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Encyclopedia > Major League Baseball Draft

The First-Year Player Draft is Major League Baseball's primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players, from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs, to its teams. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded "compensatory" picks. This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... In North American professional sports, particularly baseball, football, and basketball, a free agent is a team player whose contract with a team has expired, and the player is able to sign a contract with another team. ...


The first amateur draft was held in 1965. Unlike most sports drafts, the First-Year Player Draft is held mid-season, in June.


The 2007 Draft will be televised live for the first time in the draft's history on Thursday June 7, 2007 from 2:00pm until 6:00pm EDT (1800 - 2200 hrs UTC)[1]. The Draft coverage will take place at Disney's Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando, Fla. The 2007 First-Year Player Draft continues Major League Baseballs annual amateur draft of high school and college baseball players, and is scheduled to be held on June 7 and June 8, 2007. ... The god Thor, after whom Thursday is named. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... ...

Contents

Before the draft

Major League Baseball used a draft to assign minor league players to teams since 1921.[2][3] In 1936, the National Football League held the first amateur draft in professional sports.[4] A decade later, National Basketball Association instituted a similar method of player distribution. However, the player draft was not uncontroversial. Congressman Emanuel Celler questioned the legality of drafts during a series of hearings on the business practice of professional sports leagues in the 1950s.[5] Successful clubs saw the draft as anti-competitive. Yankees executive Johnny Johnson equated it with communism.[6] At the same time, Pulitzer Prize winning sports columnist Arthur Daley called the system to a "slave market."[7] The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Emanuel Celler (May 6, 1888–January 15, 1981) was a politician from New York who served in the United States House of Representatives for almost 50 years, from March of 1923 to January of 1973. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Prior to the implementation of the First-Year Player Draft, amateurs were free to sign with any Major League team that offered them a contract. As a result, wealthier teams such as the New York Yankees and St. Louis Cardinals were able to stockpile young talent, while poorer clubs were left to sign less desirable prospects.[8] Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ...


In 1947, Major League Baseball implemented the bonus rule, a restriction aimed at reducing player salaries, as well as keeping wealthier teams from monopolizing the player market.[9] In its most restrictive form, it forbade any team which gave an amateur a signing bonus of more than $4,000 from assigning that player to a minor league affiliate for two seasons. If the player was removed from the major league roster, he became a free agent. The controversial legislation was repealed twice, only to be re-instituted.[10] 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... The Bonus Rule was a law instituted by Major League Baseball in 1947 that prevented teams from assigning certain players to farm clubs. ...


The bonus rule was largely ineffective. There were accusations that teams were signing players to smaller bonuses, only to supplement them with under-the-table payments.[7] In one famous incident, the Kansas City Athletics signed Clete Boyer, kept him on their roster for two years, then traded him to the Yankees just as he became eligible to be sent to the minor leagues. Other clubs accused the Yankees of using the Athletics as a de facto farm team, and the A's later admitted to signing Boyer on their behalf.[11] The Oakland Athletics are a Major League Baseball team based in Oakland, California. ... Cletis Leroy “Clete” Boyer (born February 9, 1937 in Cassville, Missouri) is a former Major League Baseball player. ... A Class A California League game in San Jose, California (1994) Minor baseball leagues are North American professional baseball leagues that compete at a level below that of Major League Baseball. ...


Major League clubs voted on the draft during the 1964 Winter Meetings. Four teams -- the New York Yankees, St. Louis Cardinals, Los Angeles Dodgers, and New York Mets -- attempted to defeat the proposal, but they failed to convince a majority of teams, and in the end only the Cardinals voted against it.[12] The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1969 â€¢ 1986 NL Pennants (4) 1969 â€¢ 1973 â€¢ 1986 â€¢ 2000...


The draft

Major League Baseball's first amateur draft was held in June of 1965. Teams chose players in reverse order of the previous season's standings, with picks alternating between the National and American League.[13] With the first pick, the Kansas City Athletics took Rick Monday, an outfielder for Arizona State University. The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the National League, is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada and the worlds oldest extant professional team sports league. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The Oakland Athletics are a Major League Baseball team based in Oakland, California. ... Robert James (Rick) Monday, Jr. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ...


Originally, three separate drafts were held each year. The June draft, which was by far the largest, involved new high school graduates, as well as college seniors who had just finished their seasons. A second draft was held in January for high school and college players who graduated in the winter. Finally, there was a draft in August for players who participated in amateur summer leagues.[13] The August draft was eliminated after only two years, while the January draft lasted until 1986.[14]


Early on, the majority of players drafted came directly from high school. Between 1967 and 1971, only seven college players were chosen in the first round of the June draft.[15] However, the college players who were drafted outperformed their high school counterparts by what statistician Bill James called "a laughably huge margin."[16] In 1978, a majority of draftees had played college baseball, and by 2002, the number rose above sixty percent.[15] While the number of high school players drafted has dropped, those picked have been more successful than their predecessors. In a study of drafts from 1984 to 1999, Baseball Prospectus writer Rany Jazayerli concluded that, by the 1990s, the gap in production between the two groups had nearly disappeared.[17] George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ... Baseball Prospectus, sometimes abbreviated as BP, is a think-tank focusing on the statistical analysis of the sport of baseball, which is also known as sabermetrics. ... Rany Jazayerli, a Chicago-area dermatologic surgeon, is a co-founder and a writer for Baseball Prospectus, for whom since 1996 he has co-authored many of the annual Baseball Prospectus volumes. ...


