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Encyclopedia > Manitoba Liberal Party

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Manitoba Liberal Party
Image:Manitobaliberalparty.PNG
Active Provincial Party
Founded 1870
Leader Jon Gerrard
President Warren Thompson
Headquarters 635 Broadway
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R3C 0X1
Political ideology Liberalism
International alignment None
Colours Red
Website http://www.manitobaliberals.ca

The Manitoba Liberal Party is a political party in Manitoba, Canada. Its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth-century, in the period following the province's creation in 1870. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Honourable Dr. Jon Gerrard, P.C., M.L.A. (born October 13, 1947 in Birmingham, England) is a Manitoba politician. ... Warren Thompson developed the demographic transition model in 1929. ... Nickname: Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location of Winnipeg in Manitoba Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Manitoba Region Winnipeg Capital Region Established, 1738 (Fort Rouge) Renamed 1822 (Fort Garry) Incorporated 1873 (City of Winnipeg) Government  - City Mayor Sam Katz  - Governing Body Winnipeg City Council  - MPs... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard - Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Red is any of a number of similar colors evoked by light consisting predominantly of the longest wavelengths of light discernible by the human eye, in the wavelength range of roughly 625–750 nm. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard - Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation...

Contents

Origins and early development (to 1883)

Originally, there were no official political parties in Manitoba, although many leading politicians were affiliated with parties that existed at the national level. In Manitoba's first Legislative Assembly, the leader of the opposition was Edward Hay, a Liberal who represented the interests of recent anglophone immigrants from Ontario. Not a party leader as such, he was still a leading voice for the newly-transplanted "Ontario Grit" tradition. In 1874, Hay served as Minister of Public Works in the government of Marc-Amable Girard, which included both Conservatives and Liberals. The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge ridings. ... Look up Anglophone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... Clear Grits were Upper Canadian reformers with support concentrated among southwestern Ontario farmers, who were frustrated and disillusioned by the 1849 Reform government of Robert Baldwin and Louis_Hippolyte Lafontaines lack of radicalism. ... Marc-Amable Girard (April 25, 1822-September 12, 1892) was an early Premier of the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ...


During the 1870s, a Liberal network began to emerge in the city of Winnipeg. One of the key figures in this network was William Luxton, owner of the Manitoba Free Press newspaper and himself a member of the Manitoba legislature on two occasions. Luxton was not initially supportive of Premier Robert A. Davis (1874-1878), but endorsed the Davis ministry after brought John Norquay into cabinet (Davis's early supporters were primarily from the francophone community, and Norquay's presence gave the ministry greater credibility among the anglophone population). Luxton subsequently supported Davis and Norquay against Conservative Orangeman Thomas Scott, a leader of the local opposition (not to be confused with the figure executed by Louis Riel in 1870). Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location City Information Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge), 1873 (City of Winnipeg) Area: 465. ... The Winnipeg Free Press is the primary daily newspaper of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge ridings. ... Robert Atkinson Davis (March 9, 1841-January 7, 1903) was a businessman and Manitoba politician. ... John Norquay, Premier of Manitoba John Norquay (May 8, 1841 – July 5, 1889) was the Premier of Manitoba from 1878 to 1887. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Orange parade in Glasgow (1 June 2003) The Orange Institution, more commonly known as the Orange Order, is a Protestant fraternal organisation based predominantly in Northern Ireland and Scotland with lodges throughout the Commonwealth and in Canada and the United States. ... Louis Riel (October 22, 1844 – November 16, 1885) was a Canadian politician, a founder of the province of Manitoba, and leader of the Métis people of the Canadian prairies. ...


Although the Davis administration was on favourable terms with federal Liberal Prime Minister Alexander Mackenzie (1873-1878), his successor Norquay was more closely aligned with the federal Conservatives. This was partly a matter of necessity. As a small province, Manitoba needed to be on favourable terms with whatever party was in power at the federal level. As such, when John A. Macdonald's Conservatives were returned to power in 1878, the local balance of power began to shift. Luxton's Liberal network supported Norquay against Scott in 1878 and 1879, but was subsequently marginalized by the Norquay government. In 1882, Norquay forged a new alliance with the province's Conservatives. The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Alexander Mackenzie, PC (January 28, 1822 – April 17, 1892), a writer, was the second Prime Minister of Canada from November 7, 1873 to October 9, 1878. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, KCMG, PC, QC, DCL, LL.D was born on January 11, 1815 in Glasgow, Scotland. ...


