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Encyclopedia > Mandolin
Mandolin
Mandolin
Classification

String instrument A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... A mandoline used for slicing carrot A mandoline (pronounced man doe lean) is a kitchen utensil consisting of two flat working surfaces, one of which can be adjusted downward from the other. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ...

Playing range
(a regularly tuned mandolin with 14 frets to body)
Related instruments

A mandolin is a musical instrument which is plucked, strummed or a combination of both. It is descended from the mandora. The most common design as originated in Naples, Italy has eight metal strings in four pairs (courses) which are plucked with a plectrum. Variants include four-string (one string per course), six-string (one string per course) as per the Milanese design, twelve-string (three strings per course), and sixteen-string (four string per course). It has a body with a teardrop-shaped soundtable (i.e. face), or one which is essentially oval in shape, with a soundhole, or soundholes, of varying shapes which are open and not latticed.[1][2] Guitar and lute This ilustration in a French Psalter from the 9th century (c. ... The playing range of a musical instrument is the region of pitch in which it can play, i. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... mandola A mandola (US and Canada) or tenor mandola (Europe, Ireland, and UK) is a stringed musical instrument. ... A mandola is a stringed musical instrument. ... The mandocello (sometimes spelled mandacello) is a musical instrument of the mandolin family. ... The mandobass is the musical instrument of the mandolin family with the lowest range. ... The angélique (French, from Italian angelica) is a plucked string instrument of the lute family of the baroque era. ... An Archlute by Matteo Sellas, Venice, 17th century The archlute (Italian arciliuto, German Erzlaute, Russian Архилютня) a European plucked string instrument was developed around 1600 as a compromise between the very large theorbo, the size and re-entrant tuning of which made for difficuties in the performance of solo music, and... This article is about the instrument. ... // History The barbat is an ancient instrument of Persian origin, refined during the Arab age into the current form of oud. ... BA or Ba may stand for: ba an archaic two-letter English word meaning to kiss. in Egyptian mythology: One part of the Egyptian soul (which was imagined as a bird body with a human head). ... For other uses, see Biwa (disambiguation). ... For bouzoukia, see nightclubs in Greece. ... Visit the Guitar Portal A Bolivian charango This article is about an instrument. ... Chitarra Italiana is a lute-shaped plucked instrument with 4 or 5 single (sometimes double) strings, in a tuning similar to that of guitar. ... The daguangxian (大广弦; pinyin: dàguǎngxián) is a Chinese bowed string instrument in the huqin family of instruments. ... The đàn tỳ bà is a Vietnamese traditional plucked string instrument. ... The dombra is a long-necked, two-stringed instrument, possessing a resonating chamber, somewhat similar to a banjo or a lute, and especially popular in the Central Asian nations. ... Domra Domra (домра) is a long-necked Russian string instrument with three or four steel strings and a round resonator. ... Dotar Khorasan The dutar (also dotar or doutar) is a traditional long-necked two-stringed lute found in Central Asia. ... Similar to Electric guitar,the Pipa is modified with the electric components to change its performance. ... Side view of an erhu. ... An Irish Bouzouki The Irish bouzouki is a slightly modified bouzouki Bouzoukis were introduced into Irish Traditional Music in the 1970s, by Johnny Moynihan and Alec Finn, and popularised by Andy Irvine and Dónal Lunny. ... A liuqin The liuqin (柳琴; pinyin: liǔq­ín) is a four-stringed Chinese lute with a pear-shaped body. ... A medieval era lute. ... Front and rear views of an oud. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... A woman plays the pipa in the New York City Subways Times Square Station, 2004. ... The rubab (also spelled rubāb) is a plucked string instrument from Afghanistan and Pakistan. ... SETAR N.V., is the privatised full telecommunications service provider for the island of Aruba. ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... Surbahar The surbahar (also known as bass sitar) is a plucked string instrument used in the Hindustani classical music of North India. ... Tanbur The tanbur (var. ... This article is about the Turkish tanbur. ... The saz is a Turkish plucked stringed instrument, a member of the long-necked lute family. ... Theorbo A theorbo (from Italian tiorba, also tuorbe in French, Theorbe in German) is a plucked string instrument. ... A tiorbino, a little theorbo (tiorbo in Italian), is a rare stringed instrument, a type of long-necked lute resembling a theorbo but significantly smaller and pitched an octave higher. ... The tiqin (Chinese: ; pinyin: tíqín) is a name applied to several two-stringed Chinese bowed string instruments in the huqin family of instruments. ... Topshur is a northern turki (tuvans, altai, khakas) two-stringed musical instrument, a domra-kind. ... Woman playing the Veena. ... Zhonghu The zhonghu (中胡, pinyin: zhōnghú) is a low-pitched Chinese bowed string instrument. ... Š Ě Œõǚ ĵ Ŝ ŝ Ŵ ŵ Ŷ ŷ ōǚ ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Various guitar picks A plectrum is a small flat tool used to pluck or strum a stringed instrument. ... Type Anti-tank Nationality Joint France/Germany Era Cold War, modern Launch platform Individual, Vehicle Target Vehicle, Fortification History Builder MBDA, Bharat Dynamics (under license) Date of design 70s Production period since 1972 Service duration since 1972 Operators 41 countries Variants MILAN 1, MILAN 2, MILAN 2T, MILAN 3, MILAN...

Contents

Mandolin construction

A mandolin's typically hollow wooden body has a neck with a flat (or slightly radiused) fretted fingerboard, a nut and floating bridge, a tailpiece or pinblock at the edge of the face to which the strings are attached, and mechanical tuning machines, rather than friction pegs, to accommodate metal strings. Like the guitar, the mandolin has relatively poor sustain; that is, the sound from a plucked string decays quickly. A note cannot be maintained for an arbitrary length of time as with a bowed note on a violin. Its small size and higher pitch makes this problem more severe than with the guitar, and the use of tremolo (rapid picking of one or more pairs of strings) is often used to create a sustained note or chords. This technique works particularly well with a mandolin's paired strings, where one of the pair is sounding while the other is being struck by the pick, giving a more rounded and continuous sound than is possible with a single coursed instrument. For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... Tremolo is a musical term with two meanings: A rapid repetition of the same note, a rapid variation in the amplitude of a single note, or an alternation between two or more notes. ...


Mandolin forms

Carved (acoustic-electric) and round backed mandolins (front)
Carved (acoustic-electric) and round backed mandolins (front)
Carved and round backed mandolins (back)
Carved and round backed mandolins (back)
F5-style mandolin (f-holes)
F5-style mandolin (f-holes)
A5-style mandolin (f-holes)
A5-style mandolin (f-holes)
Example of an A4-style mandolin (oval hole)
Example of an A4-style mandolin (oval hole)

Mandolins come in several forms. The Neapolitan style, known as a round-back or bowl-back (or "tater-bug", colloquial American) has a vaulted back made of a number of strips of wood in a bowl formation, similar to a lute, and usually a canted, two-plane, uncarved top. The Portuguese bandolim, a flat-back style, is derived from the cittern, but is tuned the same as most mandolins. Another form has a banjo-style body. Mandolins This is an original photograph by Andrew Alder, taken on 18 September 2003. ... Mandolins This is an original photograph by Andrew Alder, taken on 18 September 2003. ... Mandolins (back) This is an original photograph by Andrew Alder, taken on 18 September 2003. ... Mandolins (back) This is an original photograph by Andrew Alder, taken on 18 September 2003. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links FlatironA5. ... Image File history File links FlatironA5. ... Image File history File links GibsonA4Mandolin1921. ... Image File history File links GibsonA4Mandolin1921. ... A medieval era lute. ... A woodcut of a Cittern The cittern is a stringed instrument dating from the Renaissance, having evolved considerably since that time. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ...


At the very end of the nineteenth century, a new style, with a carved top and back construction inspired by violin family instruments began to supplant the European-style bowl-back instruments, especially in the United States. This new style is credited to mandolins designed and built by Orville Gibson, a Kalamazoo, Michigan luthier who founded the "Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Co., Limited" in 1902. Gibson mandolins evolved into two basic styles: the Florentine or F-style, which has a decorative scroll near the neck, two points on the lower body, and usually a scroll carved into the headstock; and the A-style, which is pear shaped, has no points, and usually has a simpler headstock. Orville H. Gibson (born in 1856-1918, Chateaugay, New York) was a luthier who founded the Gibson Guitar Corporation in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1902, makers of guitars, mandolins and other instruments. ...


