FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mallard duck
This article is about the Mallard duck. For other uses of the term, see Mallard (disambiguation).
Mallard
image:Mallard367.jpg
A drake in flight - Alternative image
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Anseriformes
Family: Anatidae
Genus: Anas
Species: platyrhynchos
Binomial name
Anas platyrhynchos
Linnaeus, 1758

The Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) is a common and widespread dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and sub-tropical areas of North America, Europe and Asia. It also frequents Central America and the Caribbean. It is probably the best-known of all ducks.


This 56-65 cm length dabbling duck is strongly migratory in the northern parts of its breeding range, and winters farther south. It is highly gregarious outside of the breeding season and will form large flocks.


The breeding male is unmistakable, with a green head, black rear end and a blue speculum edged with white, obvious in flight or at rest.


The females are light brown, with plumage much like most female dabbling ducks. They can be distinguished from other ducks, by the distinctive speculum.


In non-breeding (eclipse) plumage, the drake looks more like the female.


It is a bird of most wetlands, including parks, small ponds and rivers, and usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing. It nests usually on a river bank, but not always particularly near water.


This is a noisy species. The male has a nasal call, whereas the female has the very familiar "quack" always associated with ducks.


Mallards frequently interbreed with the American Black Duck, Northern Pintail and domesticated species, leading to various hybrids.

Wikimedia Commons logo
Wikimedia Commons has multimedia related to:
Anas platyrhynchos



Photo gallery


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mallard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (770 words)
The Mallard is one of the rare examples of both Allen's Rule and Bergmann's Rule in birds.
The size of the Mallard varies clinally, and birds from Greenland, although larger than birds further south, have smaller bills and are stockier.
Mallards form pairs only until the female lays eggs, at which time she is left by the male.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m