FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mahonri Young

Mahonri Macintosh Young (August 9, 1877November 2, 1957) was an American sculptor and artist. Although he lived most of his life in New York City, Young is most remembered in Utah as being the grandson of Brigham Young who sculpted This is the Place Monument and Seagull Monument in Salt Lake City. Young is one of the best-known artists from Utah. August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An Italian Futurist sculpture by Umberto Boccioni at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City (MoMA). ... Nickname: The Big Apple Official website: City of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... Official language(s) English Capital Salt Lake City Largest city Salt Lake City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 13th 219,887 km² 435 km 565 km 3. ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was the second prophet and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism). ... Seagull Monument, Salt Lake City Temple Square. ... Nickname: Crossroads of the West Official website: http://www. ...


Young was born in Salt Lake City to Mahonri Moriancumer Young and Agnes Mackintosh Young just 20 days before the death of his grandfather Brigham Young. Mahonri was the last grandchild born before the great western leader and President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints died. Young's own father died when he was eight. Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was the second prophet and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism). ... In Mormonism, the President of the Church is the head of a Latter Day Saint denomination or church. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ...


Rather than high school, Young choose to pursued an artistic education under local artist James T. Harwood. Young saved money earned as a Salt Lake Tribune engraver to attend the Art Students League of New York between 1899 and 1901, returning for financial reasons. Working for the Salt Lake Herald, Young saved enough money to travel to Paris, France where he studied at the Académie Julian until 1905. In France he decided to focus on sculpture, although his watercolor paintings were also acclaimed. Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune (ISSN 0746-3502) is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... The Art Students League of New York is an art school founded in 1875. ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Eiffel Tower, the tallest structure in Paris is an international symbol of Paris Paris is the capital and largest city of France and the capital of the ÃŽle-de-France région which encompasses Paris and its suburbs. ... The Académie Julian was an art school in Paris, France. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ...

Seagull Monument in the 1920s — Western History/Genealogy Department, Denver Public Library
Seagull Monument in the 1920s — Western History/Genealogy Department, Denver Public Library

Returning to Utah, married Cecelia Sharp in 1907. They had two children, but Sharp died. Young later married Dorothy Weir, daughter of painter J. Alden Weir, in 1931. Download high resolution version (506x640, 35 KB)This beautiful picture of Seagull Monument on Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah shows the Salt Lake City Temple and in the background. ... Download high resolution version (506x640, 35 KB)This beautiful picture of Seagull Monument on Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah shows the Salt Lake City Temple and in the background. ... Seagull Monument, Salt Lake City Temple Square. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Red Bridge, ca. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ...


Young found local sculpture commissions insufficient to make a living, so he moved to New York City in 1910. Young did, however, keep geographical and religious ties to home. In 1912 he received commission from the LDS Church to make Seagull Monument on Temple Square. Young had long lobbied the church to build the monument, but they didn't find money for it until after he moved his family to New York. Nickname: The Big Apple Official website: City of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... -1... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... Seagull Monument, Salt Lake City Temple Square. ... Temple Square c. ...


Young notably created Native American statues for the American Museum of Natural History and submitted artwork for 20th Century Fox studios. During the depression he taught for the Art Students League. He also completed a series of bronze sculptures of boxers which brought him international fame. In 1941 Life magazine called him "the George Bellows of American sculpture." Young's sculptures often focused on farmers, machinists, blacksmiths and other workers. An Atsina named Assiniboin Boy Native Americans in the United States (also known as Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States and their descendants in... The American Museum of Natural History is a landmark of Manhattans Upper West Side in New York, USA, at 79th Street and Central Park West. ... 20th Century Fox logo Fox Plaza, the company headquarters. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Dominguez (left) vs. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... A cover of Life Magazine from 1911 Life has been the name of two notable magazines published in the United States. ... George Bellows George Wesley Bellows (August 19, 1882 - January 8, 1925) was an American painter, known for his bold depictions of urban life in New York City. ... Farmer spreading grasshopper bait in his alfalfa field. ... A machinist is a tradesperson who specializes in making things out of metal or other solid material. ... Blacksmith Blacksmith at work Blacksmith at work Blacksmiths fire Hot metal work from a blacksmith A blacksmith is person a who creates objects from iron or steel by forging it; i. ...


