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Encyclopedia > Manchester

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City of Manchester
Manchester City Centre

Coat of Arms of the City Council
Manchester shown within England
Coordinates: 53°28′N 2°14′W / 53.467, -2.233
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region North West England
Ceremonial county Greater Manchester
Admin HQ Manchester City Centre
Founded 13th century
City Status 1853
Government
 - Type Metropolitan borough, City
 - Governing body Manchester City Council
 - Lord Mayor Glynn Evans
 - MPs: Paul Goggins (L)
Sir Gerald Kaufman (L)
John Leech (LD)
Tony Lloyd (L)
Graham Stringer (L)
Area
 - Borough & City 44.7 sq mi (115.65 km²)
Elevation  256 ft (78 m)
Population (2005 est / Urban 2006)
 - Borough & City 441,200 (Ranked 6th)
 - Density 9,880.8/sq mi (3,815/km²)
 - Urban 2,240,230
(Greater Manchester Urban Area)
 - Metro 4,209,132
 - County 2,547,700
 - County Density 5,172.2/sq mi (1,997/km²)
 - Ethnicity
(2001 Census)
81% White
9.1% Asian
4.5% Black British
2.17% Chinese
3.23% Mixed race
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time (UTC+0)
Postcode M
Area code(s) 0161
ISO 3166-2 GB-MAN
ONS code 00BY
OS grid reference SJ838980
NUTS 3 UKD31
Website: www.manchester.gov.uk

Manchester (pronounced /ˈmæntʃɛstə/) is a city and metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England. The City of Manchester metropolitan borough has a population of 441,200.[1] Manchester lies at the centre of the wider Greater Manchester Urban Area which has a population of 2,240,230,[2] the United Kingdom's third largest conurbation. Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... A NASA satellite image of Greater Manchester. ... Manchester is the name of a large city in England, part of the Greater Manchester metropolis. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... City of Manchester. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Manchester City Council is the local authority for the metropolitan borough of Manchester in Greater Manchester, England. ... map showing Manchester within England File links The following pages link to this file: Talk:London Manchester Manchester City Centre Categories: GFDL images ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... North West England is one of the nine regions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Manchester City Council is the local authority for the metropolitan borough of Manchester in Greater Manchester, England. ... Brooklands is a district and electoral ward in the south west of the city of Manchester, in North West England. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Paul Goggins (born 16 June 1953) is a British politician He is the Labour Member of Parliament for Wythenshawe and Sale East, and Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Northern Ireland Office. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Gerald Kaufman is passionate about Palestine The Right Honourable Sir Gerald Bernard Kaufman (born June 21, 1930) is a British Labour Member of Parliament who was a government minister during the 1970s. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other persons named John Leech, see John Leech (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Anthony Joseph Lloyd, known as Tony Lloyd, (born 25 February 1950, Manchester) is a British Labour Party politician and the Member of Parliament for Manchester Central. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Graham Eric Stringer (born February 17, 1950, Manchester) is a politician in the United Kingdom, and Labour Member of Parliament for Manchester Blackley. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005 from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of English cities by population - List of English counties by population - List of Ceremonial counties of England by Population - List of English districts by area - List of English districts by ethnic diversity... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... A NASA satellite image of Greater Manchester. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Greenwich Mean Time (Media:Example. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... The M postcode area, or Manchester postcode area,[1] is a group of several postal districts in Greater Manchester, England. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... A NASA satellite image of Greater Manchester. ... A conurbation is formed when towns expand sufficiently that their urban areas join up with each other. ...


Forming part of the English Core Cities Group, and often described as the "Capital of the North",[3] Manchester today is a centre of the arts, the media, higher education and commerce. It is also regarded as the third best place to locate business in the UK,[4] is the third most visited city in the United Kingdom by foreign visitors. Manchester is also well known for its sporting connections, with two Premier League football teams, Manchester United and Manchester City,[5] and hosted the XVII Commonwealth Games in 2002. The English Core Cities Group is an association of eight large regional cities in England: Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Nottingham and Sheffield. ... Capital City is a 60-minute television show produced by Euston Films that ran for 13 episodes in 1989 on ITV. This drama focused on the lives of investment bankers in London living and working on the corporate trading floor for the fictional international bank Shane-Longman. ... The north, the midlands and the south Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The original FA Premier League logo, used until 2007 The Premier League (officially known as the Barclays Premier League for sponsorship reasons, colloquially known as The Premiership), is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top echelon of the English football league system (above The Football League). ... Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ... Manchester City Football Club is an English football club based in the city of Manchester. ... The 2002 Commonwealth Games were held in Manchester, England from July 25 to August 4, 2002. ...


It is claimed that Manchester was the world's first industrialised city[6] and is notable for the central role it played during the Industrial Revolution. It was the dominant international centre of textile manufacture and cotton spinning.[7] During the 19th century it was nicknamed Cottonopolis,[8] denoting that the area was a metropolis of cotton mills. Manchester City Centre is now on a "tentative list" of UNESCO World Heritage Sites, mainly due to its network of canals and mills that facilitated its development during the 19th century.[9] A factory in Ilmenau (Germany) around 1860 Industrialisation (also spelt Industrialization) or an Industrial Revolution is a process of social and economic change whereby a human society is transformed from a pre-industrial (an economy where the amount of capital accumulated per capita is low) to an industrial state (see... The Industrial Revolution was a major shift of technological, socioeconomic, and cultural conditions that occurred in the late 18th century and early 19th century in some Western countries. ... With the establishment of overseas colonies, the British Empire at the end of the 17th century/beginning of the 18th century had a vast source of raw materials and a vast market for goods. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... The name given to Manchester in the 19th Century inspired by its status as the centre of the cotton and textile industries. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 A metropolis (in Greek μήτηρ, mētēr = mother and πόλις, pólis = city/town) is a big city[1], in most cases with over half million inhabitants in the city proper, and with a population of at least one million living in... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... City of Manchester. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...


Manchester is regarded by many to have supplanted Birmingham as the UK's second city,[10] although it is also referred to as the third city.[11] Birmingham (pron. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Second city. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Manchester

Manchester developed over little more than a century from a minor town into the worlds first industrial city. ...

Toponymy

The name "Manchester" (pronounced /ˈmæntʃɛstə/) came from the Roman name Mamucium, thought to be a Latinisation of an original Celtic name (possibly meaning "breast-like hill" from mamm- = "breast"), plus Anglo-Saxon ceaster = "town", which is derived from Latin castra = "camp".[12] This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, a branch of the greater Indo-European language family. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Basic ideal plan of a Roman castrum. ...


Early history

A map of Manchester from 1801
The Peterloo massacre of 1819.
The Peterloo massacre of 1819.

There are few signs of prehistoric occupation of the city. The only major Bronze age find is at the far south of the city, where the remains of an extensive farming community overlooking the River Bollin were found during the construction of the second runway of the airport.[13] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 691 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1059 × 919 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 691 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1059 × 919 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links File links The following pages link to this file: Peterloo massacre ... Image File history File links File links The following pages link to this file: Peterloo massacre ... Print of the Peterloo Massacre published by Richard Carlile Peterloo Massacre of August 16, 1819 was the result of a cavalry charge into the crowd at a public meeting at St Peters Fields, Manchester, England. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Prehistoric man. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... The River Bollin is a river in the north-west of England and a major tributary of the River Mersey. ...


Central Manchester has been settled since at least Roman times.[14] The Roman general Gnaeus Julius Agricola constructed a fort in the 70s AD on a defensible hill where the River Medlock meets the River Irwell, at the junction of roads to Chester, York, Buxton, Ribchester, and Melandra.[13] A stabilised fragment of foundations of the final version of the fort is visible in Castlefield. The Romans withdrew in the early fifth century, and by the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066 the focus of settlement had shifted to the confluence of the rivers Irwell and Irk.[13][15] Much of the wider area was laid waste in the subsequent Harrying of the North.[16][17] Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... Gnaeus Julius Agricola (July 13, 40 - August 23, 93) was a Roman general responsible for much of the Roman conquest of Britain. ... Look up AD, ad-, and ad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The River Medlock is a river of Greater Manchester in north west England that flows for 10 miles before joining the River Irwell in central Manchester. ... The River Irwell is a river in the counties of Lancashire and Greater Manchester in England. ... For the larger local government district, see Chester (district). ... York is a city in North Yorkshire, England, at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ribchester is a village in the Ribble Valley district of Lancashire, England, near the towns of Blackburn and Preston. ... Ardotalia (also known as Melandra, or Melandra Castle) is a Roman fort in Gamesley, near Glossop in Derbyshire, England. ... Castlefield Castlefield in Manchester, UK was a site where the Roman Empire established a fort. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... The River Irwell is a river in the counties of Lancashire and Greater Manchester in England. ... The River Irk is a river in Greater Manchester in north-west England that flows through the northern suburbs of Manchester before merging with the River Irwell in the city centre. ... The Harrying (or Harrowing) of the North was a series of campaigns waged by William the Conqueror, King of England, in the winter of 1069–1070 in order to subjugate the north of his newfound English kingdom (primarily Northumbria and the Midlands) as part of the Norman Conquest of England. ...


Thomas de la Warre, lord of the manor, founded and constructed a collegiate church for the parish in 1421. The church is now Manchester Cathedral; the domestic premises of the college now house Chetham's School of Music and Chetham's Library.[18] Manchester was an ancient parish in the hundred of Salfordshire in Lancashire, England. ... Manchester Cathedral Manchester Cathedral is a Medieval church located on Victoria Street in central Manchester. ... Chethams School of Music, familiarly known as Chets, is a specialist music school in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Chethams Library in Manchester was founded in 1653 and claims the distinction of being the oldest public library in the English-speaking world. ...


Around the 14th century, Manchester had seen an influx of Flemish weavers, sometimes credited as the foundation of the regions textile industry.[19][20] Manchester became an important centre for the manufacture and trade of woolens and linen, and by about 1540, had expanded to become, in John Leland's words, "The fairest, best builded, quickest, and most populous town of all Lancashire."[21][22] The cathedral and Chetham's buildings are the only significant survivors of Leland's Manchester.[23] The term Flemings (Dutch: ) denotes the majority population in Flanders (the northern half of Belgium). ... John Leland (September 13, 1502–April 18, 1552) was an English antiquary. ...


Significant quantities of cotton began to be used after about 1600, firstly in linen/cotton fustians, but by around 1750 pure cotton fabrics were being produced and cotton had overtaken wool in importance.[24] The Irwell and Mersey were made navigable by 1736, opening a route from Manchester to the sea docks on the Mersey. The Bridgewater Canal, Britain's first wholly artificial waterway, was opened in 1761, bringing coal from mines at Worsley to central Manchester. The canal was extended to the Mersey at Runcorn by 1776. The combination of competition and improved efficiency halved the cost of coal and halved the transport cost of raw cotton.[25] Fustian is a term for a variety of heavy woven cotton fabrics, chiefly prepared for menswear. ... The Bridgewater Canal is a canal in North West England, near Manchester. ... Worsley, in Greater Manchester, England, is a town that is best known as one terminus of the Bridgewater Canal. ...


Manchester's became the dominant marketplace for textiles produced in the surrounding towns[26] A commodities exchange, opened in 1729,[27] and numerous large warehouses aided commerce. A commodities exchange is an exchange where various commodities and derivatives products are traded. ...


In 1780, Richard Arkwright began construction of Manchester's first cotton mill.[28] Richard Arkwright Sir Richard Arkwright (23 December 1732 – 3 August 1792) was an Englishman credited with the spinning frame — later renamed the water frame following the transition to water power. ...


