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Encyclopedia > Make Poverty History

Contents

The UK campaign

The Make Poverty History campaign (which is written as MAKEPOVERTYHISTORY) was a British and Irish coalition of charities, religious groups, trade unions, campaigning groups and celebrities who mobilized around the UK's prominence in world politics in 2005 to increase awareness and pressure governments into taking actions towards relieving absolute poverty. The symbol of the campaign was a white wristband made of cotton or silicone. Usually on the band the words would be written in black, with the 'Poverty' word a lighter shade. A 'virtual' white band was also available to be displayed on websites. // Legal definitions A charity is a trust, company or unincorporated association established for charitable purposes only. ... Various religious symbols Religion is a system of social coherence based on a common group of beliefs or attitudes concerning an object, person, unseen being, or system of thought considered to be supernatural, sacred, divine or highest truth, and the moral codes, practices, values, institutions, traditions, and rituals associated with... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... A celebrity is a widely-recognized or famous person who commands a high degree of public and media attention. ... Poverty that is so extreme that people cannot even meet the basic human necessities like food, clothes and shelter is known as absolute poverty. ... White is the color of things that reflect light of all parts of the visible spectrum equally and are not dull (see grey). ... Wristbands are encircling strips worn on the wrist, made of any of a variety of materials depending on the purpose. ...


TV ads ran for many months, urging people to speak to their representatives about stopping poverty. However the UK Office of Communications (Ofcom) banned the ads, deciding that the ads were "wholly or mainly political" in nature, since they aimed to "achieve important changes". The campaign said it was "disappointed" in the decision.[1] See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band European networks National In much of Europe television broadcasting has historically been state dominated, rather than commercially organised, although commercial stations have grown in number recently. ... ADS may stand for: Active Defense Systems Active Denial System Active Directory Service - a directory implementation by Microsoft Advance Direction Sign Advanced Design System - electronic design software from Agilent Technologies Advanced Distributed Simulation Advantage Database Server - a client/server database created by Extended Systems Aerial Delivery Sling After Dinner Speech... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ...


The three demands of the campaign were:

It should be noted that none of these aims were new (there have been many attempts over the last few decades to promote them), but the scale of the 2005 campaign dwarfed previous efforts. Trade justice is a movement of Non-Governmental and Private Voluntary organisations that lobby for certain standards in trade that include; the adherence to human rights, the universal right to economic growth and the balance of trade and justice. ... Debt relief is the partial or total forgiveness of debt, or the slowing or stopping of debt growth, owed by individuals, corporations, or nations. ... Look up Aid in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


On January 31 2006, the majority of the members of the campaign passed a resolution to disband the organisation, arguing that the UK coalition had only agreed to come together formally for a limited lifespan, to correspond with the UK holding the presidency of the EU and G8. Around forty groups had argued against the dissolution. Some have been critical of the ending of the coalition; the Left-wing activist Alex Callinicos wrote that "disbanding of mph has a lot to do with the interests of the big NGOs that dominated it" and that "scrapping mph was an utterly shameful decision. It can only promote the belief that those who currently dominate the world are benevolent figures who will, with a few pushes from below, continue to take "small steady steps forwards".[2] January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Group of Eight (G8) consists of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Alex Callinicos Alex Callinicos (born 1950 in South Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe)) is a Marxist intellectual (a contradiction in terms) and a member of the Central Committee of the Socialist Workers Party. ...

An estimated 225,000 (BBC News) campaigners marched in Edinburgh on the 2nd July
An estimated 225,000 (BBC News) campaigners marched in Edinburgh on the 2nd July

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 201 KB)Campaigners at the Make Poverty History march, Edinburgh, 2nd July 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 201 KB)Campaigners at the Make Poverty History march, Edinburgh, 2nd July 2005. ...