The party under Thomas Greenway (1883-1904)

Also in 1882, Thomas Greenway formed a new organization known as the Provincial Rights Party. Based in the province's rural areas, this group soon surpassed the Winnipeg Liberals as the dominant opposition to Norquay. After the election of 1883, Greenway united the opposition MLAs into the Manitoba Liberals (which were soon recognized as a de-facto political party). For the next 21 years, Greenway's control over the party would be unchallenged. Thomas Greenway (March 25, 1838 – October 30, 1908) was a politician, merchant and farmer. ... The Provincial Rights Party was a Canadian political party founded and led by Frederick W.A.G. Haultain in 1905 to contest elections in the new province of Saskatchewan. ...


Greenway's Liberals took power in 1888 and ended the Canadian Pacific Railway's monopoly in the province. The Greenway government's most notable feat in office was curtailing the rights of Manitoba's French Canadians population. Manitoba had been founded as a bilingual province, but Greenway's government provoked the Manitoba Schools Question, ending the educational rights of (predominantly French) Catholics, and making the public school system entirely English and Protestant. English became the province's sole official language. An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ... French Canadian is a term that has several different connotations. ... The Manitoba Schools Question was a political crisis in Manitoba and more generally in Canada in the late 19th century involving publicly funded separate schools for French and English and the deeper question of whether French would survive as a language or a culture in Western Canada. ...


Greenway was able to win large majorities in 1892 and 1896, based largely on single-issue populism relating to the schools question. After this was resolved in 1897, his government became increasingly directionless. The Liberals were defeated by the Manitoba Conservative Party in 1899. Single-issue politics involves political campaigning or political support based on one essential policy area or idea. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ...


The Liberals were unable to regain their previous support base in the decade that followed. Greenway continued to lead the party through a disastrous 1903 campaign, winning only 9 seats. He resigned in 1904 to run for federal office.


The party in the early twentieth century

Charles Mickle was chosen parliamentary leader on December 5, 1904, and led the party until a provincial convention was held in late March 1906. That convention acclaimed Edward Brown as the party's new leader. Brown failed to win a seat in the 1907 election, however, and resigned shortly thereafter. Mickle again became the party's legislative leader, and served as leader of the opposition until leaving politics in 1909. Charles Mickle (born July 22, 1849 in Stratford, Canada West, now Ontario) was a Manitoba politician. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Edward Brown was a Manitoba politician. ...


Tobias C. Norris became Liberal leader in 1910. When the Tories under Rodmond P. Roblin resigned amid scandal in 1915, he became the province's premier, and retained the position until 1922. The Norris Liberals introduced temperance laws, votes for women, workers compensation, and the minimum wage. Tobias Crawford Norris (September 5, 1861-1936) was a Manitoba politician and Premier. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... Sir Rodmond Palen Roblin (February 15, 1853-February 16, 1937) was a businessman and Manitoba politician. ... Categories: Canada-related stubs | Manitoba premiers ... A cartoon from Australia ca. ...


The Norris administration's relationship with the Liberal Party of Canada under Wilfrid Laurier was often antagonistic. Norris withdrew funding for French-language education in 1916, at a time when the federal Liberals were attempting to regain the support of Quebec nationalists. The Manitoba Liberals also supported Robert Borden's Union government in the election of 1917 (see Conscription Crisis of 1917), and were not reconciled with the "Laurier Liberals" until 1922. Even then, they refused to officially re-align themselves with the federal party. The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Sir Wilfrid Laurier, PC, GCMG, KC, BCL, DCL, LLD, DLitt, baptized Henri-Charles-Wilfrid Laurier (November 20, 1841 – February 17, 1919) was the seventh Prime Minister of Canada from July 11, 1896, to October 5, 1911. ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC, DCL, LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by MPs in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir Wilfrid Laurier in... The Conscription Crisis of 1917 was a political and military crisis in Canada during World War I. // At the outbreak of war in 1914, over 30,000 volunteers joined the army, far more than expected. ... Prior to the 1917 federal election in Canada, the Liberal Party of Canada split into two factions: the Laurier Liberals, who opposed conscription of soldiers to support Canadas involvement in World War I and who were led by former Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier; and the Liberal Unionists who...