Industrial Revolution

A map of Manchester from 1894.
Manchester (or Cottonopolis as it was sometimes referred) during the early 19th century.
Manchester (or Cottonopolis as it was sometimes referred) during the early 19th century.

During the 19th century Manchester grew to become the centre of Lancashire's cotton industry and was dubbed "Cottonopolis". During this period the canal system grew, and Manchester became one end of the world's first intercity passenger railway - the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Cottonopolis1. ... Image File history File links Cottonopolis1. ... The name given to Manchester in the 19th Century inspired by its status as the centre of the cotton and textile industries. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... The name given to Manchester in the 19th Century inspired by its status as the centre of the cotton and textile industries. ... Inaugural journey of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR) was the worlds first intercity passenger railway in which all the trains were timetabled and operated for most of the distance solely by steam locomotives. ...


Manchester quickly grew into an important industrial centre. At that time, it seemed a place in which anything could happen — new industrial processes, new ways of thinking (the so called "Manchester School", promoting free trade and laissez-faire), new classes or groups in society, new religious sects, and new forms of labour organisation. It attracted educated visitors from all parts of Britain and Europe. A saying capturing this sense of innovation survives today: "What Manchester does today, the rest of the world does tomorrow."[29] Manchester Capitalism, Manchester School, Manchester Liberalism or Manchesterism are terms for political, economic and social movements of the 19th century, which originated in the North-West of England, and in Manchester in particular. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ...


As well as being a centre of capitalism the city saw its fair share of rebellion by the working and non-titled classes, with the most famous being the events on St Peter’s Field on 16 August 1819 which have become known as 'Peterloo'. The first Trades Union Congress was held in Manchester (at the Mechanics' Institute, David Street), from 2 to 6 June 1868. Manchester was the subject of Friedrich Engels's The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844, Engels himself spending much of his life in and around Manchester.[30] Manchester was also an important cradle of the Labour Party and the Suffragette Movement.[31] In 1878 the GPO provided its first telephones to a firm in Manchester.[32] is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Peterloo Massacre of August 16, 1819 was the result of a cavalry charge into the crowd at a public meeting at St. ... Image:TradeUnionsCongress20050108 CopyrightKaihsuTai. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Media:Example. ... Friedrich Engels (November 28, 1820 – August 5, 1895) was a German social scientist and philosopher, who developed communist theory alongside his better-known collaborator, Karl Marx, co-authoring The Communist Manifesto (1848). ... The Condition of the Working Class is the best-known work of Friedrich Engels, and in many ways still the best study of the working class in Victorian England. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the womens suffrage movement in the United Kingdom. ... GPO badge / logo The General Post Office (GPO) was officially established in England in 1660 by Charles II and it eventually grew to combine the functions of both the state postal system and telecommunications carrier. ...


Manchester's golden age was perhaps the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Many of the great public buildings (including the Town Hall) date from then. The city's cosmopolitan atmosphere contributed to a vibrant culture, which included the Hallé Orchestra. In 1889, when county councils were created in England, the municipal borough became a county borough with even greater autonomy. During this period, the Manchester Ship Canal was created by the canalisation of the Rivers Irwell and Mersey for 36 miles from Salford to the Mersey estuary. This enabled ocean going ships to sail right into the Port of Manchester. By 1963 the port was the UK's third largest[33][34] and employed over 3000 men, but the canal was unable to handle the increasingly large container ships. Traffic declined, and the port closed in 1982.[35] The Hallé Orchestra is one of Britains longest established orchestras, and is based in Manchester. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The canal at its Manchester end, looking towards Old Trafford. ... Shipping containers at a terminal in Port Elizabeth, New Jersey. ...


Manchester suffered greatly from the inter-war depression and the underlying structural changes that began to supplant the old industries, including textile manufacture.


World War II

During World War II Manchester was involved in heavy industrial construction. The city was attacked a number of times by the Luftwaffe, particularly in the "Christmas Blitz" of 1941, which destroyed a large part of the historic city centre. In 1940 Manchester Cathedral was partially destroyed by a German air-raid.[36] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ... Manchester Cathedral Manchester Cathedral is a Medieval church located on Victoria Street in central Manchester. ...

The devastation left by the IRA bombing
The devastation left by the IRA bombing

Image File history File links Manchesterbomb-devestation. ... Image File history File links Manchesterbomb-devestation. ... Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish name: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA) is an Irish Republican, left wing[2] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern... The devastation on Corporation Street after the bombing. ...

1996 bomb

Manchester has a history of attacks attributed to Irish Republicanists, including arson in 1920, a series of explosions in 1939, and two bombs in 1992. On Saturday 15 June 1996, the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) detonated a large bomb adjacent to a department store in the city centre. The largest to be detonated on British soil, the bomb caused over 200 injuries, heavily damaged nearby buildings, and broke windows half a mile away. The cost of the immediate damage was initially estimated at £50 million, but this was quickly revised upwards.[37] The final insurance payout has been estimated at over £400 million, and many affected businesses never recovered from the loss of trade.[38] The devastation on Corporation Street after the bombing. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish name: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA) is an Irish Republican, left wing[2] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern...


Redevelopment

Spurred by the investment after the 1996 bomb, and aided by the XVII Commonwealth Games, Manchester's city centre has undergone extensive regeneration.[39] New and renovated complexes such as The Printworks and the Triangle have become popular shopping and entertainment destinations. New and renovated complexes such as The Printworks and the Triangle have become popular shopping and entertainment destinations. The Manchester Arndale is the UK's largest city centre shopping mall.[40] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... City of Manchester. ... Beetham Tower Manchester, also known as Hilton Manchester, is a mixed-use skyscraper in Manchester, England. ... The 2002 Commonwealth Games were held in Manchester, England from July 25 to August 4, 2002. ... The Printworks is Europes first urban entertainment venue, based on Withy Grove in Manchester Until 1986, as the name suggests, the Printworks was a printing press, owned at the time of its demise by Robert Maxwell. ... The Printworks is Europes first urban entertainment venue, based on Withy Grove in Manchester Until 1986, as the name suggests, the Printworks was a printing press, owned at the time of its demise by Robert Maxwell. ... Manchester Arndale (known locally as The Arndale Centre or just The Arndale) is a large shopping centre in Manchester City Centre in North West England. ...

Exchange Square undergoing regeneration.
Exchange Square undergoing regeneration.

Large sections of the city dating from the 1960s have been either demolished and re-developed or modernised with the use of glass and steel. Old mills have been converted into modern apartments, Hulme has undergone extensive regeneration programmes, and million-pound lofthouse apartments have since been developed. The 169 metre tall, 47-storey Beetham Tower, completed in 2006, is the tallest building in the UK outside London and highest residential accommodation in the Western Europe. The lower 23 floors form the Hilton Hotel, featuring a 'sky bar' on the 23rd floor. Its upper 24 floors are apartments.[41] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1480x967, 427 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1480x967, 427 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Exchange Square, Manchester. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Beetham Tower Manchester, also known as Hilton Manchester, is a mixed-use skyscraper in Manchester, England. ... The word Hilton or Hylton can be a place name or personal name. ...

Manchester Skyline, May 2007
   
:Image:Manchester Panoramic.jpg
Manchester Skyline, May 2007

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 130 pixelsFull resolution (5076 × 823 pixel, file size: 703 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Own panoramic image taken of Manchesters skyline. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 130 pixelsFull resolution (5076 × 823 pixel, file size: 703 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Own panoramic image taken of Manchesters skyline. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

SuperCasino

In January 2007, the independent Casino Advisory Panel awarded Manchester a licence to build the only supercasino in the UK,[42][43][44] but in March the House of Lords rejected the decision by three votes rendering previous House of Commons acceptance meaningless. This left the supercasino, and fourteen other smaller concessions, in parliamentary limbo until a final decision was made.[45] On 11 July 2007, a source close to the government declared the entire supercasino project "dead in the water".[46] A member of the Manchester Chamber of Commerce professed himself "amazed and a bit shocked" and that "there has been an awful lot of time and money wasted".[47] After a meeting with the Prime Minister, Manchester City Council issued a press release on 24 July 2007 stating that "contrary to some reports the door is not closed to a regional casino".[48] A Regional Casino, more commonly known as a Super Casino (or occasionally known as Mega Casino or variants) is the term given to the largest category of casino permitted under United Kingdom law. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Governance

Manchester Town Hall, used for the local governance of Manchester, is an example of Victorian era Gothic revival architecture.
Manchester Town Hall, used for the local governance of Manchester, is an example of Victorian era Gothic revival architecture.

Manchester is represented by three tiers of government, Manchester City Council ("local"), UK Parliament ("national"), and European Parliament ("Europe"). Greater Manchester County Council administration was abolished in 1986, and so the city is effectively a unitary authority. Since its inception in 1995, Manchester has been a member of the English Core Cities Group,[49] which, amongst other things, serves to promote the social, cultural and economic status of the city at an international level. Download high resolution version (600x800, 94 KB)Manchester Town Hall (old building). ... Download high resolution version (600x800, 94 KB)Manchester Town Hall (old building). ... Manchester Town Hall Manchester Town Hall is a building in Manchester, England that houses the citys government and administrative functions. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of the Victorian architecture found in Manchester and is the home of Manchester City Council. ... Manchester City Council is the local authority for the metropolitan borough of Manchester in Greater Manchester, England. ... The Greater Manchester County Council (GMCC) was the former upper-tier administrative body for Greater Manchester, a metropolitan county in England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The English Core Cities Group is an association of eight large regional cities in England: Birmingham, Bristol, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Nottingham and Sheffield. ...


Civic history

The town of Manchester was granted a charter by Thomas Grelley in 1301 but lost borough status by a court case in 1359. Until the 19th century local government was largely provided by manorial courts which were not finally ended until 1846.[50] From a very early time, the township of Manchester lay within the historic county boundaries of Lancashire.[50] It formed its own ecclesiastical parish and Poor Law Union by the name of Manchester.[50] In 1792 commissioners, usually known as police commissioners, were established for the social improvement Manchester. In 1838 Manchester regained borough status, and comprised the townships of Beswick, Cheetham Hill, Chorlton upon Medlock and Hulme.[50] By 1846 the Borough Council had taken over the powers of the police commissioners. In 1853 Manchester was granted city status in the United Kingdom.[50] Borough status in the United Kingdom is granted by royal charter to local government districts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... Lancashire was established as a county in 1182, making it one of the youngest of the traditional counties of England, although there is evidence that the boundaries of the county were settled as early as 1100. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... A Poor Law Union was a unit used for local government in the United Kingdom from the 19th century. ... Beswick is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ... Cheetham Hill is a district of Manchester, England located approximately 2 miles to the north of Manchester city centre. ... Chorlton-on-Medlock is a district of the City of Manchester, in North West England. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ...


