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Encyclopedia > Man of La Mancha

Man of La Mancha is a 1965 Broadway musical in one act which tells the story of the classic novel Don Quixote as a play within a play, performed by Miguel de Cervantes and his fellow prisoners as he awaits a hearing with the Spanish Inquisition. It is performed on a single set, arranged to vaguely suggest a dungeon. All changes in location are suggested by alterations in the lighting and by the creative use of props supposedly lying around the floor of the dungeon; there are no detailed stage sets. This was done to encourage the participation of the audience's imagination in the enjoyment of the show. (More recent productions, however, have added more scenery.) 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... In theater, an act (noun) is a short performance that is part of a longer program. ... Don Quixote de la Mancha (now usually spelled Don Quijote by Spanish-speakers; Don Quixote is an archaic spelling) (IPA: ) or El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) is a novel by the Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The book was by Dale Wasserman, lyrics by Joe Darion, and music by Mitch Leigh: one song, "The Quest (The Impossible Dream)", was particularly popular. Dale Wasserman, a prolific writer of drama, admits to little more than being born (1917). ... Mitch Leigh (born January 30, 1928 in Brooklyn, New York) is a Jewish-American writer of musical theatre and theatrical producer best known for the show Man Of La Mancha. ...


"Man of La Mancha" started its life as a non-musical teleplay written by Dale Wasserman for CBS's Dupont Show of the Month program. This original staging starred Lee J. Cobb, probably best known for his portrayal of Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman. The Dupont Corporation disliked the title Man of La Mancha because its viewing audience would not know what La Mancha actually is, either on a geographical or symbolic nature, so a new title, I, Don Quixote, was chosen. Upon its telecast, the play won much critical acclaim. Dale Wasserman, a prolific writer of drama, admits to little more than being born (1917). ... Lee J. Cobb Lee J. Cobb (December 8, 1911 – February 11, 1976) was an American actor. ... Cover to the Penguin Group edition. ...


Years after this television broadcast, and after the original teleplay had been unsuccessfully optioned as a non-musical Broadway play, director Albert Marre called Wasserman and suggested that he turn his play into a musical. Mitch Leigh was selected as composer. The original lyricist of the musical was world-renowned poet W. H. Auden, but his lyrics were discarded, some of them overtly satiric and biting, attacking the bourgeois audience at times. Mitch Leigh (born January 30, 1928 in Brooklyn, New York) is a Jewish-American writer of musical theatre and theatrical producer best known for the show Man Of La Mancha. ... Christopher Isherwood (left) and W.H. Auden (right), photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Wystan Hugh Auden, known more commonly as W. H. Auden, (February 21, 1907 – September 29, 1973) was an English poet, often cited as one of the most influential of the 20th century. ...



The musical first opened at the Goodspeed Opera House in Connecticut in 1964. Rex Harrison was to be the original star of this production, but soon lost interest when he discovered the songs must actually be sung. Michael Redgrave was also considered for the role. In 1959 an organization, the Goodspeed Musicals, was formed to restore the old Goodspeed Opera House, located in East Haddam, Connecticut, to its original Victorian appearance and elegance. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,549 sq. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Michael Redgrave and Margaret Lockwood in The Lady Vanishes (1938) Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave, KBE (March 20, 1908 — March 21, 1985) was an English actor and the son of the Australian silent film star Roy Redgrave and the actress Margaret Scudamore. ...