These styles generally have either two f-shaped soundholes like a violin (F-5 and A-5), or an oval sound hole (F-4 and A-4 and lower models) directly under the strings. Much variation exists between makers working from these archetypes, and other variants have become increasingly common. The Gibson F-hole F-5-style mandolins have come to be considered the most typical and traditional for playing American bluegrass music, while the A-style is generally more associated with Irish, folk, or classical music. The more complicated woodwork also translates into a more expensive instrument. A cello with f-holes A guitar with a round hole A sound hole is a hole in the upper sounding board of a string musical instrument. ... A cello with f-holes A guitar with a round hole A sound hole is a hole in the upper sounding board of a string musical instrument. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ...


Internal bracing in the F-style mandolins was usually achieved with parallel tone bars, similar to a violin's bassbar. Some makers instead employ "x-bracing" which is simply two tone bars mortised to each other to cross into an X supporting the top. Some luthiers are now using a "modified x-bracing", which incorporates both a tone bar and x-bracing.


Numerous modern mandolin makers build instruments which are largely replicas of the Gibson F-5 Artist models built in the early 1920s by Gibson acoustician Lloyd Loar. Original Loar-signed instruments are sought after and extremely valuable. Lloyd Loar was a Gibson sound engineer and master luthier in the early part of the 20th century. ...


Other American-made variants include the Howe-Orme guitar-shaped mandolin (manufactured by the Elias Howe Company between 1897 and roughly 1920), which featured a cylindrical bulge along the top from fingerboard end to tailpiece, and the Vega mando-lute (more commonly called a cylinder-back mandolin manufactured by the Vega Company between 1913 and roughly 1927), which had a similar longitudinal bulge but on the back rather than the front of the instrument. Howe-Orme instruments were manufactured by the Elias Howe Company of Boston, MA. The company was founded by Elias Howe, Jr. ... Elias Howe Company The Elias Howe Company was a nineteenth and early twentieth century musical firm located in Boston and founded by Elias Howe, Jr. ... The cylinder-back is a style of mandolin manufactured by the Vega Company of Boston, MA between 1913 and roughly 1925. ... The Vega Company was one of an illustrious group of musical instrument manufacturers trading in Boston, MA at the latter part of the 19th and early part of the 20th centuries. ...


As with almost every other contemporary string instrument, another modern variant is the electric mandolin. These mandolins can have four (single), five (single) or eight (double) strings. Carved and round backed mandolins (front) A mandolin is a stringed musical instrument. ...


Mandolin history

Mandolins evolved from the lute family in Italy during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and the deep bowled mandolin produced particularly in Naples became a common type in the nineteenth century. The original instrument was the mandore (mandorla is "almond" in Italian, describing the instrument's body shape) and evolved in the fourteenth century from the lute. As time passed and the instrument spread around Europe, it took on many names and various structural characteristics. Mandore is a town located 9 km north of Jodhpur city, in the Indian state of Rajasthan. ... A medieval era lute. ...


Further back, dating to around 15,000 BC to 8,000 BC, single stringed instruments have been seen in cave paintings and murals. They were struck, plucked, and eventually bowed. From these, the families of stringed instruments developed. Single strings were long and gave a single melody line. To shorten the scale length, other strings were added with a different tension and pitch so one string took over where another left off. In turn, this led to being able to play diads and chords. The bowed family became the rabob, rebec, and then the fiddle, evolving into the modern violin family by 1520 (incidentally also in Italy). The plucked family led to lute-like instruments in 2000 BC Mesopotamia, and developed into the oud or ud before appearing in Spain, first documented around 711 AD, courtesy of the Moors. For the video game character from Legacy of Kain Series, see Rahab (Legacy of Kain). ... The rebec in Virgin among Virgins (1509), by Gerard David. ...


Over the next centuries, frets were added and the strings doubled to courses, leading to the first lute appearing in the thirteenth century. The history of the lute and the mandolin are intertwined from this point. The lute gained a fifth course by the fifteenth century, a sixth a century later, and up to thirteen courses in its heyday. As early as the fourteenth century a miniature lute or mandora appeared. Similar to the mandola, it had counterparts in Assyria (pandura), the Arab countries (dambura), and Ukraine (kobza-bandura). From this, the mandolino (a small gut-strung mandola with six strings tuned g b e' a' d g sometimes called the Baroque mandolin and played with a quill, wooden plectrum or finger-style) was developed in several places in Italy. The mandolino was sometimes called a mandolin in the early eighteenth century (around 1735) Naples. At this point, all such instruments were strung with gut strings. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into bandura. ...


The first evidence of modern steel-strung mandolins is from literature regarding popular Italian players who traveled through Europe teaching and giving concerts. Notable is Signor Leone and G. B. Gervasio who travelled widely between 1750 and 1810.[2] This, with the records gleaned from the Italian Vinaccia family of luthiers in Naples, Italy, lead some musicologists to believe that the modern steel-strung mandolin was developed in Naples by the Vinaccia family. Gennaro Vinaccia was active circa 1710 to circa 1788, and Antonio Vinaccia was active circa 1734 to circa 1796.[3] An early extant example of a mandolin is one built by Antonio Vinaccia in 1772 which resides at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, England. Another is by Giuseppe Vinaccia built in 1763, residing at the Kenneth G. Fiske Museum of Musical Instruments in Claremont, California.[4] The earliest extant mandolin was built in 1744 by Gaetano Vinaccia. It resides in the Conservatoire Royal de Musique in Brussels, Belgium.[5] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Year 1750 (MDCCL) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Year 1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Claremont is a city in eastern Los Angeles County, California, USA, about 30 miles (45 km) east of downtown Los Angeles at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in the Pomona Valley. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ...


These early mandolins are termed Neapolitan mandolins, because of their origin from Naples. They are distinguished by an almond-shaped body with a bowled back which is constructed from curved strips of wood along its length. The soundtable is bent just behind the bridge, the bending achieved with a heated bending iron. This "canted" table aids the body to support a greater string tension. A hardwood fingerboard is flush with the soundtable. Ten metal or ivory frets are spaced along the neck in semitones, with additional frets glued upon the soundtable. The strings are brass except for the lowest string course which are gut or metal wound onto gut. The bridge is a movable length of hardwood or ivory placed in front of ivory pins which hold the strings. Wooden tuning pegs are inserted through the back of a flat pegboard. The mandolins have a tortoise shell pickguard below the soundhole under the strings. A quill or shaped piece of tortoise shell is used as a plectrum.[5][6]


Other luthiers who built mandolins included Calace (1863 onwards) in Naples, Luigi Embergher (1856–1943), the Ferrari family (1716 onwards, also originally mandolino makers), and De Santi (1834–1916) in Rome. The Neapolitan style of mandolin construction was adopted and developed by others, notably in Rome, giving two distinct but similar types of mandolin — Neapolitan and Roman.


The twentieth century saw the rise in popularity of the mandolin for Celtic, bluegrass, jazz, and classical styles. Much of the development of the mandolin from Neapolitan bowl-back to the flat-back style (actually, gently rounded and carved like a violin) is attributable to Orville Gibson (1856–1918). See above. Orville H. Gibson (born in 1856-1918, Chateaugay, New York) was a luthier who founded the Gibson Guitar Corporation in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1902, makers of guitars, mandolins and other instruments. ...


Tuning

A variety of different tunings are used. Usually, courses of 2 adjacent strings are doubled (tuned to the same pitch). The most common tuning by far (GDAE), is the same as violin tuning: A course is a pair of adjacent strings tuned to unison or an octave and usually plucked together as if a single string, in musical instruments such as the lute, vihuela or mandolin. ...

