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Encyclopedia > Mainlander

Mainlander is still an incorrect usage or misnomer promoted by mostly KMT Chinese and older folks in Taiwan because it still implied Taiwan as a providence to China even though Taiwan is never a territory claim of ROC charter. They should more accurately be called as Taiwan Mandariner (Traditional Chinese: 台灣中華大陸人 because they consider Taiwanese 台灣人 as an offensive term to them to began with) as these group of Asian people, who consider China their only home and Taiwan as temporary place to stay before returning to China. These Mandariner (Traditional Chinese: 中華大陸人) without the Taiwan prefix can also be refer to anyone born in mainland China, Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan, or Singapore that support Greater China and wants to include Taiwan into that mix! However, Taiwan belong to the Taiwanese people (Traditional Chinese: 台灣人) not Chinese people (Traditional Chinese: 中華人 or 中國人)! This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China, now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in... ... Greater China in dark green, and areas with strong Chinese cultural influence in light green Greater China (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), or simply 大华/大華, is a term referring collectively to both the territories administered by the Peoples Republic of China as well as Hong Kong and Macau, and territories... This article is about the people of Taiwan. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Chinese mainlanders (Taiwan)

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In Taiwan, mainlander can refer to two different groups: Taiwans population was estimated in July 2006 at 23,036,087 [1] spread across a total land area of 35,980 km², making it the twelfth most densely populated country in the world with a population density of 886 people per km². According to official governmental statistics, 15% of...

  1. The waisheng ren (Chinese: 外省人; pinyin: wàishěng rén; literally "external-province person") are persons who emigrated from mainland China near the end of the Chinese Civil War and their descendants.
    • This is as opposed to the Taiwanese local residents, (本省人; běnshěng rén; "original-province person"), who were in Taiwan prior to the mass exodus near the conclusion of the Chinese Civil War.
  2. The dalu ren (大陸人; dàlù rén; "mainland people") refers to residents of mainland China.
    • This group excludes almost all Taiwanese, including the waisheng ren, except recent immigrants from mainland China, such as those made Republic of China citizens through marriage. When Westerners hear the term mainlander in the context of Chinese culture or politics, they generally think of this definition.

Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... ... Combatants Nationalist Party of China Communist Party of China Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 4,300,000 (July 1946) 3,650,000 (June 1948) 1,490,000 (June 1949) 1,200,000 (July 1946) 2,800,000 (June 1948) 4,000,000 (June 1949) The Chinese Civil War... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ...

Names

Waisheng ren are also called more formally, waisheng ji ren (外省籍人), meaning "persons who are external-province natives." They are also given the nickname of Ō·-á (芋仔), meaning "taro," in the Taiwanese (linguistics). The term is somewhat pejorative because it refers to the perceived "dirtiness" of some of the early KMT troops. [citation needed] This article is about the plant. ... For other uses, see Formosan languages, Taiwanese Mandarin, and Languages of Taiwan. ...


The opposite of waisheng ren is bensheng ren who are called "sweet potato" (蕃薯; fánshǔ; tw: han-chû) which comes from the shape of Taiwan.[citation needed] Bensheng ren includes three distinct groups: the Hoklo (Hō-ló), the Hakka, and the aborigines. Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... The Hoklo (Chinese: 福佬, 河洛, 鶴佬; Hanyu Pinyin: ; POJ: Hō-ló; native pronunciation /Holo/) are an ethnic-cultural group originating in southeast China (Fujian province), and now form a sizeable diaspora, particularly in such places as Taiwan and Malaysia A slang term in Hong Kong (學佬, 鶴佬) for Hokkien-speaking people, or those with Hokkien... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Total population 2006: 458,000 (CIP 2006) 2004: 454,600 (CIP 2004) Homelands in Taiwan Mountainous terrain running in five ranges from the northern to the southern tip of the island Narrow eastern plains Orchid Island (Lán YÇ”) Languages 14 living Formosan languages. ...


The translations of waisheng ren and bensheng ren into English poses some interesting difficulties. The usual English translation of waisheng ren is Mainlander, although many waisheng ren find this translation uncomfortable since it implies that waishengren are not fully Taiwanese. Translating the term bensheng ren as "native Taiwanese" is also problematic because of confusion with Taiwanese aborigines. Most academic literature uses the terms waishengren and benshengren directly. The terms rarely come up in the English-speaking media.