In 1885 Bradford, Harpurhey, Rusholme and parts of Moss Side and Withington townships became part of the City of Manchester. In 1889 the city became the County borough of Manchester, which was external to the administrative county of Lancashire, and thus not governed by Lancashire County Council.[50] Between 1890 and 1933, more areas were added to the city from Lancashire, including former villages such as Burnage, Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Didsbury, Fallowfield, Levenshulme, Longsight, Withington. In 1931 the Cheshire civil parishes of Baguley, Northenden and Northern Etchells from the south of the River Mersey were added.[50] In 1974, by way of the Local Government Act 1972, the City of Manchester became a metropolitan district of the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester.[50] In this year, Ringway was also added to the city. Bradford is an electoral ward in the city of Manchester, in North West England. ... Harpurhey is a suburb of Manchester, approximately three miles north of the city centre. ... Rusholme is a part of Manchester, in North West England, about two miles south of Manchester city centre. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Withington is an area of Manchester, England about 4 miles south of the city centre, intersected by the busy thoroughfare of Wilmslow Road. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The division into counties is one of the larger divisions of England. ... Lancashire County Council is the local authority for the county of Lancashire, England. ... Burnage is a post-industrial suburb of the City of Manchester in North West England. ... Chorlton-cum-Hardy or Chorlton is a suburb of Manchester. ... Didsbury is a suburb of Manchester, in North West England. ... Fallowfield is an area of the City of Manchester, England. ... Levenshulme is an urban area in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Longsight is an area in Manchester, England, around 3 miles south of the city centre. ... Withington is an area of Manchester, England about 4 miles south of the city centre, intersected by the busy thoroughfare of Wilmslow Road. ... Cheshire (or, archaically, the County of Chester)[1] is a county in North West England. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Baguley is an area of Wythenshawe, Manchester. ... , Northenden is a district and suburb located at the edge of the Wythenshawe council-estate in the City of Manchester, in North West England. ... Ferry across the Mersey, June 2005 The River Mersey is a river in north-western England. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... The six metropolitan counties shown within England The metropolitan counties are a type of county-level subnational entity in current use in England. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... The name Ringway can have these meanings:- Ringway Airport is old name for Manchester International Airport. ...


Geography

Further information: Geography of Greater Manchester

A NASA satellite image of Greater Manchester. ...

Topography

Climate chart for Manchester
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temperatures in °C / precipitation in mm
source: [3]

Manchester lies in a bowl-shaped land area bordered to the north and east by the Pennine hills, a mountain chain that runs the length of the Northern England and to the south by the Cheshire Plain. The city centre is on the east bank of the River Irwell, near the confluence with the Rivers Medlock and the Irk, and is relatively low-lying, being between 35 and 42 metres (115 to 138 ft) above sea level.[51] The River Mersey flows through the south of Manchester. Much of the inner city, especially in the south, is flat, offering extensive views from many highrise buildings in the city of the foothills and moors of the Pennines, which can often be capped with snow in the winter months. Manchester's geographic features were highly influential in its early development as the world's first industrial city. These features are its climate, its proximity to a seaport at Liverpool, the availability of water power from its rivers, and its nearby coal reserves.[52] Typical Pennine scenery. ... The north, the midlands and the south Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... Cheshire (or, archaically, the County of Chester)[1] is a county in North West England. ... The River Irwell is a river in the counties of Lancashire and Greater Manchester in England. ... The River Medlock is a river of Greater Manchester in north west England that flows for 10 miles before joining the River Irwell in central Manchester. ... The River Irk is a river in Greater Manchester in north-west England that flows through the northern suburbs of Manchester before merging with the River Irwell in the city centre. ... The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... Ferry across the Mersey, June 2005 The River Mersey is a river in north-western England. ... Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ... Location within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region North West England Ceremonial county Historic county Merseyside Lancashire Admin HQ Liverpool City Centre Founded 1207 City Status 1880 Government  - Type Metropolitan borough, City  - Governing body Liverpool City Council Area  - Borough & City 43. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ...


Climate

Manchester has a temperate climate, like the rest of the United Kingdom, but with regular but generally light precipitation throughout the year. Its average annual rainfall is 806.6 mm[53] compared to the UK average of 1125.0 mm[54] and its mean rain days are 140.4 per annum[55] compared to the UK average of 154.4.[56] Manchester also has a relatively high humidity level, which lent itself to the optimised and breakage-free textile manufacturing which took place there. Snowfall is not a common sight in the city, due to the urban warming effect. The Pennines and Rossendale Forest hills that surround the city to its east and north receive much snow in the winter and many roads leading out of the city can be closed due to snow,[57] including the A62 road via Oldham and Standedge, the A57 (Snake Pass) towards Sheffield,[58] and the M62 over Saddleworth Moor In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... Urban climate refers to climatic conditions in an urban area that differ from neighboring rural areas and are attributable to urban development. ... Typical Pennine scenery. ... The Rossendale Forest is the area of hills in Lancashire in England between the Manchester basin and the upper Ribble valley. ... The A62 is a major road in England. ... Map showing the location of Standedge in the United Kingdom Standedge (normally pronounced Stannige) is a moorland escarpment in the Pennine Hills of northern England. ... The A57 is a major road in England. ... The Snake Pass is the name of the A57 road where it crosses the Peak District between Manchester and Sheffield in the north of England, or more specifically to the section between the town of Glossop and the Ladybower reservoir, where the road passes over the high ground between the... The route of the M62, in dark blue. ... Saddleworth Moor looking toward the Wessenden valley Saddleworth Moor is an area of heath moorland on the northern English Pennine hill-range between Holmfirth and Uppermill. ...



Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Avg high °C (°F) 6.4 (43.5) 6.6 (43.9) 8.9 (48.0) 11.6 (52.9) 15.3 (59.5) 18.2 (64.8) 19.6 (67.3) 19.5 (67.1) 17.0 (62.6) 13.7 (56.7) 9.1 (48.4) 7.1 (44.8)
Avg low temperature °C (°F) 1.3 (34.3) 1.2 (34.2) 2.5 (36.5) 4.3 (39.7) 7.3 (45.1) 10.2 (50.4) 12.0 (53.6) 11.9 (53.4) 10.0 (50.0) 7.5 (45.5) 3.6 (38.5) 2.0 (35.6)
Mean Total Rainfall mm 69 50 61 51 61 67 65 79 74 77 78 78
Mean Number of Rainy Days 18.2 13.1 15.6 14.4 15.1 14.4 13.6 15.0 15.0 16.5 17.0 17.4
Source: Worldweather.org

Demography

Further information: Demography of Greater Manchester
Manchester Compared[59][60]
UK Census 2001 Manchester Greater Manchester England
Total population 441,200 2,547,700 49,138,831
Foreign born 15% 7.2% 9.2%
White 81% 91% 91%
Asian 9.1% 5.7% 4.6%
Black 4.5% 1.2% 2.3%
Christian 62% 74% 72%
Muslim 9.1% 5.0% 3.1%
Hindu 0.7% 0.7% 1.1%
No religion 16% 11% 15%
Over 75 years old 6.4% 7.0% 7.5%
Unemployed 5.0% 3.5% 3.3%

The United Kingdom Census 2001 showed a total resident population for Manchester of 392,819, a 9.2% decline from the 1991 census.[61] Approximately 83,000 were aged under 16, 285,000 were aged 16-74, and 25,000 aged 75 and over.[61] 75.9% of Manchester's population claim they have been born in the UK, according to the 2001 UK Census. Inhabitants of Manchester are known as Mancunians or Mancs for short. Manchester reported the second-lowest proportion of the population in employment of any area in the UK. A primary reason cited for Manchester's high unemployment figures is the high proportion of the population who are students.[61] The demography of Greater Manchester is charactered by a number of trends recorded amongst its multicultural agglomoration of 2. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ...


Religion

Religion Percentage of
population[61]
Christian 62.4%
No religion 16.0%
Not stated 9.7%
Muslim 9.1%
Jewish 1.0%
Hindu 0.7%
Buddhist 0.5%
Sikh 0.4%
Other 0.3%

Manchester is a religiously diverse city. Manchester boasts the second largest Jewish population in the country, the largest Muslim population in Greater Manchester. It also has a large Catholic community with its origins in Ireland, Italy, Poland, The Caribbean and Africa.[citation needed] Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages) is a religious tradition that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is a religion that began in fifteenth century Northern India with the teachings of Nanak and nine successive human gurus. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ...


Ethnicity

In 2001, 80% of people identified themselves as White British, 9% Asian or Asian British, 5% Black or Black British, 3% Mixed Race and 2% Chinese or other ethnic group.[62] However correct these statistics are for the year 2001, it is now estimated that Manchester's black and minority ethnic population has made a significant growth and white British now make up 75% of the population compared to 80% in 2001. Moss Side, Longsight, Cheetham Hill, Rusholme, and Whalley Range, but to name a few are particularly noted for their ethnically diverse population. It has been estimated that around 35% of Manchester's population has Irish ancestry.[63] White British is an ethnic classification used in the United Kingdom Census 2001, 92. ... // The term British Asian is used to denote a person of South Asian ancestry or origin, who was born in or is an immigrant to the United Kingdom. ... Black British is term which has had different meanings and uses as a racial and political label. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Longsight is an area in Manchester, England, around 3 miles south of the city centre. ... Cheetham Hill is a district of Manchester, England located approximately 2 miles to the north of Manchester city centre. ... Rusholme is a part of Manchester, in North West England, about two miles south of Manchester city centre. ... Whalley Range, a district of Manchester, lies about 1. ...


Manchester's Irish Festival, including a St Patrick's Day parade, is one of Europe's largest.[64] Also, Manchester's Palace Hotel hosted the 2007 Lloyds TSB's Northern Jewel Awards, where leaders of the Asian community in the North of the UK were recognized.[65]
St. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Manchester

Manchester's Central Business District is in the centre of the city, adjacent to Piccadilly, focused on Mosley Street, Deansgate, King Street and Piccadilly. Spinningfields is a large new business centre west of Deansgate that will serve as home to several headquarters, squares, and cafes. The first building on the site was the Royal Bank of Scotland's new headquarters[66] on Deansgate. The project is being spear-headed by Sir Norman Foster. Other buildings include a 110 metre tall office building, a new civil justice centre[67] and new Magistrates Court,[68] to be built over the next few years. This article is about the economy in Manchester The CIS Tower is one of the many company Headquarters in the city Manchesters Central Business District is in the centre of the city, adjacent to Piccadilly, focused on Mosley Street, Deansgate, King Street and Piccadilly. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... City of Manchester. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Royal Bank of Scotland plc (Scottish Gaelic: [1]) is one of the retail banking subsidiaries of Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc, which together with NatWest, provides branch banking facilities in the UK. Royal Bank of Scotland has around 700 branches, mainly in Scotland though there are branches in... The restored Reichstag in Berlin, housing the German parliament. ...


Landmarks

See also: Places of interest in Manchester
See also: List of streets in Manchester

The following is a selection of streets in Manchester, United Kingdom. ...

Architecture

Beetham Tower on Deansgate. An example of Manchester's new skyscrapers.
Beetham Tower on Deansgate. An example of Manchester's new skyscrapers.

Manchester has a wide variety of buildings, ranging from Victorian architecture to modern. Much of the architecture in the city harks back to its days as a global centre for the cotton trade.[69] Manchester also has a number of skyscrapers mostly built during the 1960s and 1970s, although recently there has been a renewed interest in building more. Beetham Tower, completed in 2006, includes a Hilton hotel, a restaurant, and residences. It is currently the tallest building in the UK outside London. An even taller building, the Piccadilly Tower, is scheduled to commence construction in 2007 behind Manchester Piccadilly station.[70] This article is about the architecture of Manchester. ... Artists impression of Beetham Tower in Birmingham, UK File links The following pages link to this file: Beetham Tower ... Artists impression of Beetham Tower in Birmingham, UK File links The following pages link to this file: Beetham Tower ... Beetham Tower Manchester, also known as Hilton Manchester, is a mixed-use skyscraper in Manchester, England. ... The Manchester Evening News Head Office on Deansgate. ... Taipei 101, the worlds tallest skyscraper by roof height on high rise. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ... Beetham Tower, Manchester. ... Beetham Tower Manchester, also known as Hilton Manchester, is a mixed-use skyscraper in Manchester, England. ... Render of how the tower is expected to look when completed. ... Interior shot of the station with the Victorian trainshed. ...