  • fourth (lowest tone) course: G2 (196.00 Hz)
  • third course: D3 (293.66 Hz)
  • second course: A3 (440.00 Hz; A above middle C)
  • first (highest tone) course: E4 (659.25 Hz)

Image:Mandolin_fretboard.png A course is a pair of adjacent strings tuned to unison or an octave and usually plucked together as if a single string, in musical instruments such as the lute, vihuela or mandolin. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Other tunings exist, including "cross-tunings" in which the usually doubled string runs are tuned to discrete pitches. This is often used in the "cross-picking" style of playing. Additionally, guitarists may sometimes tune a mandolin to mimic a portion of the intervals on a standard guitar tuning to achieve familiar fretting patterns.


Mandolin family

The mandolin is the soprano member of the mandolin family, as the violin is the soprano member of the violin family. Like the violin, its scale length is typically about 13 inches (330 mm). Modern American mandolins modeled after Gibsons have a longer scale, about 13-7/8" (352mm). For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... The Violin family of instruments was developed in Italy in the 17th Century. ...


Other members of the mandolin family are:

  • The mandola (US and Canada), termed the tenor mandola in Europe, which is tuned to a fifth below the mandolin, in the same relationship as that of the viola to the violin. Some also call this instrument the "alto mandola". Its scale length is typically about 16.5 inches (420 mm). It is normally tuned like a viola: C-G-D-A.
  • The octave mandolin (US and Canada), termed the octave mandola or mandole in Europe, which is tuned an octave below the mandolin. Its scale length is typically about 20 inches (500 mm), although instruments with scales as short as 17 inches (430 mm) or as long as 21 inches (530 mm) are not unknown.
  • The mandocello, which is classically tuned to an octave plus a fifth below the mandolin, in the same relationship as that of the cello to the violin: C-G-D-A. Today, it is not infrequently restrung for octave mandolin tuning or the Irish bouzouki's GDAD. Its scale length is typically about 25 inches (635 mm). A typical violoncello scale is 27" (686mm).
  • The Greek laouto is essentially a mandocello, ordinarily tuned D-G-D-A, with half of each pair of the lower two courses being tuned an octave high on a lighter gauge string. The body is a staved bowl, the saddle-less bridge glued to the flat face like most ouds and lutes, with mechanical tuners, steel strings, and tied gut frets. Modern laoutos, as played on Crete, have the entire lower course tuned in octaves as well as being tuned a reentrant octave above the expected D. Its scale length is typically about 28 inches (712mm).
  • The mando-bass, has 4 single strings, rather than double courses, and is tuned like a double bass. These were made by the Gibson company in the early twentieth century, but appear to have never been very common. Reportedly, most mandolin orchestras preferred to use the ordinary double bass, rather than a specialised mandolin family instrument. Calace and other Italian makers predating Gibson also made mandolin-basses.
  • The piccolo or sopranino mandolin is a rare member of the family, tuned one octave above the tenor mandola and one fourth above the mandolin; the same relation as that of the piccolo or sopranino violin to the violin and viola. One model was manufactured by the Lyon & Healy company under the Leland brand. A handful of contemporary luthiers build piccolo mandolins. Its scale length is typically about 9.5 inches (240 mm).
  • The Irish bouzouki is also considered a member of the mandolin family; although derived from the Greek bouzouki, it is constructed like a flat backed mandolin and uses fifth-based tunings (most often GDAD, an octave below the mandolin, sometimes GDAE, ADAD or ADAE) in place of the guitar-like fourths-and-third tunings of the three- and four-course Greek bouzouki. Although the bouzouki's bass course pairs are most often tuned in unison, on some instruments one of each pair is replaced with a lighter string and tuned in octaves, in the fashion of the 12-string guitar. Although occupying the same range as the octave mandolin/octave mandola, the Irish bouzouki is distinguished from the former instrument by its longer scale length, typically from 22 inches (560 mm) to 24 inches (610 mm), although scales as long as 26 inches (660 mm), which is the usual Greek bouzouki scale, are not unknown.
  • The modern cittern is also an extension of the mandolin family, being typically a five course (ten string) instrument having a scale length between 20 inches (500 mm) and 22 inches (560 mm). It is most often tuned to either DGDAD or GDADA, and is essentially an octave mandola with a fifth course at either the top or the bottom of its range. Some luthiers, such as Stefan Sobell also refer to the octave mandola or a shorter-scaled Irish bouzouki as a cittern, irrespective of whether it has four or five courses.
  • In Indian classical music and Indian light music, the mandolin, which bears little resemblance to the European mandolin, is likely to be tuned to E-B-E-B. As there is no concept of absolute pitch in Indian classical music, any convenient tuning maintaining these relative pitch intervals between the strings can be used. Another prevalent tuning with these intervals is C-G-C-G, which corresponds to Sa-Pa-Sa-Pa in the Indian carnatic classical music style. This tuning corresponds to the way violins are tuned for carnatic classical music.

mandola A mandola (US and Canada) or tenor mandola (Europe, Ireland, and UK) is a stringed musical instrument. ... The viola (French, alto; German Bratsche) is a bowed string instrument. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... The octave mandolin is an eight-stringed fretted string instrument tuned an octave below the neopolitan mandolin. ... The mandocello (sometimes spelled mandacello) is a musical instrument of the mandolin family. ... This article is about the stringed musical instrument. ... An Irish Bouzouki The Irish bouzouki is a slightly modified bouzouki Bouzoukis were introduced into Irish Traditional Music in the 1970s, by Johnny Moynihan and Alec Finn, and popularised by Andy Irvine and Dónal Lunny. ... The mando-bass or mandobass is the largest member if the mandolin family. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... Mandolin orchestras were all the rage in the US and elsewhere from just before the turn of the 20th century until about the end of World War I. For a while, every city and town and many high schools had one. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... This article is about the instrument in the flute family. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... The viola (French, alto; German Bratsche) is a bowed string instrument. ... An Irish Bouzouki The Irish bouzouki is a slightly modified bouzouki Bouzoukis were introduced into Irish Traditional Music in the 1970s, by Johnny Moynihan and Alec Finn, and popularised by Andy Irvine and Dónal Lunny. ... For bouzoukia, see nightclubs in Greece. ... For bouzoukia, see nightclubs in Greece. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A woodcut of a Cittern The cittern is a stringed instrument dating from the Renaissance, having evolved considerably since that time. ... A mandola is a stringed musical instrument. ... A mandola is a stringed musical instrument. ... An Irish Bouzouki The Irish bouzouki is a slightly modified bouzouki Bouzoukis were introduced into Irish Traditional Music in the 1970s, by Johnny Moynihan and Alec Finn, and popularised by Andy Irvine and Dónal Lunny. ... The origins of Indian classical music can be found from the oldest of scriptures, part of the Hindu tradition, the Vedas. ...

Mandolin music

Mandolins have a long history, and much early music was written for them. In the first half of the 20th century, they enjoyed a period of great popularity in Europe and the Americas as an easier approach to playing string music. Many professional and amateur mandolin groups and orchestras were formed to play light classical string repertory. Just as this practice was falling into disuse, the mandolin found a new niche in American country, old-time music, bluegrass, and folk music. More recently, the Baroque and Classical mandolin repertory and styles have benefited from the raised awareness of and interest in Early music. Tremolo and fingerpicking methods are used while playing a mandolin. country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... West Virginia fiddler Edden Hammons, accompanied by his son James on the banjo Old-time music is a form of North American folk music, with roots in the folk musics of many countries, including England, Scotland and Ireland, as well as the continent of Africa. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Early music is commonly defined as European classical music from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Baroque. ... Tremolo is a musical term with two meanings: A rapid repetition of the same note, a rapid variation in the amplitude of a single note, or an alternation between two or more notes. ...


The United States of America

The mandolin's popularity in the United States was spurred by the success of a group of touring young European musicians known as the Spanish Students, or in Spanish, the Estudiantes Españoles. The group debuted in the U. S. on January 2, 1880 in New York City. Ironically, this ensemble did not play mandolins but rather Bandurrias, which are also small, double-strung instruments resembling the mandolin. The success of the Figaro Spanish Students spawned several groups who imitated their musical style and colorful costumes. In many cases, the players in these new musical ensembles were Italian-born Americans who had brought mandolins from their native land. Thus, the Spanish Student imitators did primarily play mandolins and helped to generate enormous public interest in an instrument which previously was relatively unknown in the United States. The bandurria is a plectrum plucked chordophone from Spain, similar to the cittern, primarily used in Spanish folk music. ... A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who perform instrumental or vocal music. ... An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent either born in America or someone who has immigrated. ...