Many supporters of Taiwan independence object to the term "other province people", because it implies that Taiwan is a province of China, and prefer the name "new immigrant". The latter term has not become popular in Taiwan and is extremely unpopular among waishengren themselves. Taiwan independence (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p ūn-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan out of the... A province, in the context of China, is a translation of sheng (省 shěng), which is an administrative division of China. ...


Chinese Civil War veterans especially are called "old taro" (老芋仔 due to the similarity between the shape of Mainland China and the taro leaves), or waisheng lao bing (外省老兵), "old external-province soldiers," in Mandarin. In government publications and the media, they are also called rongmin (榮民), meaning "honorable citizens." Combatants Nationalist Party of China Communist Party of China Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 4,300,000 (July 1946) 3,650,000 (June 1948) 1,490,000 (June 1949) 1,200,000 (July 1946) 2,800,000 (June 1948) 4,000,000 (June 1949) The Chinese Civil War... This article is on all of the Northern and Southwestern Chinese dialects. ...


Mainlanders make up about 10% of the population of Taiwan and are heavily concentrated in northern Taiwan especially in the Taipei area. Although no longer dominating the government, waishengren still make up a disproportionately large fraction of bureaucrats and military officers. Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Xinyi District (信義區) Government  - Mayor Hau Lung-bin (KMT)1 E9 Area  - City 271. ...


Definition

The formal definition of a mainlander is someone living in Taiwan whose "native province" is not Taiwan. Native province does not mean the province in which one is born, but rather the province whose father's family comes from. Until the early 1990s, identity cards in Taiwan contained an entry for native province. The removal of native province from identity cards and replacement with place of birth was motivated in large part to reduce the mainlander/local distinction. This is especially true when virtually all "mainlanders" born after 1949 were born in Taiwan, not in their "native provinces."


Because of the "native province" definition, someone who is born on Taiwan, but whose father's family roots are not in Taiwan, is generally considered a Mainlander. By contrast, someone who is not born in Taiwan, but whose native province is Taiwan (most notably Lien Chan) is generally not considered a Mainlander. Similarly, a child that is born to a Taiwanese businessman residing in the PRC would generally not be considered a waishengren. Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ...


Furthermore, recent immigrants to Taiwan from Mainland China, mostly from marriages to Taiwanese businessmen, mail-order brides, and undocumented migrants, are not considered waishengren, but make up a separate social category. Although the numbers of these people are thought of as small and insignificant by most Taiwanese, it has been pointed out that recent immigrants from Mainland China and their children actually make up a larger population in Taiwan than Taiwanese aborigines. For the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode of the same name, see Mail Order Bride. ... A Rukai village Chief visiting the Department of Anthropology in Tokyo Imperial University during the Japanese rule. ...


The definitions get even fuzzier with mixed marriages and the fact that provincial identity sometimes does not correlate in obvious ways to characteristics such as political orientation or ability to speak Taiwanese. For example, although Mainlanders are often stereotyped as supporting Chinese reunification and opposing Taiwan independence there are numerous examples where this formula does not hold. Similarly, it is common to find younger waishengren who speak fluent Taiwanese and younger benshengren who cannot speak it at all. Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ... Taiwan independence (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p ūn-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan out of the... For other uses, see Formosan languages, Taiwanese Mandarin, and Languages of Taiwan. ...


The great majority of waishengren were born in Taiwan, and they do not speak the dialect of their "native province."


History

Waishengren are descended from the people who followed Chiang Kai-shek to Taiwan after the Kuomintang (KMT) lost the Chinese Civil War in 1949. These people included KMT officials, soldiers, merchants, bankers, executives, scientists, various other intellectuals, and anyone else who sensed that the Communist regime would ultimately be worse, and had the connections and money to escape mainland China. Until the 1970s, these people controlled the political systems of Taiwan; this, along with the looting and corruption that occurred under Chen Yi's military government immediately following the Japanese surrender in 1945, generated resentment among benshengren and was one of the main causes of the Taiwan independence movement. Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was the Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the death of Sun Yat-sen in 1925. ... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China, now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in... Combatants Nationalist Party of China Communist Party of China Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 4,300,000 (July 1946) 3,650,000 (June 1948) 1,490,000 (June 1949) 1,200,000 (July 1946) 2,800,000 (June 1948) 4,000,000 (June 1949) The Chinese Civil War... Chen Yi, the first ROC Chief Executive and Garrison Commander of Taiwan. ... Taiwan independence (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p ūn-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan out of the...