Richard Kiley won a Tony Award for his performance as Cervantes/Quixote on Broadway, but the role went to Peter O'Toole in the less-successful 1972 film. O'Toole, however, did not really sing his own songs; they were dubbed by tenor Simon Gilbert. All other actors in the film, however, from non-singers such as Sophia Loren to Broadway musical stars such as Julie Gregg, did do their own singing. The only member of the original cast to reprise his role in the film was Gino Conforti, repeating his hilarious turn as the amazed barber, whose shaving basin is mistaken by Don Quixote for the Golden Helmet of Mambrino. Although the bulk of the film was made on two enormous sound stages, the use of actual scenery was much more explicit - Don Quixote is shown fighting a real windmill, while onstage this had been merely suggested by having Quixote run offstage to agitated music, and then crawl back onstage a few seconds later, with his lance broken and his sword twisted. Richard Paul Kiley (31 March 1922 – 5 March 1999) was an American stage, television, and film actor, though he is best known for his voice work, as narrator of various documentary series. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Peter OToole (center) with Roger Ebert (left) and Jason Patric (right) at the 2004 Savannah Film Festival Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932) is a British-born film and stage actor of Irish descent. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1972 calendar). ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... Loren in De Sica’s Two Women, 1960 Alfred Eisenstaedts portrait of Sophia Loren, September 16, 1966. ... Broadway theatre is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ...


The play has been run on Broadway five times:

Richard Paul Kiley (31 March 1922 – 5 March 1999) was an American stage, television, and film actor, though he is best known for his voice work, as narrator of various documentary series. ... John Cullum is an American actor and singer. ... José Ferrer José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintrón (January 8, 1909 – January 26, 1992), was an actor and film director, born in Santurce, Puerto Rico. ... Richard Paul Kiley (31 March 1922 – 5 March 1999) was an American stage, television, and film actor, though he is best known for his voice work, as narrator of various documentary series. ... Richard Paul Kiley (31 March 1922 – 5 March 1999) was an American stage, television, and film actor, though he is best known for his voice work, as narrator of various documentary series. ... Raúl Juliá Raúl Rafael Juliá y Arcelay (March 9, 1940 – October 24, 1994) was a Puerto Rican actor who lived and worked for many years in the United States. ... Sheena Easton on the cover of her 2000 CD, Fabulous. ... Brian Stokes Mitchell (b. ... Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio (b. ... Ernie Sabella (born September 19, 1949) has been an actor on Broadway, television and film since the late 1970s. ...

Trivia

A French adaptation, which feautured the Belgian singer-songwriter Jacques Brel in the lead rôle, was recorded and issued in 1968 as the album L'Homme de la Mancha. Brel on a cover of Les Adieux à lOlympia concert album (1966) Jacques Brel (April 8, 1929 – October 9, 1978) was a Belgian French-speaking author-composer, considered by many as a poet as well, given the power of his lyrics. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... LHomme de la Mancha is a 1968 album by Jacques Brel and others. ...


Another French version was produced in Liège in 1998 and 1999 with José van Dam in the lead role. Liège (Dutch: Luik, German: Lüttich; before 1946, the citys name was written Liége, with the acute accent) is a major city located in the Belgian province of Liège, of which it is the capital. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Baron José van Dam (August 25, 1940) is one of the most prominent and sought-after interpreters of the baritone-bass repertoire. ...


Tenor Plácido Domingo has also played Quixote on a stage set and made a recording together with Julia Migenes as Dulcinea and Mandy Patinkin as Sancho. Plácido Domingo Plácido Domingo [1] (born January 21, 1941) [2] is a famous Spanish opera singer, well-known for a voice that is versatile, strong and possessed of a ringing and clear tone throughout its range. ... Julia Migenes (born March 13, 1949) is an American soprano. ... Mandel Bruce Patinkin (born November 30, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois), is an American actor and renowned tenor. ...


Singer Jack Jones has played Quixote in 2000. Jones was responsible for numerous chart-topping singles including "The Impossible Dream (The Quest)". Jack Jones, singer Jack Jones (born John Allan Jones in January 14, 1938) is an American jazz and pop singer. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