Mandolins were a fad instrument from the turn of the century to the mid-twenties. Instruments were marketed by teacher-dealers, much as the title character in the popular musical The Music Man. Often these teacher-dealers would conduct mandolin orchestras: groups of 4-50 musicians who would play various mandolin family instruments together. The instrument was primarily used in an ensemble setting well into the 1930s, although the fad died out at the beginning of the 1930s; the famous Lloyd Loar Master Model from Gibson (1923) was designed to boost the flagging interest in mandolin ensembles, with little success. The true destiny of the "Loar" as the defining instrument of bluegrass music didn't appear until Bill Monroe purchased F5 S/N 73987[1] in a Florida barbershop in 1943 and popularized it as his main instrument. For other uses, see FAD (disambiguation). ... This article is about the stage musical. ... Lloyd Loar was a Gibson sound engineer and master luthier in the early part of the 20th century. ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is one of the worlds best-known manufacturers of acoustic and electric guitars. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... For the retired NBC News correspondent of the same name, see Bill Monroe (journalist). ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The mandolin orchestras never completely went away, however. In fact, along with all the other musical forms the mandolin is involved with, the mandolin ensemble (groups usually arranged like the string section of a modern symphony orchestra, with first mandolins, second mandolins, mandolas, mandocellos, mando-basses, and guitars, and sometimes supplemented by other instruments) continues to grow in popularity. Since the mid-nineties, several public-school mandolin-based guitar programs have blossomed around the country, including Fretworks Mandolin and Guitar Orchestra, the first of its kind. The national organization which represents these groups is the Classical Mandolin Society of America. mandola A mandola (US and Canada) or tenor mandola (Europe, Ireland, and UK) is a stringed musical instrument. ... The mandocello (sometimes spelled mandacello) is a musical instrument of the mandolin family. ... The mando-bass or mandobass is the largest member if the mandolin family. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Classical Mandolin Society of America, or CMSA was founded in 1986 to promote knowledge and interest in the the mandolin; its family (mandolin, mandola, mandocello, mando-bass) and guitar. ...


Single mandolins were first used in southern string band music in the 1930s, most notably by brother duets such as the sedate Blue Sky Boys (Bill Bolick and Earl Bolick) and the more hard-driving Monroe Brothers (Bill Monroe and Charlie Monroe). However, the mandolin's modern popularity in country music can be directly traced to one man: Bill Monroe, the father of bluegrass music. After the Monroe Brothers broke up in 1939, Bill Monroe formed his own group, after a brief time called the Blue Grass Boys, and completed the transition of mandolin styles from a "parlor" sound typical of brother duets to the modern "bluegrass" style. He joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1939 and its powerful clear-channel broadcast signal on WSM-AM spread his style throughout the South, directly inspiring many musicians to take up the mandolin. Monroe famously played Gibson F5 mandolin, signed and dated July 9, 1923, by Lloyd Loar, chief acoustic engineer at Gibson. The F5 has since become the most imitated tonally and aesthetically by modern builders. Monroe's style involved playing lead melodies in the style of a fiddler, and also a percussive chording sound referred to as "the chop" for the sound made by the quickly struck and muted strings. He also perfected a sparse, percussive blues style, especially up the neck in keys which had not been used much in country music, notably B and E. He emphasized a powerful, syncopated right hand at the expense of left-hand virtuosity. Monroe's most influential follower of the second generation is Frank Wakefield and nowadays Mike Compton of the Nashville Bluegrass Band and David Long, who often tour as a duet. The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... WSM is the call letters of a 50,000 watt AM radio station (and its associated FM station) located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is one of the worlds best-known manufacturers of acoustic and electric guitars. ... Lloyd Loar was a Gibson sound engineer and master luthier in the early part of the 20th century. ... In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... The aesthetics of music or musical aesthetics is the quality and study of the beauty and enjoyment (plaisir and jouissance), the aesthetics, of music. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt Wakefield (born June 26, 1934) is a legendary American mandolin player. ... Mike Compton (born September 18, 1970) is a former NFL guard who played twelve seasons in the NFL from 1993-2004. ...


The other major original bluegrass stylists, both emerging in the early 1950s and active still, are generally acknowledged to be Jesse McReynolds (of Jim and Jesse) who invented a syncopated banjo-roll style of crosspicking and Bobby Osborne of the Osborne Brothers, who is a master of clarity and sparkling single-note runs. Highly-respected and influential modern bluegrass players include Herschel Sizemore, Doyle Lawson, and the multi-genre Sam Bush, who is equally at home with old-time fiddle tunes, rock, reggae, and jazz. Ronnie McCoury of the Del McCoury Band has won numerous awards for his Monroe-influenced playing. The late John Duffey of the original Country Gentlemen and later the Seldom Scene did much to popularize the bluegrass mandolin among folk and urban audiences, especially on the east coast and in the Washington, D.C. area. Jesse Lester McReynolds, (Born July 9, 1929, in Coeburn, Virginia). ... Jesse McReynolds, along with his late brother, Jim McReynolds, formed the bluegrass pioneering band Jim and Jesse in or around 1947. ... Crosspicking is a technique for playing various stringed instruments using a plectrum or flatpick in a rolling, syncopated style across three strings. ... Bobby Osborne is a bluegrass musician known for his mandolin playing and high lead vocals. ... Sam Bush Sam Bush (b. ... b. ... Originally Del McCoury and the Dixie Pals with Del on guitar and his brother Jerry McCoury on bass, the band went through a number of changes until the late eighties when the band solidified its line-up adding Ronnie McCoury and Robbie McCoury on mandolin and banjo, respectively. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Country Gentlemen are a bluegrass band originating in the area of Washington, DC, United States. ... Since its inception in 1971, the Seldom Scene has thrived on playing bluegrass a little differently than everyone else. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Jethro Burns, best known as half of the comedy duo Homer and Jethro, was also the first important jazz mandolinist. Tiny Moore popularized the mandolin in Western swing music. He initially played an 8-string Gibson but switched after 1952 to a 5-string solidbody electric instrument built by Paul Bigsby. Modern virtuosos David Grisman, Sam Bush, and Mike Marshall, among others, have worked since the early 1970s to demonstrate the mandolin's versatility for all styles of music. Chris Thile of California is the best-known of the younger generation of players; the band Nickel Creek features his virtuoso playing in its blend of traditional and pop styles. Kenneth C. Burns (Conasaga, Tennessee March 10, 1920 - Evanston, Illinois February 4, 1989) was a country musician, comedian, and highly-influential mandolin player. ... Homer and Jethro were an American country music team with a long career from the 1940s through the 1960s, sometimes known as the thinking mans hillbillies, specializing in comedy records and satirical versions of popular songs. ... Paul A. Bigsby was the designer of the Bigsby tremolo arm and proprieter of Bigsby Guitars. ... David Grisman David Grisman (born March 23, 1945 in Hackensack, New Jersey) is a noted bluegrass/newgrass mandolinist and composer of acoustic music. ... Sam Bush Sam Bush (b. ... Mike Marshall is an American mandolin player and multi-instrumentalist who grew up in central Florida and now lives in Oakland, California. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Chris Thile & the How To Grow A Band, accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Nickel Creek is an American acoustic music trio. ...