Monuments

Two large squares hold many of Manchester's public monuments. Albert Square, in front of the Town Hall, has monuments to Prince Albert, Bishop James Fraser, Oliver Heywood, William Ewart Gladstone and John Bright. Piccadilly Gardens has monuments dedicated to Queen Victoria, Robert Peel, James Watt and the Duke of Wellington.[71][72] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 363 KB) The B of the Bang, a sculpture in Manchester, UK This photo was taken by Nick Smale on Saturday, 19 January 2005. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 363 KB) The B of the Bang, a sculpture in Manchester, UK This photo was taken by Nick Smale on Saturday, 19 January 2005. ... B of the Bang B of the Bang is a sculpture designed by Thomas Heatherwick erected in Manchester, England. ... Albert Square is a public plaza in Manchester, England. ... Manchester Town Hall Manchester Town Hall is a building in Manchester, England that houses the citys government and administrative functions. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... James Fraser (August 18, 1818- October 22, 1885) was a reforming Anglican bishop of Manchester, England. ... Oliver Heywood (September 9, 1825 - 1892) was a British banker and philanthropist. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... John Bright John Bright (November 16, 1811–March 27, 1889), was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with Richard Cobden in the formation of the Anti-Corn Law League. ... Fountains in Piccadilly Gardens looking towards Market Street Piccadilly Gardens is a green space in Manchester City Centre situated at one end of Market Street (a busy shopping area) and on the edge of the Northern Quarter. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet (5 February 1788 – 2 July 1850) was the Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from December 10, 1834 to April 8, 1835, and again from August 30, 1841 to June 29, 1846. ... James Watt James Watt (19 January 1736 – 19 August 1819) was a Scottish inventor and engineer whose improvements to the steam engine were fundamental to the changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution. ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ...


Other notable monuments include the Alan Turing Memorial (the father of modern computing) in Sackville Park, adjacent to Sackville Street.[72] A monument to Abraham Lincoln was presented to the city by Mr. & Mrs. Charles Phelps Taft of Cincinnati, Ohio. The statue, located in the eponymous Lincoln Square, is the work of George Gray Barnard[71][72] and marks the part that Lancashire played in the cotton famine and American Civil War of 1861–1865.[73] Alan Turing Memorial Situated in the Sackville Park in memory of the father of modern computing. ... Whitworth Gardens (also known as Sackville Park) in Manchester, England, is bounded by the City College Manchester City Campus on one side and Whitworth Street, Sackville Street and the Rochdale Canal and Canal Street on the others. ... Sackville Street can refer to both a steet in central Manchester, England and a large, historic building on that street. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... The cotton famine (1861 – 1865) was a depression in the textile industry in northwest England, brought about by the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


The success of the 2002 Commonwealth Games is commemorated by the 56 m (184 ft) tall B of the Bang, located near the City of Manchester Stadium in the Eastlands area of the city.[72] As of 2007, the sculpture is the tallest in the UK.[74] B of the Bang B of the Bang is a sculpture designed by Thomas Heatherwick erected in Manchester, England. ...


Transport

See also: Manchester Congestion Charge

Manchester and the surrounding settlements in North West England are served by an international airport as well as a major motorway and rail network. The Liverpool and Manchester Railway was the first passenger railway in the world. Greater Manchester has an extensive countywide railway network, and two mainline stations. A network of bus routes and a modern tram system radiates from Manchester City Centre. A canal network also remains from the Industrial Revolution. Manchester and the surrounding settlements in the North West of England are served by numerous transport facilities. ... The Manchester Congestion Charge is a proposed scheme of road charging for the Greater Manchester area [1][2]. Unlike the current version of the London Congestion Charge, two cordons will be used, covering both Greater and inner Manchester[3]. It is proposed that vehicles entering the area bordered by the... North West England is one of the nine regions of England. ... Inaugural journey of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR) was the worlds first intercity passenger railway in which all the trains were timetabled and operated for most of the distance solely by steam locomotives. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Manchester
See also: Natives of Manchester

The Culture of Manchester boasts a rich and diverse artistic, architectural, musical, sporting, theatrical and creative bredth, comparable to any significant international metropolis. ... This is a partial list of famous or notable Mancunians, that is people who were born, lived or worked in Manchester in the North West of England (including in this case Greater Manchester). ...

Nightlife

The central fountain in Piccadilly Gardens
The central fountain in Piccadilly Gardens

Manchester played several key roles in the development of nightclub and DJ culture (see main article on Culture of Manchester). One of the oldest venues is the Band on the Wall, a live music club in the Northern Quarter. It was built around 1862 as the flagship pub of a local brewery and originally called The George & Dragon. In 1975 it was taken on by jazz musician Steve Morris and Frank Cusick, and renamed The Band on the Wall, a longtime nickname for the club since the late 1920s alluding to its stage high on the back wall.[75] Image File history File linksMetadata Piccadilly-gardens. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Piccadilly-gardens. ... Fountains in Piccadilly Gardens looking towards Market Street Piccadilly Gardens is a green space in Manchester City Centre situated at one end of Market Street (a busy shopping area) and on the edge of the Northern Quarter. ... // This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... The Culture of Manchester boasts a rich and diverse artistic, architectural, musical, sporting, theatrical and creative bredth, comparable to any significant international metropolis. ... Band on the Wall Band on the Wall is a live music venue in the Northern Quarter area of Manchester City Centre. ... The Northern Quarter is an area in the city centre of Manchester, UK, generally marked out between Piccadilly, Victoria and Ancoats, and centred around Oldham Street, just off Piccadilly Gardens. ...


Along with other areas that are frequented by late night revellers (such as Castlefield, Deansgate Locks, the Printworks and the Northern Quarter), Manchester boasts the famous Canal Street, the centre of the city's gay community. This was made famous by the Channel 4 programme, 'Queer as Folk', and is the centre of the annual Pride celebrations, held on the last weekend in August. Castlefield Castlefield in Manchester, UK was a site where the Roman Empire established a fort. ... The Northern Quarter is an area in the city centre of Manchester, UK, generally marked out between Piccadilly, Victoria and Ancoats, and centred around Oldham Street, just off Piccadilly Gardens. ... Canal Street may refer to: Canal Street, Manchester – a street in Manchester, England Canal Street, New Orleans – a street in New Orleans Canal Street, Manhattan – a street in New York City This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... Channel 4 is a public-service British television station, broadcast to all areas of the United Kingdom (and also the Republic of Ireland), which began transmissions in 1982. ... Queer as Folk is a 1999 British television series that chronicles the lives of three gay men let loose in Manchesters gay village around Canal Street. ...


Music

Manchester is home to two symphony orchestras, the Hallé Orchestra and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra. There is also a chamber orchestra, the Manchester Camerata. In the 1950s the city was home to the so-called ‘Manchester School’ of classical composers, which comprised Harrison Birtwistle, Peter Maxwell Davies, David Ellis and Alexander Goehr. Manchester is a centre for musical education, with the Royal Northern College of Music and Chetham’s School of Music. The main classical venue was the Free Trade Hall on Peter Street, until the 1996 debut of the 2,500 seat concert venue Bridgewater Hall. For Mancunians, the popular musical heritage of the city has always been a source of great pride. ... This article features a List of bands from Manchester, and may also include some bands who hail from the wider area of Greater Manchester, in England. ... Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... The Hallé Orchestra is one of Britains longest established orchestras, and is based in Manchester. ... The BBC Philharmonic is a professional symphony orchestra based in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... An orchestra is a musical ensemble used most often in classical music. ... Sir Harrison Paul Birtwistle, CH (born July 15, 1934) is a British composer, widely seen as one of the most significant modern composers from that country. ... Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, CBE (b. ... Hi ya all! ... Alexander Goehr (born 10 August 1932 in Berlin) is an English composer and academic. ... Royal Northern College of Music The Royal Northern College of Music or RNCM is a conservatoire in Manchester, England. ... Chethams School of Music, familiarly known as Chets, is a specialist music school in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... The Free Trade Hall in Manchester, England, was for many years a focal point for public debate and cultural activity in the city. ... The Bridgewater Hall is an international concert venue in Manchester, England. ...


Manchester’s main pop music venue is the Manchester Evening News Arena, situated next to Manchester Victoria railway station. It seats over 21,000, is the largest arena of its type in Europe, and has been voted International Venue of the Year.[76] Other major venues include the Manchester Apollo and the Manchester Academy. Smaller venues throughout the city are the Bierkeller, the Roadhouse, and Night and Day Cafe. The Manchester Evening News Arena or M.E.N. Arena (commonly referred to as just The M.E.N. or simply Manchester Arena) is a large indoor arena in Manchester, England. ... Manchester Victoria Manchester Victoria railway station is the second of Manchesters mainline railway stations, now being much less important than Manchester Piccadilly station. ... The Manchester Apollo is a concert venue in Manchester. ... Harris Manchester College, formerly Manchester College, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom; it has the emphasis on mature students. ...


Bands that have emerged from the Manchester music scene include The Smiths, the Buzzcocks, The Fall, Joy Division and its successor group New Order, Oasis and Doves. . Manchester was credited as the main regional driving force behind indie bands of the 1980s including Happy Mondays, The Charlatans, Inspiral Carpets, James, and The Stone Roses. These groups came from what became known as the "Madchester" scene that also centred around the legendary club Fac 51 Haçienda (also known as simply The Haçienda) developed by founder of factory records Anthony Wilson. Subsequently The Chemical Brothers, although from southern England, formed in Manchester. Ex-Stone Roses frontman Ian Brown and ex-Smiths Morrissey continue successful solo careers. Other Greater Manchester natives include Richard Ashcroft and Jay Kay of Jamiroquai. The Smiths were an English rock group active from 1982 to 1987. ... Buzzcocks are an English punk rock band formed in Manchester in 1975, led by singer/songwriter/guitarist Pete Shelley for nearly their entire existence. ... The Fall are an English post-punk band, formed in Manchester in 1976. ... Joy Division were an English rock band that formed in 1976 in Salford, Greater Manchester. ... New Order are an English rock group formed in 1980 from the remaining members of Joy Division—Bernard Sumner (vocals, guitars, synthesizers), Peter Hook (bass, electronic drums), and Stephen Morris (drums, synthesizers). ... Oasis are an English rock band, formed in Manchester in 1991. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... in music that is characterized by its perceived independence from mainstream or pop culture as a whole. ... Happy Mondays are an English alternative rock band from Salford, Greater Manchester. ... The Charlatans could refer to two bands The Charlatans, a United States band The Charlatans, a British band, sometimes known in the US as Charlatans UK This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Inspiral Carpets is an alternative rock band from Oldham in Greater Manchester, England formed by Graham Lambert in 1986. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Stone Roses were an influential English rock band from Manchester formed in 1984. ... Fac 51 Haçienda (also known as simply The Haçienda) was one of the best known nightclubs in Manchester during the Madchester years of the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... FAC 115: Factory Records Stationery (1984) Factory Records was a Manchester-based British independent record label, started in 1978 which featured several prominent musical acts, such as Joy Division, New Order, The Durutti Column, Happy Mondays, and (briefly) James and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark. ... Anthony (Tony) Wilson is a British record label and nightclub manager and journalist for Granada Television. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ian Brown (born February 20, 1963) is an English musician and former lead singer of the indie rock/Madchester band The Stone Roses. ... The Smiths were an English rock group active from 1982 to 1987. ... Steven Patrick Morrissey (born May 22, 1959) is an English singer and songwriter from Davyhulme, near Manchester. ... Richard Paul Ashcroft born 11 September 1971, in Billinge Maternity Hospital in Higher End, Lancashire (now part of the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, Greater Manchester). ... Jason Jay Kay (born December 30, 1969, Stretford - Manchester) is a British funk musician. ... Jamiroquai (A portmanteau of Jam and iroquai, loosely based on the native American Indian tribe the Iroquois) is a Grammy Award-winning English funk / soul / disco band. ...