Events

Make Poverty History set out a timescale revolving around the 31st G8 summit in Gleneagles, Scotland on July 6, 2005. Official G8 2005 Portrait. ... Gleneagles Hotel and grounds. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen of the UK Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Plastic version of the "white band"
Plastic version of the "white band"

The campaign was given a high profile launch on British television on New Year's Day 2005 in a special edition of The Vicar of Dibley, written by Richard Curtis, who pledged support for the campaign during 2005. The same issues were highlighted in Curtis' television drama The Girl in the Café, in an episode broadcast on June 25 on the BBC One channel in the UK on the HBO channel in the US and on ABC TV in Australia. Image File history File links Make Poverty History Band (Plastic) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Make Poverty History Band (Plastic) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... The Vicar of Dibley is a British sitcom created by Richard Curtis, and mostly written by Curtis and Paul Mayhew-Archer. ... Richard Curtis in London, 1999 Richard Curtis (born November 8, 1956), is a New Zealand-born British screenwriter, best known for the TV programs Blackadder and The Vicar of Dibley and the movies Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. ... The Girl in the Café is a British one-off television drama, produced by independent production company Tightrope Pictures for BBC Wales, and originally screened on BBC One in the UK on Saturday June 25, 2005. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... BBC One (or BBC1 as it was formerly styled) is the primary channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is an American premium cable television network with headquarters in New York City. ...

  • The Commission for Africa, launched by Tony Blair in February 2004, aimed to help create a strong and prosperous Africa. Their report, published in March 2005, was a focal point for the UK presidency of the G8.
  • July 2 - Over 225,000 protesters demonstrated in Edinburgh to promote the campaign's demands. On the same day, the Live 8 concerts took place before the G8 summit to encourage activism and debate within the G8 member countries, with the aim of increasing political pressure on the leaders.
  • July 6 - The final Live 8 concert, named Edinburgh 50,000 - The Final Push rocks Edinburgh in the final strike to persuade G8 Leaders to double aid in Africa. Demonstrators walked overnight up to 20 miles to reach Gleneagles as the A8 had been closed. They were not convinced by the police who told them that they were not allowed to continue "for their own safety" as there had been "bomb threats" near Auchterarder. There had been an agreement with police that protesters would be allowed to walk past Gleneagles Hotel itself, within earshot of the G8, but police from all over the UK instead herded protesters onto a road bridge and violently suppressed the peaceful protest there.

The Group of Eight (G8) consists of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... The Commission for Africa , also known as the Blair Commission for Africa, is an initiative established by the British government to examine and provide impetus for development in Africa. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... The Presidency of the Council of the European Union refers to the responsibility of presiding over all aspects of the Council of the European Union, when exercised collectively by a government, on a pre-established rota of the member states, of the European Union. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... link titleThe word international can mean: Between nations or encompassing several nations. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... Official Live 8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 was a series of benefit concerts that took place in July 2005, in the G8 nations and South Africa. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cherbourg is a city of Normandy, in northwestern France, in the Manche département, of which it is a sous_préfecture. ... Sail 8 was an attempt at sailing protesters from Cherbourg, Northern France to Edinburgh, Scotland as part of the 2005 Make Poverty History campaign. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... Official Live 8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 was a series of benefit concerts that took place in July 2005, in the G8 nations and South Africa. ... Edinburgh 50,000 - The Final Push was part of the series of Live 8 concerts held around the world designed to encourage the leaders congregating at the G8 meeting to consider the plight of those in absolute poverty (see Make Poverty History). ... The Group of Eight (G8) consists of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ... Glen Eagles is a glen or valley in the Ochil Hills. ... Live Aid (not to be confused with Live 8) was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985. ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... link titleThe word international can mean: Between nations or encompassing several nations. ... The United Nations General Assembly (GA) is one of the five principal organs of the United Nations. ... The Millennium Development Goals are eight goals that all 191 United Nations member states have agreed to try to achieve by the year 2015. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... link titleThe word international can mean: Between nations or encompassing several nations. ...

Member organisations

The UK campaign had over 540 member organisations including many faith groups, trade unions and charities. See Member organisations of Make Poverty History (UK). A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... // Legal definitions A charity is a trust, company or unincorporated association established for charitable purposes only. ... Make Poverty History is an anti-poverty campaign, members of its UK (and Irish) group are: Make Poverty History banner in front of Trades Union Congress. ...


