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Encyclopedia > Manannan mac Lir

In Irish mythology, Manannan mac Lir was a sea and weather god. He is usually counted as one of the Tuatha Dé Danann, although he was sometimes considered as older than them. The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity, but much of it was preserved, shorn of its religious meanings, in medieval Irish literature, which represents the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology. ... The Tuatha Dé Danann (peoples of the goddess Danu or erroneously tribe of Dan) were the fifth group of inhabitants of Ireland according to the Lebor Gabála Érenn (Book of Invasions) tradition. ...


His given name was Orbsen or Oirbsen. The name Manannan derives from an earlier name for the Isle of Man, and his patronymic mac Lir was metaphorical and meant "son of the sea (Ler)": his father is given in early genealogies as Allód. He is unrelated to the character Lir of the well known story of the Children of Lir. Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... In Celtic mythology, Lir (the sea) was the god of the sea, father of Manannan mac Lir, Bran, Branwen and Manawydan by Penarddun and a son of Danu and Beli. ... The Children of Lir (or Children of Lear) is an Irish legend. ...


His wife was Fand. He ruled over the Blessed Isles as well as Mag Mell, the underworld. In Irish mythology, Fand was Queen of the Fairies, and wife of Manannan. ... In Irish mythology, Mag Mell (plain of joy), also called Tir na nOg (land of the young), Land of the Living, the Many-colored land and the Promised Land, was a mythical realm achievable through death and/or glory. ... In Irish mythology, Mag Mell (plain of joy), also called Tír na nÓg (land of the young), Land of the Living, the Many-colored Land and the Promised Land, was a mythical realm achievable through death and/or glory. ...


Manannan had many magical items. He gave Cormac mac Airt his magic goblet of truth; he had a ship that did not need sails named "Wave Sweeper"; he owned a cloak that granted him invisibility, a flaming helmet, and a sword named "Answerer" that could never miss its target. He also owned a horse called "Enbarr of the Flowing Mane" which could travel over water as easily as land. Cormac Mac Airt is probably the most famous of the ancient kings of Ireland, and is now thought to have been an authentic historical king. ...


Manannan left his wife, Fand, and she fell in love with Cuchulainn. Since a mortal and fairy (Fand was Queen of the fairies) could not stay together without destroying the fairy, Manannan erased their memories of each other. In Irish mythology, Fand was Queen of the Fairies, and wife of Manannan. ... Young Cúchulainn, 1912 illustration by Stephen Reid. ... by Sophie Anderson A fairy is a spirit (supernatural being) found in the legends, folklore, and mythology of many cultures. ...


He raised two foster children:

  1. Egobail
  2. Lugh

He also prophesized to Bran, in the Voyage of Bran, that a great warrior would be descended from him, Mongan mac Fiachna. In Irish mythology, Egobail was a foster son of Manannan mac Lir and father of Aine. ... Lugh (earlier Lug, modern Irish Lú, pronounced loo) is an Irish deity represented in mythological texts as a hero and High King of the distant past. ... The Beginning In Irish Mythology, Bran, son of Febal, embarks upon a quest to the Other World. ...


In the Isle of Man, Manannan mac Lir was known as Mannan. On Midsummer Eve, people offered green grass to Mannan-beg-mac-y-Leir (beg=small) and prayed for blessings in seafaring and fishing. He was believed to be a magician who could make an illusory fleet from pea shells in order to discourage would-be invaders. In Irish mythology, Manannan mac Lir was a sea and weather god. ... Midsummer celebration, Ã…mmeberg, Sweden Midsummer, or Litha as it was known by the ancient Germanic peoples and to this day by many Neopagans, refers the period of time centered upon the summer solstice and the religious celebrations that accompany it. ...


Medieval traditions claimed there were a number of historical characters known as Manannan, who lived at different times. One was supposed to have been an Irish prince named Orbsenius who was hailed for his abilities at navigating the Irish sea as a merchant. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ...


His Welsh equivalent is Manawyddan ap Llyr. Welsh mythology, the remnants of the mythology of the pre-Christian Britons, has come down to us in much altered form in medieval Welsh manuscripts such as the Red Book of Hergest, the White Book of Rhydderch, the Book of Aneirin and the Book of Taliesin. ... In Irish mythology, Manannan mac Lir was a sea and weather god. ...


Alternative: Barinthus, Manannan, Manawydan, Mannan (Manx).


Today there is a museum in the City of Peel on the Isle of Man named the House of Manannan. Peel is a town in the Isle of Man. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Manannan mac Lir Information (371 words)
The name Manannan derives from an earlier name for the Isle of Man, and his patronymic mac Lir was metaphorical and meant "son of the sea (Ler)": his father is given in early genealogies as Allód.
Manannan left his wife, Fand, and she fell in love with Cuchulainn.
In the Isle of Man, Manannan mac Lir was known as Mannan.
Manannan mac Lir - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (389 words)
The name Manannan derives from an earlier name for the Isle of Man, and his patronymic mac Lir was metaphorical and meant "son of the sea (Ler)": his father is given in early genealogies as Allód.
He is unrelated to the character Lir of the well known story of the Children of Lir.
In the Isle of Man, Manannan mac Lir was known as Mannan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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