Literature

In the 19th century, Manchester figured in novels that discussed the changes that industrialisation had brought to Britain. These included works such as Mary Barton: A Tale of Manchester Life (1848) by Elizabeth Gaskell, [4], and The Condition of the English Working Class in 1844, written by Friedrich Engels while living and working in Manchester. Charles Dickens is reputed to have set his novel Hard Times in the city, and while it is partly modelled on Preston, it shows the influence of his friend Elizabeth Gaskell [5]. Elizabeth Gaskell — from the portrait by George Richmond Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell (née Stevenson; 29 September 1810–12 November 1865), often referred to simply as Mrs. ... Friedrich Engels (November 28, 1820 – August 5, 1895) was a German social scientist and philosopher, who developed communist theory alongside his better-known collaborator, Karl Marx, co-authoring The Communist Manifesto (1848). ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... Hard Times is a novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1854. ...


Theatre

Larger venues include the Manchester Opera House, featuring large scale touring shows and West End shows, the Palace Theatre, the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester’s former cotton exchange, and the Lowry Centre, a touring venue in Salford. Smaller sites include the Library Theatre, a producing theatre in the basement of the central library, the Green Room, the Contact Theatre, and Studio Salford. The Dancehouse is dedicated to dance productions. The Opera House in Manchester, England is a 2000 seat commercial touring theatre which plays host to touring musicals, ballet, concerts and a spectactular Christmas pantomime. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in... The Palace Theatre Manchester is one of the main theatres in Manchester, England. ... Royal Exchange The Royal Exchange Theatre is a producing theatre in Manchester, England. ... The entrance to the Lowry Centre ian is the best, he is king The Lowry Centre or The Lowry is a combined ian ,theatre and gallery complex dedicated to L.S. Lowry situated in Salford Quays, Manchester. ... The Library Theatre is located an the basement of Manchester Central Library and is the home of the respected Library Theatre Company, a Manchester City Council service. ... The Green Room is an arts venue in Manchester. ... The Contact Theatre is a theatre owned by The University of Manchester. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Second City?

Manchester has recently been regarded by some as the Second city of the United Kingdom. A 2007 poll by the BBC placed it ahead of Birmingham in the category of second city, but also ahead in the category of third city. Neither categories are officially sanctioned, and criteria for determining what 'second city' means are ill-defined. Certainly Manchester is not the second largest city in size or population, but some argue that cultural and historical criteria are important. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Second city. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Second city. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


The redevelopment of recent years has heightened claims that Manchester is the second city of the United Kingdom.[77]This title however, which is unofficial in the UK, is also claimed by a number of other cities, including Birmingham which has traditionally held this title since the early 20th century.[78] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Second city. ...


Education

The Old Quadrangle of the University of Manchester
The Old Quadrangle of the University of Manchester

Main Quadrangle University of Manchester by Nick Higham. ... Main Quadrangle University of Manchester by Nick Higham. ... The University of Manchester is a university located in Manchester, England. ...

Universities

Manchester is home to two universities, the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University. The University of Manchester is the largest full-time non-collegiate university in the United Kingdom, and was created in autumn 2004 by the merger of Victoria University of Manchester and UMIST.[79] Manchester Business School, which offered the first MBA course in the UK in 1965, is also part of the University of Manchester. Manchester Metropolitan University was formed out of the old polytechnic college in the city[80] and subsequently took over the old Crewe and Alsager College of Higher Education in South Cheshire.[81] Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... The University of Manchester is a university located in Manchester, England. ... Manchester Metropolitan University is based in Manchester, England. ... The Victoria University of Manchester (VUM) was a large university in Manchester in England. ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... Manchester Business School (MBS) is the business and management school of the University of Manchester in England. ... The term polytechnic, from the Greek πολύ polú meaning many and τεχνικός tekhnikós meaning arts, is commonly used in many countries to describe an institution that delivers vocational or technical education and training, other countries do not use the term and use alternative terminology. ...


The University of Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan University and the Royal Northern College of Music are grouped together around Oxford Road on the southern side of the city centre, and form the largest city-centre group of higher education institutions in Europe.[82] Royal Northern College of Music The Royal Northern College of Music or RNCM is a conservatoire in Manchester, England. ...


Schools

One of Manchester's most notable secondary schools is the Manchester Grammar School. Established in 1515[83] as a free grammar school next to what is now the Cathedral, it moved in 1931 to Old Hall Lane in Fallowfield, South Manchester, to accommodate the growing student body. In the post-war period, it was a direct-grant grammar school (i.e. partially state funded), but it reverted to independent status in 1976 after abolition of the direct-grant system.[84] Its previous premises are now used by Chetham's School of Music. There are two schools nearby: Withington Girls' School and Manchester High School for Girls. The Manchester Grammar School (MGS) is an independent boys school (ages 11-18) in Fallowfield, Manchester, England. ... A grammar school is a school that may, depending on regional usage as exemplified below, provide either secondary education or, a much less common usage, primary education (also known as elementary). Grammar schools trace their origins back to medieval Europe, as schools in which university preparatory subjects, such as Latin... A grammar school is one of several different types of school in the history of education in the United Kingdom. ... Chethams School of Music, familiarly known as Chets, is a specialist music school in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Withington Girls School is an independent daytime school for girls. ... Manchester High School for Girls is an independent daytime school for girls. ...


Sports

Main article: Sports in Manchester

Two Premiership football clubs, Manchester United and Manchester City, bear the city’s name. Manchester City's ground is at the City of Manchester Stadium, (48,000 capacity); Manchester United's Old Trafford ground, the largest club football ground in the United Kingdom with 76,000 capacity, and England's only UEFA-rated 5-star stadium, is just outside the city in the borough of Trafford. Trafford is also the home of Old Trafford cricket Ground which is home to Lancashire County Cricket Club (LCCC). The B of the Bang, a sculpture commemorating the 2002 Commonwealth Games in Manchester. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The City of Manchester Stadium (also known as COMS or Eastlands) is a sports venue in Manchester, England. ... The 2002 Commonwealth Games were held in Manchester, England from July 25 to August 4, 2002. ... The original FA Premier League logo, used until 2007 The Premier League (officially known as the Barclays Premier League for sponsorship reasons, colloquially known as The Premiership), is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top echelon of the English football league system (above The Football League). ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ... Manchester City Football Club is an English football club based in the city of Manchester. ... The City of Manchester Stadium (also known as COMS or Eastlands) is a sports venue in Manchester, England. ... Old Trafford (given the nickname The Theatre of Dreams by Sir Bobby Charlton) is a football stadium in the Greater Manchester borough of Trafford, and is the home of Manchester United F.C.. The ground has been Uniteds permanent home since 1910, bar an eight year absence from 1941... The Metropolitan Borough of Trafford is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England. ...


First class sporting facilities were built for the 2002 Commonwealth Games, including the Manchester Velodrome, the City of Manchester Stadium, the National Squash Centre and the Manchester Aquatics Centre. Manchester has competed twice to host the Olympic Games, being beaten by Atlanta for 1996 and Sydney for 2000, and various sporting arenas around the city will be used as training facilities prior to the 2012 Olympics in London. The 2002 Commonwealth Games were held in Manchester, England from July 25 to August 4, 2002. ... Manchester Velodrome is a velodrome in Manchester. ... The City of Manchester Stadium (also known as COMS or Eastlands) is a sports venue in Manchester, England. ... The National Squash Centre is part of the Sportcity complex in Eastlands, Manchester, England which was constructed for the 2002 Commonwealth Games. ... The Manchester Aquatics Centre is a public aquatic sports facility in Manchester, England. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 4. ... (Redirected from 2012 Olympics) Nine cities submitted bids for the 2012 Summer Olympics, and five have made it to the shortlist for hosting the Games of the XXX Olympiad. ...


Media

Television and radio

See also: List of television shows set in Manchester
The headquarters of Granada Television
The headquarters of Granada Television

ITV franchisee Granada Television has its original headquarters on Quay Street in the Castlefield area of the city. The city is where programmes including World's oldest and most watched television soap opera Coronation Street which is networked 5 times a week on ITV is made. Local News for the Granada Region, local programmes and Networked Children’s ITV presentations are produced in Manchester. This is a list of television shows set in Manchester Clocking Off Coronation Street Life on Mars Queer as Folk The Second Coming Shameless Cold Feet Cutting It Having It Off Making Out Cracker Ideal The Royle Family In the massively successful American Sitcom Frasier, the character Daphne Moon is... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV but also as ITV Network or Channel 3) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Coronation Street is an award winning British soap opera. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV but also as ITV Network or Channel 3) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Manchester is one of the three main BBC bases in England, alongside London and Bristol. Programmes including A Question of Sport, Mastermind[85] and Real Story[86] are made at New Broadcasting House on Oxford Road, just south of the city centre. The hit series Cutting It was set in the city's Northern Quarter and ran on BBC1 for 5 series. Life on Mars was set in 1973 Manchester. The first edition of Top of the Pops was broadcast from a converted church in Longsight on New Year's Day 1964.[87] Manchester is also the regional base for the BBC One North West Region so programmes like North West Tonight are produced here.[88] The BBC intends to relocate large numbers of staff and facilities from London to Media City at Salford Quays. The Children's (CBBC), Comedy, Sport (BBC Sport) and New Media departments are all scheduled to move before 2010.[89] The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the English city. ... A Question of Sport is a long-running BBC quiz show which started on 5 January 1970 and continues to this day. ... Mastermind is one of the most highly regarded British quiz shows, well-known for its challenging questions, intimidating setting, and air of seriousness. ... Real Story is a current affairs programme which airs on the British television channel, BBC One at 19:30 GMT weekly on Mondays. ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... Life on Mars is a BAFTA- and International Emmy award-winning British television drama series, which was first shown on BBC One in January and February 2006. ... Top of the Pops, also known as TOTP, was a long-running British music chart television programme, made and broadcast by the BBC. It was originally shown each week, mostly on BBC One, from 1 January 1964 to 30 July 2006. ... Longsight is an area in Manchester, England, around 3 miles south of the city centre. ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... Salford Quays, showing the The Lowry arts complex. ... CBBC Logo CBBC - short for Childrens BBC - is the brand-name for the BBCs childrens television programmes aimed at children aged between 6 and 12 years old. ... BBC Sport is the sports division of the BBC. It became a fully dedicated division of the BBC in 2000. ...


Manchester has its own television channel, Channel M, owned by the Guardian Media Group and operated since 2000. The station produces almost all content including local news locally and is available nationally on the BSkyB television platform. Channel M is a television station which is based in Manchester. ... Guardian Media Group plc is a company of the United Kingdom owning various mass media operations including The Guardian, The Observer and the Manchester Evening News. ... British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB - formerly two companies, Sky Television and British Satellite Broadcasting, which merged) is a company that operates the most popular subscription television service in the Ireland. ...