Some rock musicians use mandolins, typically single-stringed electric models rather than double-stringed acoustic mandolins. One example is Tim Brennan of the Irish-American punk rock band Dropkick Murphys. In addition to electric guitar, bass, and drums, the band uses several instruments associated with traditional Celtic music, including mandolin, tin whistle, and Great Highland bagpipes. The band explains that these instruments accentuate the growling sound they favor. Levon Helm of The Band occasionally moved from his drum kit to play mandolin, most notably on 'Evangeline' and 'Rockin' Chair. The 1991 R.E.M. hit "Losing My Religion" also featured a simple mandolin lick played by guitarist Peter Buck, who also played the mandolin in nearly a dozen other songs. Rod Stewart's still-played 1971 hit "Maggie May" features a significant mandolin riff in its motif. Every song on Mark Heard's final album, 1992's Satellite Sky, was written on a mandolin, Heard's antique National Silvo electric mandolin was prominently featured on every track of the recording. Jack White of The White Stripes played mandolin for the film Cold Mountain, and plays mandolin on the song "Little Ghost" on the White Stripes album Get Behind Me Satan; he also plays mandolin on "Prickly Thorn, But Sweetly Worn" on "Icky Thump". David Immerglück of the Counting Crows, Monks of Doom, and Glider is also known to feature the mandolin in many of his recordings, especially those with the Counting Crows. Rock superstar Tommy Shaw of STYX has used the mandolin in the their international hit "Boat on the River" (1979) and on the Shaw/Blades album Influence in the song "Dance with Me". The Country band Sugarland's own Kristian Bush has been known to play the mandolin from time to time. Pop rock band Green Day has used a mandolin in several occasions, especially on their 2000 album, Warning:. Boyd Tinsley, violin player of the Dave Matthews Band has been using an electric mandolin since 2005. Pipe Major The Great Highland Bagpipe (Gaelic : A Phìob Mhòr) is probably the best-known variety of bagpipe. ... Mark Lavon Helm (born May 26, 1940), better know as Levon Helm, is an American rock musician most famous as the drummer for the rock group The Band. ... For other uses, see Band. ... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... Losing My Religion is a song recorded by the alternative rock band R.E.M. from their 1991 album Out of Time. ... Peter Lawrence Buck (born 6 December 1956 in Berkeley, California) is the guitarist and co-founder, along with Bill Berry, Mike Mills, and Michael Stipe of the alternative rock band R.E.M. // After spending time in Los Angeles and San Francisco, the Buck family moved to Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article is about the Rod Stewart song. ... John Mark Heard John Mark Heard (December 16, 1951 - August 16, 1992) was a record producer, folk-rock singer, and songwriter originally from Macon, Georgia. ... Satellite Sky is the title of the final album by Mark Heard, released in 1992, on Heards own Fingerprint Records, shortly before his death. ... For other persons named Jack White, see Jack White (disambiguation). ... This article is about the American duo. ... This article is about the film. ... For the 1936 Irving Berlin song see Get Thee Behind Me Satan. Get Behind Me Satan is the fifth studio album by The White Stripes and was released in June 2005. ... This article is about the album by The White Stripes. ... David Immerglück is a multi-instrumentalist who is probably best as a guitar player for adult alternative band Counting Crows and alternative rock band Camper Van Beethoven. ... Counting Crows is an American Folk Rock band originating from Berkeley, California. ... Monks of Doom formed in 1986. ... Counting Crows is an American Folk Rock band originating from Berkeley, California. ... Thomas Roland Tommy Shaw (born September 11, 1953) is an American guitarist, best known for his work with the rock band Styx. ... Styx may refer to: Styx (band), an American rock band popular in the 1970s and 1980s Styx (album), the first album released by the band Styx in 1972 Styx forest, a forest in Tasmania, Australia Styx (Game), a 1983 game by Windmill Software Styx (MUD), a text-based game Styx... Sugarland is an American country music duo composed of two Atlanta, Georgia singer-songwriters: lead singer Jennifer Nettles and Kristian Bush. ... Kristian Bush (born March 14, 1970) is a singer/songwriter. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... This article is about the band Green Day. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Warning: is the 6th full length album by Green Day. ... Boyd Tinsley (b. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ...


Very rarely mandolins are played with bottlenecks or slides. Sam Bush plays with a slide, mostly on a four string mandolin, Ken Burnett, a northern California mandolin player, uses slide playing frequently while playing with rock/folk bands 2Me and Amee Chapman and the Big Finish.


The United Kingdom

The mandolin has been used extensively in the traditional music of England and Scotland for generations, but the instrument has also found its way into British rock music. The mandolin was used by Vivian Stanshall on Mike Oldfield's album "Tubular Bells". It was used extensively by the British folk-rock band Lindisfarne, who featured two members on the instrument, Ray Jackson and Simon Cowe, and whose "Fog on the Tyne" was the biggest selling UK album of 1971-1972. "Maggie May" by Rod Stewart, which hit No. 1 on both the British charts and the Billboard Hot 100, also featured Jackson's playing. It has also been used by other British rock musicians, including Led Zeppelin, whose bassist John Paul Jones is an accomplished mandolin player and has recorded numerous songs on mandolin including "Going to California" and "That's the Way"; the mandolin part on "The Battle of Evermore" is played by Jimmy Page, who composed the song. Another Led Zeppelin song featuring mandolin is "Hey Hey What Can I Do". Pete Townshend of The Who played mandolin on the track "Mike Post Theme", along with many other tracks on Endless Wire. McGuinness Flint, for whom Benny Gallagher played the mandolin on their most successful single, "When I'm Dead And Gone", is another example. Gallagher was also briefly a member of Ronnie Lane's Slim Chance, and played mandolin on their hit "How Come". One of the more prominent early users of the mandolin in popular music were The Incredible String Band, in which Robin Williamson played the instrument extensively throughout the bands musical career. The popular song "Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want" by The Smiths featured a mandolin solo played by Johnny Marr. More recently, the Glasgow-based band Sons and Daughters (band) has featured the mandolin, as played by Ailidh Lennon, on tracks such as "Fight", "Start to End", and "Medicine". British folk-punk icons the Levellers also regularly use the mandolin in their songs. Current bands are also beginning to use the Mandolin and its unique sound - such as South London's Indigo Moss who use it throughout their recordings and live gigs. The mandolin has also recently featured in the playing of Matthew Bellamy in the rock band Muse. Lifes like that sometimes, isnt it? — Stanshall prepares to sing The Sound of Music with the Bonzo Dog Band on Do Not Adjust Your Set. ... Michael Gordon Oldfield (born May 15, 1953 in Reading, England) is a multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, working a style that blends progressive rock, folk, ethnic or world music, classical music, electronic music and more recently dance. ... This article is about the Mike Oldfield album. ... Lindisfarne were a popular British folk/rock group of the 1970s, fronted by singer/songwriter Alan Hull. ... Ray Jackson was part of the famed University of Michigan Fab Five along with Jimmy King and current NBA players Chris Webber, Juwan Howard and Jalen Rose. ... Fog On The Tyne is an album and song written by 1970s English rock band Lindisfarne in 1971. ... This article is about the Rod Stewart song. ... Roderick Stewart (rod stewart), CBE (born January 10, 1945), is a singer and songwriter born and raised in London, England, with Scottish parentage. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... John Paul Jones (born John Baldwin on January 3, 1946 in Sidcup, Kent) is an English multi-instrumentalist musician, and was known for being the bassist, the keyboardist and the mandolinist for rock band Led Zeppelin from its inception until the bands breakup following the death of John Bonham... Going to California is the penultimate song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin on their fourth album, released in 1971. ... Thats the Way is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their third album, Led Zeppelin III, released in 1970. ... The Battle of Evermore is an acoustic guitar and mandolin song by English rock band Led Zeppelin, featured on their fourth album, Led Zeppelin IV, released in 1971. ... James Patrick Jimmy Page, OBE (born 9 January 1944) is an English guitarist, composer and record producer. ... Hey Hey What Can I Do is one of the more famous Led Zeppelin songs to never be released on an album. ... Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend (born May 19, 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, and composer. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Mike Post Theme is a track off of the 2006 The Who release Endless Wire. ... Endless Wire is an album by Canadian singer Gordon Lightfoot, released in 1978 on the Warner Brothers label (#3149). ... McGuinness Flint was a rock band formed in 1970 by Tom McGuinness, former guitarist with Manfred Mann, and Hughie Flint, former drummer with John Mayall, plus vocalist and keyboard player Dennis Coulson and multi-instrumentalists and songwriters Benny Gallagher and Graham Lyle. ... The Scottish pairing of Benny Gallagher and Graham Lyle joined forces in 1964, initially as songwriters. ... Ronnie Lanes Slim Chance is the second solo album by Ronnie Lane, one of the founding members of Small Faces and Faces. ... How Come is a 2004 rap single by the rap group D12. ... The iconic cover of the bands 2nd album designed by The Fool The Incredible String Band were (and are) a Scottish acoustic band who way back in the 1960s built a popular following among the British counter culture, and are considered psych folk music pioneers. ... Robin Williamson (born 1943, Edinburgh) is a Scottish multi-instrumentalist musician. ... Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want (written by Morrisey and originally performed by The Smiths) is a single by The Dream Academy. ... The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987. ... Johnny Marr (born John Martin Maher on 31 October 1963 in Ardwick, Manchester) is a prolific English guitarist, keyboardist, harmonica player and singer. ... (left-right): Ailidh Lennon, Adele Bethel, Scott Paterson, David Gow Sons and Daughters are a Scottish rock band, from Glasgow. ... The Levellers are a popular English band that plays Folk-rock or Indie rock influenced by Punk and traditional English music. ... indigo Moss are a Alternative, Rock and Roll, Bluegrass band based in London, England. ... Matthew James Bellamy (born June 9, 1978 in Cambridge, England) is the lead singer, guitarist and pianist of the Alternative/Progressive Rock group Muse, known for his falsetto voice and guitar/piano playing ability. ... For other uses, see Muse (disambiguation). ...


