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Encyclopedia > Malcolm Bradbury

Sir Malcolm Stanley Bradbury (September 7, 1932November 27, 2000) was a British author and academic. September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...

Contents


Life

Born in 1932, the son of a railwayman in Sheffield, his family moved to London in 1935, returning to Sheffield in 1941 with his brother and mother. The family later moved to Nottingham and in 1943 Bradbury attended West Bridgford Grammar School until 1950 when he went to University College, Leicester, getting a first-class degree in English in 1953. He continued his studies at Queen Mary College, where he gained his M.A. in 1955. Between 1955 and 1958 he moved between teaching posts with the University of Manchester and Indiana University in the USA, returning to England in 1958 for a major heart operation, completing Eating People is Wrong in 1959 while in hospital. He married Elizabeth Salt, with whom he would later have two sons, and took up his first teaching post as an adult-education tutor at the University of Hull. With his study on Evelyn Waugh in 1962 he began his career of writing and editing critical books. From 1961 to 1965 he taught at the University of Birmingham. He completed his Manchester University Ph.D. in American studies in 1962, moving to the University of East Anglia (his second novel, Stepping Westward, appeared in 1965), where he became Professor of American Studies in 1970 and launched an M.A. in Creative Writing course, which Ian McEwan and Kazuo Ishiguro both attended. He published Possibilities: Essays on the State of the Novel in 1973, The History Man in 1975, Who Do You Think You Are? in 1976, Rates of Exchange in 1983, Cuts: A Very Short Novel in 1987, retiring from academic life in 1995. Malcolm Bradbury became a Commander of the British Empire in 1991 for services to Literature, and was knighted in 2000. 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... The University of Leicester is based in Leicester, England, with about 8,000 full-time students and over 10,000 distance-learning students, one of the larget distance learning populations of any UK university. ... Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL) (until recently Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London and still called that in its charter and occasionally still abbreviated to QMW) is the fourth largest College of the University of London. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate or graduate course of one to three years in duration. ... The University of Manchester in Manchester, England, was formed by the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (commonly known as the University of Manchester before the merger) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) on 1 October 2004. ... The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university in the East Riding of Yorkshire which was founded in 1927. ... The University of Birmingham is an English university in the city of Birmingham. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... The famous ziggurats of the student accommodation at Norfolk Terrace, photographed in January 2004. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Ian McEwan CBE, (born June 21, 1948), is a British novelist (sometimes nicknamed Ian Macabre because of the nature of his early work). ... Kazuo Ishiguro Kazuo Ishiguro (カズオ・イシグロ Kazuo Ishiguro, originally 石黒一雄 Ishiguro Kazuo, born November 8, 1954) is a British author of Japanese origin. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE) is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these... This article is about the year 2000. ...


Works

Bradbury was a productive academic writer as well as a successful teacher; an expert on the modern novel, he published books on Evelyn Waugh and E. M. Forster, as well as editions of such modern classics as F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, and a number of surveys and handbooks of modern fiction, both British and American. However, he is best known to a wider public as a novelist. Although he is often compared with David Lodge, his friend and a contemporary as a British exponent of the campus novel genre, Bradbury's books are consistently darker in mood and less playful both in style and language. In 1986 he wrote a short humorous book titled Why Come to Slaka?, a parody of travel books, dealing with the fictional Eastern European country that is the setting for his novel Rates of Exchange. Daniel Defoes Robinson Crusoe; title page of 1719 newspaper edition A novel (from French nouvelle, new) is an extended fictional narrative in prose. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... E. M. Forster as a young man in about 1905 E.M. Forster should not be confused with C. S. Forester, author of the Horatio Hornblower novels. ... F.Scott Fitzgerald, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an Irish American Jazz Age novelist and short story writer. ... David Lodge (born January 28, 1935 at London, England) is a British author. ... A Campus Novel is one where the main action of a novel is set in and around the campus of a university. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He also wrote extensively for television, including scripting series such as Anything More Would Be Greedy and The Gravy Train, and adapting novels such as Tom Sharpe's Blott on the Landscape and Porterhouse Blue, Alison Lurie's Imaginary Friends and Kingsley Amis's The Green Man. Tom Sharpe (born March 30, 1928) is an English satirical author, born in London and educated at Lancing College and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. ... Blott on the Landscape is a novel written in 1975 by Tom Sharpe, which became a special 6-part television series, made by the BBC, in 1985. ... Porterhouse Blue is a novel written by Tom Sharpe, first published in 1974. ... Alison Lurie (born September 3, 1926) is an American novelist and academic. ... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ...