The city also has the highest number of local radio stations outside London including BBC Radio Manchester, Key 103, Galaxy, Piccadilly Magic 1152, 105.4 Century FM, 100.4 Smooth FM, Capital Gold 1458, 96.2 The Revolution and Xfm. BBC Radio Manchester, which became BBC GMR in 1988, returned to its former title in 2006. BBC Radio Manchester is a BBC Local Radio station broadcasting to the city of Manchester and surrounding areas. ... Key 103 is an Independent Local Radio station that broadcasts on 103 FM, from a 4 kW transmitter on Saddleworth Moor, to Manchester and the north west of England. ... Galaxy is a local radio station owned by the Chrysalis Group as part of its Galaxy Network specialising in dance music and RnB. It is based in Manchester, and broadcasts from studios in the Triangle shopping centre, formerly the Corn Exchange. ... Piccadilly Magic 1152 (also known as Magic 1152) ‘Greatest Hits Non-Stop,’ began life as Piccadilly Radio, which was Manchesters first commercial radio station. ... 105. ... Smooth FM is a independent local radio station based in Manchester. ... The Revolution is an Independent Local Radio station broadcasting to the areas of Oldham, Rochdale and Tameside in Greater Manchester, England. ... Xfm Manchester is a commercial radio station broadcasting alternative music to Manchester in North West England. ... BBC Radio Manchester is a BBC Local Radio station broadcasting to the city of Manchester and surrounding areas. ...

Construction of Mediacity:uk at Salford Quays in July 2007

Student radio stations include Fuse FM at the University of Manchester and Shock FM at the University of Salford). A community radio network is coordinated by Radio Regen, with stations covering the South Manchester communities of Ardwick, Longsight and Levenshulme (ALL FM 96.9) and Wythenshawe (Wythenshawe FM 97.2). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 424 pixelsFull resolution (1231 × 653 pixel, file size: 286 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A photograph that I took myself of the construction of Media City in Salford Quays. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 424 pixelsFull resolution (1231 × 653 pixel, file size: 286 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A photograph that I took myself of the construction of Media City in Salford Quays. ... Salford Quays, showing the The Lowry arts complex. ... The University of Manchester is a university located in Manchester, England. ... Community radio is a type of radio service that caters to the interests of a certain area, broadcasting material that is popular to a local audience but is overlooked by more powerful broadcast groups. ... Ardwick is an inner-city district of Manchester, about one mile south east of the city centre. ... Longsight is an area in Manchester, England, around 3 miles south of the city centre. ... Levenshulme is an urban area in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Wythenshawe is a district in the south of the City of Manchester, in North West England. ...


Defunct radio stations include Sunset (which became) Kiss 102 (now Galaxy), and KFM which became Signal Cheshire (now Signal 1). These stations, as well as pirate radio, played a significant role in the city's House music culture, also known as the Madchester scene, which was based around clubs like the The Haçienda which had its own show on Kiss 102. Kiss 102 was a Music radio station broadcasting to Greater Manchester on 102. ... Signal One is an Independent Local Radio station broadcasting from studios in Shelton, Stoke on Trent to Staffordshire and Cheshire on 96. ... The term pirate radio usually refers to illegal or unregulated radio broadcasting. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... Fac 51 Haçienda (also known as simply The Haçienda) was one of the best known nightclubs in Manchester during the Madchester years of the late 1980s and early 1990s. ...


Erstwhile producer and radio personality Karl Pilkington, of The Ricky Gervais Show fame, hails from Manchester. Karl Pilkington (born September 23, 1972 in Manchester) is an English, Sony Award winning radio producer and thinker best known for producing (and then later becoming a de facto presenter on) The Ricky Gervais Show on the radio station Xfm. ... The Ricky Gervais Show is a comedy audio show in the UK starring Ricky Gervais, Stephen Merchant, and Karl Pilkington. ...


Television characters who hail from Manchester includes Daphne Moon (played by Jane Leeves), of Frasier, Charlie Pace (played by Dominic Monaghan) of Lost, Naomi Dorrit (Lost) and Nessa Holt (Las Vegas), both played by local actress Marsha Thomason. Information Gender female Occupation physical therapist Family Gertrude Moon (mother) Harry Moon (father) Simon Moon (brother) Stephen Moon (brother) Nigel Moon (brother) Michael Moon (brother) Spouse(s) Niles Crane Relatives Martin Crane (father-in-law) Hester Crane (mother-in-law, deceased) Frasier Crane (brother-in-law) Grammy Moon (grandmother) Portrayed... Jane Leeves Jane Leeves (born April 18, 1961) is an actress best known for her work as Daphne Moon on Frasier. ... Frasier is a popular American situation comedy television series that starred Kelsey Grammer, reprising the character of psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane from parent show Cheers, which had ended months before. ... Charlie Hieronymus Pace is a fictional character on the ABC television series Lost played by Dominic Monaghan. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Lost is a popular American serial drama television series that follows the lives of plane crash survivors on a tropical island, after a passenger jet flying between Australia and the United States crashes somewhere in the South Pacific. ... This article contains character information for the American drama/adventure television series Lost. ... Las Vegas is a dramatic comedy television series about a team of people working in the fictional Montecito Resort and Casino in Las Vegas — dealing with issues that arise within the working environment, ranging from valet parking and restaurant management to casino security. ... Las Vegas is a dramatic comedy television series about a team of people working in the fictional Montecito Resort and Casino in Las Vegas — dealing with issues that arise within the working environment, ranging from valet parking and restaurant management to casino security. ... Marsha Thomason (born January 19, 1976 in Manchester) is an English actress, born to an English father and a Jamaican mother, who first came to prominence on British television in the series Playing The Field and Where The Heart Is, as well as in the first series of the BBC3...


Filmography

See also: Films set in Manchester

Manchester is featured in films such as My Son, My Son! (1940), directed by Charles Vidor and starring Brian Aherne and Louis Hayward. Also Grand Hotel (1932), in which Wallace Beery often shouts "Manchester!". Others include Velvet Goldmine starring Ewan MacGregor, and Sir Alec Guinness's The Man in the White Suit. More recently, the entire city of Manchester is engulfed in runaway fires in the 2002 film 28 Days Later. This is a partial list of films set in Manchester, England: Grand Hotel (1932) My Son, My Son! (1940) The Man in the White Suit (1951) Love on the Dole (1959) Hell is a City (1960) Billy Liar (1963) Yanks (1979) No Surrender (1985) Velvet Goldmine (1998) East is East... Charles Vidor (July 27, 1900 – June 4, 1959) was a film director. ... Brian Aherne (May 2, 1902 – February 10, 1986) was an English film actor who found success in Hollywood. ... Louis Hayward, born Seafield Grant, (March 19, 1909-February 21, 1985), was a British actor born in Johannesburg, South Africa. ... Grand Hotel is a 1932 art deco movie, and is considered as a classic of the sort. ... Wallace Beery (April 1, 1885 – April 15, 1949) was an American actor, best known for his many cinema appearances. ... Velvet Goldmine (1998) is a film directed and co-written by Todd Haynes. ... Ewan McGregor Ewan McGregor (born March 31, 1971 in Crieff, Perthshire, Scotland, UK) is a Scottish film actor who has had significant success in both mainstream and art house movies. ... The Swan Sir Alec Guinness, CH, CBE (April 2, 1914 - August 5, 2000) was a British actor who became one of the most versatile and best loved performers of his generation. ... The Man in the White Suit is a satirical comedy movie made in 1951 by Ealing Studios. ... 28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris and Christopher Eccleston. ...


Manchester is also home to the Manchester Film Festival and has held the Commonwealth film festival.


Magazines and newspapers

The Guardian newspaper was founded in Manchester in 1821 as The Manchester Guardian. Its head office is still in Manchester, though many of its management functions were moved to London in 1964. It shares an office on Hardman Street with sister publication Manchester Evening News (biggest-selling daily paper although now free within the city centre), and the Manchester Metro News (free weekly, Greater Manchester's biggest-circulation newspaper). Another free newspaper is the Metro North West, available from Metrolink stops, rail stations and other busy locations. The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Manchester Evening News is an English daily newspaper published each week day evening and on Saturdays. ... Cover for an issue of the Metro newspaper, October 25th 2004. ... Map of St. ...


For many years most of the national newspapers had offices in Manchester: The Daily Telegraph, Daily Express, Daily Mail, The Daily Mirror, The Sun. Only The Daily Sport remain based in Manchester. At its height, 1,500 journalists were employed. But in the 1980s office closures began and today the "second Fleet Street" is no more. A late attempt to launch a Northern daily newspaper, North West Times, floundered in the late 1980s lasting just three months. Another attempt was made with the North West Enquirer, which hoped to provide a true "regional" newspaper for the North West, much in the same vein as the Yorkshire Post does for Yorkshire or The Northern Echo does for the North East. It folded in October 2006. This article concerns the British newspaper. ... For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid daily newspaper. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... The Daily Sport is a tabloid newspaper published in the United Kingdom by Sport Newspapers. ... The Enquirers first edition, published 27 March 2006 The North West Enquirer was a short-lived weekly regional tabloid newspaper covering the North West region of England. ... North West England is one of the nine regions of England. ... The Yorkshire Post was founded in 1754, as the Leedes Intelligencer, making it one of Britains first daily newspapers. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Northern Echo is a regional newspaper serving the north-east of England. ... North-East England is one of the nine official regions of England and comprises the combined area of Northumberland, County Durham, Tyne and Wear and a small part of North Yorkshire. ...


There are several local lifestyle magazines, including 'YQ Magazine' and 'Moving Manchester'.


Foreign consulates and commissions

Manchester and its conurbation are home to a number of foreign consulates and commissions: For the uses of Consul as Chief Magistrate of a (city) state, see Consul. ...

  • Flag of Australia Australia Chatsworth House, Lever Street, Manchester M1 2QL. (Tel: 0161 228 1344)
  • Flag of Bangladesh Bangladesh High Commission,3rd Floor, 28-32 Princess Street, Manchester M1 4LB
  • Flag of People's Republic of China China Denison House, Denison Road, Rusholme, Manchester M14.
  • Flag of Denmark Denmark Trade Office, 4th Floor, Arkwright House, Parsonage Gardens, Manchester M3.
  • Flag of France France Trade Commission, 24th Floor, Sunley Tower, Piccadilly Plaza, Manchester M1.
  • Flag of France France Davis Blank Furniss, 90 Deansgate, Manchester M3 2QJ. (Tel. 0161 832 3304)
  • Flag of Ireland Ireland Trade Board, 56 Oxford Street, Manchester M1.
  • Flag of Italy Italy Rodwell Tower, 111 Piccadilly, Manchester M1.
  • Flag of Monaco Monaco Dene Manor, Dene Park, Manchester M20.
  • Flag of Netherlands Netherlands 123 Deansgate, Manchester M3.
  • Flag of Pakistan Pakistan Vice-consulate, 4th Floor Hilton House, 26/28 Hilton Street, Manchester M1.
  • Flag of Spain Spain 1a Brook House, 70 Spring Gardens, Manchester M2 2BQ.

In addition, the British Council maintains a metropolitan centre in Manchester.[90] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bangladesh. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Monaco. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Logo of the British Council British Council building in London The British Council is a non-departmental public body and registered charity for cultural relations in the United Kingdom. ...

