FACTOID # 27: If you're itching to live in a trailer park, hitch up your home and head to South Carolina, where a whopping 18% of residences are mobile homes.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Major Robert Anderson
Robert Anderson
June 14, 1805October 26, 1871

Lithograph of Major Robert Anderson
Place of birth Louisville, Kentucky
Place of death Nice, France
Allegiance U.S. Army
Years of service 1825 – 1863
Rank Brevet Major General
Commands Fort Sumter
Battles/wars Seminole War
Mexican-American War
American Civil War
*Battle of Fort Sumter
Anderson after the War

Robert Anderson (June 14, 1805October 26, 1871) was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War, known for his command of Fort Sumter at the start of the war. He is often referred to using his rank of that time, Major Robert Anderson. June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 522 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1176 pixel, file size: 538 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Photographed, cropped, and image-enhanced by Hal Jespersen. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... Night view along the Promenade des Anglais This article is about the city. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Osceola, Seminole leader, detail from an 1838 lithograph The Seminole Wars were three wars or conflicts in Florida between the Seminole Native American tribe and the United States. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded... This article is becoming very long. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Robert Anderson P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 85 soldiers 500 soldiers Casualties 1 dead 5 injured 4 injured The Battle of Fort Sumter (April 12 – April 13, 1861), was a relatively minor military engagement at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor... This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... This article is becoming very long. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Robert Anderson P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 85 soldiers 500 soldiers Casualties 1 dead 5 injured 4 injured The Battle of Fort Sumter (April 12 – April 13, 1861), was a relatively minor military engagement at Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor...

Contents

Early Life

Anderson was born in Louisville, Kentucky. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1825 and received a commission as a brevet second lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Artillery. He served in the Black Hawk War of 1832 as a colonel of Illinois volunteers, where he had the distinction of twice mustering Captain Abraham Lincoln in and out of army service. Returning to the U.S. Army as a first lieutenant in 1833, he served in the second Seminole War, as an assistant adjutant general on General Winfield Scott's staff, and in the Mexican-American War, where he was severely wounded at Molino del Rey, and for which he received a brevet promotion to major. He eventually received a permanent promotion to major of the 1st U.S. Artillery in the Regular Army on October 5, 1857. He was the author of Instruction for Field Artillery, Horse and Foot in 1839. “Louisville” redirects here. ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Combatants United States Sauk Nation Commanders Henry Atkinson Henry Dodge Adam Snyder Isaiah Stillman Samuel Whiteside Black Hawk Strength 2,000 Miltia 1,500 Regulars volunteers? Indian allies ? 1000 The majority were women and children Casualties 33 killed in action 39 non-combatants killed 450-600 The Black Hawk War... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Captain is a nautical term, an organizational title, and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Osceola, Seminole leader, detail from an 1838 lithograph The Seminole Wars were three wars or conflicts in Florida between the Seminole Native American tribe and the United States. ... An adjutant general is the chief administrative officer to a military general. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded... The Battle of Molino del Rey turned out to be one of the bloodiest fights of the Mexican-American War. ... In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... The Regular Army is the permanent force of the United States Army or any Countrys army that is maintained during peacetime, as opposed to those persons who may be part of a reserve or national guard outfit. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Civil War

As Southern states began to secede, Major Anderson remained loyal to the Union. He was the commanding officer of Fort Sumter in the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina, at the time it was bombarded by forces of the Confederate States of America. The artillery attack was commanded by Brig. Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, who had been Anderson's student at West Point. The attack began April 12, 1861, and continued until Anderson, badly outnumbered and outgunned, surrendered the fort on April 14, 1861. The battle began the American Civil War. He was promoted to brigadier general on May 15 Historic Southern United States. ... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12N... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (traditional) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Republic President... Artillery with Gabion fortification Cannons on display at Fort Point Continental Artillery crew from the American Revolution Firing of an 18-pound gun, Louis-Philippe Crepin, (1772 – 1851) A forge-welded Iron Cannon in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (BO-rih-gahrd) (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893), best known as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. ... USMA redirects here. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (136th in leap years). ...


Later Life and Death

Anderson took the fort's 33-star flag with him to New York City, where he participated in a Union Square patriotic rally that is thought to have been the largest public gathering in North America up to then. Anderson then went on a highly successful recruiting tour of the North before taking a leave of absence because of to ill health. He retired from the Army on October 27, 1863. The Fort Sumter Flag is a United States flag with a distinctive, diamond-shaped pattern of 33 stars. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Union Square Union Square (also known as Union Square Park) is an important and historic intersection in New York City, located where Broadway and the Bowery came together in the early 19th century. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Days after Robert E. Lee's surrender and the effective conclusion of the war, Anderson returned to Charleston in the uniform of a brevet major general (ranking as of February 3, 1865) and, four years after lowering the 33-star flag in surrender, raised it in triumph over the recaptured but badly battered Fort Sumter during ceremonies there. That same evening, April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was shot. // This article is about the Confederate general. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Assassination of Abraham Lincoln From left to right: Major Henry Rathbone, Clara Harris, Mary Todd Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth. ...


Anderson died in Nice, France, and is buried at West Point Cemetery. Night view along the Promenade des Anglais This article is about the city. ... West Point Cemetery is an historic cemetery on the grounds of the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York. ...


Anderson's brother, Charles Anderson, served as Governor of Ohio from 1865 to 1866. Another brother, the Rev. William C. Anderson, served as President of Miami University from 1849–1854. Their nephew, Thomas M. Anderson, was a brigadier general who fought in the Spanish-American War and Philippine-American War. Charles Anderson (June 1, 1814 - September 2, 1895) was first a Whig and later a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... Miami University (colloquially and incorrectly referred to as Miami of Ohio) is a selective coeducational American public university founded in 1809 in the university town of Oxford, Ohio. ... Thomas McArthur Anderson (1836-1917) was a United States general who served in the Spanish-American War and the Philippine-American War. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1] The Spanish–American... Combatants United States Philippines Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Strength 126,000 soldiers 80,000 soldiers Casualties 4,324 U.S. soldiers dead, 3,000 wounded 2,000 killed, dead, or wounded suffered by the Philippine Constabulary 16,000 soldiers killed est. ...


References

  • Eicher, John H., and Eicher, David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.
  • Lawton, Eba Anderson, Major Robert Anderson and Fort Sumter, 1861 (New York, 1911).
  • Robert Anderson Biography. Retrieved on 2006-10-01.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Major Robert Anderson at AllExperts (571 words)
Robert Anderson (June 14, 1805 – October 26, 1871) was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War, known for his command of Fort Sumter at the start of the war.
Anderson died in Nice, France, and is buried at West Point Cemetery.
Anderson's brother, Charles Anderson, served as Governor of Ohio from 1865 to 1866.
Robert Anderson (1388 words)
Robert Anderson was born on 14 June 1805 near Louisville, Kentucky into a slave-holding family steeped in American military tradition.
Anderson was promoted to B.G. USA on 15 May 1861 and took command of the Dept. of Ky. on 28 May 1861.
Anderson retired from the army due to disabilities on 27 Oct. 18 63 and was brevetted Maj. Gen.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m