Fiction

The History Man

Main article: The History Man

His best known novel, The History Man, published in (1975), is a dark satire of academic life in the "glass and steel universities" that followed their "redbrick" predecessors (the then fashionable newer universities of England); in 1981 it was made into a successful BBC television serial. The protagonist is the hypocritical Howard Kirk, a sociology professor at the fictional University of Watermouth. The History Man (1975) is a campus novel by British author Malcolm Bradbury set in 1972 in the fictional seaside town of Watermouth in the South of England. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the largest publicly-funded radio and television broadcasting corporation of the United Kingdom (see British television) and the world. ...


Cuts

Commissioned by Hutchinson as part of their Hutchinson Novella series, Cuts was published in 1987. It used a host of plays on the word 'cuts' to mock the values of Thatcherist Britain in 1986 and the world of television drama production in which Bradbury had become involved after the adaptation of The History Man. Bradbury derided the philistinism of television executives who wanted to capture the market of Brideshead Revisited and The Jewel in the Crown at impossibly low cost. He also explored the low esteem accorded writers in the hierarchy of television production. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thatcherism is the system of political thought attributed to the governments of Margaret Thatcher, British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990. ... Jacket of the first UK edition of Brideshead Revisited Brideshead Revisited, the Sacred and Profane Memories of Capt. ... The Jewel in the Crown is a British television drama series produced by Granada Television for ITV and based on the Raj Quartet novels by Paul Scott. ...


Bibliography (incomplete)

  • The After Dinner Game
  • All Dressed Up and Nowhere To Go
  • Eating People is Wrong (1959)
  • Stepping Westward (1968)
  • The Social Context of Modern English Literature (1971)
  • Who Do You Think You Are — a collection of short stories
  • The History Man (1975)
  • Rates of Exchange
  • To the Hermitage (2000)
  • Mensonge (1987)
  • The Modern American Novel (1983)
  • Why Come to Slaka? (1986)
  • Cuts (1987) — a Hutchinson Novella
  • Doctor Criminale (1992)
  • The Modern British Novel (1993)
  • Dangerous Pilgrimages: Trans-Atlantic Mythologies and the Novel (1995)

1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Quote

  • If God had been a liberal, we wouldn't have had the Ten Commandments; we'd have the Ten Suggestions

External links

  • BBC obituary
  • obituary in The Guardian November 28, 2000
  • obituary in The Independent November 29, 2000

References

  • Bradbury, Malcolm. Cuts (London: Hutchinson, 1987)
  • Literary Encyclopedia
  • BBC News Archive

  Results from FactBites:
 
Malcolm Bradbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (725 words)
Sir Malcolm Stanley Bradbury (September 7, 1932 – November 27, 2000) was a British author and academic.
Malcolm Bradbury became a Commander of the British Empire in 1991 for services to Literature, and was knighted in 2000.
Bradbury was a productive academic writer as well as a successful teacher; an expert on the modern novel, he published books on Evelyn Waugh and E.
Guardian Unlimited | Archive Search (1424 words)
Malcolm Bradbury was born in Sheffield, the son of Arthur Bradbury, a railway worker, and his wife Doris, and grew up in Nottingham, where he attended West Bridgford grammar school.
Bradbury was a prolific writer - as an academic critic, as a novelist and humorist, and for television, a medium which increasingly fascinated him.
Bradbury was always fascinated by the experimental fictive techniques of contemporary American novelists, and The History Man shows a marked development in his own writing in its unvaried use of a present tense, which reports without comment or analysis the speech and actions of the characters.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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