The Liberals were swept from power in 1922 by the United Farmers of Manitoba, who were also known as the Progressive Party. Norris continued to lead the party through most of the 1920s, but was replaced by Hugh Robson before the 1927 election (which was again won by the Progressives). Robson, in turn, resigned on January 3, 1930. He was replaced as parliamentary leader by James Breakey. In 1931, Murdoch Mackay was selected as the party's official leader. The Progressive Party of Manitoba was a political party that developed from the United Farmers of Manitoba, an agrarian movement that became politically active following World War I. A successor to the provinces Grain Growers Association, the UFM represented the interests of farmers frustrated with traditional political parties. ... The Progressive Party of Manitoba was a political party that developed from the United Farmers of Manitoba, an agrarian movement that became politically active following World War I. A successor to the provinces Grain Growers Association, the UFM represented the interests of farmers frustrated with traditional political parties. ... Hugh Robson (born September 9, 1871 in Furness, England) was a politician and judge in Manitoba. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Washington Breakey (b. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Murdoch Mackay Murdoch Mackay (April 30, 1884-1963) was a Manitoba politician. ...


Merger with the Progressives

Pressured by William Lyon Mackenzie King, Mackay brought the Liberals into a coalition with Premier John Bracken's Progressives before the 1932 election. The national Progressive Party had been largely absorbed into the Liberal Party of Canada by this time, and King believed that it was foolish to divide the resources of the parties within Manitoba. He was especially concerned that the Conservatives could recapture the provincial government if the Liberals and Progressives were not united. Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ...


For the election of 1932, the provincial government referred to itself as "Liberal-Progressive" (effectively a fusion of the parties, albeit one dominated by Progressives). A small group of Liberals, led by St. Boniface mayor David Campbell, opposed the merger and ran as "Continuing Liberals". They were resoundingly defeated. After the election, the Liberals of Manitoba were absorbed into the Progressive Party. Two non-coalition Liberals were elected in 1936, but they were not intended to represent a rival party. Liberal-Progressive was a label used by a number of candidates in Canadian elections between 1926 and 1953. ... David Campbell was a Manitoba politician. ...


Despite being dominated by Progressives, the merged party soon became popularly known as the "Liberal Party of Manitoba". The federal Progressive Party had long since disappeared, and the "Progressive" name had little continued meaning in Manitoba politics. The party formally changed its name to the "Liberal Party of Manitoba" in 1961, over only scattered objections from Progressive diehards.


The party in the 1940s and 1950s

In 1940, Bracken's Liberal-Progressives forged an even broader coalition, bringing the Conservatives, Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and Social Credit in a "non-partisan" government. This coalition governed the province until 1950, although the CCF left in 1943. The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Manitoba Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (or CCF) was a provincial branch of the national Canadian party by the same name. ... The Manitoba Social Credit Party (originally the Manitoba Social Credit League) was a political party in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ...


The Liberal-Progressive governments were cautious and moderate. Bracken's government undertook few major initiatives, and was unfriendly to labour issues even during its alliance with the CCF. Following World War II, the government of Stuart Sinclair Garson (who replaced Bracken as premier in January 1943) led a program of rapid rural electrification, but was also otherwise conservative. Garson left provincial politics in 1948 to join the federal Liberal Cabinet of Louis St. Laurent. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Honourable Stuart Sinclair Garson, PC , CC (December 1, 1898-May 5, 1977) was a Canadian politician and lawyer. ... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Louis Stephen St. ...


The government of Garson's successor, Douglas Lloyd Campbell, was socially conservative and generally opposed to state intervention of any sort. The educational system remained primitive (it was dominated in the 1950s by one-room schools), and no significant steps were taken on language or labour issues. The province did reform its liquor laws during this period, however. For others named Douglas Campbell see Douglas Campbell (disambiguation) Douglas Lloyd Campbell (May 27, 1895-April 23, 1995) was a Manitoba politician. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Liberal-Progressives were swept out of office in the 1958 provincial election by the Progressive Conservatives under Dufferin Roblin. Dominated by Red Tories, this party was actually to the left of Campbell's government. Manitobas general election of June 16, 1958 was held to elect Members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Manitoba, Canada. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... Dufferin Roblin, PC (born June 17, 1917) is a Canadian businessman and politician. ... The Red Tory Tradition: Ancient Roots-New Routes, by Ron Dart Red Tory is a term given to a political philosophy, tradition, and disposition in Canada. ...


