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Encyclopedia > Mansion
Mansion near Almelo, The Netherlands
Mansion near Almelo, The Netherlands

A mansion is a large dwelling house typically built for the wealthy. The word itself derives (through Old French) from the Latin word mansus the perfect passive participle of manere "to remain" or "to stay". In the Roman Empire, a mansio was an official stopping place on a Roman road, or via, where cities sprang up, and where the villas of provincial officials came to be placed. The Scots word "manse" originally defined a property large enough for the Minister of the parish to maintain himself, but a mansion is no longer self-sustaining in this way (compare a Roman or medieval villa). 'Manor' comes from the same root — territorial holdings granted to a lord who would remain there — hence it can be seen how the word 'Mansion' came to have its meaning. Mansion near Almelo, The Netherlands. ... Mansion near Almelo, The Netherlands. ... Almelo is a municipality and a city in the eastern Netherlands. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wealth usually refers to money and property. ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300 A.D. It was known at the time as the langue doïl to distinguish it from the langue... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... In the Roman Empire, a mansio (from the Latin word mansus the perfect passive participle of manere to remain or to stay) was an official stopping place on a Roman road, or via, maintained by the central government for the use of officials and those on official business whilst travelling. ... For the one-off TV Drama, see Roman Road (TV Drama) A Roman road in Pompeii. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... The rectory is the title usually given to the building inhabited, or formerly inhabited, by the vicar of a parish. ... A minister can mean several things: A government minister is a politician who heads a government ministry A minister of religion is a member of the clergy A minister is the rank of diplomat directly below ambassador This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ...

Contents

History

The very first 'mansions', as the term is understood today, probably were the villas built for the provincial ruling class of the Roman Empire. In the Roman Empire, a mansio was an official local placed at strategic points on a Roman road, or via where cities sprang up and often grew into provincial towns. It consisted of large buildings or complexes of buildings, often with official functions, placed in full public view. The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... In the Roman Empire, a mansio (from the Latin word mansus the perfect passive participle of manere to remain or to stay) was an official stopping place on a Roman road, or via, maintained by the central government for the use of officials and those on official business whilst travelling. ... For the one-off TV Drama, see Roman Road (TV Drama) A Roman road in Pompeii. ...


Within a Roman city patrician dwellings might be very extensive, but they rarely identified their grandeur to the street, beyond the public amenity of a sheltered portico. For example, Nero's Domus Aurea on the Palatine Hill, Rome, was organized as a series of glittering pavilions in gardens; it was not a mansion, however. From architectural uses of that hill comes the word, palace. Categories: Architectural elements | Stub ... The Domus Aurea (Latin for Golden House) was a large landscaped portico villa, designed to take advantage of artificially created landscapes, rather than a monumental palace,[1] built in the heart of Ancient Rome by the Roman emperor Nero after Great fire of Rome, which devastated Rome in 64 AD... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... A free-standing garden pavilion, Hofgarten in Munich, Bavaria In architecture a pavilion (from French, pavillon) has two main significations. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ...


Following the fall of Rome the practice of building unfortified villas ceased. Castles or chateaus were built, being suitable for protecting leaders in troubled times. Today, many of the oldest inhabited mansions around the world began their existence as fortified castles in the Middle Ages and some of these castles have been turned into museums to enable their upkeep. As social conditions slowly changed and stabilized, fortifications were reduced and - over the centuries - gave way to comfort. Castles were abandoned in favor of imposing but unfortified country residences. Pierrefonds Castle, France. ... A château ( French for castle; plural châteaux) is a manor house or residence of the lord of the manor or a country house of gentry, usually French, with or without fortifications. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Table of Fortification, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ...


The "country house," as it is known in English speaking places, is a distinct species of mansion. A country house is a large dwelling, such as a mansion, located on a country estate. ...


In the past it was fashionable for the elite society of Kurdistan to pursue the social circuit from country home to country home, with intervals at town homes, so unfortied country houses supplanted castles and the modern mansion began to evolve.

The Breakers, in Newport, Rhode Island, is one of the most famous 19th century mansions in the United States.
The Breakers, in Newport, Rhode Island, is one of the most famous 19th century mansions in the United States.