Ireland

The mandolin is becoming a somewhat more common instrument amongst Irish traditional musicians. Fiddle tunes are readily accessible to the mandolin player because of the equivalent range of the two instruments and the practically identical (allowing for the lack of frets on the fiddle) left hand fingerings.


Although almost any variety of acoustic mandolin might be adequate for Irish traditional music, virtually all Irish players prefer flat-backed instruments with oval sound holes to the Italian-style bowl-back mandolins or the carved-top mandolins with f-holes favoured by bluegrass mandolinists. The former are often too soft-toned to hold their own in a session (as well as having a tendency to not stay in place on the player's lap), whilst the latter tend to sound harsh and overbearing to the traditional ear. Greatly preferred are flat-topped "Irish-style" mandolins (reminiscent of the WWI-era Martin Army-Navy mandolin) and carved (arch) top mandolins with oval soundholes, such as the Gibson A-style of the 1920s. The mandolins built by British luthier Stefan Sobell are perhaps the most highly-prized for Irish traditional music, although many other makers, such as Ireland's Joe Foley, also make well-regarded mandolins.


Noteworthy Irish mandolinists include Andy Irvine (who almost always tunes the E down to D), Mick Moloney, Paul Kelly, and Claudine Langille. John Sheahan and Barney McKenna, fiddle player and tenor banjo player respectively, with The Dubliners are also accomplished Irish mandolin players. The Dubliners 'Live at the Gaiety' DVD features an extensive mandolin duet of a three-tune 'set', two hornpipes and a reel. The instruments used are flat-backed, oval hole examples as described above: in this case made by UK luthier Fylde. The Irish guitarist Rory Gallagher often played the mandolin on stage, and he most famously used it in the song 'Going to my hometown'. Andy Irvine (born 14 June 1942) is an Irish folk musician, singer, and songwriter, and a founding member of the popular band Planxty. ... Mick Moloney is a musician who plays traditional Irish music. ... Paul Kelly may refer to: Paul Kelly (musician), (born 1955) Australian musician Paul Kelly (journalist) (born 1947), Australian journalist Paul Kelly (footballer) (born 1969), Australian footballer Paul Kelly (actor) (1899-1956) Paul Kelly (criminal) (c. ... We dont have an article called John Sheahan Start this article Search for John Sheahan in. ... Barney McKenna or Banjo Barney, From Donnycarney as he is known amongst his fellow musicians, (born December 16, 1939) is an Irish singer and musician who plays the tenor banjo, mandolin, and melodeon. ... The Dubliners are an Irish folk band founded in 1962, making them one of the older bands still playing music today. ... Rory Gallagher (2 March 1948–14 June 1995) was an Irish blues/rock guitarist, born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, grew up in Cork City in the south of Ireland. ...


Continental Europe

See also: Czech bluegrass

An increased interest in bluegrass music, especially in Central European countries such as the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic, has inspired many new mandolin players and builders. These players often mix traditional folk elements with bluegrass. While bluegrass cannot really be considered essentially Czech music, there is a lot about the American genre and style that has been absorbed and transformed in the Czech context. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ...


Brazil

The mandolin (called "bandolim") has a long and rich tradition in Brazilian folk music, especially in the style called choro. The composer and mandolin virtuoso Jacob do Bandolim did much to popularize the instrument through many recordings, and his influence continues to the present day. Some contemporary mandolin players in Brazil include Jacob's disciple Deo Rian, and Hamilton de Holanda (the former, a traditional choro-style player, the latter an eclectic innovator). Choro, also called chorinho, is a Brazilian popular music style. ... Jacob do Bandolim (1918-1969) was a Brazilian composer and musician. ...


The mandolin came into Brazil by way of Portugal. Portuguese music has a long tradition of mandolins and mandolin-like instruments (see, for example, the Portuguese guitar). Portugal is internationally known in the music scene for its traditions of fado, a popular form of music that has undergone numerous mutations in the last half of the 20th century. ... The Portuguese guitar, more specifically a Coimbra model, as shown on the cover of Carlos Paredes album, Guitarra Portuguesa. ...


The mandolin is used almost exclusively as a melody instrument in Brazilian folk music - the role of chordal accompaniment being taken over by the cavaquinho and nylon-strung violão, or Spanish-style guitar. Its popularity, therefore, has risen and fallen with instrumental folk music styles, especially choro. The later part of the 20th century saw a renaissance of choro in Brazil, and with it, a revival of the country's mandolinistic tradition. The cavaquinho is a small string instrument (like the ukulele) of the European guitar family with four wires or gut strings. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Choro, also called chorinho, is a Brazilian popular music style. ...


Greece

The mandolin has a long tradition in the Ionian islands (the Eptanese) and Crete. It has long been played in the Aegean islands outside of the control of the Ottoman Empire. It is common to see choirs accompanied by mandolin players (mantolinates) in Ionian islands and especially in the cities of Corfu, Zakynthos (also known as Zante) and Kefalonia. The development of songs for mandolin (kantades) developed during the Venetian rule over Ionia. The Ionian Sea. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... The Ionian Sea. ... This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ... “Zante” redirects here. ... The island of Kefalonia, also known as Cephallenia, Cephallonia, Kefallinia, or Kefallonia (Ancient Greek: Κεφαλληνία; Modern Greek: Κεφαλλονιά or Κεφαλονιά; Italian: Cefalonia), is the largest of the Ionian Islands in western Greece, with an area of 350 sq. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... The Ionian Sea. ...


On the island of Crete, along with the lyra and the laouto, the mandolin is one of the main instruments used in Cretan Music. It appeared on Crete around the time of the Venetian rule of the island. Different variants of the mandolin, such as the mantola, were used to accompany the lyra, the violin, and the laouto. Stelios Foustalierakis reported that the mandolin and the mpougari were used to accompany the lyra in the beginning of the 20th century in the city of Rethimno. There are also reports that the mandolin was mostly a woman's musical instrument. Nowadays it is played mainly as a solo instrument in personal and family events on the Ionian islands and Crete. For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lyra (disambiguation). ... History (Timeline and Samples) Genres: Classical music -Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Rock Regional styles Aegean Islands - Arcadia - Argos - Athens - Crete - Cyclades - Dodecanese Islands - Epirus - Ionian Islands - Lesbos - Macedonia - Peloponnesos - Thessaloniki - Thessaly - Thrace - Cyprus Crete is an island that is a SMALL part of Greece. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... The Ionian Sea. ...