Economic impact

Initially, the draft succeeded in reducing the value of signing bonuses. In 1964, a year before the first draft, University of Wisconsin outfielder Rick Reichardt was given a record bonus of $205,000. Without competition from other clubs, the Athletics were able to sign Rick Monday for a bonus of only $104,000. It would take until 1979 for a drafted player to receive a bonus higher than Reichardt's.[18] The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... Frederic Carl Reichardt (born March 16, 1943 in Madison, Wisconsin) was an outfielder for the Los Angeles Angels/California Angels (1964-70), Washington Senators (1970), Chicago White Sox (1971-73) and Kansas City Royals (1973-74). ...


Player salaries continued to to escalate through the 1980s. In 1986, Bo Jackson became the first draftee to sign a total contract (signing bonus and salary) worth over one-million dollars.[19] Jackson, a Heisman Trophy winning football player for Auburn University, was also the first overall choice in the National Football League Draft, and was offered a seven-million dollar contract to play football for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[20] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... John Cappellettis 1973 Heisman Trophy is part of an exhibit at the Penn State All-Sports Museum located at Beaver Stadium, on the campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, in the United States. ... The NFL Draft (officially the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting) is an annual sports draft in which National Football League (NFL) teams take turns selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players. ... City Tampa Bay, Florida Other nicknames The Bucs, Pewter Pirates Team colors Buccaneer Red, Pewter, Black, and Orange Head Coach Jon Gruden Owner Malcolm Glazer General manager Bruce Allen Mascot Captain Fear League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1976–present) American Football Conference (1976) AFC West (1976) National Football Conference...


High school players possessed additional leverage, as they had the option of attending junior college and re-entering the draft the next year. Agent Scott Boras routinely exploited this loophole to increase the contracts of his clients. In 1990, Boras client Todd Van Poppel signed a $1.2 million contract with Oakland Athletics, after committing to play for the University of Texas. The following year, Boras negotiated a $1.55 million contract for Yankees first round pick Brien Taylor, who had said he would attend junior college if he didn't receive a contract equal to Van Poppel's.[21] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Todd Matthew Van Poppel (born December 9, 1971 in Hinsdale, IL - ) was a pitcher with an eleven year career from 1991, 1993-1996, 1998, 2000-2004. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Ballpark McAfee Coliseum (1968–present) a. ... The University of Texas at Austin, often called UT or Texas, is a doctoral/research university located in Austin, Texas. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Increasingly, teams drafted based on whether or not a player was likely to sign for a particular amount of money, rather than on his talent. This became known as a "signability pick." Before the 1992 draft, team owners unilaterally decided to extend the period of time a team retained negotiating rights to a player from one year to five. In effect, the rule prohibited a high school draftee from attending college and re-entering the draft after his junior or senior seasons. The Major League Baseball Players Association filed a legal challenge, but Major League Baseball argued that, since the Players Association did not represent amateur players, it was not necessary for the union to agree to the change.[22]An arbitrator ultimately decided that any change to draft articles must be negotiated with the Players Association.[23] The Major League Baseball Players Association (or MLBPA) is the union of professional major-league baseball players. ...


Procedures and rules

Eligibility

In order to be drafted a player must fit the following criteria:

  • He is a resident of the United States, Canada, or a U.S. territory such as Puerto Rico. Players from other countries are not subject to the draft, and can be signed by any team.
  • He has never before been signed a major or minor league contract.
  • High school players are eligible only after graduation, and if they have not attended college.
  • Players at four-year colleges are eligible after completing their junior years, or after their twenty-first birthdays.

- The exception to this is in Division 3 schools, players can be drafted before their junior year A Class A California League game in San Jose, California (1994) Minor baseball leagues are North American professional baseball leagues that compete at a level below that of Major League Baseball. ...

For the Indian grade 11 and 12 schools, see Junior College A junior college is a two-year post-secondary school whose main purpose is to provide a method of obtaining academic, vocational and professional education. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Junior college. ...

Negotiating rights

A team retains the rights to sign a selected player for one week prior to the next draft, or until the player enters, or returns to, a four-year college on a full-time basis. A selected player who enters a junior college cannot be signed until the conclusion of the school's baseball season. A player who is drafted and does not sign with the club that selected him may be drafted again at a future year's draft, so long as the player is eligible for that year's draft. A club may not select a player again in a subsequent year, unless the player has consented to the re-selection.


A player who is eligible to be selected and is passed over by every club becomes a free agent and may sign with any club, up until one week before the next draft, or until the player enters, or returns to, a four-year college full-time or enters, or returns to, a junior college. In the one-week period before any draft, which is called the "closed period", the general rule is that no club may sign a new player.