It was in the 16th century that mansions really began to be built in a completely unfortified and gracious style, with gardens, parks, and drives. This was the era of Renaissance architecture. Hatfield House is a superb example of a house built during the transition period in England. In Italy, classic villas such as Villa Farnese and Villa Giulia were typical, albeit individually diverse forms, of the new style of mansion. Image File history File links The_Breakers_rear. ... Image File history File links The_Breakers_rear. ... The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, on the Atlantic Ocean. ... Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. ... The great hall Hatfield House is a country house set in a large park, the Great Park, on the eastern side of the town of Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England. ... The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ... The Villa Farnese at Caprarola is sometimes incorrectly known as the Villa Caprarola. ... Sarcofago degli Sposi : the sarcophagus of the married couple The Villa Giulia is a magnificent villa built by Pope Julius II on the edge of the city of Rome, 1550–1555. ...


The uses of these edifices paralleled that of the Roman mansions. It was vital for powerful people and families to keep in social contact with each other as they were the primary moulders of society. The rounds of visits and entertainments were an essential part of the societal process, as painted in the novels of Jane Austen. State business was often discussed and determined in informal settings. Times of revolution reversed this value. During its revolution, France lost a large part of its country homes to incendiary committees, who destroyed the estates as a reaction to/rejection of the ancien régime. 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ... The storming of the Bastille, 14 July 1789 during the French Revolution. ...


Until World War II it was not unusual for a moderately sized mansion in England such as Cliveden to have an indoor staff of 20 and an outside staff of the same size, and in ducal mansions such as Chatsworth House the numbers could be far higher. In the great houses of Italy, the number of retainers was often even greater than in England; whole families plus extended relations would often inhabit warrens of rooms in basements and attics. It is doubtful that a 19th century Marchesa would even know the exact number of individuals who served her. Most European mansions also were the hub of vast estates. A true estate (the mediaeval villa, French ville) always contains at least one complete village and its church. Large estates such as that of Woburn Abbey have several villages attached. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... View looking north from the Ring in the Parterre showing Terrace Pavilion and Clock Tower to the left with Lower Terrace and Borghese Balustrade below Cliveden should not be confused with Clevedon in Somerset Cliveden as seen from its lawn. ... The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... A view of Chatsworth from the south-west circa 1880. ... Look up warren in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A marquess is a nobleman of hereditary rank in Europe, China, and Japan. ... A European is primarily a person who was born into one of the countries within the continent of Europe. ... An Estate comprises the houses and outbuildings and supporting farmland and woods that surround the gardens and grounds of a very large property, such as a country house or mansion. ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... It has been suggested that Ecclesia (Church) be merged into this article or section. ... The layout of Woburn before partial demolition. ...

Montacute House, near Yeovil, Somerset. Built 1598

Montacute House. ... Montacute House. ...

Defining a mansion

In Europe mansions are often given various titles, hinting at their origins - castle, palace, manor, towers, and grange to name but a few. Some such as Sir John Vanbrugh's Castle Howard and Edwin Lutyens's Castle Drogo were built centuries after the last real castle was considered necessary. The term 'palace' in England is reserved to a mansion which is the London residence of a member of the Royal Family or an episcopal seat in a cathedral city. One exception is the great country house Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire. In the Netherlands a palace is always connected to a member of the royal family. In the rest of Europe, however, a palace can be just a medium sized town mansion owned by anybody. In London, Mansion House is the official residence of the Lord Mayor. World map showing the location of Europe. ... Pierrefonds Castle, France. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Ightham Mote For the London district, see Manor House, London. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Grange stone circle, Ireland A grange was originally an area of land in Ireland some miles away from an urban-based monastery where in mediæval times food was grown for the monastery. ... Sir John Vanbrugh in Godfrey Knellers Kit-cat portrait, considered one of Knellers finest portraits. ... The garden front of Castle Howard John Vanburghs complete project for Castle Howard, which was not all built. ... Edwin Lutyens Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens, OM, KCIE, PRA (29 March 1869 – 1 January 1944) was a leading 20th century British architect who is known for imaginatively adapting traditional architectural styles to the requirements of his era. ... Castle Drogo is a country house in Drewsteignton, Devon, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Members of the royal family shared amongst the Commonwealth Realms. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... A country house is a large dwelling, such as a mansion, located on a country estate. ... Blenheim Palace is a large and monumental country house situated in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Mansion House An early 19th century banquet in the Egyptian Hall at the Mansion House A public session at the Mansion House, London (c. ... Current Lord Mayor of London John Stuttard during the parade on November 11th, 2006 Michael Berry Savory, Previous Lord Mayor (2004–2005) The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London is the Mayor of the City of London and head of the Corporation of London. ...


