Neptune Agnolo di Cosimo ( 1503, Firenze – 1572, Firenze) (also known as Agnolo Bronzino and Agnolo Tori). ... This article is about the word itself. ... Cesare Ripa was a 16th-century Italian aesthetician and author of the Iconologia. ... For other uses, see Sphinx (disambiguation). ...


Legacy

Nowadays, the manticore is said by the natives to inhabit the forests of Asia, particularly Indonesia. The manticore can kill instantly with a bite or a scratch and will then eat the victim entirely, bones and all. Whenever a person disappears completely, it is said that the locals consider it the work of the manticore.


The manticore is also known as the "mantícora", the "mantichor", or by a folk etymology, even the "mantiger". Outside occultist circles, the manticore was still an arcane creature in the Western world when Gian Carlo Menotti wrote his ballet The Unicorn, the Gorgon, and the Manticore in 1956. Manticores appear frequently in fiction, invoked by authors as diverse as Salman Rushdie, Samit Basu and J.K. Rowling, among many others. They have appeared in films (ie. Manticore (2005)), videogames (such as Archon and Age of Mythology), role-playing games, and music (for example, in Emerson, Lake & Palmer's "Tarkus" suite). Gian Carlo Menotti, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944 Gian Carlo Menotti (July 7, 1911 – February 1, 2007) was an Italian-born American composer and librettist who wrote the classic Christmas opera Amahl and the Night Visitors among about two dozen other operas intended to appeal to popular taste. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ahmed Salman Rushdie KBE (Hindi: Urdu: سلمان رشدی; born 19 June 1947) is a British-Indian novelist and essayist. ... Samit Basu is the author of The Simoqin Prophecies and The Manticores Secret, the first two parts of The GameWorld Trilogy, a fantasy trilogy published by Penguin Books, India. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... Manticore was a Scifi original movie that aired on the Sci Fi channel on November 26, 2005. ... Age of Mythology (commonly abbreviated as AoM), is a popular mythology-based, real-time strategy computer game developed by Ensemble Studios, and published by Microsoft Game Studios. ... ELP Logo Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP) were an English progressive rock group. ... Tarkus is the title track of Emerson, Lake and Palmers second album (Tarkus). ...


In 1781, the scientific name Manticora was given to a group of large, flightless tiger beetles from Africa; they are voracious predators with large jaws. Manticora (often misspelled Mantichora following an unjustified spelling change in 1837) is a well-known genus of tiger beetle that is endemic to Africa. ... Genera Cicindela Megacephala Omus Amblycheila Manticora The tiger beetles are a large group of beetles known for their predatory habits. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Fictional Allusions

In Salman Rushdie's novel called The Satanic Verses, one of the characters has a short series of encounters with what he calls a manticore in the streets of Jahilia, an ancient Arabian town which is the setting of some of the flashback-cum-dream sequences. Ahmed Salman Rushdie KBE (Hindi: Urdu: سلمان رشدی; born 19 June 1947) is a British-Indian novelist and essayist. ... For the verses known as Satanic Verses, see Satanic Verses. ...


"Manticore" was the name of the fictional military project/facility in the Fox Network's television series, Dark Angel. The name Manticore was chosen because the company was in the business of combining DNA from several species into a single being. The title character of the series, was said to possess, amongst others, feline DNA. The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... Dark Angel is an American cyberpunk science fiction television program, created by James Cameron and Charles H. Eglee, which ran from 2000 to 2002 on the FOX network. ...


A novel, The Manticore, by Canadian writer, Robertson Davies, was published in 1972. The Star Kingdom of Manticore is a fictional star nation in the Honor Harrington series, by David Weber The Star Kingdom of Manticore is commonly known as Manticore and is abbreviated as SKM; it is a fictional human star-nation in the Honorverse, which is the background setting for a series of books and stories written by David Weber and others, and published by Baen Books. ... Honor Stephanie Harrington is a fictional character, the eponymous heroine of a series of science fiction books set in the Honorverse, written by David Weber and published by Baen Books. ... Honor Harrington from Honor Among Enemies cover, by David Mattingly. ...


References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Manticore
  1. ^ John F. Moffitt, "An Exemplary Humanist Hybrid: Vasari's "Fraude" with Reference to Bronzino's 'Sphinx'" Renaissance Quarterly 49.2 (Summer 1996), pp. 303-333, traces the chimeric image of Fraud backwards from Bronzino.

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Andrea Doria as Neptune Agnolo di Cosimo ( 1503, Firenze – 1572, Firenze) (also known as Agnolo Bronzino and Agnolo Tori). ...

See Also

Which Way Adventure Game


  Results from FactBites:
 
Manticore - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (862 words)
The term Manticore is a derived from the Latin, Mantichora, from the greek mantikhoras, being a mistranslation of the Persian words martiya (man) and khvar (to eat), hence the term man-eater as a description.
Nowadays, the manticore is said to inhabit the forests of Asia, particularly Indonesia.
The manticore is also known as the "manticora", the "mantichor", or by a folk etymology, even the "mantiger".
Manticore (Monstrous Manual) (574 words)
The manticore is a true monster, with a leonine torso and legs, batlike wings, a man's head, a tail tipped with iron spikes, and an appetite for human flesh.
Manticores collect their victims' valuables for a variety of reasons, including curiosity, emulation of other monsters who collect treasure, the man-scent on the things, or because they know humans value the things and therefore might come looking for them.
Manticores are wide-ranging carnivores that have successfully survived in every region inhabited by humans, whether in the wilderness or underground.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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