Starting in the 1970s, nationalist dominance of the government began to recede. This was due to a lack of a political or social theory that would justify continued nationalist dominance, meritocratic policies which allowed local Taiwanese to move up in the political establishment, and economic prosperity which allowed for social mobility for those outside of the political establishment.


Intermarriage and a new generation raised under the same environment has largely blurred the distinction between waishengren and benshengren.


In the late 1990s, the concept of "The New Taiwanese" became popular both among supporters of Taiwan independence and Chinese reunification in order to advocate a more tolerant proposition that waishengren, who sided with the Allies against the reluctant Japanese colony in Taiwan during World War II, are no less Taiwanese than benshengren. However it quickly became apparent that the notion of New Taiwanese meant different things to supporters of independence and unification. To supporters of independence, the concept of New Taiwanese implied that waishengren should assimilate into a Taiwanese identity which was separate from the Chinese one. By contrast, the supporters of Chinese reunification seemed to believe that all Taiwanese (not just waishengren) should restore a previously marginalized Taiwanese identity without antagonizing a larger pan-Chinese identity. Taiwan independence (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p ūn-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan out of the... Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ... Look up ally in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ...


As of the early 21st century, more and more waishengren see themselves as Taiwanese and as socially distinct from current residents of Mainland China. Unlike those belonging to groups such as the Hakka or Taiwanese aboriginals, waishengren are not encouraged to find their root, and their relationship with anti-China organizations suffers further as a result. Most of them, especially those of the younger generation, make extensive efforts to establish themselves as Taiwanese, sometimes by manifesting good interest in Hokkien Taiwanese culture. At the same time, right-wing discourse alleging that pro-unification waishengren are a fifth column for the People's Republic of China agonizes those mainlanders who regard Taiwan as their new homeland. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Rukai villege Chief visiting Department of Anthropology in Tokyo Imperial University during the Japanese rule. ... Hoklo (pronounced Holo; Chinese ; Mandarin pronunciation--pinyin: Fulao) can refer to an ethnic-cultural group originating in Fujian province, China. ... A fifth column is a group of people which clandestinely undermines a larger group to which it is expected to be loyal, such as a nation. ...


Now, the term "mainlander" is used to describe a person, Chinese by race, born and raised in mainland China, thereby avoiding confusion with waishengren. (someone whose ancestors were from the Mainland China, but born in Taiwan, or descended from someone born in Taiwan).


People

Prominent Mainlanders in Taiwan include:

  • John Chang, politician, born in mainland China.
  • Hau Pei-tsun, politician, born in mainland China.
  • Hau Lung-pin, politician, born in Taiwan, son of Hau Pei-tsun.
  • Li Ao, writer, born in mainland China.
  • Ang Lee, film director, born in Taiwan.
  • Ma Ying-jeou, politician, born in Hong Kong.
  • Pai Hsien-yung, writer, born in mainland China.
  • James Soong, politician, born in mainland China.

Lien Chan sometimes is pejoratively denoted as a mainlander, although the general perception on Taiwan is that he is not. Although he was born in mainland China, his father's family had roots in Taiwan. John Hsiao-yen Chiang (Chinese: 蔣孝嚴, pinyin: Jiǎng Xiàoyán) (born May 2, 1941), formerly John Hsiao-yen Chang (章孝嚴, Zhāng Xiàoyán), is a Kuomintang politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Hau Pei-tsun (郝柏村; pinyin: Hǎo Bócūn; born July 13, 1919) was Premier of the Republic of China (on Taiwan) from May 30, 1990 to February 10, 1993 and a 4-star general in the ROC Army. ... Hau Lung-pin (郝龍斌) (born on August 22, 1952 in Taiwan with ancestral roots in Jiangsu, China) is a politician in the Republic of China (Taiwan) and is the current Mayor of Taipei. ... Li Ao at Fayuansi, 2005 Li Ao (李敖 pinyin Lǐ Áo) (born April 25, 1935), is a writer, social commentator, historian, and politician in the Republic of China. ... Ang Lee (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (born October 23, 1954) is an Academy-Award winning film director from the Republic of China (Taiwan). ... China Pig Ma Ying-Jeou (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma Ying-chiu) (born July 13, 1950 in Hong Kong, China) is a politician in the Republic of Taiwan (Taiwan), a former Justice Minister, former Mayor of Taipei, and former Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ...