Whilst the anti-war group CND was a member, the Stop the War Coalition (StWC) requested to join but was refused. There was speculation that this was because the organisers wanted to minimise criticism of the Labour government over the Iraq war. The Make Poverty History's governing body, the coordination team, cited the substantial political party affiliations of the governing body of StWC as the primary reason. They also gave the grounds that the issues of economic justice are separate from those of war, and STWC participation in Edinburgh on 2 July would confuse the message. In a highly critical article in the Red Pepper magazine Stuart Hodkinson claimed that this was ironic since Oxfam a member of the coordination team "is currently leading a worldwide campaign for an international arms treaty on the basis that uncontrolled arms fuels poverty and suffering."[3] CND logo In British politics, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament has been at the forefront of the peace movement in the United Kingdom and claims to be Europes largest single-issue peace campaign. ... The Stop the War Coalition (StWC) (informally just Stop the War) is a UK anti-war group set up on 21 September 2001. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The chile pepper (also chili or chilli; from Nahuatl chilli via Spanish chile) is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family (Solanaceae). ... Oxfam International is a confederation of 13 independent, non-profit, secular, community-based aid and development organizations who work with local partners in over 100 countries worldwide to reduce poverty, suffering, and injustice. ...


The Canadian campaign

It has been suggested that End Poverty Now be merged into this article or section. (Discuss)

The Canadian Make Poverty History campaign was launched in February of 2005 by a coalition coordinated by Gerry Barr, President and CEO of the Canadian Council for International Co-operation. The campaign is supported by a coalition of charities, trade unions, faith groups, students, academics, literary, artistic and sports leaders such as actor Mary Walsh, musician Tom Cochrane, Canadian Olympian Anna van der Kamp, French-Canadian actors Roy Dupuis and Pascale Montpetit, and United Nations special envoy Stephen Lewis. Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... End Poverty Now (EPN) is an NGO with the goal of ending poverty on a global scale. ... Gerry Barr is the 1996 recipient of the Pearson Medal of Peace for the creation of the Steelworkers Humanity Fund. ... Mary Walsh as Marg Princess Warrior alongside politician Stephen Harper. ... Tom Cochrane (born May 14, 1953) is a Canadian singer and songwriter, whose story-telling songs have earned him the nickname The thinking mans rocker. Perhaps his best known song is the hit single Life Is a Highway. // Biography Cochrane was born in Lynn Lake, Manitoba to Violet and... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Anna van der Kamp (born June 19, 1972 in Abbotsford, British Columbia) is a former rower from Canada, who won the silver medal in the Womens Eights at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... French Canadians or (normally only in French) Canadiens historically refers to inhabitants of Canada who can trace their ancestry to the original French settlers of what is now the Province of Quebec. ... Roy Dupuis (April 21, 1963) is a French-Canadian (Québécois) actor. ... Pascale Montpetit is a French Canadian actress, born in 1961. ... The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, and social equity. ... Stephen Lewis at a public speaking engagement on April 25, 2001. ...


Make Poverty History has four main objectives in Canada:

The French-Canadian (French language) site of Make Poverty History is called Abolissons La Pauvreté. (See External Links.) It has been suggested that Official Development Assistance, International development, Foreign aid, Aid, Tied aid, Aid effectiveness, Output-based aid be merged into this article or section. ... Trade justice is a movement of Non-Governmental and Private Voluntary organisations that lobby for certain standards in trade that include; the adherence to human rights, the universal right to economic growth and the balance of trade and justice. ... Debt relief is the partial or total forgiveness of debt, or the slowing or stopping of debt growth, owed by individuals, corporations, or nations. ...


The US "ONE" Campaign

Main article: ONE Campaign

In April 2005, a commercial began airing in the United States with several celebrities in black and white stating the pledge of the American ONE Campaign, their version of Make Poverty History. The commercial featured 33 celebrities and personalities; names as diverse as religious leaders Pat Robertson and Frank Griswold; singers including Bono, P. Diddy, Mos Def and Jewel; and various actors including Brad Pitt, Susan Sarandon, Al Pacino and Antonio Banderas. At the end, Tom Hanks states, "We're not asking for your money. We're asking for your voice." ONE Campaign logo. ... ONE Campaign logo. ... Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ... The Most Reverend Frank Tracy Griswold Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United Stated of America The Most Reverend Frank Tracy Griswold III is the 25th Presiding Bishop and Primate of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... Ercole de Roberti performing the song Freinds Of P: Concert, c. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... P. Diddy Sean John Combs (born November 4, 1969 aka P. Diddy, Puff Daddy, Sean Puffy Combs) is an African-American record producer, entrepreneur, and rapper. ... Mos Def (born Dante Terrell Smith on December 11, 1973) is a critically acclaimed rapper and actor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (December 18, 1963) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Alfredo James Al Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is an Academy Award, Emmy Award, and Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor, regarded by many to be one of the seminal actors of his generation. ... José Antonio Domínguez Banderas (born August 11, 1960 in Málaga, Spain), better known as Antonio Banderas, is a Spanish film actor. ... Thomas Tom Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor, voice-over artist and movie producer who starred in family-friendly and screwball comedies before achieving notable success as a dramatic actor. ...


