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Encyclopedia > Man in the Moon
An image of the Man in the Moon in the film Le Voyage dans la Lune.
An image of the Man in the Moon in the film Le Voyage dans la Lune.

The Man in the Moon is an imaginary figure resembling a human face that observers from some cultural backgrounds typically perceive in the bright disc of the full Moon. The figure is composed of large dark areas (the lunar maria, or "seas") on the Moon's surface. The figure's eyes are Mare Imbrium and Mare Serenitatis, its nose is Sinus Aestuum, and its open mouth is Mare Nubium and Mare Cognitum. Not to be confused with Man on the Moon. ... Image of the 1902 film A Voyage to the moon (public domain) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Le Voyage dans la lune is a 1902 French science fiction black and white silent film known in its English language release as A Trip to the Moon. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Lunar nearside with major maria and craters labeled A global albedo map of the Moon obtained from the Clementine missionThe dark regions are the lunar maria, whereas the lighter regions are the highlands. ... Oblique view of Mare Imbrium looking south towards Copernicus crater. ... A map of Mare Serenitatis. ... Mare Insularum (the sea of islands) is a lunar mare located in the Insularum basin just south of Mare Imbrium. ... The Sea of Clouds of the Moon. ... Mare Cognitum (the sea that has become known) is a lunar mare located in a basin or large crater which sits in the second ring of the Procellarum basin. ...


The conventionalized image of the Man in the Moon, unlike the vague natural appearance, bears just a very simple, wide-grinning face.

Contents

Origin stories

There are various explanations as to how there came to be a Man in the Moon.


One tradition, both Christian and Jewish, claims him as Cain, the Wanderer, forever doomed to circle the Earth. Dante's Inferno[1] alludes to this: In stories common to the Abrahamic religions, Cain or Káyin (קַיִן / קָיִן spear Standard Hebrew Qáyin, Tiberian Hebrew Qáyin / Qāyin; Arabic قايين Qāyīn in the Arabic Bible; قابيل Qābīl in Islam) is the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and the first man born in creation... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... For other uses see The Divine Comedy (disambiguation), Dantes Inferno (disambiguation), and The Inferno (disambiguation) Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino...

"For now doth Cain with fork of thorns confine
On either hemisphere, touching the wave
Beneath the towers of Seville. Yesternight
The moon was round."

This is mentioned again in his Paradise[2]: For other uses, see Seville (disambiguation). ... For other uses see The Divine Comedy (disambiguation), Dantes Inferno (disambiguation), and The Inferno (disambiguation) Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino...

But tell, I pray thee, whence the gloomy spots
Upon this body, which below on earth
Give rise to talk of Cain in fabling quaint?”

There is also a Talmudic tradition that Jacob is on the moon, although no such mention appears in the Bible. The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ...


John Lyly says in the prologue to his Endymion (1591), "There liveth none under the sunne, that knows what to make of the man in the moone." John Lyly (Lilly or Lylie) (c. ... Endymion, the Man in the Moon is an Elizabethan era stage play, a comedy by John Lyly. ... Year 1591 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In Norse mythology, Máni is the man who pulls the Moon across the sky. He is continually pursued by the Great Wolf Hati who catches them both at Ragnarok. The name Máni simply means "Moon", but sounds very similar to the Old Norse for "human" mannligr. Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... In Norse mythology, Máni was the god of the moon and a son of Mundilfari and Glaur. ... In Norse mythology, Hati (Hateful) is a wolf that according to Gylfaginning chases the Moon across the night sky, just as the wolf Sköll chases the Sun during the day, until the time of Ragnarök when they will swallow these heavenly bodies, after which Fenrir will break free... Look up Ragnarok in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ...


Traditions

There is a tradition that the Man in the Moon enjoyed to drink, especially claret. An old ballad runs (original spelling):[3] Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ...

"Our man in the moon drinks clarret,
With powder-beef, turnep, and carret.
If he doth so, why should not you
Drink until the sky looks blew?"

Plutarch, in his treatise, Of the Face appearing in the roundle of the Moone, cites the poet Agesinax as saying of that orb,[4] Claret is a name used in English for red wine from the Bordeaux region of France, along the valleys of the rivers Gironde, Garonne and Dordogne, including Medoc, Graves and St Emilion. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... Trinomial name Brassica rapa rapa L. For similar vegetables also called turnip, see Turnip (disambiguation). ... This article is about the cultivated vegetable. ... For other uses, see Sky (disambiguation). ... Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ...

"All roundabout environed
With fire she is illumined:
And in the middes there doth appeere,
Like to some boy, a visage cleere;
Whose eies to us doe seem in view,
Of colour grayish more than blew:
The browes and forehead tender seeme,
The cheeks all reddish one would deeme."

There is a traditional Mother Goose nursery rhyme featuring the Man in the Moon: For other uses, see Mother Goose (disambiguation). ... A nursery rhyme is a traditional song or poem taught to young children, originally in the nursery. ...

"The man in the moon came down too soon,
and asked his way to Norwich,
He went by the south and burnt his mouth
By supping on cold plum porridge."