Recent Mainland Immigration to Taiwan

Since the mid-1990s, there has been a small amount of mainland Chinese immigration into Taiwan. These immigrants are predominantly female and are often colloquially known as dalu mei (大陸妹), which means "mainland girls". These consist of two categories: female brides of businessmen who work in the mainland; and women who have married rural Taiwanese, mainly through a marriage broker. This population is generally seen as socially distinct from waishengren.


External links

  • Goa-Seng-Lang Association For Taiwan Independence

Chinese mainlanders (Hong Kong)

In Hong Kong and Macau (both under the control of People's Republic of China, but not considered part of mainland China), "mainlander" refers to residents of mainland China, or recent immigrants from mainland China. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ...


Names

Residents of mainland China are usually called 大陸人 (literally mainlanders), or sometimes 內地同胞 (literally inland compatriot). The latter term is more neutral, while the former term is derogatory. ...


Mainlanders are sometimes called 表叔, 表姐 (literally cousins), and 阿燦, which were coined by various characters in movies and television series. These terms are considered derogatory and are politically incorrect. Recent immigrants are more politically correctly called 新移民 (literally new immigrants). 阿燦 is especially rude. The history of Chinese-language cinema has three separate threads of development: the Hong Kong, the Mainland and Taiwan. ...


History

At the time when Hong Kong was colonised by Great Britain, the colony covered only Hong Kong Island, with a population of only around 6 000, most of whom were fishermen. Other than the indigenous population on Hong Kong Island, Kowloon, and New Territories who had lived in the area before the British arrived, most people in Hong Kong either immigrated from somewhere in mainland China, or are descendants of those immigrants. For the historic phenomenon of colonization and imperialism, see main article colonialism (and also decolonization). ... The night view of the Island side as seen from the Kowloon side - the opposite side of the Victoria Harbour Hong Kong Island (Traditional Chinese: 香港島; Simplified Chinese: 香港岛; Cantonese Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 dou2; Mandarin Pinyin: Xiānggǎngdǎo) is the island where the colonial settlement of the Hong Kong territory... The night view of the Island side as seen from the Kowloon side - the opposite side of the Victoria Harbour Hong Kong Island (Traditional Chinese: 香港島; Simplified Chinese: 香港岛; Cantonese Jyutping: hoeng1 gong2 dou2; Mandarin Pinyin: Xiānggǎngdǎo) is the island where the colonial settlement of the Hong Kong territory... In modern day Hong Kong, Kowloon refers to the urban area made up of Kowloon Peninsula and New Kowloon, bordered by the Lei Yue Mun strait in the east, Mei Foo Sun Chuen and Stonecutters Island in the west, Tates Cairn and Lion Rock in the north, and... A major road, Kwong Fuk Road in Tai Po, a town in the New Territories. ...


The largest influx of population from the mainland was during the Taiping Rebellion (late 19th century) and the Chinese Civil War (1945-1949). The British colonial government maintained a touch-base policy until the early 1980s, allowing people from Mainland China to apply to be Hong Kong residents if they manage to arrive in the territory. Combatants Qing Empire United Kingdom France (United Kingdom and France join the war later) Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Commanders Xianfeng Emperor Tongzhi Emperor Empress Dowager Cixi Charles George Gordon Frederick Townsend Ward Hong Xiuquan Yang Xiuqing Xiao Chaogui Feng Yunshan Wei Changhui Shi Dakai Li Xiucheng Strength 2,000,000-5... Combatants Nationalist Party of China Communist Party of China Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 4,300,000 (July 1946) 3,650,000 (June 1948) 1,490,000 (June 1949) 1,200,000 (July 1946) 2,800,000 (June 1948) 4,000,000 (June 1949) The Chinese Civil War... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


Many of these early immigrants, especially those who moved from Shanghai in the 1940s and early 50's to escape the Communist government, came to dominate the business world in Hong Kong. In the 1980s and 1990's, Shanghai-born immigrants also occupied prominent roles in the government, including former Chief Executive Tung Chee Hwa and former Chief Secretary Anson Chan. For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), also known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China, a position guaranteed by the countrys constitution. ... The Honourable Tung Chee Hwa, GBM, D.S.Sc. ... Anson Chan Anson Chan (Fang On Sang) GBM GCMG CBE JP (Chinese: ) (born January 17, 1940) was head of Hong Kongs civil service before and after the territorys handover to the Peoples Republic of China from British colonial rule. ...