The general goals of the ONE campaign in the United States are to end extreme poverty, hunger and AIDS. A more specific goal is to get President George W. Bush to commit at least 0.3% of the national budget, around US$30 billion, to foreign aid, and increase it further to the UN goal of 0.7% of GDP, around US$73 billion as of 2004, over the next several years. In 2004, the United States Government spent US$7 billion on foreign aid. The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The founding sponsors of ONE are Bread for the World, CARE, DATA, International Medical Corps, International Rescue Committee, Mercy Corps, Oxfam America, Plan USA, Save the Children US, World Concern, and World Vision. They have strong ties with the NBA, MTV's Rock the Vote, and the Millennium Campaign. Bread for the World is a non-profit organization devoted to encouraging public policy decisions aimed at alleviating global hunger. ... Look up care in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Debt, Aids, Trade in Africa (or DATA) is a multinational non-government organization founded in January 2002 in London by U2s Bono along with Bobby Shriver and activists from the Jubilee 2000 Drop the Debt campaign. ... The International Rescue Committee was founded in 1933 at the request of Albert Einstein to assist opponents of Adolf Hitler. ... Mercy Corps logo Mercy Corps is a non-profit organization engaged in humanitarian aid and development activities. ... Oxfam International is a confederation of 13 independent, non-profit, secular, community-based aid and development organizations who work with local partners in over 100 countries worldwide to reduce poverty, suffering, and injustice. ... Plan USA is an international charity helping children and their families in developing countries. ... Save the Children Logo Save the Children is an international non-profit organization dedicated to working for children. ... World Vision, founded in the United States in 1950, is an international Christian relief and development organization whose goal is working for the well being of all people, especially children. ... The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the worlds premier mens professional basketball league and one of the major professional sports leagues of North America. ... MTV (Music Television) is an American cable television network headquartered in New York City. ... Rock the Vote is a non-profit political advocacy organization founded in Los Angeles in 1990 by Jeff Ayeroff, co-chief of Virgin Records. ...


The Norwegian campaign

The Norwegian campaign was started by Kirkens Nødhjelp on June 9. Haakon Magnus, Crown Prince of Norway and Kjell Magne Bondevik are some of the celebrities in Norway that wear a white Make Poverty History band. Crown Prince Haakon of Norway (born Haakon Magnus on July 20, 1973 in Oslo). ... Kjell Magne Bondevik (born September 3, 1947) is a Norwegian Lutheran minister and politician. ...


The three demands of the Norwegian campaign are:

The shops in Norway that sell Make Poverty history bands are Cubus and Dressman, two Norwegian clothing shops. Trade justice is a movement of Non-Governmental and Private Voluntary organisations that lobby for certain standards in trade that include; the adherence to human rights, the universal right to economic growth and the balance of trade and justice. ... Debt relief is the partial or total forgiveness of debt, or the slowing or stopping of debt growth, owed by individuals, corporations, or nations. ... Look up Aid in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The Australian Campaign

The Australian campaign is coordinated by the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID).


The Australian campaign remains popular with many national Non Government Organisations (NGO's) including World Vision, Oxfam and The Oaktree Foundation promoting the campaign. World Vision, founded in the United States in 1950, is an international Christian relief and development organization whose goal is working for the well being of all people, especially children. ... Oxfam International is a confederation of 13 independent, non-profit, secular, community-based aid and development organizations who work with local partners in over 100 countries worldwide to reduce poverty, suffering, and injustice. ... The Oaktree Foundation is a major organiser of Australias Make Poverty History Concert: November 17, Melbourne The Oaktree Foundation is an entirely youth run aid and development organisation, and appears to be the first of its kind in Australia. ...


