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Encyclopedia > Mandible
Bone: Mandible
Mandible. Outer surface. Side view
Mandible. Inner surface. Side view
Latin mandibula
Gray's subject #44 172
Precursor 1st branchial arch[1]
MeSH Mandible

The mandible (from Latin mandibŭla, "jawbone") or inferior maxillary bone is, together with the maxilla, the largest and strongest bone of the face[citation needed]. It forms the lower jaw and holds the lower teeth in place. File links The following pages link to this file: Mandible Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 4 Categories: Public domain images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Mandible Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 4 Categories: Public domain images ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... In the development of vertebrate animals, the branchial arches (or pharyngeal arches) develop during the fourth and fifth week in utero as a series of mesodermal outpouchings on the left and right sides of the developing pharynx. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... The maxillae are the largest bones of the face, except for the mandible, and form, by their union, the whole of the upper jaw. ... Grays Anatomy illustration of a human femur. ... The face is the front part of the head, in humans from the forehead to chin including the hair, forehead, eyebrow, eyes, nose, cheeks, mouth, lips, philtrum, teeth, skin, and chin. ... Human jaw front view Human jaw left view Human jaw top view The jaw is either of the two opposable structures forming, or near the entrance to, the mouth. ... The visible teeth of a smile. ...

Contents

Components

The mandible consists of:

  • a curved, horizontal portion, the body. (See body of mandible).
  • two perpendicular portions, the rami, which unite with the ends of the body nearly at right angles. (See ramus mandibulae)
  • Alveolar process, the tooth bearing area of the mandible (upper part of the body of the mandible)
  • Condyle, superior (upper) and posterior projection from the ramus, which makes the joint with the temporal bone
  • Coronoid process, superior and anterior projection from the ramus. This provides attachment to the temporalis muscle

The body of the mandible is curved somewhat like a horseshoe and has two surfaces and two borders. ... (ramus mandibulæ; perpendicular portion) The ramus of the mandible is quadrilateral in shape, and has two surfaces, four borders, and two processes. ... The temporal bones (os temporales) are situated at the sides and base of the skull. ... The temporalis muscle is one of the muscles of mastication. ...

Foramens

  • Mandibular foramen, paired, in the inner aspect of the mandible, superior to the mandibular angle in the middle of the ramus.
  • Mental foramen, paired, lateral to the mental protuberance on the body of mandible.

Articulations

The mandible articulates with the two temporal bones at the temporomandibular joints. The temporal bones (os temporales) are situated at the sides and base of the skull. ... The temporomandibular joint (From the Latin for too much jaw) is a diarthrodial joint that connects the condyle of the mandible (lower jaw) to the temporal bone at the side of a skull. ...


Injuries

Mandibular fractures are often accompanied by a 'twin fracture' on the contralateral (opposite) side. It has been suggested that Human Anatomical Terms be merged into this article or section. ...


The mandible may be dislocated anteriorly (to the front) and inferiorly (downwards) but very rarely posteriorly (backwards).


See also

Grays Anatomy illustration of a human femur. ... In zootomy, several terms are used to describe the location of organs and other structures in the body of bilateral animals. ... Figure 7: At birth. ... Figure 3: Mandible of human embryo 24 mm. ...

Additional images

References

  1. ^ Embryology at UNC hednk-023

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ...

External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body (or Grays Anatomy as it has more commonly become known) is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mandible - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (805 words)
In insects, the mandible is an appendage near the mouth, typically acting as a jaw.
The mandible (inferior maxillary bone) (together with the maxilla) is the largest and strongest bone of the face.
The mandible consists of a curved, horizontal portion, the body, and two perpendicular portions, the rami, which unite with the ends of the body nearly at right angles.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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