Declining popularity (1958-1981)

Gildas Molgat, a protege of Campbell, became party leader in 1961. Molgat prevented the Liberals from falling to third-party status during the 1960s, but never posed a serious threat to Roblin's government. Gildas L. Molgat (January 25, 1927 - February 28, 2001) was a Canadian politician. ...


The Liberal Party subsequently declined as politics in the province became polarized between the Tories and the New Democratic Party of Manitoba (NDP). Robert Bend, chosen as party leader in 1969, led the party to only five seats in the election that followed. A succession of leaders, including Israel Asper (1970-1975), Charles Huband (1975-1978) and Doug Lauchlan (1980-1982) were unable to prevent the party's decline. It reached its nadir in the 1981 election, being swept from the assembly entirely. The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The New Democratic Party of Manitoba is a social democratic political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... Robert (Bobby) Bend (April 14, 1914-September 24, 1999) was a Manitoba politician, and was briefly the leader of the Manitoba Liberal Party (1969-1970). ... The Manitoba General Election of June 25, 1969 was a watershed moment in the provinces political history. ... Israel Izzy Harold Asper (August 11, 1932 - October 7, 2003), Canadian tax lawyer and media magnate, was the founder of CanWest Global Communications Corp. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Huband was a Manitoba politician, who subsequently became a judge. ... Doug Lauchlan is a Canadian politician, minister and educator. ... The Manitoba, Canada general election of November 17, 1981 was won by the opposition New Democratic Party, which took 34 of 57 seats. ...


The 1980s

In 1984, the party chose Sharon Carstairs as its new leader. She was elected to the assembly in the 1986 election, and in the 1988 election, led the party to 20 seats and official opposition status. This was precipitated by the unpopularity of Howard Pawley's New Democratic government, which allowed the Liberals to win the support of many centre-left voters (the Liberals had largely abandoned their right-wing origins in the mid-1970s, particularly after Asper stepped down as party leader.) The Honourable Senator Sharon Carstairs, PC (born April 26, 1942) is a Canadian politician. ... The 1986 general election in Manitoba, Canada was won by the New Democratic Party, which took 30 seats out of 57. ... The election of May 9, 1988 in Manitoba, Canada resulted in a hung parliament. ... Howard Russell Pawley (born November 21, 1934) is a Canadian politician and professor who was Premier of Manitoba from 1981 to 1988. ... The New Democratic Party of Manitoba is a social democratic political party in Manitoba, Canada. ...


This proved to be a temporary recovery. The NDP revived under Gary Doer, and the Liberals slipped back into third place in the 1990 election with only seven seats, against 20 for the NDP and 30 for the Conservatives. Gary Albert Doer, MLA (March 31, 1948) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... The election of September 11, 1990 in Manitoba, Canada was won by the Progressive Conservatives, who took 30 out of 57 seats. ...


Further decline (1993 to date)

Carstairs was replaced as leader by Paul Edwards in 1993. By the time the 1995 election was called, the party had managed to recover to a strong second-place position in the polls. They ran a poor campaign, however, and were again overtaken by the NDP well before election day. Despite having almost 24% of popular support, the Liberals won only three seats and lost official party status. Edwards, who was defeated in his own riding, stepped down as party leader in 1996. Paul Edwards (born February 21, 1961) is a Manitoba politician and lawyer. ... The Manitoba, Canada general election of 1995 was won by the Progressive Conservatives, who won 31 seats out of 57. ...