Young became associated with the Ashcan School, an art movement which focused on realistic, gritty scenes of everyday life. A Social Realist, Young ennobled the struggle of industrial workers. Characteristic of this theme are "Factory Worker" and "Farm Worker", two sculptures displayed at the 1939 New York World's Fair. The statue of the farmer, a man sharpening his blade, stood at the fair's entrance. The Ash Can School was remembered on the USPS stamp. ... Realism is commonly defined as a concern for fact or reality and rejection of the impractical and visionary. ... Social Realism is a term used to describe visual and other realistic arts depicting working class activities as heroic. ... The 1939 New York Worlds Fair, located on the current site of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park (also the location of the 1964 New York Worlds Fair), was one of the largest worlds fairs of all time. ...

Mahonri sculpted this 1950 statue of his grandfather Brigham Young for the National Statuary Hall Collection at the United States Capitol
Mahonri sculpted this 1950 statue of his grandfather Brigham Young for the National Statuary Hall Collection at the United States Capitol

Young was especially proud of This Is The Place Monument located at This Is The Place Heritage Park in the foothills of Salt Lake City. Awarded commission to built the monument in 1947 when Young was just shy of 70 years old, This is the Place Monument included many sculptures dedicated to the Mormon pioneers. The project proved frustrating for Young, who had to win the contract through an arduous contest. After granted, many of the artistic qualities sought by Young were vetoed by representatives from Utah state government, the LDS Church, and descendants of pioneers. For example, Young wanted pioneer leaders in realistic clothing like they would have worn when entering the Salt Lake Valley on July 24, 1847. However, Young's vision of leaders like Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball in suspenders and bloomers was deemed undignified. Instead, pioneer leaders were portrayed in heavy formal overcoats. statue of Brigham Young; http://www. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was the second prophet and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism). ... The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the US capitol building, that serves as home for Congress, the legislative branch of the United States federal government. ... The This Is The Place Heritage Park is located on the east side of Salt Lake City. ... Nickname: Crossroads of the West Official website: http://www. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... A commemorative statue of mormon pioneers. ... Official language(s) English Capital Salt Lake City Largest city Salt Lake City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 13th 219,887 km² 435 km 565 km 3. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was the second prophet and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism). ... Heber C. Kimball Heber Chase Kimball (June 14, 1801 – June 22, 1868) (commonly known as Heber C. Kimball) was a leader in the early Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... An overcoat is a long coat worn over other clothing. ...


Young died in Norwalk, Connecticut. City Motto: The Right Place - The Right Time County Fairfield County, Connecticut Area  - Total  - Water 59. ...


Interestingly, although Young was known as a "Mormon artist," he was a non-practicing "Jack Mormon" for most of his life. Unlike active Latter-day Saints, his marriages were not sealed in the temple during his lifetime. Young enjoyed beer, which is forbidden in the LDS Church, although he remained friendly and even personally close to some of the church's leaders. Mormon is a colloquial term used to refer to members of most of the forms of Christianity within the Latter Day Saint movement, which began during the 1830s in the United States. ... The term Jack Mormon is a pejorative term that originated in the 19th century. ... A Latter-day Saint is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... The Salt Lake Temple is the most well-known Mormon Temple. ... Beer is an alcoholic beverage produced through the fermentation of cereal sugars, and which is not distilled after fermentation. ...


Young's estate included 320 sculptures and thousands of paintings and sketches.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
ART; At Weir Farm, the Bucolic Side of a Man - New York Times (735 words)
Mahonri Young was born three weeks after the death of his grandfather, Brigham Young, one of the founders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
Mahonri Young is best known for the ''This Is the Place Monument'' in Salt Lake City that commemorates Brigham Young's entry into the area when he made the terse declaration that is the title of the monument.
Mahonri Young sculptured the figures for it, as well as the marble statue of Brigham Young displayed in the rotunda of the United States Capitol, at Weir Farm.
Mahonri Young - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (763 words)
Young was born in Salt Lake City to Mahonri Moriancumer Young and Agnes Mackintosh Young just 20 days before the death of his grandfather Brigham Young.
Mahonri was the last grandchild born before the great western leader and President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints died.
Young enjoyed beer, which is forbidden in the LDS Church, although he remained friendly and even personally close to some of the church's leaders.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m