The Chinese Man in the Moon is called "Yue-lao". For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ...


Pareidolia, and other things on the moon

(Clockwise, from top left) the full moon, a woman, a hare, "the Man in the Moon"
(Clockwise, from top left) the full moon, a woman, a hare, "the Man in the Moon"
A modern depiction of Chang'e and the Jade Rabbit

The Man in the Moon is an example of pareidolia. Other cultures perceive the silhouette of a woman, a hare/rabbit, a frog, a moose, a buffalo, or a dragon (with its head and mouth to the right and body and wings to the left) in the full moon. Alternatively, the vague shape of the overall dark and light regions resemble a Yin Yang symbol, on it side and backwards. Image File history File links Man_In_The_Moon. ... Image File history File links Man_In_The_Moon. ... Change and the Jade Rabbit; Picture taken September 18, 2004 by Allen Timothy Chang at San Francisco, CA Chinatown File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Change and the Jade Rabbit; Picture taken September 18, 2004 by Allen Timothy Chang at San Francisco, CA Chinatown File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A classic portrait of Change, from the Ming Dynasty, 16th-17th century Change flies to the moon, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner Change, Chang-O or Chang-Ngo (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Heng-E or Heng-O (姮娥; H... An image of the Moon Goddess, (Hokkien : Guek Niao), enshrined and worshipped at Thee Kong Thuah (Jade Emperor Temple), Penang, Malaysia. ... The term pareidolia (pronounced ), referenced in 1994 by Steven Goldstein,[1] describes a psychological phenomenon involving a vague and random stimulus (often an image or sound) being perceived as significant. ... Change flies to the moon, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner Change, Chang-O or Chang-Ngo (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Heng-E or Heng-O (姮娥; Héngé), is the Chinese goddess of the moon. ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... Distribution of frogs (in black) Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia - List of Anuran families The frogness babe is an amphibian in the order Anura (meaning tail-less from Greek an-, without + oura, tail), formerly referred to as Salientia (Latin saltare, to jump). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... Taoists Taijitu The concept of Yin Yang originates in ancient Chinese philosophy, most likely from the observations of day turning into night and night into day. ...


The Nepalese also have a tradition that the dead go to the Moon.


Woman

In Elizabethan England, the spots of the Moon were supposed to represent a witch carrying sticks of wood on her back, or an old man with a lantern (which was illustrated by Shakespeare in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream.) The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ...


In New Zealand Maori legend, the moon shows a woman with a local tree, the Ngaio. However, throughout Melanesia and Polynesia, the moon is seen to be a cook over a three-stone fire. Te Puni, Māori Chief Māori is the name of the indigenous people of New Zealand, and their language. ... The Ngaio is a tree native to New Zealand, also known as the Mousehole tree. ... map of Melanesia Melanesia (from Greek: μέλας black, νῆσος island) is a subregion of Oceania extending from the western side of the West Pacific to the Arafura Sea, north and northeast of Australia. ... Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ...


Many lunar deities are also female, e.g. Hecate, Selene and Diana in Greek Mythology. See Category:Lunar goddesses. For other uses, see Hecate (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... The Diana of Versailles In Roman mythology, Diana was the goddess of the hunt, in literature the equivalent of the Greek goddess Artemis, though in cult she was Italic in origin. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ...


In Chinese Mythology, Chang'e (various spellings) lives on the moon. She was mentioned in the conversation between Houston Capcom and Apollo 11 crew just before the first moon landing:[5] [6] Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... A classic portrait of Change, from the Ming Dynasty, 16th-17th century Change flies to the moon, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner Change, Chang-O or Chang-Ngo (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Heng-E or Heng-O (姮娥; H... This article covers the Apollo 11 mission itself. ...

Houston: Among the large headlines concerning Apollo this morning there's one asking that you watch for a lovely girl with a big rabbit. An ancient legend says a beautiful Chinese girl called Chang-o has been living there for 4000 years. It seems she was banished to the moon because she stole the pill for immortality from her husband. You might also look for her companion, a large Chinese rabbit, who is easy to spot since he is only standing on his hind feet in the shade of a cinnamon tree. The name of the rabbit is not recorded.Collins: Okay, we'll keep a close eye for the bunny girl. An aerial view of the Johnson Space Center facility of Houston in 1989 The Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations center for human spaceflight activities. ... Michael Collins (born October 31, 1930) is a former American astronaut and test pilot. ...