The leadership convention of 1996 exposed deep divisions in the party, as Ginny Hasselfield defeated maverick Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) Kevin Lamoureux by only 21 votes. Two of the party's three MLAs (Lamoureux and Gary Kowalski) subsequently sat as "Independent Liberals", and there were threats of legal action between Hasselfield and Lamoureux. The party was only reunited when Hasselfield resigned in 1998, replaced by former federal Member of Parliament (MP) Jon Gerrard. In Canadian politics, a leadership convention is held by a political party when the party needs to choose a leader due to a vacancy or a challenge to the incumbent leader. ... Ginny Hasselfield is a Canadian politician, and was the leader of the Manitoba Liberal Party between 1996 and 1998. ... A Member of the Legislative Assembly, or MLA, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to the Legislature or legislative assembly of a subnational jurisdiction. ... Kevin Lamoureux (January 22, 1962-) is a Manitoba politician. ... Gary Kowalski (born August 9, 1952) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Honourable Dr. Jon Gerrard, P.C., M.L.A. (born October 13, 1947 in Birmingham, England) is a Manitoba politician. ...


Liberal Party support fell by 10% in the election of 1999, which allowed Gary Doer's New Democrats to regain centre-left support and win government. Gerrard became the party's only MLA, winning election in the upscale riding of River Heights. The party failed to recover much of its support base in the 2003 election, although Lamoureux was able to regain his seat in north Winnipeg to become the party's second MLA. The election of September 21, 1999 in Manitoba, Canada returned to power the New Democratic Party (NDP), which had been out of power since 1988. ... Gary Albert Doer, MLA (March 31, 1948) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... River Heights is a provincial electoral division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The June 3, 2003 provincial election in Manitoba, Canada was won by the New Democratic Party, which won 35 seats out of 57. ...


Despite Lamoureux's re-election, the popular vote for the Liberal party fell in 2003 even through the party managed to field a full slate of candidates (they were 7 shy in 1999). The Liberal party did have more second place finishes than in the previous election, a potential sign that they may be on the rebound. If the party had any momentum to build upon, it was negated by a weak campaign in the 2007 provincial election which again saw Gerrard and Lamoureux re-elected but the party's popular support decline to just above 12% and fewer second place finishes than they had in 1999. On April 20, 2007, Premier of Manitoba Gary Doer announced that a general election will be held on May 22, 2007. ...


Party leaders

Liberal Party leaders

  1. Thomas Greenway 1882/1883-1904
  2. Charles Mickle December 5, 1904-March 28, 1906 (parliamentary leader)
  3. Edward Brown March 28, 1906-1907
  4. Charles Mickle January 1908-1909 (parliamentary leader)
  5. Tobias C. Norris 1910-March 30, 1927
  6. Hugh Robson March 10, 1927-January 3, 1930
  7. James Breakey 1930-June 26, 1931 (parliamentary leader)
  8. Murdoch Mackay June 26, 1931-1932

"Continuing Liberal" leaders Thomas Greenway (March 25, 1838 – October 30, 1908) was a politician, merchant and farmer. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Mickle (born July 22, 1849 in Stratford, Canada West, now Ontario) was a Manitoba politician. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Edward Brown was a Manitoba politician. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Mickle (born July 22, 1849 in Stratford, Canada West, now Ontario) was a Manitoba politician. ... Tobias Crawford Norris (September 5, 1861-1936) was a Manitoba politician and Premier. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hugh Robson (born September 9, 1871 in Furness, England) was a politician and judge in Manitoba. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Washington Breakey (b. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Murdoch Mackay Murdoch Mackay (April 30, 1884-1963) was a Manitoba politician. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. David Campbell 1932

Liberal-Progressive Party leaders David Campbell (musician), a Canadian musician David Campbell (politician), a Canadian politician David Campbell (Virginia), a Democratic Governor, 1837-1840 David Campbell (musician, Australian musician David Campbell ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. John Bracken 1932-January 1943
  2. Stuart Garson January 1943-November 1948
  3. Douglas Campbell November 1948-April 19, 1961

Liberal Party leaders (renewal) The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... The Honourable Stuart Sinclair Garson, PC , CC (December 1, 1898-May 5, 1977) was a Canadian politician and lawyer. ... For others named Douglas Campbell see Douglas Campbell (disambiguation) Douglas Lloyd Campbell (May 27, 1895-April 23, 1995) was a Manitoba politician. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. Gildas Molgat April 20, 1961-May 10, 1969
  2. Robert Bend May 10, 1969-October 31, 1970
  3. Israel Asper October 31, 1970-February 22, 1975
  4. Charles Huband February 22, 1975-1978
  5. Doug Lauchlan November 30, 1980-1982
  6. Sharon Carstairs March 4, 1984-June 4, 1993
  7. Paul Edwards June 4, 1993-1996
  8. Ginny Hasselfield October 19, 1996-1998
  9. Jon Gerrard October 17, 1998-