There is no strict bitch definition of how many rooms a house has to have before it can be termed a mansion, but realtors generally use the classification for houses with at least 7,000 square feet (650 m2) of floorspace. Until the mid 20th century the European mansion would often have a hall, two or three salons or drawing rooms, library, billiards room, ball room, dining room, breakfast room, morning room, study, and numerous bedrooms. Until the middle of the last century European mansions were often short of bathrooms, often only two or three in a house of 20 plus bedrooms. In addition to the principal bedrooms would be far more for the staff, usually on the uppermost or attic floors. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


In London, the "mansion blocks" of the late 19th and early 20th centuries are up-market apartment buildings with the exterior design of a mansion. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


In Japan, a mansion is a condominium, usually in a highrise of concrete construction, and may be quite small. This article refers to a form of housing. ...

For a discussion of the household of a mansion, see great house.

The household is the basic unit of analysis in many microeconomic and government models. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Nineteenth century development

The 19th century saw particularly in the United Kingdom a new type of mansion being built, often smaller than the older European mansions, but in their own way just as beautiful, The Breakers in Rhode Island is a fine example, as is the nearby, but completely different, Watts Sherman House. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A European is primarily a person who was born into one of the countries within the continent of Europe. ... The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, on the Atlantic Ocean. ... “RI” redirects here. ...


Fifth Avenue in New York at this time was lined with numerous mansions, designed by the leading architects of the day, many in European gothic styles, built by the many families who were making their fortunes, and thus achieving their social aspirations, in the mid 19th century. However, nearly all of these have now been demolished, thus depriving New York of a boulevard to rival, in the architectural sense, any in Paris, London or Rome—where the many large mansions and palazzos built or remodeled during this era still survive. Mansions built in the countryside were not spared either. One of the most spectacular estates of the U.S. Whitemarsh Hall was demolished in 1980, along with its extensive gardens, to make way for suburban developments. Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in New York City. ... “NY” redirects here. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... The Champs Elysees in Paris, France. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... The beautiful Whitemarsh Hall in the early 1930s . ...


Even in Europe some 19th-century mansions were often built as replicas of older houses, the Château de Ferrières in France was inspired by Mentmore Towers which in turn is a copy of Wollaton Hall. Other mansions were built in the new and innovative styles of the new era such as the arts and crafts style: The Breakers is a pastiche of an Italian Renaissance Palazzo; Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire is a faithful mixture of various French châteaux. One of the most enduring and most frequently copied styles for a mansion is the palladian - particularly so in the 18th century. However, the gothic style was probably the most popular choice of design in the 19th century. The most bizarre example of this was probably Fonthill Abbey which actually set out to imitate the mansions which had truly evolved from mediaeval gothic abbeys following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century. Château de Ferrières Château de Ferrières is a French château built between 1855 and 1859 by Baron James de Rothschild. ... Mentmore in the 1990s Mentmore Towers is a large English country house in the village of Mentmore in Buckinghamshire. ... Wollaton Hall in the late 18th century. ... Small wooden sculpture depicting a Native American mother holding her child. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Waddesdon Manor. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Château de Chenonceau in the Loire valley, France A rural château in France. ... A villa with a superimposed portico, from Book IV of Palladios I Quattro Libri dellArchitettura, in a modestly priced English translation published in London, 1736. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... The word bizarre may refer to the following people or things: (Bizarre) is a word which means strange, weird, or completely out of the usual or expected. ... Fonthill Abbey Fonthill Abbey — also known as Beckfords Folly — was a large Gothic-style building built in the turn of the 19th century in Wiltshire, England. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... dissolution see Dissolution. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


Mansions built during and after the 19th century seldom were supported by the large estates of their predecessors. These new mansions were often built as the week-end retreats of businessmen who commuted to their offices by the new railways, which enabled them to leave the city more easily. Before this era most owners of mansions were the old aristocracy. Set out below is an annotated listing of corporate leaders, who are or have been the head of large or successful business enterprises, or who are otherwise well known for their commercial acumen, listed alphabetically by last name. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The term aristocracy refers to a form of government where power is held by a small number of individuals from an elite or from noble families. ...