In November 2006, Melbourne hosted the Make Poverty History Concert to align with the G20 Summit. Melbournes Yarra River is a popular area for walking, jogging, cycling, rowing and for relaxing on the banks with a picnic Melbourne (pronounced either or [1]) is the second most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 3. ... The Make Poverty History Concert was held on the night of November 17, 2006 at Sidney Myer Music Bowl in Melbourne, Australia. ... The 7th annual summit of G20 industrial nations will take place in Melbourne, Australia on the weekend of November 17, 2006. ...


GCAP

These national campaign groups work under the Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP) coalition. GCAP is a worldwide alliance committed to making world leaders live up to their promises, and to making a breakthrough on poverty in 2005. The Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP) is an emerging worldwide alliance consisting of national platforms of campaigns to end poverty. ...


It is the largest anti-poverty campaign in the world and is made up of existing coalitions, community groups, trade unions, individuals, religious and faith groups, campaigners and more.


In early 2006, the global campaign's International Facilitation Group, almost unanimously, decided to extend the campaign up to December 31, 2007. December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


White Band Day 4 will be on October 17, 2006 and will end a month of mobilization commencing on September 16, 2006. October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Country specific details for WB4 are available on the campaign's website - www.whiteband.org


Criticism

Critics of the campaign see debt relief as counter-productive and have referred to it as "Make Poverty Permanent", as they do not trust the criteria used to select non-corrupt governments for debt relief. In past cases other third world governments have invested aid money in military spending and other projects that help the rich and not the poor in these countries. Thus, these critics allege that debt relief and aid are used to fund lavish lifestyles for the ruling class[4] (although efforts are made to exclude these countries from the G8 debt relief). Debt relief is the partial or total forgiveness of debt, or the slowing or stopping of debt growth, owed by individuals, corporations, or nations. ...


The campaign has also received criticisms in that it is said to resemble a notion put forward during the 1980's which put continents such as Africa in debt to companies and governments because of such aid being used irresponsibly or incorrectly. Fears are that for their initial stake, countries wish to pursue further interests in the country after such debts are free - some even arguing of hegemony of the United States wishing to export its culture elsewhere for profit.


Critics also argue that the countries receiving aid cannot control how it is used. Aid may be structured to help the first world governments giving the aid more than the countries in receipt of it, while the power to change things in these societies is given to western educated people who may not know about the countries they are meddling in, and often instigate inappropriate ideas that tend to increase rather than decrease levels of suffering. The campaign has also been criticised for accepting some tenets of neoliberalism [5], though it also has its neoliberal critics, who claim wealth is created only through voluntary free trade, and thus that the "Trade Justice" aim of the campaign is a counter-productive form of protectionism, which will harm the poor more than help them. In Britain some critics, including those in the left of the Labour Party, have criticised the campaign for not being critical enough of the UK government, as they see Tony Blair and Gordon Brown's support for the campaign as a cynical ploy to move away from criticism of the Iraq war and its protectionist policies. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Trade justice is a movement of Non-Governmental and Private Voluntary organisations that lobby for certain standards in trade that include; the adherence to human rights, the universal right to economic growth and the balance of trade and justice. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... James Gordon Brown (born 20 February 1951) is the Chancellor of the Exchequer of the United Kingdom and a Labour Party politician. ... This article regards the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


See also

Dissent! is the name taken for an international network of local groups, organising to oppose the G8 meeting which will take place in July 2005 in Scotland. ... G8 Alternatives was a coalition of activist groups set up to co-ordinate actions around the 31st G8 summit held at Gleneagles Hotel in Perthshire, Scotland. ...

External links

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Official

Coverage


  Results from FactBites:
 
Make Poverty History - 2005 (792 words)
2005 was a monumental year for the campaign to make poverty history.
Schoolchildren across the world were asked to make a cutout representation of their 'buddy', who represents one of the 100 million children not able to attend school because they are too poor.
They warned the Prime Minister that generations of people will continue to live in poverty if his manifesto promise to allow poor countries to protect their markets is broken.
Make Poverty History (254 words)
Two years ago, world leaders were given a huge global mandate to make poverty history.
Germany is centre stage in the first half of 2007 as it holds the EU Presidency and chairs the G8.
Raise your voice against poverty by emailing German Chancellor Angela Merkel, asking her to put poverty at the top of the political agenda.
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