After decades of wars, internal conflicts and the Cultural Revolution, there was a large gap in the level of development between Hong Kong and the mainland. Many new immigrants arriving in the late 1970s and early 1980s were thought to be less sophisticated, and preserved many habits from the rural way of lives. A TV series starring Liu Wai Hung (廖偉雄) reflected the life of a new immigrant in Hong Kong. Nonetheless, new immigrants of this time were believed to be hardworking and optimistic, and were welcome by people in Hong Kong. The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution [1] in the Peoples Republic of China was a struggle for power within the Communist Party of China that manifested into wide-scale social, political, and economic chaos, which grew to include large sections of Chinese society and eventually brought the entire country to... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


Starting from the early 1990s many new immigrants to Hong Kong are the spouses of Hong Kong males, and their children. Many of them are not rich, and some have to rely on money from Comprehensive Social Security Assistance to survive. Although only a few do so, new immigrants of this time were held in a negative view. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Social security primarily refers to social welfare service concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment and others. ...


Education: Since the handover in 1997, the academic exchange between Hong Kong and mainland China became much more common. In the year of 2004, a policy that allowed mainland high school students to apply for studying in Hong Kong universities has passed. The universities in Hong Kong began to admit students from mainland high school. It’s a breakthrough allowing students with different backgrounds learning and growing together. On the other hand, the Chinese government encouraged more Hong Kong local students to study in the mainland universities by offering scholarship or superiority with a much lower admission score. As a result, in the universities in Hong Kong, you can hear more students speaking Mandarin in campus. By the same token, in mainland, the students from Hong Kong take more percentage, comparing with 10 years ago.


Exchange student program contributes to this kind of academic communication. Some universities have bonded with other universities as "sister school." By dispatching several outstanding students to the other university every year, they can build a permanent relationship. Exchange program flourished when the interaction between mainland and Hong Kong becoming easier and more frequent. Both sides choose excellent students and expect them to be a culture-bridge. After several months communicating, each delegate can obtain a further understanding about a different culture. That’s really help to build a harmonious society for these young people will probably be the hard-core in future. Exchange student is just like an ambassador dispatched by her country, who also contribute to the multi-culture here. But before the handover, this kind of mixture is absolutely invisible.


Recent Development

Since 1 July 1997, the day when Hong Kong became a Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, the immigration policies have changed. It is stated that : A person of Chinese nationality born outside Hong Kong before or after the establishment of the HKSAR to a parent who, at the time of birth of that person, was a Chinese citizen who is a permanent resident, is a permanent resident of the HKSAR and enjoys the right of abode in Hong Kong.


But in 1999, the Supreme Court of The HKSAR made a judgment that as long as the person is born in Hong Kong, he will be regarded as a permanent resident and will get the right of abode, even though his parents are not permanent residents of Hong Kong at the time he is born.


Since then, a lot of Mainlanders have come to live in Hong Kong. Every day there are 150 quota.

 1)A daily sub-quota of 60 are given to children of all ages who are eligible for right of abode in Hong Kong. 2)a sub-quota of 30 are for long-separated spouses; 3)an unspecified sub-quota of 60 for other OWP applicants allocated to the following persons: a) Separated spouses irrespective of the length of separation; b) Dependent children coming to Hong Kong to join their relatives; c) Persons coming to Hong Kong to take care of their dependent parents; d)Dependent elderly people coming to Hong Kong to join their relatives; e)Those entering Hong Kong for the inheritance of property 

Starting from 2003 the mainland authorities loosened control over visiting Hong Kong and Macau of mainland residents. In the past residents from mainland could only visit Hong Kong and Macau for sightseeing as part of tour groups. The Individual Visit Scheme allows mainland residents of selected cities to visit Hong Kong and Macau for sightseeing on their own. It has boosted tourism in the two special administrative regions. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Individual Visit Scheme (Chinese: 自由行 (Mandarin Pinyin: zì yóu xíng; Cantonese IPA: ) in Hong Kong and Macau; 个人游 (Pinyin: gè rén yóu) in Mainland China) was begun on July 28, 2003, to allow travelers from Mainland China to visit Hong Kong and Macau on an individual basis. ... Special administrative region may be: Peoples Republic of China Special administrative regions, present-day administrative divisions (as of 2006) set up by the Peoples Republic of China to administer Hong Kong (since 1997) and Macau (since 1999) Republic of China Special administrative regions, also translated as special administrative...