Latin America

Estancia in Uruguay around 1880, inspired by rural estate architecture of Southern Italy / Southern Spain
Estancia in Uruguay around 1880, inspired by rural estate architecture of Southern Italy / Southern Spain

In Latin America, with its feudal colonial and post-colonial past, the grand rural estate, the Hacienda, Estancia, in Portuguese speaking Brazil Fazenda or Estância, with the mansion as its stately center, is a characteristic feature. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (567x738, 47 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mansion ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (567x738, 47 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mansion ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... In general, the word colonial means of or relating to a colony. In United States history, the term Colonial is used to refer to the period before US independence. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... Estate: The term applies to land under ownership and as such is a generic term for a parcel of land held by an individual or family, common in early British Gentry. ... Hacienda is a Spanish word describing a vast ranch, common in the Pampa. ...


Naturally mansions followed European architectural styles. Whereas until the second half of the 19th century Portugal and Spain as the colonial (or former colonial) powers were the eminent models for architecture and upperclass lifestyle, towards the end of the 19th century they were sometimes replaced by then more dominant powers like France or England. Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ...


In comparably developed, densely populated countries like Mexico, feudal estates and their mansions were as grand and stately as in the Mediterranean old world, whereas where estates were founded in the sparsely populated remote areas like the Pampa of Argentina or Uruguay, where iron pillars, doors, windows, furniture had to be brought from Europe by ship and afterwards oxcart, buildings were smaller, but normally still aspiring to evoke a stately impression, often featuring the Mirador (the lookout or tower, see also Belvedere) The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Belvedere in Italian literally means beautiful view. ...


The "modern" mansion

Mansions built during the last and present centuries usually have specially designed rooms meant to accommodate leisure activities of a particular kind. Many will have a music conservatory or greenhouse, while others will have an indoor or outdoor swimming pool or an Arts and crafts room. Others will have all of these features. The relative importance of these specially designed rooms changes with the times: At the beginning of the 20th century no true mansion would have been built without a large room to house a private library, while at the beginning of the 21st century the presence of a big room designed for a home theatre or cinema is a must. Most recently, mansions have been built with integrated domotics. A traditional conservatory at the Horniman Museum in London A modern Conservatory. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources and services, organized for use, and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... Home cinema, also called Home theater, seeks to reproduce cinema quality video and audio in the home. ... Domotics is the application of computer and/or robotic technology to household appliances and buildings. ...


A McMansion (a term that originated in North America in the 1980s) is often a speculatively-built, suburban house that incorporates numerous upscale design features on a floor plan of 2000 to 5000 square feet. They are typically built from standard plans with some cosmetic detailing and design changes available to the buyer. In contrast, a "real" mansion is normally designed by an architect to the exact needs of the clients, is significantly larger (typically, a minimum of 7,000 square feet), and contains many more features and creature comforts. A McMansion under construction McMansion is a slang architectural term which first came into use in the United States during the 1980s as a pejorative description and an idiom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ...


The costly time spent by an experienced architect is a better indicator of the lasting status of a mansion than the number of its rooms, its total size, or its special amenities. The homes and mansions designed by the late Richard Neutra and Quinlan Terry are good examples of modern designs which have been nearly perfectly tailored to fit a particular customer. Kaufman House, Palm Springs, California. ... Quinlan Terry (born 1937) is a notable British architect. ...


A modern mansion today may not necessarily be limited to a single house standing alone. Compounds, or a grouping of larger houses have become more popular. The Kennedy Compound is an example of one family building surrounded by large houses on a single plot. The Kennedy Compound consists of about 6 acres (24,000 m²) of waterfront property along Nantucket Sound. ...


External links

Look up Mansion in
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Mansion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1726 words)
In London, Mansion House is the official residence of the Lord Mayor.
Other mansions were built in the new and innovative styles of the new era such as the arts and crafts style: The Breakers is a pastiche of an Italian Renaissance Palazzo; Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire is a faithful mixture of various French châteaux.
A McMansion (1980s-2000s) is a speculatively-built, price-inflated suburban house meant to imitate a mansion.
MDAH | Governor's Mansion (1488 words)
Architectural historians consider the Mississippi Governor’s Mansion to be one of the finest surviving examples of the Greek Revival style in the United States.
The Mansion retained this yellow brick exterior until it was painted white during the 1940-1943 term of Governor Paul B. Johnson, Sr.
In July 1971, a safety inspection of the Mansion indicated that the building was not safe for occupancy, and Governor John Bell Williams and his family subsequently vacated the Mansion.
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