An interesting side note: Mitch Leigh did not play any instrument while writing the score to Man of La Mancha. He submitted songs for the production on cassette tapes, already fully orchestrated and performed by professional musicians (it is a custom on Broadway for professional orchestrators other than the composer to arrange instrumental parts for musicals. Mitch Leigh's work, which won him the Tony Award for Best Original Score, was therefore notable because the company that Leigh founded, Music Makers, Inc., orchestrated the work under his very direct supervision). Leigh scored the piece for a flute (which alternates on piccolo), an oboe, a clarinet, a bassoon (which alternates as the second clarinet), 2 B-flat trumpets, 2 horns, two trombones (one tenor and one bass), one timpanist (playing either two or three timpani), two percussionists playing 14 instruments, 2 Spanish guitars and one string bass. In addition, in two scenes on-stage guitars accompany singers. Leigh's ensemble, as opposed to the traditional Broadway orchestra, had only one bowed string instrument and was virtually a wind band with guitars. The film version of the show, orchestrated and conducted by Laurence Rosenthal, did add strings to the orchestration, although very discreetly. Mitch Leigh (born January 30, 1928 in Brooklyn, New York) is a Jewish-American writer of musical theatre and theatrical producer best known for the show Man Of La Mancha. ... For the use of the term orchestration in computer science, see orchestration (computers) Orchestration is the study and practice of adapting music for an orchestra or musical ensemble. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... The Flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... A Yamaha piccolo. ... Modern Oboe The oboe is a double reed musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... Two soprano clarinets: a Bâ™­ clarinet (left) and an A clarinet (right, with no mouthpiece). ... A Fox Instruments bassoon. ... Trumpeter redirects to here. ... The horn is a brass instrument consisting of tubing wrapped into a coiled form. ... A lip-reed aerophone with a predominantly cylindrical bore, the trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... Percussion instruments are music instruments played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped, hence the percussive name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... The Boston Pops orchestra performing on the Charles River Esplanade in Boston, Massachusetts. ... An ARCO gas station in Los Angeles ARCO (Atlantic Richfield Company) is an American oil company that prospered during the energy crisis. ...


The musical is also featured in the sci-fi TV series Quantum Leap. The episode "Catch A Falling Star", has Dr Sam Beckett (Scott Bakula, who himself has considerable experience in Broadway musicals) leaping into the body of an understudy who falls in love with the girl playing Dulcinea, saves the life of the drunk luvvie to whom he is an understudy and, of course, eventually plays the lead role. With aplomb, it must be said. This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Scott Bakula Scott Stewart Bakula (born October 9, 1954) is an American television actor most famous for his lead role in the television series Quantum Leap. ...


Songs

  • Overture
  • Man of La Mancha (I, Don Quixote)
  • It's All the Same
  • Dulcinea
  • I'm Only Thinking of Him
  • I Really Like Him
  • What Do You Want of Me?
  • The Barber's Song
  • Golden Helmet of Mambrino
  • To Each His Dulcinea (To Every Man His Dream)
  • The Quest (The Impossible Dream)
  • The Combat
  • Little Bird, Little Bird
  • The Dubbing (Knight of the Woeful Countenance)
  • The Abduction
  • Moorish Dance
  • Aldonza
  • The Knight of the Mirrors
  • A Little Gossip
  • Dulcinea (Reprise)
  • The Impossible Dream (Reprise)
  • Man of La Mancha (Reprise)
  • The Psalm
  • Finale (The Impossible Dream)

Mambrino was a fictional Moorish king, celebrated in the romances of chivalry, who possessed a helmet of pure gold which rendered the wearer of it invulnerable, the possession of which was the ambition of all the paladins of Charlemagne, and which was carried off by Rinaldo (Orlando Furioso), who slew...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Man of La Mancha - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (508 words)
Man of La Mancha is a 1965 Broadway musical which tells the story of the classic novel Don Quixote as a play within a play, performed by Miguel Cervantes and his fellow prisoners as he awaits a hearing with the Spanish Inquisition.
The Dupont Corporation disliked the title Man of La Mancha because its viewing audience would not know what La Mancha actually is, either on a geographical or symbolic nature, so a new title, I, Don Quixote, was chosen.
A French adaptation, which feautured the Belgian singer-songwriter Jacques Brel in the lead rôle, was recorded and issued in 1968 as the album L'Homme de la Mancha.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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