Twin cities

Although not an official twin city, Tampere, Finland is known as "the Manchester of Finland" - or "Manse" for short. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Nickname: Motto: Heldhaftig, Vastberaden, Barmhartig (Valiant, Determined, Compassionate) Location of Amsterdam Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province North Holland Government  - Mayor Job Cohen (PvdA)  - Aldermen Lodewijk Asscher Hennah Buyne Carolien Gehrels Tjeerd Herrema Maarten van Poelgeest Marijke Vos  - Secretary Erik Gerritsen Area [1][2]  - City 219 km²  (84. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Chemnitz (Sorbian/Lusatian Kamjenica, 1953-1990 called Karl-Marx-Stadt; Czech: Saská Kamenice) is a city in the Free State of Saxony, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location Coordinates : , , Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Córdoba (Spanish) Spanish name Córdoba Founded 8th century BC Postal code 140xx Website http://www. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Faisalabad (Urdu: فیصل آباد) is a city located in Punjab, Pakistan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Coordinates: Country Nicaragua Department Managua Municipality Managua Founded 1819 Seat of the Government 1852 Capital of the Nation 1857  - Mayor Dionisio Marenco Area    - City 544 km²  - Urban 173. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Rehovot (Hebrew רְחוֹבוֹת ) is a city in the Center District of Israel, about 20 km south of Tel Aviv. ... Tampere ( , Tammerfors in Swedish) is a city in southern Finland located between two lakes, Näsijärvi and Pyhäjärvi. ... The rectory is the title usually given to the building inhabited, or formerly inhabited, by the vicar of a parish. ...

Gallery

Main article: Manchester Gallery

Further reading

  • Architecture
    • Manchester. Clare Hartwell. Pevsner Architectural Guides ISBN 0-300-09666-6
    • Manchester: A guide to recent architecture. David Hands and Sarah Parker. Ellipsis. ISBN 1-899858-77-6
    • Manchester — an Architectural History John Parkinson Bailey. Manchester University Press. ISBN 0-7190-5606-3
  • General
    • Hylton, Stuart (2003). A History of Manchester. Phillimore & Company. ISBN 1-86077-240-4. 
    • Kidd, Alan J. (1993). Manchester (Town and city histories). Manchester: Ryburn. ISBN 1-85331-016-6. 
    • The City Life Guide to Manchester: 6th edition. ISBN 0-9544460-7-0
    • The Mancunian Way Published by Clinamen Press ISBN 1-903083-81-8
    • Manchester — a Celebration. Brian Redhead. André Deutsch Limited, London. ISBN 0-233-98816-5
    • Victorian Manchester & Salford. Published in 1988 by Ryburn Publishing Limited. ISBN 1-85331-006-9
  • Culture
    • Morrissey's Manchester: The Essential Smiths Tour Phil Gatenby ISBN 1-901746-28-3
    • Manchester, England. The story of the pop cult city. Dave Haslam ISBN 1-84115-146-7
    • And God Created Manchester. Sarah Champion. Wordsmith. ISBN 1-873205-01-5
    • The Hacienda Must be Built. Edited by Jon Savage. International Music Publications ISBN 0-86359-857-9
    • Shake, Rattle and Rain — Popular Music in Manchester 1955-1995. CP Lee ISBN 1-84382-049-8
    • Like The Night — Bob Dylan and the road to the Manchester Free Trade Hall. CP Lee ISBN 1-900924-33-1

References

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  2. ^ United Kingdom Census 2001 (2001). Key Statistics for urban areas in England and Wales. statistics.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  3. ^ Manchester, www.manchester.ac.uk, Manchester University. URL accessed October 24, 2006.
    Northern Soul, www.educationuk.org, March 2003. URL accessed October 24, 2006.
  4. ^ [1] 11 July 2007.
  5. ^ Note that Manchester United's ground is in Greater Manchester but not inside Manchester city limits: it is in the borough of Trafford.
  6. ^ Manchester's Buildings, Manchester UK. URL accessed December 18, 2006.
    • Kidd, A., (2006), Manchester: A History, Carnegie Publishing Ltd.
    • Frangopulo, N.J., (1977), Tradition in Action: The Historical Evolution of the Greater Manchester County, EP Publishing, Wakefield.
    Manchester United in Celebration of City, European Funding NW. URL accessed December 18, 2006.
    National Museum of Science and Industry. Manchester - the first industrial city. www.sciencemuseum.org.uk. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
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  10. ^ Riley, Catherine. "Can Birmingham halt its decline?", The Times, Times Newspapers Ltd, 08 July 2005. Retrieved on 2007-08-01. “Many now consider Manchester to be the country’s second city” 
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    "Manchester tops second city poll", BBC News, 10 February 2007, retrieved 11 February 2007
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  14. ^ Rogers, Nicholas - Halloween: from Pagan Ritual to Party Night, 2003, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-1951-6896-8? p 18
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  17. ^ Arrowsmith, Peter (1997). Stockport: a History. Stockport: Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council, p 30. ISBN 0-905164-99-7. 
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  29. ^ (2003) in Speake, Jennifer: The Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs, 4th ed, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0198605242. Retrieved on 2007-07-06. “What MANCHESTER says today, the rest of England says tomorrow” 
    Osborne, George (March 7, 2007). Conservative Party - News Story. Conservative Party Website. Conservative Party. Retrieved on 2007-07-06. “The saying goes that what Manchester does today the rest of the world does tomorrow.”
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  30. ^ Biography of Engels. Marx-Engels Internet Archive. Retrieved on 2007-07-30.
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  34. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus (1969). The Buildings of England: South Lancashire. London: Penguin, p267. ISBN 0-14-071036-1. 
  35. ^ Manchester docks pre-1985. Salford City Council web pages. Salford City Council (10 June 2005). Retrieved on 2007-07-06.
  36. ^ "Historical Timeline" Manchester Cathedral's website
  37. ^ Hylton, pp 227-230.
  38. ^ The cost of terrorism. BBC News. BBC (15 May 2004). Retrieved on 2007-07-09.
  39. ^ Hartwell, Clare (2001). Pevsner Architectural Guides: Manchester. London: Penguin Books. ISBN 0-14-071131-7. 
    Parkinson-Bailey, John J (2000). Manchester: an Architectural History. Manchester: Manchester University Press. ISBN 0-7190-5606-3. 
    Hartwell, Clare; Matthew Hyde, Nikolaus Pevsner (2004). Lancashire: Manchester and the South-East. New Haven and London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-10583-5. 
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  42. ^ Casino Advisory Panel Recommendation.
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  44. ^ Greenwich loses Casino Bet.
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  49. ^ English Core Cities Group (N.D.). Core Cities. corecities.com. Retrieved on 2007-07-09.
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  52. ^ The Manchester Coalfields. The Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. Retrieved on 2007-07-15.
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  57. ^ MEN News report on road closures accessed July 15 2007
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  62. ^ [2] Manchester ethnic groups- percentages
  63. ^ History of Manchester - 35% of the city's population has Irish ancestry URL accessed on June 28, 2007
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  69. ^ See Parkinson-Bailey, Hartwell, and Hartwell et al
  70. ^ Taylor, Paul R. "It's a really tall storey", Manchester Evening News, M.E.N media, 11 May 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-09. 
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  73. ^ Inscription on plinth.
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    •http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/manchester/4293814.stm "Manchester 'close to second city'"], BBC News, 29 September 2005, retrieved 2 May 2006
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External links

Find more information on Manchester by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
Dictionary definitions from Wiktionary
Textbooks from Wikibooks
Quotations from Wikiquote
Source texts from Wikisource
Images and media from Commons
News stories from Wikinews
Learning resources from Wikiversity
  • Manchester City Council
  • Visit Manchester, the official tourist board
  • BBC Manchester
  • Greater Manchester Online - Community news & info
  • Rail map of Greater Manchester
  • National Statistics Profile*Manchester travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Channel M - Greater Manchester's own TV station
  • Manchester Conservatives - The local Manchester Conservative party website.
Places with city status in the United Kingdom


The City of Manchester
Greater ManchesterEnglandUnited Kingdom
About Manchester
Architecture | Buildings | Crime | Cuisine | Culture | Economy | Gallery | History | Music | People | Politics | Sport | Transport
Districts
Ancoats | Ardwick | Ardwick Green | Baguley | Belle Vue | Benchill | Blackley | Bradford | Burnage | Castlefield | Cheetham Hill | Chorlton | Chorlton-on-Medlock | City Centre | Clayton | Collyhurst | Crumpsall | Darnhill | Didsbury | East Didsbury | Fallowfield | Gatley | Gay Village | Gorton | Harpurhey | Hulme | Levenshulme | Longsight | Lower Crumpsall | Miles Platting | Moss Side | Moston | Newall Green | Newton Heath | Northenden | Northern Quarter | Openshaw | Parrs Wood | Peel Hall | Piccadilly Village | Ringway | Rusholme | Sharston | University | Whalley Range | Withington | Woodhouse Park | Wythenshawe


Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... This article is about the architecture of Manchester. ... Manchesters Beetham Tower - the tallest building in the UK outside London The CIS Tower was for many years the tallest building in Manchester Manchester has a recognisable skyline and a number of notable tall buildings and structures. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Culture of Manchester boasts a rich and diverse artistic, architectural, musical, sporting, theatrical and creative bredth, comparable to any significant international metropolis. ... A Manchester Gallery with pictures of the city of Manchester, England. ... Manchester developed over little more than a century from a minor town into the worlds first industrial city. ... For Mancunians, the popular musical heritage of the city has always been a source of great pride. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of the Victorian architecture found in Manchester and is the home of Manchester City Council. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ardwick is an inner-city district of Manchester, about one mile south east of the city centre. ... Ardwick Green is an important public space in Ardwick, Manchester, England. ... Baguley is an area of Wythenshawe, Manchester. ... Belle Vue is a district of Manchester (post code M12), England between Longsight and Gorton. ... Benchill is a district of the city of Manchester, part of the massive Wythenshawe council estate, about eight miles south of the city centre. ... , Blackley (pronounced blake-ley (/bleɪklɪ/)) is a district of Manchester, in North West England. ... Bradford is an electoral ward in the city of Manchester, in North West England. ... Burnage is a post-industrial suburb of the City of Manchester in North West England. ... Castlefield Castlefield in Manchester, UK was a site where the Roman Empire established a fort. ... Cheetham Hill is a district of Manchester, England located approximately 2 miles to the north of Manchester city centre. ... Chorlton-cum-Hardy or Chorlton is a suburb of Manchester. ... Chorlton-on-Medlock is a district of Manchester immediately south of Manchester City Centre and south of the River Medlock. ... City of Manchester. ... Clayton is a district of Manchester, England about 3 miles east of the city centre. ... Collyhurst is an inner-city area north of the city centre of Manchester, in north west England. ... Crumpsall is a suburb some 3 miles to the north of Manchester, in the United Kingdom. ... Darnhill is a district of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale , England originally designed as an overspill estate for Manchester city centre it is now no longer run by Manchester City Council but by The Guinness Trust Housing Association. ... Didsbury is a suburb of Manchester, in North West England. ... East Didsbury is a prosperous area of South Manchester. ... Fallowfield is an area of the City of Manchester, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Canal Street, Manchester Canal Street Canal Street looks across the Rochdale Canal into Sackville Park in the city centre of Manchester. ... Gorton is a district in Manchester, United Kingdom, to the south-east of the city centre. ... Harpurhey is a suburb of Manchester, approximately three miles north of the city centre. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Levenshulme is an urban area in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Longsight is an area in Manchester, England, around 3 miles south of the city centre. ... Lower Crumpsall is a part of Crumpsall, a suburb some 3 miles to the north of Manchester in the UK. It is situated in the valley of the River Irk, which forms its northern boundary with the neighbouring suburb of Blackley at Tetlow Bridge [1]. It consited largely of several... The area of Miles Platting in inner north Manchester, England, was intensively developed in the 19th century providing homes for the industrial workforce. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Moston is a town in the district of Oldham, England, and lies around 4 miles north of the Manchester City Centre. ... Newall Green is part of the Wythenshawe area of Manchester, England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... , Northenden is a district and suburb located at the edge of the Wythenshawe council-estate in the City of Manchester, in North West England. ... The Northern Quarter is an area in the city centre of Manchester, UK, generally marked out between Piccadilly, Victoria and Ancoats, and centred around Oldham Street, just off Piccadilly Gardens. ... Openshaw Citadel was the third Salvation Army corps opened in Manchester from August 7, 1879 to the 1970s. ... Parrs Wood is an area in South Manchester, South East of Didsbury, at one end of Wilmslow Road. ... Peel Hall is in an area of Wythenshawe twinned with Gaza. ... Fountains in Piccadilly Gardens looking towards Market Street Piccadilly Gardens is a green space in Manchester City Centre situated at one end of Market Street (a busy shopping area) and on the edge of the Northern Quarter. ... The name Ringway can have these meanings:- Ringway Airport is old name for Manchester International Airport. ... Rusholme is a part of Manchester, in North West England, about two miles south of Manchester city centre. ... Sharston is in the south of the city of Manchester. ... The University of Manchester is a university located in Manchester, England. ... Whalley Range, a district of Manchester, lies about 1. ... Withington is an area of Manchester, England about 4 miles south of the city centre, intersected by the busy thoroughfare of Wilmslow Road. ... Woodhouse Park is a housing estate in the south of the area of Wythenshawe, which is in turn in the south of the city of Manchester in North West England in the United Kingdom. ... Wythenshawe is a district in the south of the City of Manchester, in North West England. ...