India

Mandolin music was used in the Indian Movies as far back as the 1940's by the Raj Kapoor Studios in movies such as Barsaat, Awara etc. Adoption of the mandolin in Carnatic music is recent and, being essentially a very small electric guitar, the instrument itself bears rather small resemblance to European and American mandolins. U. Srinivas has, over the last couple of decades, made his version of the mandolin very popular in India and abroad. Many adaptations of the instrument have been done to cater to the special needs of Indian Carnatic music. Carnatic music, also known as is one of the two styles of Indian classical music, the other being Hindustani music. ... Categories: 1969 births | Musician stubs ...


This type of mandolin is also used in Bhangra, dance music popular in Punjabi culture. Bhangra (Punjabi: , , ) is a lively form of music and dance that originated in the Punjab region of India and Pakistan. ...


Mandolin players

Renowned modern mandolinists include Chris Thile, Bill Monroe, Ricky Skaggs, David 'Dawg' Grisman, Mike Marshall, Sam Bush, Yank Rachell, and Tim Ware - all of whom revolutionized the use of the instrument through the incorporation of various styles such as rap, techno, classical, rock and jazz. U. Srinivas (popularly known as mandolin Srinivas) was a child prodigy who plays Indian Classical Music on the mandolin, Patrick Vaillant (head of the "mandolin liberation front" and founder of the Melonious Quartet). Famous electric mandolin players include Canadian Nash the Slash It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Chris Thile & the How To Grow A Band, accessible from a disambiguation page. ... For the retired NBC News correspondent of the same name, see Bill Monroe (journalist). ... Ricky Skaggs, April 1988 Ricky Skaggs1st off Skaggs was known to hate everyone he met. ... David Grisman David Grisman (born March 23, 1945 in Hackensack, New Jersey) is a noted bluegrass/newgrass mandolinist and composer of acoustic music. ... Mike Marshall is an American mandolin player and multi-instrumentalist who grew up in central Florida and now lives in Oakland, California. ... Sam Bush Sam Bush (b. ... Yank Rachell (born James Rachell near Brownsville, Tennessee, March 16, 1910; d. ... The Tim Ware Group, 1983 Musician/Composer Tim Ware came to prominence with the release, in 1980, of The Tim Ware Group on Kaleidoscope Records. ... Categories: 1969 births | Musician stubs ... The origins of Indian classical music can be found from the oldest of scriptures, part of the Hindu tradition, the Vedas. ... Carved and round backed mandolins (front) A mandolin is a stringed musical instrument. ... Nash the Slash Nash the Slash is a Canadian progressive rock, classical, and alternative musician. ...


Classical mandolinists of the past include: Samuel Adelstein, Samuel Siegel, Valentine Abt, Giuseppe Pettine, Aubrey Stauffer, and Willian Place, Jr. of the United States; Raffaele Calace; Silvio Ranieri; Laurent Fantauzzi, Carlo Munier of Italy and Hugo D'Alton of the UK.