The Quality Migrant Admission Scheme Hong Kongs Quality Migrant Admission Scheme (QMAS) took effect on 2006-06-28. ...


Besides, on 28 June 2006, the HKSAR imposed The Quality Migrant Admission Scheme. It is a scheme aims at attracting highly skilled or talented persons who are fresh entrants not having the right to enter and remain in Hong Kong to settle in Hong Kong in order to enhance Hong Kong's economic competitiveness in the global market. Successful applicants are not required to secure an offer of local employment before their entry to Hong Kong for settlement. Many Mainland artists and former national sportsmen/sportswomen have applied for the right of abode via this way, such as Li Yundi and Lang Lang (pianist). Li Yundi (Chinese: 李云迪, pinyin: Lǐ Yúndí) (born October 7, 1982) is a well-known young classical pianist. ... For the Australian town, see Lang Lang, Victoria. ...


People

The following are some notable people who were born in the mainland and moved to Hong Kong later in their lives.

Anson Chan Anson Chan (Fang On Sang) GBM GCMG CBE JP (Chinese: ) (born January 17, 1940) was head of Hong Kongs civil service before and after the territorys handover to the Peoples Republic of China from British colonial rule. ... Wong Jim, James Wong Jim M.Phil. ... Lau Chin-shek The Honourable Lau Chin Shek (Chinese: 劉千石, born 12 September 1944 in Guangzhou, Guangdong and his native place is Shunde, Guangdong) is the President of the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions and a Vice Chairman of the Hong Kong Christian Industrial Committee. ... The honourable OBE, JP, GBM Tang Hsiang Chien (唐翔千) was a member of the Standing Committee of the 7-9th CPPCC National Committee. ... The Honourable Tung Chee Hwa, GBM, D.S.Sc. ...

Chinese mainlanders (Hainan)

Although the island of Hainan is not politically separate from China in the sense that Taiwan or Hong Kong/Macau are, consciousness of Hainan as an island leads local Hainanese to refer to recent immigrants from the Chinese mainland as "mainlanders" (大陆人 da4 lu4 ren2) or 'inlanders' (内地人 nei4 di4 ren2). In the 1990s, when there was a rapid influx of mainlanders looking to get rich quick from the province's status as a special economic zone, there was considerable local resentment towards the new arrivals.[citation needed] This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Mainlanders elsewhere

In Tasmania, mainlander refers to Australians from the other five states and the territories, which are situated on the Australian mainland. Slogan or Nickname: The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $16,114...


In New Zealand, mainlander refers to a resident of the South Island, which is the bigger island. The South Island The South Island is the larger of the two major islands of New Zealand, the other being the more populous North Island. ...


In Canada, mainlander is often used on the East Coast by residents of Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Deer Island, New Brunswick, Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick or Cape Breton Island. On the West Coast the term is used by people who live on Vancouver Island. This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Deer Island is a Canadian island located in the Bay of Fundy at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay. ... Campobello Island is a Canadian island located in the Bay of Fundy near the entrances to Passamaquoddy Bay and Cobscook Bay. ... Cliffs at Southwest Head The Swallow Tail lighthouse greets visitors as they arrive by ferry. ... For other uses, see Cape Breton. ... Vancouver Island is separated from mainland British Columbia by the Strait of Georgia and the Queen Charlotte Strait, and from Washington by the Juan De Fuca Strait. ...


In Hawaii, mainlander is sometimes used to refer to Americans from the continental United States. Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mainlander (50 words)
A fine sounding ukulele made from domestic tonewoods.
The MAINLANDER fills the need for a basic, decent instrument, without frills.
It's available in standard, concert, or tenor size in a variety of mainland hardwoods, including Maple, Sassafrass, Pear, or Walnut, with a mesquite or pearloid fingerboard and Grover Sta-tite tuners.
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