(Note: Stan Roberts served as the party's acting leader from 1969 to 1970, after Robert Bend was defeated in the province's 1969 election. Although Lloyd Axworthy was the party's only MLA from 1977 to 1979, he was never party leader.) Gildas L. Molgat (January 25, 1927 - February 28, 2001) was a Canadian politician. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Robert (Bobby) Bend (April 14, 1914-September 24, 1999) was a Manitoba politician, and was briefly the leader of the Manitoba Liberal Party (1969-1970). ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Israel Izzy Harold Asper (August 11, 1932 - October 7, 2003), Canadian tax lawyer and media magnate, was the founder of CanWest Global Communications Corp. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Huband was a Manitoba politician, who subsequently became a judge. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Doug Lauchlan is a Canadian politician, minister and educator. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The Honourable Senator Sharon Carstairs, PC (born April 26, 1942) is a Canadian politician. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Paul Edwards (born February 21, 1961) is a Manitoba politician and lawyer. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Ginny Hasselfield is a Canadian politician, and was the leader of the Manitoba Liberal Party between 1996 and 1998. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Honourable Dr. Jon Gerrard, P.C., M.L.A. (born October 13, 1947 in Birmingham, England) is a Manitoba politician. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Stan Roberts (January 17, 1927 – September 6, 1990) was a Canadian politician. ... Robert (Bobby) Bend (April 14, 1914-September 24, 1999) was a Manitoba politician, and was briefly the leader of the Manitoba Liberal Party (1969-1970). ... The Manitoba General Election of June 25, 1969 was a watershed moment in the provinces political history. ... Lloyd Norman Axworthy, PC, OC, OM, Ph. ...


See also

This article lists political parties in Canada. ... Proportion of seats won by major parties for each election This article provides a summary of results for the general elections to the Canadian province of Manitobas unicameral legislative body, the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. ... The Manitoba Liberal Party has chosen most of its leaders by delegated leadership conventions. ...

External link

  • Manitoba Liberal Party
Manioba Political Parties
Represented in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba:
NDP PC Liberal
Other parties recognized by the Elections Manitoba:
Green Communist Freedom

Provincial Elections
Provincial and territorial Liberal parties (edit):
Manitoba - New Brunswick - Newfoundland and Labrador - Nova Scotia - Prince Edward Island - Saskatchewan - Yukon

Allied, autonomous Liberal parties: Alberta - Ontario

The Liberal parties in British Columbia and Quebec are not affiliated with the federal Liberal Party.
The Northwest Territories Liberal Party dissolved in 1905 when Alberta and Saskatchewan were formed.
Major national, provincial, and territorial Liberal parties in Canada (edit):
Forming the government:
New Brunswick - Prince Edward Island - Ontario - Qu├ębec - British Columbia
Forming the official opposition:
Canada - Newfoundland and Labrador - Alberta
Third parties represented in legislatures:
Manitoba - Nova Scotia
No representation in legislature.:
Saskatchewan

  Results from FactBites:
 
Manitoba Liberal Party - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1787 words)
The national Progressive Party had been largely absorbed into the Liberal Party of Canada by this time, and King believed that it was foolish to divide the resources of the parties within Manitoba.
The Liberal Party subsequently declined as politics in the province became polarized between the Tories and the New Democratic Party of Manitoba (NDP).
She was elected to the assembly in the 1986 election, and in the 1988 election, led the party to 20 seats and official opposition status.
Manitoba Liberal Party (1637 words)
The Manitoba Liberal government also supported Robert Borden in the election of 1917, and was not formally reconciled with the "Laurier Liberals" (see Wilfrid Laurier) until 1922.
The Liberal Party subsequently declined as politics in the province became polarized between the Tories and the New Democratic Party of Manitoba.
She was elected to the assembly in 1986, and in 1988 led the party to 20 seats and official opposition status.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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