Rabbit/Hare

Rabbit with a pot - making medicine, mochi, or tteok.
Rabbit with a pot - making medicine, mochi, or tteok.
Main article: Moon rabbit

In Chinese culture, the rabbit in the moon (a companion of Chang'e) is pounding medicine. Similarly, in Japan and Korea, popular culture sees a rabbit making mochi and tteok, respectively, in the moon. The mythology of Pre-Colombian Mesoamerica also featured a lunar rabbit, for example, Tecciztecatl, the Aztec moon god, was sometimes pictured as an anthropomorphic rabbit. Image File history File links Rabbit_in_the_moon_standing_by_pot. ... Image File history File links Rabbit_in_the_moon_standing_by_pot. ... Rice Cake Pounding mochi in an usu Making mochi with a modern piece of equipment Mochi (Japanese ) is the Japanese variant of Chinese rice cake, which, like its Chinese origin, is made of glutinous rice, pounded into paste and molded into shape; however, unlike the Chinese variety, it is molded... Tteok (IPA: ) or Ddeog is a Korean sweet cake made with glutinous rice flour, also known as sweet rice or chapssal, by steaming. ... The image of a rabbit on Moons surface The Moon rabbit (Chinese: ; pinyin: yuètù; Japanese: tsuki no usagi), also called the Jade Rabbit (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is a rabbit that lives on the moon in East Asian folklore. ... For contemporary culture after 1949, see Culture of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Change flies to the moon, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner Change, Chang-O or Chang-Ngo (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Heng-E or Heng-O (姮娥; Héngé), is the Chinese goddess of the moon. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... Rice Cake Pounding mochi in an usu Making mochi with a modern piece of equipment Mochi (Japanese ) is the Japanese variant of Chinese rice cake, which, like its Chinese origin, is made of glutinous rice, pounded into paste and molded into shape; however, unlike the Chinese variety, it is molded... Tteok (IPA: ) or Ddeog is a Korean sweet cake made with glutinous rice flour, also known as sweet rice or chapssal, by steaming. ... The term Pre-Columbian is used to refer to the cultures of the New World in the era before significant European influence. ... This article is about the culture area. ... In Aztec mythology, Tecciztecatl (old moon god; also Tecuciztecal, Tecuciztecatl) was a lunar deity, representing the old man-on-the-moon. He could have been the sun god, but he feared the suns fire, so Nanahuatzin became the sun god and Tecciztecatl (in the form of a rabbit) was... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ...

The Arabic word Ali made from three letters written in cursive style

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Maula Ali's name on the moon

Shia Muslims believe that name of Maula Ali Ibne-Abi Talib (Muhammad's son in law) is written on the moon. This interpretation has roots in several hadith by Muhammad where he compares Ali with Moon and himself to Sun. The notion is that Ali's teaching is the light that shall guide the Muslims after Muhammad has departed. There are also other esoteric interpretation of this analogy in Islamic philosophy. For other uses, see Ali (disambiguation). ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Hadith ( transliteration: ) are oral traditions relating to the words and deeds of Prophet Muhammad. ...


References

  1. ^ Dante, The Divine Comedy, Inferno, canto 20, line 126 and 127. The Dante Dartmouth Project contains the original text and centuries of commentary.
  2. ^ Dante, The Divine Comedy, Paradiso, canto 2, line 51.
  3. ^ The Man in the Moon drinks Claret, as it was sung at the Court in Holy-well. Bagford Ballads, Folio Collection in the British Museum, vol. ii. No. 119.
  4. ^ Plutarch's Morals. Translated by Holland. London, 1603, p. 1160.
  5. ^ Onion-Club, Chang - e, About the Moon Festival
  6. ^ Apollo 11 Technical Air-to-Ground Voice Transcription

DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... For other uses see The Divine Comedy (disambiguation), Dantes Inferno (disambiguation), and The Inferno (disambiguation) Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino... Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, in Michelinos fresco. ... London museum | name = British Museum | image = British Museum from NE 2. ...

External links

Mythology

Rice Cake Pounding mochi in an usu Making mochi with a modern piece of equipment Mochi (Japanese: ; Chinese: ) is a Japanese rice cake made of glutinous rice pounded into paste and molded into shape. ...

Chinese Moon festival legends

Change flies to the moon, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner Change, Chang-O or Chang-Ngo (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Heng-E or Heng-O (姮娥; Héngé), is the Chinese goddess of the moon. ... Tantalos, by Goya In Greek mythology Tantalus (Greek Τάνταλος) was a son of Zeus[1] and the nymph Plouto (riches)[2] Thus he was a king in the primordial world, the father of a son Broteas whose very name signifies mortals (brotoi)[3] Other versions name his father as Tmolus wreathed...

  Results from FactBites:
 
CNN.com - Man on the moon: Kennedy speech ignited the dream - May 25, 2001 (562 words)
Man on the moon: Kennedy speech ignited the dream
President Kennedy calls for a mission to send man to the moon during a joint session of Congress on May 25, 1961
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SPACE.com -- The Origins Of The Man In The Moon (755 words)
The “Man in the Moon” illusion, familiar to various cultures around the world, was created by powerful asteroid impacts that rocked the satellite billions of years ago, a new study suggests.
Man in the Moon.” The man’s eyes are the Mare Imbrium and Mare Serenitatis, its nose is the Sinus Aestuum and its grinning mouth is the Mare Nubium and Mare Cognitum.
The researchers think the Moon was struck by at least two very powerful asteroid impacts in its past (in addition to countless smaller impacts that left smaller craters easily identifiable still today).
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