Popular musicians who play mandolin

Amiina (formerly Amína and Aníma) is an Icelandic quartet comprising Hildur Ársælsdóttir, Edda Rún Ólafsdóttir, Maria Huld Markan Sigfúsdóttir and Sólrún Sumarliðadóttir. ... This article is about the lead singer of Jethro Tull. ... For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ... Jeff Austin (born in Arlington Heights, Illinois[1]) is a mandolinist and singer best known for being a part of the Yonder Mountain String Band. ... Yonder Mountain String Band The Yonder Mountain String Band (YMSB) is a progressive bluegrass group from Nederland, Colorado, outside Boulder. ... Martin Lancelot Barre (born 17 November 1946, in Kings Heath, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England) is an English rock musician. ... For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ... Kristian Bush (born March 14, 1970) is a singer/songwriter. ... Sugarland is an American country music duo composed of two Atlanta, Georgia singer-songwriters: lead singer Jennifer Nettles and Kristian Bush. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... Peter Lawrence Buck (born 6 December 1956 in Berkeley, California) is the guitarist and co-founder, along with Bill Berry, Mike Mills, and Michael Stipe of the alternative rock band R.E.M. // After spending time in Los Angeles and San Francisco, the Buck family moved to Atlanta, Georgia. ... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Arcade Fire (often known as The Arcade Fire) is an indie rock band from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Sam Bush Sam Bush (b. ... Michael (Mike) Campbell (born February 1, 1950 in Panama City, Florida in the U.S.) is a guitarist and record producer, best known for his work with Tom Petty. ... Tom Petty Thomas Earl Petty (born October 20, 1953 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American musician. ... Ryland Ry Peter Cooder (born 15 March 1947, in Los Angeles, California) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries. ... Lol Creme (born September 19, 1947 in Prestwich, near Bury, Lancashire, England) is an English musician and music video director. ... 10cc was a British pop band which achieved its greatest commercial success during the 1970s. ... Josh Cunningham is an Australian guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter famous as one-third of the Australian folk rock band The Waifs. ... The Waifs is a folk rock band from Western Australia. ... Steve Earle (born Stephen Fain Earle January 17, 1955) is an American singer-songwriter, well known for his rock and country music, as well as for his political views. ... Donald William[1] Felder (born September 21, 1947 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American rock musician who was a member of the Eagles from 1974-1980 and from 1994-2001. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... David Jon Gilmour CBE (born March 6, 1946 in Cambridge) is an English musician best known as a guitarist, singer, and songwriter in the band Pink Floyd. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... David Grisman David Grisman (born March 23, 1945 in Hackensack, New Jersey) is a noted bluegrass/newgrass mandolinist and composer of acoustic music. ... Graham Keith Gouldman (born on 10 May 1946, in Broughton, Salford, Lancashire, in England) is an English songwriter and musician who was a long-time member of British band 10cc. ... 10cc was a British pop band which achieved its greatest commercial success during the 1970s. ... Kevin Hearn, 2005 Kevin Neil Hearn (b. ... Barenaked Ladies (often abbreviated BNL or occasionally BnL) is a Canadian alternative rock band currently composed of Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn, Steven Page, Ed Robertson, Tyler Stewart, and formerly Andy Creeggan. ... Mark Lavon Helm (born May 26, 1940), better know as Levon Helm, is an American rock musician most famous as the drummer for the rock group The Band. ... For other uses, see Band. ... David Immerglück is a multi-instrumentalist who is probably best as a guitar player for adult alternative band Counting Crows and alternative rock band Camper Van Beethoven. ... Counting Crows is an American Folk Rock band originating from Berkeley, California. ... John Paul Jones (born John Baldwin on January 3, 1946 in Sidcup, Kent) is an English multi-instrumentalist musician, and was known for being the bassist, the keyboardist and the mandolinist for rock band Led Zeppelin from its inception until the bands breakup following the death of John Bonham... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Michael Kang, born in South Korea on May 13th, 1971, is a multi-instrumentalist for the popular jam band The String Cheese Incident (often abbreviated to SCI). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Edward Larrikin is the lead singer of the band Larrikin Love. ... Marit Elisabeth Larsen (born on July 1, 1983) is a Norwegian singer and songwriter. ... Fabio Machado is a portuguese mandolin player. ... Alex Lifeson, OC (born August 27, 1953), is a Canadian musician, known as the guitarist for the rock group Rush. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band comprising bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Bernard Leadon (born July 19, 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American musician, best known as a founding member of the Eagles, an American rock band. ... The Eagles redirects here. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Dixie Chicks: Martie, Natalie and Emily The Dixie Chicks is a country music group, formed in 1989 in Dallas, Texas. ... Daron Vartan Malakian (Armenian: ) (born 18 July 1975) lead guitarist in the Armenian-American band System of a Down. ... For the bands self-titled album, see System of a Down (album). ... Mike Marshall is an American mandolin player and multi-instrumentalist who grew up in central Florida and now lives in Oakland, California. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... b. ... Originally Del McCoury and the Dixie Pals with Del on guitar and his brother Jerry McCoury on bass, the band went through a number of changes until the late eighties when the band solidified its line-up adding Ronnie McCoury and Robbie McCoury on mandolin and banjo, respectively. ... Colin Meloy in Atlanta, Georgia Colin Meloy in Brussels (2006) Colin Patrick Henry Meloy (born October 5, 1974) is the lead singer and songwriter for the Portland, Oregon, folk-rock band The Decemberists. ... The Decemberists are a five-piece indie pop band from Portland, Oregon, fronted by singer/songwriter Colin Meloy . ... Chris Funk is a member of the Portland, Oregon, indie rock band, The Decemberists. ... The Decemberists are a five-piece indie pop band from Portland, Oregon, fronted by singer/songwriter Colin Meloy . ... Mike Mogis is a Nebraskan producer/engineer and multi-instrumentalist who, along with his brother A.J. Mogis, founded Presto! Recording Studios (previously known as Dead Space Recording and, earlier, Whoopass Recording). ... Bright Eyes is a band consisting of singer-songwriter/guitarist Conor Oberst, multi-instrumentalist/producer Mike Mogis, Nate Walcott, and a rotating lineup of collaborators drawn primarily from Omahas indie music scene. ... Lloyd Edward Elwyn Robertson, better known as Ed Robertson (born October 25, 1970 in Scarborough, Ontario), is a lead singer, guitarist and songwriter in the band, Barenaked Ladies. ... Barenaked Ladies (often abbreviated BNL or occasionally BnL) is a Canadian alternative rock band currently composed of Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn, Steven Page, Ed Robertson, Tyler Stewart, and formerly Andy Creeggan. ... Robert Schmidt may refer to the following people: Robert Schmidt (German bobsleigh), a bobsledder who competed in the early 1930s. ... Flogging Molly is a seven-piece Irish American punk band that formed in Los Angeles and is currently signed under SideOneDummy Records. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Christian rock band. ... Thomas Roland Tommy Shaw (born September 11, 1953) is an American guitarist, best known for his work with the rock band Styx. ... Styx (pronounced sticks) is an American rock band that was popular in the 1970s and 1980s, with such hits as Come Sail Away, Babe, Lady, Suite Madame Blue, Mr. ... Listen to this article ( info) in media player in browser This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2007-03-02, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Ricky Skaggs, April 1988 Ricky Skaggs1st off Skaggs was known to hate everyone he met. ... Categories: 1969 births | Musician stubs ... Lakshmi is a common aspect of Shakti Shakti meaning force, power or energy is the Hindu concept or personification of Gods female aspect, sometimes referred to as The Divine Mother. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. ... Sufjan Stevens (IPA pronunciation: ) (born July 1, 1975) is an American singer-songwriter and musician from Petosky, Michigan. ... Marty Stuart (born John Marty Stuart September 30, 1958 in Philadelphia, Mississippi) is an American country music singer, known for both his traditional style, and eclectic merging of rockabilly, honky tonk, and traditional country music. ... Fred Tackett, a native of the U.S. state of Arkansas, is a guitarist, mandolinist and trumpeter with the band Little Feat. ... ...and then I met Lowell George. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Chris Thile & the How To Grow A Band, accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Nickel Creek is an American acoustic music trio. ... Timothy Z. Mosley (born March 10, 1971), better known as Timbaland, is an American musical composer and R&B record producer and rapper whose style influenced both genres even helping to blur the distinction between the two, as well as Pop and Dance music. ... Boyd Tinsley (b. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Bruce Watson (born Bruce William Watson, 11 March 1961, Timmins, Ontario, Canada) is a Canadian guitarist most famous for being a founding member of the Scottish based rock band, Big Country. ... For other uses, see Big Country (disambiguation). ... Stefan Weinerhall, born 1976 in Mjölby, Sweden, is a Heavy Metal guitarist, presently playing with Falconer, the band he started in 1999. ... Falconer is rap ghetto-techs newest proteges, formed by the former rapist of Mithotyn Stefan Weinerhall. ... For other persons named Jack White, see Jack White (disambiguation). ... This article is about the American duo. ... Barrie James Wilson (18 March 1947--8 October 1990); born in Edmonton, London, England; was the original drummer of Procol Harum. ... Procol Harum is an English rock band, formed in the 1960s, who built a heavy foundation for what would become progressive rock. ... Ann (left) and Nancy Wilson, 1993 Nancy Wilson (born March 16, 1954) is an American singer and guitarist who, with her older sister Ann, became a part of the Seattle band Heart. ... For other uses, see Heart (disambiguation). ... Patrick Wolf (born Patrick Apps on June 30, 1983 at St Thomas Hospital, London[1]) is an English singer-songwriter from South London. ... Zakk Wylde (born Jeffrey Phillip Wiedlandt on January 14, 1967 in Bayonne, New Jersey) is a lead guitarist, pianist, singer and songwriter, best known for his role as founder of Black Label Society and guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne. ... Black Label Society is a heavy metal band formed by Zakk Wylde, with nine albums released to date. ... Ozzy redirects here. ... Pride and Glory is a side project for Zakk Wylde. ... Steven van Zandt (born November 22, 1950 in Boston, Massachusetts) is one of the founding members of Bruce Springsteens E-Street Band and plays guitar and mandolin. ... Bruce Springsteen (born September 23, 1949) is an American singer and songwriter, nicknamed The Boss. He frequently recorded with The E-Street Band. ... This article is about the musician. ... Robin Williamson (born 1943, Edinburgh) is a Scottish multi-instrumentalist musician. ... The iconic cover of the bands 2nd album designed by The Fool The Incredible String Band were (and are) a Scottish acoustic band who way back in the 1960s built a popular following among the British counter culture, and are considered psych folk music pioneers. ... Tymon Dogg is a multi-talented singer, songwriter, fiddler/violinist, guitarist, pianist, and poet from England. ... Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros. ... Mike Mogis is a Nebraskan producer/engineer and multi-instrumentalist who, along with his brother A.J. Mogis, founded Presto! Recording Studios (previously known as Dead Space Recording and, earlier, Whoopass Recording). ... Bright Eyes is a band consisting of singer-songwriter/guitarist Conor Oberst, multi-instrumentalist/producer Mike Mogis, Nate Walcott, and a rotating lineup of collaborators drawn primarily from Omahas indie music scene. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Mandolins

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... A list of tunings for stringed musical instruments from around the world. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Musical Instruments, A Comprehensive Dictionary, by Sibyl Marcuse (Corrected Edition 1975)
  2. ^ a b The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Second Edition, edited by Stanley Sadie and others (2001)
  3. ^ Embergher History
  4. ^ CIMCIM International Directory of Musical Instrument Collections
  5. ^ a b The Early Mandolin by James Tyler and Paul Sparks (1989)
  6. ^ The Classical Mandolin by Paul Sparks (1995)

External links

The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

Further reading

CHORD DICTIONARIES

  • Richards, Tobe A. (2007). The Mandolin Chord Bible: 2,736 Chords. United Kingdom: Cabot Books. ISBN 978-1-906207-01-4.  — A very comprehensive chord dictionary
  • Major, James (2002). Mandolin Chord Book. United States: Music Sales Ltd. ISBN 978-0825622960.  — A case-style chord dictionary
  • Johnson, Chad (2003). Hal Leonard Mandolin Chord Finder. United States: Hal Leonard. ISBN 978-0634054228.  — A comprehensive chord dictionary


METHOD & INSTRUCTIONAL GUIDES

  • Bay, Mel (1987). Complete Mandolin Method. United States: Mel Bay. ISBN 978-0871667632.  — Instructional guide

  Results from FactBites:
 
A Brief History of the Mandolin (1616 words)
The mandolin entered the mainstream of popular American culture during the first epoch of substantial immigration from eastern and southern Europe, a period of prosperity and vulgarity, when things exotic and foreign dominated popular taste.
By the turn of the century, mandolin ensembles were touring the vaudeville circuit, and mandolin orchestras were forming in schools and colleges.
As the popularity of mandolin orchestras and the mandolin as a parlor instrument in the United States began to wane, it began to take somewhat of a back seat to other instruments.
Mandolin (487 words)
Mandolin, a small winery with large ambitions, is generating considerable attention for its stylish wines.
The Mandolin winemaking style leans toward emphasizing balance and expressive fruit flavors, rather than sweetness or excessive oak, and the result is a very accessible, flavorful wine that appeals to experienced wine drinkers and neophytes alike.
The broad appeal of Mandolin wines is credited to their full middle palate, which maximizes the fruit character of the wines.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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