The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... The City of Salford is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England. ... The Metropolitan borough of Bolton is a metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. ... The Metropolitan borough of Bury is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, in the northwest of England. ... This article relates to the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham. ... The Metropolitan borough of Rochdale is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester in North West England. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Stockport is a Metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, in north west England. ... Tameside is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester in north west England. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Trafford is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Wigan is a Metropolitan Borough of Greater Manchester, in the North West of England. ... Altrincham (pronounced Oltringum) is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford in Greater Manchester, England. ... Ashton-in-Makerfield is a town in the north west of England and is split between the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, Greater Manchester, and the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside. ... Ashton-under-Lyne is a town in Greater Manchester with a population of 44,400 (2001 estimate). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bolton is a large town in the north-west of England. ... , Bury is a town in the north of Greater Manchester in North West England. ... Cadishead is a town in the metropolitan borough of the City of Salford, Greater Manchester, England. ... Statistics Population: 33,001 (2001 Census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SD9005 Administration Metropolitan Borough: Oldham Metropolitan county: Greater Manchester Region: North West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Greater Manchester Historic county: Lancashire Services Police force: Greater Manchester Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance... Cheadle Hulme is a suburban area located in the south of Greater Manchester in the North-West of England. ... Cheadle is a small town near Stockport in Greater Manchester in England and falls within the Manchester urban area. ... Denton is a former hat-manufacturing town and suburb of Manchester, situated six miles east of the centre of the city of Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Droylsden is a town within the Tameside borough of Greater Manchester, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Location within the British Isles Eccles is a Small Town in the northwest of England that is in the metropolitan borough of the City of Salford but not, traditionally, part of Salford. ... Failsworth is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, Greater Manchester, in the North West of England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Heywood is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, Greater Manchester, England. ... , Hindley is a town and district of the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan in Greater Manchester, England. ... Horwich (pronounced Horrich) is a town and civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton in Greater Manchester, England. ... Hyde is a town in Greater Manchester, England. ... Ince-in-Makerfield, usually known just as Ince is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan in Greater Manchester, England. ... Irlam is a town within the metropolitan borough of the City of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England. ... Kearsley is an area in the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton in Greater Manchester, England, about four miles south-east of Bolton itself. ... Leigh is a town in Greater Manchester, in north west England. ... Little Lever is a small town in the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton of Greater Manchester in the north west of England. ... Littleborough is a small town on the western side of the Pennines, which forms part of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, in Greater Manchester, England. ... {infobox England place| |Latitude= 53. ... Milnrow is a small town in the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, in Greater Manchester, England. ... Mossley is a town in Tameside on the north-east side of Greater Manchester. ... For the larger local government district, see Metropolitan Borough of Oldham. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Radcliffe is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Bury, Greater Manchester (historically in Lancashire), England. ... Ramsbottom is a small town on the border of Lancashire and Greater Manchester, England. ... For other uses, see Rochdale (disambiguation). ... Royton is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham,[1] in Greater Manchester, England. ... Sale is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford in Greater Manchester, England. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... Shaw and Crompton is a town and civil parish within the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, in Greater Manchester, England. ... Statistics Population: 22,568 (2001 Census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SJ963985 Administration District: Tameside Metropolitan county: Greater Manchester Region: North West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Greater Manchester Historic county: Cheshire / Lancashire Services Police force: Greater Manchester Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: North... Stockport is a large town in the north west of England. ... Stretford is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford, in Greater Manchester, England. ... Swinton is a town within the metropolitan borough of the City of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England. ... Tyldesley (pronounced tilds-lee) is a town and component area of the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, Greater Manchester, north-west England. ... Walkden. ... , Westhoughton is a town and civil parish of the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton in Greater Manchester, England. ... Whitefield is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Bury of Greater Manchester, traditionally Lancashire, England. ... Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester, North West England. ... Worsley, in Greater Manchester, England, is a town that is best known as one terminus of the Bridgewater Canal. ... This is a list of civil parishes in Greater Manchester, England. ... Astley Brook is a stream in Greater Manchester, England. ... The River Beal is a small river in Greater Manchester, England. ... The River Bollin is a river in the north-west of England and a major tributary of the River Mersey. ... Bradshaw Brook is a river draining parts of Lancashire and Greater Manchester in Northern England. ... The River Croal is a river in Lancashire, England and a tributary of the River Irwell. ... Dean Brook is a river near Bolton in Greater Manchester. ... The River Douglas, also known as the River Asland, is a river in Lancashire in the north west of England. ... The River Etherow is a river in the north west of England, and a tributary of the River Mersey. ... The River Goyt is a river in Derbyshire in north west England. ... The River Irk is a river in Greater Manchester in north-west England that flows through the northern suburbs of Manchester before merging with the River Irwell in the city centre. ... The River Irwell is a river in the counties of Lancashire and Greater Manchester in England. ... The River Medlock is a river of Greater Manchester in north west England that flows for 10 miles before joining the River Irwell in central Manchester. ... Ferry across the Mersey, June 2005 The River Mersey is a river in north-western England. ... The River Roch (pronounced roach) is a river in Greater Manchester in north-west England, a tributary of the River Irwell that gives Rochdale its name. ... The River Spodden is a watercourse in north west England. ... The River Tame is a river in Greater Manchester, England. ... The River Tonge is a short river flowing close to the town of Bolton-le-Moors in Greater Manchester (in the traditional county of Lancashire). ... The demography of Greater Manchester is charactered by a number of trends recorded amongst its multicultural agglomoration of 2. ...

Districts of North West England Flag of England

Allerdale | Barrow-in-Furness | Blackburn with Darwen | Blackpool | Bolton | Burnley | Bury | Carlisle | Chester | Chorley | Congleton | Copeland | Crewe and Nantwich | Eden | Ellesmere Port and Neston | Fylde | Halton | Hyndburn | Knowsley | Lancaster | Liverpool | Macclesfield | Manchester | Oldham | Pendle | Preston | Ribble Valley | Rochdale | Rossendale | St Helens | Salford | Sefton | South Lakeland | South Ribble | Stockport | Tameside | Trafford | Vale Royal | Warrington | West Lancashire | Wigan | Wirral | Wyre The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... North West England is one of the nine regions of England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Allerdale is a local government district and borough in Cumbria, England. ... Barrow-in-Furness is a local government district and borough in Cumbria, England. ... Blackburn with Darwen (Dwrgwyn) is a borough in Lancashire, North West England. ... It has been suggested that South Shore, Blackpool be merged into this article or section. ... The Metropolitan borough of Bolton is a metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. ... Burnley is a local government district with borough status in Lancashire in North West England. ... The Metropolitan borough of Bury is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, in the northwest of England. ... The City of Carlisle is a local government district with city status in Cumbria, England. ... Chester is a local government district in Cheshire, North West England, with the status of a city. ... Chorley is a local government district with borough status, in Lancashire, England. ... Congleton is a local government district and borough in Cheshire, in North West England. ... Copeland is a local government district and borough in western Cumbria, England. ... Crewe and Nantwich is one of six local government districts in the administrative county of Cheshire, England. ... Eden is a local government district in Cumbria, England. ... Ellesmere Port and Neston is a local government district, borough and parliamentary constituency in Cheshire, England. ... Fylde is a local government district with borough status in Lancashire, England. ... Halton is a borough in North West England, administered by a unitary authority. ... Hyndburn is a local government district with borough status in Lancashire, England. ... Knowsley is a metropolitan borough in the metropolitan county of Merseyside, England. ... Logo The City of Lancaster (2002 population: 133,914) is a local government district with city status in Lancashire, England. ... Location within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region North West England Ceremonial county Historic county Merseyside Lancashire Admin HQ Liverpool City Centre Founded 1207 City Status 1880 Government  - Type Metropolitan borough, City  - Governing body Liverpool City Council Area  - Borough & City 43. ... Macclesfield is a local government district, borough and parliamentary constituency in Cheshire England. ... This article relates to the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham. ... Pendle is a district borough of Lancashire, England, on the North Yorkshire and West Yorkshire borders. ... Preston, a city and local government district in Lancashire, England, is located on the River Ribble. ... Ribble Valley is a local government district with borough status in the administrative county of Lancashire, England. ... The Metropolitan borough of Rochdale is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester in North West England. ... Rossendale is a local government district with borough status. ... St Helens is a Metropolitan Borough in Merseyside, North West England. ... The City of Salford is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England. ... See Sefton, New South Wales for the suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... South Lakeland is a local government district in Cumbria, England. ... South Ribble is a local government district and borough in Lancashire, England. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Stockport is a Metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, in north west England. ... Tameside is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester in north west England. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Trafford is a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester, England. ... Vale Royal is a local government district and borough in Cheshire, North West England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... West Lancashire is a local government district in Lancashire, England. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Wigan is a Metropolitan Borough of Greater Manchester, in the North West of England. ... Wirral is a metropolitan borough in Merseyside, North West England, which occupies the northern part of the Wirral Peninsula, more commonly known as The Wirral. ... This article is about the district of Wyre in England. ...

Counties with multiple districts: Cheshire, Cumbria, Greater Manchester, Lancashire, Merseyside Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... Cheshire (or, archaically, the County of Chester)[1] is a county in North West England. ... Cumbria (IPA: ), is a shire county in the extreme North West of England. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Manchester UK (736 words)
Manchester is a relatively new city; born of the Industrial Revolution, it took the lead in the world's textile manufacture and production in the late 18th century, a position it held until its decline in the 1960s.
Manchester is one of the largest metropolitan conurbations in the United Kingdom, justly proud of its history and heritage, its culture, enterprise and its entrepreneurial spirit.
The City of Manchester and innumerable small satellite towns and villages surrounding it saw the rapid growth of factories manufacturing merchandise for cotton weaving and spinning, dyeing, fulling and all apects of the textile industry.
Manchester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8034 words)
Greater Manchester County consists of the metropolitan boroughs of Manchester and the surrounding boroughs of Trafford, Tameside, Salford, Wigan, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale and Stockport.
Manchester is situated within a bowl-shaped land area, bordered to the north and east by the Pennine moors and to the south by the Cheshire Plain.
Manchester was an important place in the county of Lancashire by the time of the reformation.
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