Compensatory picks

Unlike other sports drafts, picks are made extremely quickly; each team must select a player or pass on him within five minutes when it is their turn. Baseball draft picks cannot be traded until a year after they're drafted; however, if a first- or second-round draft pick signs with a different team as a free agent, and the former team had offered the player arbitration, then the player's former team is entitled to a draft pick during the "sandwich round" of next year's draft. A sandwich round, also known as a compensatory round, occurs after the first, but before the second round of the draft. For instance, if a team has the No. 5 pick in the first round but fails to sign the player, then the team receives a pick in the first sandwich round of the following year. The order of picks in a sandwich round is determined by inverse standings. In North American professional sports, particularly baseball, football, and basketball, a free agent is a team player whose contract with a team has expired, and the player is able to sign a contract with another team. ... Arbitration is a legal technique for the resolution of disputes outside the courts, wherein the parties to a dispute refer it to one or more persons (the arbitrators or arbitral tribunal), by whose decision (the award) they agree to be bound. ...


See also

The 2005 First-Year Player Draft, Major League Baseballs annual amateur draft, was held on June 7 and 8. ... The 2006 First-Year Player Draft, Major League Baseballs annual amateur draft, was held on June 6 and 7. ... The 2007 First-Year Player Draft continues Major League Baseballs annual amateur draft of high school and college baseball players, and is scheduled to be held on June 7 and June 8, 2007. ... This is a list of Major League Baseballs first overall draft picks from the MLB Draft. ... The Rule 5 draft is a Major League Baseball player draft that occurs each year in December, at the annual Winter Meeting of general managers. ...

References

  1. ^ ESPN.com news - Coming this June: The MLB draft on TV
  2. ^ Before the advent of the farm system, minor league players were under contract to their respective teams, rather than to a parent club. The minor league draft (known today as the Rule 5 draft) was later used to redistribute minor league players already under contract to major league teams.
  3. ^ "Committee Passes on Baseball Rules: Heydler, Johnson and Farrell Complete Work Codifying Interleague Laws", New York Times, February 24, 1921, pp. 21. 
  4. ^ Staudohar, Lowenthal, and Lima, pp. 27-28.
  5. ^ Hearings before the Antitrust Subcommittee, Committee on the Judiciary,, 85th Cong., 1st Sess. (1957) (testimonies of Chuck Bednarik, Red Grange, Kyle Rote, and Jackie Robinson).
  6. ^ Koppett, Leonard. "Baseball's New Draft: Two Views", New York Times, June 6, 1965, pp. S3. 
  7. ^ a b Daley, Arthur. "Sports of the Times: The World is Arrogate", New York Times, June 11, 1965, pp. 22. 
  8. ^ Staudohar, Paul; Franklin Lowenthal and Anthony K. Lima (Fall 2006). "The Evolution of Baseball's Amateur Draft". Nine: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture 15 (1): 29. Retrieved on 2007-02-16. 
  9. ^ Treder, Steve (November 1, 2004). Cash in the Cradle: The Bonus Babies. The Hardball Times. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  10. ^ Simpson, Allan (June 4, 2005). Bonus Concerns Created Draft; Yet Still Exist. Baseball America. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  11. ^ Clete Boyer. BaseballLibrary.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  12. ^ Durso, Joseph. "Baseball's Minors Follow Pro Football Pattern in Backing Free-Agent Draft", New York Times, December 3, 1964, pp. 64. 
  13. ^ a b Koppett, Leonard. "Baseball's New Draft", New York Times, February 28, 1965, pp. S2. 
  14. ^ Year Draft Results: Supplemental Phase. The Baseball Cube. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  15. ^ a b Baseball Draft Index: 1965-2006. The Baseball Cube. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  16. ^ Staudohar, Lima, and Lowenthal, p. 39.
  17. ^ Jazayerli, Rany (May 25, 2005). Doctoring the Numbers: The Draft, Part Three. Baseball Prospectus. Prospectus Entertainment Ventures, LLC. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  18. ^ There is some disagreement over who was the first player to surpass Reichardt's bonus. Staudohar claims that Darryl Strawberry's 1980 bonus equaled Reichardt's, but it was actually worth only $200,000. Jazayerli credits Andy Benes, who signed with the San Diego Padres for $235,000 in 1988. Baseball America lists Todd Demeter, a career minor-leaguer drafted by the New York Yankees, as surpassing the milestone when he signed for a $208,000 bonus in 1979.Evolution of the Bonus Record. Baseball America (June 4, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  19. ^ Evolution of the Bonus Record. Baseball America (June 4, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  20. ^ "Bo Jackson Takes Royals Over NFL", New York Times, June 22, 1986. Retrieved on 2007-02-28. 
  21. ^ Moran, Malcom. "BASEBALL; New to Yanks, New to City, Old Hand in Cutting a Deal", New York Times, August 28, 1991. Retrieved on 2007-02-28. 
  22. ^ Chass, Murray. "ON BASEBALL; Owners Take Leash And Make It Longer", New York Times, June 2, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-03-01. 
  23. ^ Staudohar, Lowenthal, and Lima, pp. 32-33.

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